MIZIWE BIIK Aboriginal Employment and Training

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MIZIWE BIIK Aboriginal Employment and Training
MIZIWE BIIK
Aboriginal Employment and Training
FY 2011-2012
Miziwe Biik is committed to assisting all
persons of native ancestry in the Greater
Toronto Area to attain a better quality of life.
We believe that community needs and
aspirations are paramount. We are committed
to strengthening the community through
partnerships promoting equality and self
reliance.
Miziwe Biik strives to provide training and
employment opportunities in a supportive
environment in which people can affirm their
native identities and develop to their full
potential.
Miziwe Biik is committed to the belief that it is
through traditional cultural values, practices
and resources that we will reclaim our destiny.
SUCCESS STORIES
JESSE DARBY
A recent George
Brown College
graduate, Jesse
successfully
completed his first
term of apprenticeship
through our 2012
Carpentry PreApprenticeship
Training Program.
SYLVIA PLAIN
Sylvia is a former
student of the
Ngindaasmin Back to
Basics/Native Studies
program and now she is
entering her second
year at the University of
Toronto.
NICOLE HARE
Nicole took advantage
of the many services
offered at Miziwe Biik
and shortly thereafter
she became successfully
employed as the
Administrative Assistant
and Receptionist for the
Ngindaasmin Academic
Upgrading Program and
The GTA Aboriginal
Housing Program
MARY JACKO
After Mary completed a
Construction
Technology program,
the training provider
was so impressed that
they referred her to
several
employers. Within a
few weeks Mary was
hired as a technician
with a well known
telecom company.
PROGRAMS
EMPLOYMENT RESOURCE CENTRE
The Employment Resource Centre has had
another exciting year of growth and
opportunities. As more and more Aboriginal
people continue to relocate to Toronto the
search of Employment and Training
opportunities, the number of clients using
Miziwe Biik services continues to grow.
“Congratulations” to all our clients who were
successful in their pursuit of meaningful
employment in their fields of expertise. Our
Job Developers worked hard to create
several new Employer partnerships using
the “Employer Incentives” available through
our Employment Ontario Program.
Employment Counselling
Employment Preparation Program
Community-Based Training
Resource Centre with Computer and Internet
Access
CARPENTRY PRE-APPRENTICESHIP
TRAINING PROGRAM
Our 2012 students have accomplished many of
the tasks required of them to complete the
program but more importantly, have
accomplished many of their own personal goals.
These goals range from gaining the level 1
Carpentry Certification, being the first in their
families to attend college or simply earning
credits towards their OSSD. Either way the
general consensus is that there was positive
change and personal growth throughout the
project with an end result of employability;
reinforcing our belief that this program promotes
constructive transformations within our urban
Aboriginal population. With new confidence,
skills and an understanding of the industry our
participants are an asset for builders and
renovators within Toronto and across the GTA.
Joseph O’Byrne
Program Graduate
NGINDAASMIN ACADEMIC UPGRADING
PROGRAM
The Ngindaasmin Academic program continues
to offer the upgrading program to those that want
to earn their Ontario Secondary School Diploma.
What makes this upgrading program unique is
that the students learn about who they are as
First Nations people: the history, treaties and
traditions of the Anishnawbek, the course is
designed to bring about an understanding of the
complex issues facing First Nations people in
Canada. According to a former student, “I can’t
emphasize enough how much the native studies,
as well as the Ngindaasmin program has helped
me. The Native Studies portion mentally
prepares you for Aboriginal studies at the
university because the program focuses on the
positive aspects of native culture and traditional
teachings as opposed to the very negative truth
in aboriginal studies in university. I can focus
more on the historical sense of reclamation we
are being taught”.
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
REPORT ON PROGRESS AGAINST ANNUAL OPERATIONAL PLAN
Priority / Objective
Description of Supporting Activities
Results / Progress Achieved
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
Demand Driven Skilled Trades and
Construction
There is a need to match the Aboriginal labour
force with the anticipated labour market
shortage/ongoing demand in the trades.
Interventions will be used to familiarize clients
with specific trades, working conditions, training
required.
11/12: 218 clients
EI: 63 clients
52 completed interventions.
Of the 52, 31 clients became employed after
6 months.
CRF: 155 clients
94 completed interventions.
Of the 94, 49 clients became employed after
6 months.
Community Service Organizations
There are over 40 organizations who contribute to 11/12: 507 clients
employment and training opportunities for
Aboriginal people. Interventions will assist
EI: 143 clients
individuals who are lacking on-the-job work
121 completed interventions. Of the 121, 73
experience, and this allows for individuals to gain clients became employed after 6 months.
transferable skills in a culturally supportive
environment.
CRF: 364 clients
294 entered and completed interventions.
Of the 294, 189 became employed after 6
months
Priority / Objective
Description of Supporting Activities
Results / Progress Achieved
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
Youth Employment and Leadership
Community Capacity Building - Management
Training
Economic Development
Self-Employment Assistance
Youth Employment and Leadership
Programs utilized will include but not limited to:
Targeted wage subsidy, self employment
assistance, work experience partnerships,
apprenticeship partnerships, youth work
experience, purchase of training, pre-employment
preparation, job creations, local labour market
programs.
Facilitating individuals access to management
training to assist community organisations with
succession planning activities and prepare
Aboriginal people for management positions in
government and the private sector.
Many urban Aboriginal people lack the skills and
resources to succeed economically and to realize
their dream of self-sufficiency by establishing and
operating a viable business. Provide access to
programmes and services that will assist.
11/12: 390 clients
EI: 40 clients completed interventions.
Of the 40, 19 became employed after 6
months.
CRF: 350 clients
350 clients completed interventions.
Of the 350, 161 became employed after 6
months.
11/12: 43 clients
EI: 43 clients completed interventions.
Of the 43, 18 became employed after 6
months.
11/12: 90 clients
EI: 20 clients completed interventions. Of the
20, 11 became self-employed after 6 months.
CRF: 70 clients
70 clients completed interventions. Of the 70,
43 became self-employed after 6 months.
Priority / Objective
Description of Supporting Activities
Results / Progress Achieved
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
To provide services to disabled, alterabled.
Miziwe Biik will provide servicing in all areas to
assist with the training and employment of
individuals with disabilities and alterabled
concerns.
To increase client employability by providing
Literacy and essential skills for those who do not
training in Literacy, Numeracy, Basic Skills and have Grade 12 and/or seeking general upgrading
essential skills to enhance their employability.
to make them job-ready. Individuals seeking to
improve their skills through various funded
interventions leading to increased employability.
This priority is also used to meet labour market
demands.
11/12: 364 clients
EI: 77 clients completed interventions.
Of the 77, 24 became employed after 6
months.
CRF: 287 clients completed interventions.
Of the 287, 103 became employed after 6
months.
MIZIWE BIIK
Aboriginal Employment and Training
FY 2011-2012
MIZIWE BIIK
Aboriginal Employment and Training

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