HAZCOMM/Environmental Safety Awareness

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HAZCOMM/Environmental Safety Awareness
MCCS
MCAGCC, 29 Palms, California
The Marine Corps Community Services
Hazard Communication Program document
review and handout is part of protecting
employees from known hazardous material
risk.
Chemical Exposure
Chemical Control
 Must
comply with Hazard Communication
Standard - 29 CFR 1910.1200
OSHA – Occupational Safety and Health
Administration
3a
Written program must include:
 a list of hazardous chemicals present in the
workplace
 MSDS
( Material Safety Data Sheets)
 labeling
system
information
3b
Written program must include:
 employee training information
 information
regarding non-routine hazards
 methods
of informing
employers of other
workers (contractors)
3c
 Written
program does not have to be
accessible to every work area and every work
shift
 Written
program is available to workers upon
request
(All Supervisors will be provided the
program with Standard Operating
Procedures from the Safety Officer.)
3d
 Workers
must know how to obtain, and the
location of:
the written Hazcom program
 lists of hazardous
chemicals
 MSDS

4a
 Work
practices
 Engineering
controls
 Personal
Protective
Equipment (PPE)
5a
 Primary
tool for getting detailed chemical
information
 Must
be readily
available
6a
 Chemical
identity
 Physical
and chemical characteristics
 Physical
and health
 Primary
routes of entry
hazards
6b
 PEL
(Permissible Exposure Limit, TLV (Total
Liquid Volatility), other exposure limits
 Whether
it is a carcinogen
 Precautions
for safe handling/use
 Recommended
engineering controls
6c
 Emergency
 Date
first aid procedures
of preparation
 Name,
address, phone number of
manufacturer,
importer, responsible
party
6d
 MSDSs
may contain recommendations from
ANSI (American National Standard Institute)
6e
 MSDS
also provide information regarding:
signs and symptoms of exposure
 personal protective equipment
 spill and leak clean-up
 labeling information

6f
 MSDS
must be available to downstream
employers from:
chemical
manufacturers
 importers
 distributors

7a
 Labels
warn of potential dangers
 Labels
are not intended to be the sole source
of information
7a
 Labels
serve as an immediate warning
 Labels
must be keyed to MSDS
7b
 Labels
must contain:
the identity of the hazardous chemical
 appropriate hazard warnings
 the name, address of the chemical manufacturer,
importer, other responsible party

7c
 Ensure
that labels do not come off, become
smudged or unreadable
 For
hard-to-label containers, use:
signs or placards
 process sheets, or batch tickets

7d
 Be
able to quickly identify the general
hazard of any material:

NFPA (National Fire Protection Association)system
identifies:




Health hazards
Flammability hazards
Reactivity hazards
Special hazards
7e
 Be
able to quickly identify the general
hazard of any material:

HMIS (Hazardous Material Information Sheet)
system identifies



Health hazards
Flammability hazards
Physical hazards
7f
 Know
what chemicals you work with and
their hazards
 Know
the contents of pipes, cans and all
containers
8a

Fire and extinguisher operation

A , B, C, is the key

Fire triangle
To understand how fire extinguishers work, you need to
understand a little about fire. Fire is a very rapid chemical
reaction between oxygen and a combustible material,
which results in the release of heat, light, flames, and
smoke.




For fire to exist, the following four elements must be
present at the same time:
Enough oxygen to sustain combustion,
Enough heat to raise the material to its ignition
temperature,
Some sort of fuel or combustible material, and
The chemical reaction that is fire.
 Fire
Extinguishers
All portable fire extinguishers must be approved by a
nationally recognized testing laboratory
A, B, C Fire Extinguishers and how they work The letters (A, B, and C)
represent the type(s) of fire for which the extinguisher has been approved.
The number in front of the A rating indicates how much water the
extinguisher is equal to and represents 1.25 gallons of water for
every unit of one.
For example,
a 4-A rated extinguisher would be equal to five (4 x 1.25) gallons of water.
The number in front of the B rating represents the area in square feet
of a class B fire that a non-expert user should be able to extinguish.
Using the above example, a non-expert user should be able to put
out a flammable liquid fire that is as large as 10 square feet.
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
MARINE CORPS COMMUNITY SERVICES
Certificate of Training
This is to certify that
___________________
HAS SATISFACTORILY COMPLETED
Hazard Communication
MCAGCC, 29 Palms, CA
_____________
Date
Employee ID #