District Light - Rising Sun Lodge No.15

Transcription

District Light - Rising Sun Lodge No.15
Happenings,
Happenings, Events,
Events, and
and Masonic
Masonic Light
Light
From
From Around
Around the
the District
District
G
LODGES OF THE
18TH DISTRICT
Audubon-Parkside #218
Collingswood-Cloud #101
Laurel #237
Lazarus #303
Merchantville #119
Mozart #121
Rising Sun #15
USS NJ #62
HAPPY
NEW YEAR!
The Seven Liberal Arts
2015 Schedules - DLIs OVs - Masonic Home
!
e
r
o
M
h
c
u
M
d
an
January Events
● From the DDGM
● Article: Reflections Upon the Origins
of the Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences
● Illustration: The Golden Ratio
● Poetry: A Man’s a Man For A’ That by Robert Burns
● 18th District Regular Communications Schedule
● 2015 Official Visit, DLI/GLI, and Masonic Home
Visitation Schedules
● January Events Calendar
● Event Flyers
● Puzzle: Touring America
● Puzzle: Masonic Cryptoquote
● Puzzle Solutions
● From the Editors
The District Light - Journal of the 18th Masonic District
Editor, Keith Josepayt..................................................... [email protected]
Editor, David A. [email protected]comcast.net
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Brethren,
Something a little lighter this month, a Masonic Quiz. The answers will be mailed separately to the Worshipful Masters, so they may use the quiz as Masonic Light at a meeting.
Enjoy the Holiday Season and a Happy New Year.
Fraternally,
Dale A. Lynch Jr.
Masonic Quiz
20 Questions to test your knowledge of the Master Mason Degree!
1.
What stage of Life does this degree represent?
a. Youth
b. Manhood
c. Middle Age
d. Age
4. What is considered the heart of this Degree?
a. Entry into the Lodge
b. The Sprig of Acacia
c. Placement of Lodge Officers
d. Your Obligation
2. What does this degree symbolize?
a. Culmination of your Masonic career
b. Symbolizes man’s domination over man
c. Victory over death and immortality of the soul
d. Mortality of the soul
5. What is a clandestine Lodge?
a. A Lodge located in another state
b. A Lodge without its own building
c. A Lodge not in session
d. A Lodge not issued a Charter from a Grand Lodge
3. What are you reminded of at your reception at the
door?
a. Reminded of all the lessons of Freemasonry
b. Reminded of the tenets of Freemasonry
c. Reminded of your obligation
d. Reminded of your previous degrees
6. What is meant by the term “Dotage”?
a. A young man who is uninformed
b. The condition in which you were expected to be
found
c. A diminished state of mind
d. The loss of membership by the vote of the Lodge
The District Light wants YOUR material!
We’re here to publicize and report on your events, and to provide articles on
matters of interest to you. If you have flyers to advertise your events, or
pictures and stories from your events, this is the place to put them! Have a
short article, or something to say on a matter of Masonic interest? Let us
know! We want this to be the most informative publication we can make it,
and we can only do that with YOUR help.
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(Continued from page 3)
7. What is a Libertine?
a. One who believes in Liberty for all
b. One who acts without moral restraints
c. A medal worn by Lodge Officers
d. The sword at the Tilers Door
8. What do Signs, Tokens and Words mean to a Mason?
a. Methods of recognition
b. Symbols of Officers rank
c. The language of Freemasonry
d. The rewards that a Free Mason can expect to
receive
9. Who was Hiram Abif?
a. King Solomon’s son
b. A tent designer and builder
c. King David’s nephew
d. The Widow’s Son worthy of imitation
10. What is taught by the use of the Three Ruffians?
a. Rewards can not be attained by illicit means
b. Rewards can be attained by illicit means
c. Good things always come in threes
d. The three principle stages of life
11. What is the Masonic definition of “Low Twelve”?
a. Midnight
b. Noon
c. The number of Lodge Officers
d. The number of Craftsmen
12. What do the points of fellowship promote?
a. Love and Hope
b. Peace and Harmony
c. Fidelity and Unity
d. Charity and Forgiveness
13. Who was the Lion of the Tribe of Judah?
a. Boaz
b. Hiram Abif
c. King Solomon
d. Moses
c. Charity
d. Truth
15. What does ‘The All Seeing Eye” represent?
a. Sanctum Sanctorum
b. Holy of Holies
c. Lodge of Master Masons
d. Deity
16. What are the rights of a Master Mason?
a. Masonic Relief, Masonic Visitation and Funeral
Rites
b. Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth
c. Masters Wages
d. Masonic Charity
17. Who can establish Masonic Law?
a. The District Deputy Grand Master
b. The Worshipful Master
c. Any Master Mason
d. The Grand Lodge
18. What is the principle working tool of a Master Mason?
a. The Level
b. The Plumb
c. The Compass
d. The Trowel
19. How many Master Masons constitute a Lodge of
Master Masons?
a. 3
b. 5
c. 7
d. 9
20. Who are they?
a. The Worshipful Master, Tiler and Secretary
b. The Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior
Wardens
c. The Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior
Deacons
d. The Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior
Stewards
14. What does the Sprig of Acacia represent?
a. Immortality
b. Honesty
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by RW Howard Z. Kanowitz, PGC
Each of us is all too familiar with the discussion of the Seven Liberal
Arts and Sciences in the Fellowcraft Lecture. However, have we ever
given any thought as to where this idea for the Seven Liberal Arts and
Sciences comes from, or for that matter, why seven and not four or
eight? For well over a decade, as a result of research into other papers written for NJLORE and
AMD, this writer has been aware that the Seven
Liberal Arts and Sciences are attributed to Martianus Capella, who lived in the fifth century. Beyond that, I had no conception as to who he was
or for that matter what prompted him to develop
this idea.
As an aside, this writer has always been a believer in cause and effect. Nothing just happens. It
happens for a reason. What prompted Martianis
Capella to undertake this assemblage of arts and
sciences had gnawed at me, but I never took the time to find out. Then,
out of the blue came a book written twenty-eight years earlier by a BBC
historian and broadcaster, James Burke. When Walter Cronkite was
broadcasting the moon landing in 1969 for CBS, Burke was doing so
for BBC. In or about 1978 he produced a multi-part series titled Connections which described the rise of technology. In 1985 he produced a
series called The Day the Universe Changed, which dealt with the rise
of our social institutions. At a recent Library used book sale this writer
came upon the companion book to that series and scoffed it up.
(Continued on page 6)
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(Continued from page 5)
Chapter Two described the rise of communications and, as a sub-topic,
the rise of educational systems, which obviously depend upon communication skills. It was there that Burke introduced the story behind the
Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences. To appreciate their origin we must go
back to the fifth century, 1600 years ago. Rome had just been sacked by
the Goths. The Empire was crumbling. On the southern shore of the
Mediterranean stood the “Chicago” of the Empire, Carthage. Carthage
was the Empire's breadbasket. It was the economic hub behind the distribution of grain – from the farthest
reaches of what was still part of the Empire to the East to what was left of the
Empire in the West. (Britain had been
long abandoned so that the armies once
stationed there could be used in defense
elsewhere). Cousins to the Goths who had
come down into the Italian peninsula
were the Visigoths, who were heading
south through the Iberian Peninsula, now modern Portugal and Spain.
The Carthaginians knew that it was only a matter of time before they
would be invaded and crushed.
Fortuitously for history, Carthage had produced two sons of note. The
first of these scions of Carthage was a profligate, an irreligious libertine, a whoremonger, who had wasted his youth on the proverbial wine,
woman, and song. But by his late twenties he “got religion” big-time.
He became the most significant churchman of the first millennium. His
name was Augustine.
(Continued on page 7)
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(Continued from page 6)
Technically, he wasn't from Carthage, whose ruins lie in what is now a
suburb of Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. He was actually from Hippo,
modern Annaba, Algeria, one hundred fifty miles west of Carthage.
Having risen to Bishop, Augustine saw the coming
darkness and responded with one of the most significant documents in post-New Testament Christian writing, The City of God. In it he laid out the different jurisdictions between Church and secular. Its purpose
was to differentiate between the present life and the
life after salvation. He witnesses massive suffering on
a biblical scale, as the Empire was eclipsed by the barbarian hordes. Incidentally, many of those barbarian
hordes were already Christians, but evidently hadn't gotten the memo
about love thy neighbor. So the thrust of his book was to teach Christianity to look within itself, as a means to endure the horrors of this life
in anticipation of the bliss that would follow in the life to come. As in
the case of tectonic plates coming together, where one must subduct below the other, he taught Christianity to subduct this life below the life to
come. No suffering could be too great because the sufferer would be rewarded in the next life. In so doing he inadvertently gave license to the
idea of sacrificing the flesh to save the soul, which would in later centuries manifest itself in the Crusades and the Inquisition. The principal
thesis of the book was that the Church, i.e., the Pope, was primary over
king. This idea would manifest itself in later centuries in the conflict between the Pope and the Holy Roman Emperor. The reason the Montagues and Capulets of Romeo and Juliet fame hated each other was because they were on opposite sides of this rivalry.
(Continued on page 8)
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(Continued from page 7)
The second son was Martianus Capella, who was Roman Pro
Council. He also realized the consequences of a barbarian conquest but
he approached the darkness in a vastly different way. Rather than
preaching to internalize the problem in the hope of a better life in the
life to come, he sought to arm the people with the skill sets they would
need to deal with it. To that end he gathered up the curricula that were
being taught in the Roman schools, which at the time were taught to the
aristocracy. He condensed it into nine volumes so that the people would
have at their disposal Latin Grammar, a universal language that could
spread into what had
been the Empire; legal
Rhetoric, so that there
could be laws upon
which to build social
institutions; and the
Logic of Christian theology, so that he could
spread that memo of
love thy neighbor. He
then went on to the realization that these
skill sets were only
half of what was
needed. He realized the sacking of the Empire would destroy its physical plant. Roads, aqueducts and administrative buildings would fall into
decay and the sciences would be needed to restore them. So he added to
the first three which he called the Trivium another set of four which he
called the Quadrivium: Arithmetic to be the basis of commerce and engineering; Geometry through which engineering and architecture could
rebuild; Astronomy so that there could be a calendar, another important
tool in commerce, and so that seafarers could find their way; and lastly
Music which was the ultimate expression of Arithmetic, Geometry and
Astronomy in the Harmony of the Spheres envisioned by Pythagoras
and adopted by Aristotle as the structure of our universe.
(Continued on page 9)
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(Continued from page 8)
Burke then mentioned that The Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences
remained the basis of education for a good 600 years. However this
writer believes that their influence is still with us. Chartres Cathedral
was completed somewhere around 1220 some 800 years after the sack
of Rome. In an archway over the main entrance to the Cathedral sits an
allegory to The Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences. In a Barbara
Tuchman's A Distant Mirror-the 14th Century, she discusses the educational system of that period, and lo and behold it was all based on The
Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences. However while our educational systems have grown more complex and more diversified, one element still
remains in today’s colleges, we travel one of two roads, the one leading
to a Bachelor of Arts, the other leading to a Bachelor of Sciences.
Masonic Charity Foundation Scholarship Applications
are available online on the Grand Lodge Website
Application Deadline
February 17, 2015
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The Golden Ratio (Φ) is famous in nature and many fields of art and science, particularly architecture. When applied to the relative proportions of structures it imbues them with lines inexplicably pleasing to the human eye. The Golden Ratio derives from the Golden Rectangle — a rectangle constructed such that if one takes
away a unit square from the rectangle, the rectangle that remains bears the identical
proportions of its parent.
For example, in the diagram below, if one removes the unit square (ABCD) from the
larger rectangle (ABFE), the smaller rectangle that remains (DCEF) has exactly the
same length to width ratio as the original recB
F
C
tangle.
The Golden Rectangle
may be constructed (as
in the diagram) by
drawing a circle whose
center is the midpoint
(G) of one side of a unit
square (AD=1) with radius GC (the distance
from the midpoint to an
opposite corner of the
square), and extending
the side (AD) of the
square to intersect the
circle at E, creating
length AE.
1
A
D
E
G
Φ-1
1
Φ
Applying the Pythagorean Theorem:
GC = SQRT(GD2+DC2)
GC = SQRT(.52+12)
GC = SQRT(1.25)
GC = 1.1180339887498948482045868343656
GE = GC
AE = GE + .5 (AG=.5)
AE = 1.6180339887498948482045868343656 (The Golden Ratio)
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by Robert Burns
Is there for honesty poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave - we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The man's the gowd for a' that.
A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquise, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's aboon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that,
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.
What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a' that?
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their
wine,
A man's a man for a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that,
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.
Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the
earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
That man to man, the world o'er,
Shall brithers be for a' that.
Ye see yon birkie ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that,
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.
Burns Dinner
& DVD Night
for details see the
Event Flyers Section
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From our Political Irony
Department:
Solon was an Athenian lawgiver and poet in
ancient Greece, the eponym of today’s
“solon” which is defined as “a wise lawgiver
or legislator.” A bas-relief in his honor
(pictured at right) adorns the chamber of the
U.S. House of Representatives.
The Alchemist
In his mid-twenties he began his research into alchemy, that mysterious
intersection of magic and science, which led him into a life-long fascination
with the occult. Though he spent a great deal of time and energy on his
search for the “philosopher’s stone” — an object thought capable of transmuting base metals into gold — he defended the art, writing that “Alchemy
tradeth not with metals as ignorant vulgars think.”
He taught himself Hebrew in order to read ancient texts in the original and
immersed himself in the Bible, in further search of secrets of the universe
possibly hidden in scripture. He constructed elaborate chronologies of the
future based on biblical prophesies. Based on his analysis of Old Testament clues and descriptions, he created a painstakingly detailed floor plan
of King Solomon’s Temple, believing its dimensions to hold sacred clues
to other secrets.
But we know and remember Sir Isaac Newton for changing our understanding of the world through science. In the words of Alexander Pope,
“Nature and Nature’s laws lay hid in night: God said, ‘Let Newton be!’ and
all was light.”
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AUDUBON-PARKSIDE LODGE No. 218
1st Friday
305 East Atlantic Avenue
Audubon, NJ 08106
COLLINGSWOOD-CLOUD LODGE No. 101
2nd Tuesday
790 Haddon Avenue
Collingswood, NJ 08108
LAUREL LODGE No. 237
1st & 3rd Friday
Atlantic Avenue and Stone Road
Laurel Springs, NJ 08021
LAZARUS LODGE No. 303
1st Monday (@ Haddonfield)
16 East Kings Highway
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
MERCHANTVILLE LODGE No. 119
2nd & 3rd Friday
6926 Park Avenue
Merchantville, NJ 08109
MOZART LODGE No. 121
1st & 3rd Tuesday (@ Audubon)
305 East Atlantic Avenue
Audubon, NJ 08106
RISING SUN LODGE No. 15
1st & 3rd Wednesday (@ Haddonfield)
16 East Kings Highway
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
USS NEW JERSEY LODGE No. 62
3rd Monday (@ Audubon)
305 East Atlantic Avenue
Audubon, NJ 08106
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Date
Lodge/Location
February 2
Lazarus #303
(@ Haddonfield Temple)
February 3
Mozart #121
(@ Audubon Temple)
February 4
Rising Sun #15
February 6
Audubon-Parkside #218
February 10
Collingswood-Cloud #101
February 13
Merchantville #119
February 16
USS New Jersey #62
(@ Audubon Temple)
February 20
Laurel #237
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Wednesday
Lodge/Location
January 14
February 11
March 11
April 8
Audubon-Parkside #218
Collingswood-Cloud #101
Laurel #237
Lazarus #303
(@ Haddonfield Temple)
May 13
June 10
Merchantville #119
M&W/GLI (tentative)
(location TBA)
September 9
Mozart #121
(@ Audubon Temple)
October 14
November 11
Rising Sun #15
Qualification Teams
(location TBA)
USSNJ #62 to assist as needed.
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Audubon-Parkside #218
Feb 15, May 24, Aug 30, Dec 6
Collingswood-Cloud #101
Feb 22, May 31, Sep 6, Dec 13
Laurel #237
Mar 22, Jun 28, Oct 4
Lazarus #303
Mar 29, Jul 5, Oct 11
Merchantville #119
Jan 11, Apr 19, Jul 26, Nov 1
Mozart #121
Jan 18, Apr 26, Aug 2, Nov 8
Rising Sun #15
Jan 25, May 3, Aug 9, Nov 15
USSNJ #62
Apr 5, Jul 12, Oct 18
Effective January 4, 2015
● All Masonic Volunteers park in the Foundation parking lot, directly
across from the Chapel
● Enter via the Chapel entrance and sign in at the provided sign-in table
● Wear lodge badges or shirts — blue volunteer jackets will no longer
be required
● All residents should have foot pedals on wheelchairs while being
transported — no one should be transported without foot pedals
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Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Dec 31
Thu
1
RS FIRST
NIGHT
4
5
LZ
6
MZ
7
8
RS - George
Washington
Visit
Fri
Sat
2
3
LL - Steve
Hart:Ameri
can Dictators
9
AP (by dispensation)
10
MV
11
12
MV Masonic
Home
13
CC
14
DLI @ AP
18
19
MZ Masonic US
Home
20
MZ - Brew
25
26
RS Masonic
Home
Burns Night
Dinner &
DVD
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15
16
LL- FC Deg.
MV
17
21
22
RS - FC Deg.
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24
28
30
31
Your Own
Beer Demo
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Robert
Coming on February 3rd
Hudgins’
Chili Cook-off
Masonic Home Visitations
Merchantville — Sunday, January 11
Mozart — Sunday, January 18
Rising Sun — Sunday, January 25
AP = Audubon-Parkside
CC = Collingswood-Cloud
LL = Laurel
LZ = Lazarus
MV =Merchantville
MZ = Mozart
RS = Rising Sun
US = USSNJ
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The following pages contain advertisements for
individual events, submitted by the event sponsors and printed as a courtesy by the District
Light. The District Light is not responsible for
the accuracy of information nor for accepting
reservations for these events. For information
or reservations for a particular event, please
follow the instructions in the event flyer.
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Help us pack the house and show a
proper Masonic & Haddonfield welcome to . . .
Hotsy Totsy began as
an a cappella Andrews
Sisters tribute trio. The
group now boasts a
still-growing repertoire
of nearly one hundred
songs. Expanding beyond their origins they have found a niche as a
retro-pop novelty act. From the girl groups of
old to current billboard chart toppers, the ladies
have reinvented today's hits to sound reminiscent of
yesterday's favorites. Mixing it up! Mashing it up! Serving it up in their own signature style, Hotsy Totsy is sure
to bring a new level of fun and entertainment to your
New Year’s celebration.
Two Performances at 8pm and 10:30pm
Steve
Steve Hart
Hart
Author of
American Dictators: Frank
Hague, Nucky Johnson and
the Perfection of the Urban
Political Machine
Journey back in time to
America’s Prohibition era with
Steve Hart’s presentation on
Atlantic City’s Nucky Johnson, of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire fame, and Frank Hague,
of Jersey City.
Friday, January 2, 2015
Laurel Lodge #237
629 Stone Rd
Laurel Springs, NJ
Lodge opens at 7:45pm
Presentation after lodge
After the presentation enjoy
Chicken Chili with Corn Muffins
presented by Susan Taylor
Free Raffle Ticket (for a copy of
the author’s book) to all attendees
Please RSVP for dinner by Dec. 30
Bro. Robert Taylor
856-834-3917
[email protected]
$10 includes Food,
Dessert and
Beer Sampling
Audubon Masonic Temple
305 East Atlantic Avenue
Audubon, NJ 08106
2 Route 73 Unit I, Berlin, NJ
RESERVATIONS A MUST by January 18, 2015
Contact: David A. Frankel ● [email protected] ● (856) 429-4607
Libations ● 6:00 PM
Dinner & DVD ● 7:00 PM
MENU
Potato & Black Pepper Soup
Filet Mignon
“Neeps” and “Tatties”
Asparagus Hollandaise
Butterscotch Cake
Coffee
FOOD BY
WESTMONT CATERING
SUGGESTED
DONATION
$25.00 ● OR
a bottle of your favorite
Single Malt Scotch
to share
e|á|Çz fâÇ _Éwzx
No. 15, F. & A.M.
As we confer the Master Mason Degree in the magnificent Corinthian Room of
the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, located at One North Broad, Philadelphia.
Lodge Opening — 7:30 pm
Dinner will precede the degree at 6:30 pm in the Dining Hall.
Cost for dinner has yet to be determined. Please make your dinner reservation
no later than Wednesday, March 11th with Bro. Michael Phillips:
mp21476 @ gmail.com — or — (856) 287-1976
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EclipseCrossword.com
Immense caverns beneath the Guadalupe Mountains.
It dams the Colorado in the Black Canyon.
A massive, snow-capped, stratovolcano southeast of Seattle.
Goat Island separates these famous falls straddling the U.S. - Canada border.
At 1943 feet, this Oregon lake is the deepest in the U.S.
This unusual "forest" is named for its trees which were turned to stone.
Giant trees in the American Northwest are the tallest in the world and live for a thousand years.
Down
2.
3.
5.
6.
9.
10.
This trail stretches 2200 miles through 14 states atop an Eastern mountain range.
A supervolcano underlies this famous Wyoming national park.
277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and a mile deep.
The width of this great river varies from 20 feet to more than 11 miles!
Gutzon Borgulm & son sculpted the granite face of this mountain.
A type of dry terrain where softer sedimentary rocks and clay-rich soils have been extensively eroded by wind and
water.
11. These mountains dominate the western horizon as seen from Denver, Colorado.
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Puzzle Solutions
TOURING AMERICA
MASONIC CRYPTOQUOTE
R E D W O O D S
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Brethren:
For Masons, the Holiday Season is also Installation Season. If you have photographs from
your Installation Celebrations, please share
some of them with the District Light for our
February issue.
And, as always, please share news of your upcoming speakers, programs, and events as
soon as it becomes available, so we can pass
the information on to everyone in the District.
Wishing you and yours a Happy and Healthy
New Year,
Keith & Dave
THE
TRAVELING
GAVEL
Possession of the Traveling
Gavel is the 18th District’s
reward to Lodges that demonstrate the true spirit of
Masonic Travel. The Gavel
resides with the Lodge last
able to capture it, and remains there until another
Lodge captures it away by
visiting a Regular or Emergent Communication with
at least Twelve Brethren
(symbolic of the Twelve
Craftsmen) meeting the following criteria:
The Worshipful Master
Senior Warden
Junior Warden
Senior OR Junior Deacon
Three Additional Officers
Two Past Masters
Three Additional Brethren
Look for the gavel on the
Communications page to
see which Lodge presently
holds it.
The District Light - Journal of the 18th Masonic District
Editor, Keith Josepayt..................................................... [email protected]
Editor, David A. [email protected]comcast.net
29