PDF - Learning is Lifelong

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PDF - Learning is Lifelong
Age 0-5 years
Age 6-24 years
Age 25-60 years
Age 60+ years
the highest amount of
informal learning as
children imitate almost
everything from parents,
peers and their
environment
The objective of learning
in this period is the
holistic development of
learners in four aspects:
physical, intellectual,
social, emotional and
mental development
Adults learn from
experiences and
problem solving. They
therefore need
continuous development
of intellect, capability
and integrity.
In their senior years,
people may seek new
knowledge for its' own
sake, resulting in a sense
of accomplishment and
helping to maintain selfesteem.
Maturationist Theory
Arnold Gessell
• Development is a biological process that
occurs automatically in predictable,
sequential stages over time (Hunt, 1969).
• Young children will acquire knowledge
naturally and automatically as they grow
physically and become older, provided that
they are healthy (Demarest, Reisner,
Anderson, Humphrey, Farquhar, & Stein,
1993).
Gessell
• School readiness is a state at which all
healthy young children arrive when they can
perform tasks such as reciting the alphabet
and counting; these tasks are required for
learning more complex tasks such as
reading and arithmetic.
Environmentalist Theory
John Watson, B.F. Skinner, Albert Bandura
• The child's environment shapes learning and
behavior; in fact, human behavior, development, and
learning are thought of as reactions to the
environment.
• Young children develop and acquire new knowledge
by reacting to their surroundings.
Bandura
• School readiness is the age or stage when young
children can respond appropriately to the environment
of the school and the classroom (e.g., rules and
regulations, curriculum activities, positive behavior in
group settings, and directions and instructions from
teachers and other adults in the school).
Constructivist Theory
Jean Piaget, Maria Montessori, Lev Vygotsky
• Young children as active participants in the
learning process.
• Young children initiate most of the activities
required for learning and development.
• School readiness is the stage when children can
initiate many of the interactions they have with the
environment and people around them.
Montessori
Maturationist Theory
• Development is a biological process that
occurs automatically in predictable,
sequential stages over time (Hunt, 1969).
• Young children will acquire knowledge
naturally and automatically as they grow
physically and become older, provided that
they are healthy (Demarest, Reisner,
Anderson, Humphrey, Farquhar, & Stein,
1993).
Environmentalist Theory
John Watson, B.F. Skinner,
Albert Bandura
• The child's environment shapes
learning and behavior; in fact, human
behavior, development, and learning
are thought of as reactions to the
environment.
• Young children develop and acquire
new knowledge by reacting to their
surroundings.
Constructivist Theory
Jean Piaget, Maria
Montessori, Lev Vygotsky
• Learning and development occur
when young children interact with the
environment and people around them
(Hunt, 1969).
• Young children as active participants
in the learning process. They initiate
most of the activities required for
learning and development.
• Children are ready for school when
they can initiate many of the
interactions they have with the
environment and people around
them.
Today, most researchers have come to
understand child development and the
learning process as articulated by the
constructivists. However, this view has
not been widely translated into practice.
Many kindergarten teachers and parents
still believe that young children are not
ready for school unless they can recite
the alphabet, count, and have the ability
to follow directions.
The percent of the population 60 and older is increasing.
Go to Social Menu
Aging
Bones shrink in size and density, more susceptible to fracture.
Muscles generally lose strength and flexibility.
You may become less coordinated or have trouble balancing.
Loss of bladder control.
Memory becomes less efficient.
It may take longer to learn new things or remember familiar words or names.
The eyes are less able to produce tears, the retinas thin.
The lenses gradually become less clear.
Focusing on objects that are close up may become more difficult.
Sensitive to glare and have trouble adapting to different levels of light.
Your hearing may dim or become difficult with background noise.
Skin thins and becomes less elastic and more fragile, and you may bruise more easily.
Who is a Lifelong
Learner?
Enthusiastic, ready, willing and able, and
empowered when it comes to their own
learning.
They are also not afraid to make mistakes.
Lifelong learners take full responsibility for
their learning, …they go out and do what has
to be done to make it happen. They are selfstarters.
Lifelong learners understand that there is no
one right way to learn and they want to
expose themselves to every variance and
nuance of learning. They often encourage
others to join them. They are always spreading
the word about their programs. They see laterlife learning, not only as an altruistic act, but
also as a way to engage in reciprocal learning
by developing a learning community of likeminded individuals.
It’s been said that people who are
lifelong learners are more tolerant,
more stimulated in their lives and
more upbeat.
Their life takes on an added dimension
and often brings a different perspective
to a particular viewpoint. It’s been said
that lifelong learning can save your life.
HGSE Professor
Sara LawrenceLightfoot
“Competition, speed, the
single pursuit of achievement,
masking failure, are things we
all learn to do in school. The
learning and productivity we
have in our Third Chapter has
to do with patience, with
collaboration, with restraint
and incrementalism.”
Lets turn our attention to a
short film.
Learning
is
lifelong.
• Great lighting/daylight
• Large projections
• Adjustable/Comfortable
• Lockable storage
• Flexible, open display

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