Inkle Pattern Directory 400 4 00

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Inkle Pattern Directory 400 4 00
THE WE AV E R ’S
Inkle Pattern Directory
ANNE DIXON
4 00
warp-faced
weaves
Warping
Originally the modern inkle loom would have been
warped with one continuous single-color thread, alternately passing the warp thread over and then under
the top peg and tying the end of the last pass onto
the beginning of the warp. The main disadvantage
of a single continuous warp is that the warp tends
to become tighter with each successive wind, even
when heddles are added (or threaded through) during
warping.
Sometimes people like to emulate the continuous
warping, even when using different colors—either
tying on the new color at each change, or wrapping
the ends of the warp threads around different nails
near the front of the loom, unwrapping to continue
with that color when next needed, and again tying all
ends to the beginnings of the warp colors.
When several different colors or threads are used for
warping the extra tying-on or securing/releasing of
each new yarn, the entanglements that can ensue
(resulting in crossed threads at the end of the warp),
plus the tensioning problems, hardly justify strict
adherence to the “original” method. The following
method seeks to eradicate the disadvantages and is
at least just as fast as tying-in the different threads,
plus it is always easy to see exactly where to place the
heddle. See page 15 for tying a knot by yourself.
These instructions assume that the first and last warp
thread is a heddled thread.
• If the first warp thread is unheddled,
start at 2 (a or b).
• If the last warp thread is unheddled, finish
with a single warp thread under the top peg.
Loom with Heddles
1.
Warp the first thread over the top peg, along the
chosen pathway, push the thread to the frame
of the loom at all points, cut off and tie securely
with two or three knots. Place a heddle over the
heddle peg, take the loop behind the warp
thread, back down and loop over the heddle
peg, with the knots under the peg.
2a.
If the next two warp threads are the same, first
wind one pathway under the top peg, then
continue with the next over the top peg: push
both warp threads to the frame of the loom at
all points and tie as above. Place a heddle on
the last (over peg) warp thread.
2b.
If the next two warp threads are different, then
hold both threads together and take in their
correct pathway around the loom, placing the
first (unheddled) thread under and the second
(heddled) thread over the top peg. Push both
warp threads to the frame of the loom at all
points, and tie together as above. Place a
heddle on the last warp thread. If you find that
the heddled thread is always too tight, tie the
beginnings of the warp threads together and at
the finish place one thread through the loop
above the beginning knot and then tie the ends
of the two threads together.
Repeat using either 2a or 2b.
Adding heddles as you go along is far quicker and
more accurate. Warping only two threads at a time
helps to reduce the tendency for the warp to tighten.
2
the weave r ’s i nkl e pa t te r n d i re c to r y
Minimum and Maximum Length
The warp on any inkle loom has a possible
minimum and maximum length, with variations
between the two.
The minimum length for any warp is from the starting
peg, to the joining peg, around the tensioner, and back to
the starting peg, without interfering with the heddle peg.
The maximum length winds zigzag around the tensioner
and all the pegs on the loom, without interfering with
any of the other pegs or the pathway of the warp.
time). Weave both the tail and the shuttle into this
next shed, then change the shed and continue weaving. The tail of the weft will remain secure and can be
trimmed later.
Finishing
At the penultimate pick, weave the weft through a
shed, and into the SAME pick insert a loop of smooth
thread with the loop at the opposite side to the
shuttle.
Change the shed, beat, and tug.
Weave the shuttle through this final pick.
Starting and Finishing
If the ends of the weft are left loose, then the edges of
the inkle will move outward when it is removed from the
loom, making the selvedges uneven. So a secure start
and finish is best.
Starting
Open one of the sheds—it doesn’t matter which—and
insert a shed stick. Change the shed, push the first shed
stick down to the starting peg and insert a second stick.
Repeat so that there are three shed sticks in place.
Change the shed once more.
Insert the shuttle through the open shed (from the side
that suits you) and leave a tail of the weft hanging at the
side. Change the shed, beat and tug (both edges this
Cut the weft, leaving about 8" (20 cm). Insert the very
end of this tail into the loop—not too far—so that it
creates a loop clasped with the first.
Now, holding both loops gently in opposite hands,
pull the clasped loops through the shed, positioning
the upper (final) weft into place, and pulling the weft
completely through the previous pick.
Again, change the shed and beat.
Discard the extra loop of thread. The weft will remain
secure and can be trimmed later. This saves having to
darn the weft into place after the inkle has been cut
off the loom and is extremely secure.
There is no need to secure the ends of the inkle any
further when the inkle is removed from the loom, but
sometimes a decorative or braided edging is required.
Remember to leave enough unwoven warp—generally
braiding uses about 1½ times the finished length. See
page 27 for further information.
3
Vertical Lines
Even Single & Double
Triple
H
U
H
U
x3
x3
x3
Warp: 3x2/16, dark green and
pale blue
Warp: 3x2/16, dark green and
pale blue
Weft: pale blue 3x2/16
Weft: pale blue 3x2/16
All lines curve the same way
All lines curve the same way
Single & Double: In Opposition
Triple: In Opposition
H
U
H
U
x3
cont’d
x3
x2
x2
x2
x2
Warp: 3x2/16, pale blue and
dark green
Warp: 3x2/16, dark green and
pale blue
Weft: pale blue 3x2/16
Weft: pale blue 3x2/16, pale blue
Lines curve the opposite way
to the adjacent line
Lines curve the opposite way
to the adjacent line
4
the weave r ’s i nkl e pa t te r n d i re c to r y
Runic
Runic 1
Runic 2
H
U
H
U
x2
x27
x3
x2
x26
x3
Warp: 2/16, border pale blue
multicolor where shown as orange
Warp: 2/16, border brown striped red
and orange where shown as red
Bar: brown
Bar: cream
Weft: 2/16, pale blue
Weft: 2/16, brown
Alternate single Y shape and inverse
Alternating 3xY and inverse
Length of upright (float) always 16
pick-up
Random lengths
Alternating 2xY and inverse
Random lengths
Y shape and extra short lengths
Random
‘Sunrise, Sunset’ pattern
completely random
reverse of sample
Includes short lengths and gaps
Random
reverse of sample
For Runic technique, see page 35.
5
Repp Weave
Repp 1
A
H
U
x3
x16
x3
Single Insertion Method
Cross-Over Method
Warp: 2/16, dark green and cream
Thin Weft: 2/16, dark green
Thin Weft: 2/16, dark green
Thick Wefts: 2 shuttles each wound with 2
strands 3x2/16, dark green.
Thick Weft: 4 strands dark green 3x2/16
wound onto one shuttle
A. Alternate thick weft with thin weft,
weaving a thin weft into all sheds. To
change color order in blocks, throw
2 thick wefts or 2 thin wefts in
succession.
B
6
the weave r ’s i nkl e pa t te r n d i re c to r y
B. Alternate thick wefts with thin weft,
weaving a thin weft into all sheds. For thick
weft, take both thick shuttles through the
shed, starting them from opposite sides. To
change color order in blocks, throw 2 thick
wefts or 2 thin wefts in succession.
Pick-up, Pairs, Unheddled
Pick-up 1
A
A
H
U
x3
x14
Warp: 2/16 navy
and lime green
Weft: 2/16 lime green
Balance
↑
Repeat
x3
B
B
Pick-up 2
G
G
Balance
H
Balance
↑
Repeat
H
C
↑
Repeat
C
Balance
I
↑
Repeat
D
I
↑
Repeat
Balance
D
↑
Repeat
J
J
↑
Repeat
E
E
Balance
↑
Repeat
F
Balance
K
↑
Repeat
K
F
↑
Repeat
For Pick-up technique, see page 47.
↑
Repeat
7
Contents
Foreword
by Madelyn van der Hoogt
Inserted auxiliary
thread manipulation
Introduction
About This Book
Weft manipulation
Basic Equipment
Dukagang
Inlay
Basic Techniques
Pattern Directory
Basic warp color patterns
Warp manipulation
Pick-Up
Lettering: Compensating
Runic
Lettering on Checks
Baltic-Style
South American Pebbles
Monk’s Belt
Krokbragd
Warp changes
Additions to warp surface
Auxiliary Warp Threads
Scribbling
Embroidery
Soumak and Loops
Turkish and Other Knots
Gathering and Pleating
Scrunching and Shibori
Selvedge treatments
Beads
Fancy Yarns
Clasped Wefts and
Cross-overs
Tablet Edging
Fringes
Width of inkle
Finishings
Charts for Designing
Your Own Inkles
Glossary
Resources
Credits
Index
More Than 400 Patterns for Weaving Enthusiasts
From highly praised author and expert weaver Anne Dixon
comes the ultimate resource for inkle weavers.
Anne Dixon weaves, lectures, and teaches throughout the United
Kingdom and abroad. She is the author of The Handweaver’s Pattern
Directory (Interweave),and has published booklets on inkle weaving,
contributed articles to a number of publications, including Handwoven
magazine, and exhibited both in the United Kingdom and the United
States. She is a guild member of the Association of Weavers, Spinners,
and Dyers and a founding member of The Braid Society.
Hardcover with concealed wire-o
7 ½ x 9½, 176 pages
ISBN 978-1-59668-647-2
$29.95
Available June 2012