Richard K. Rein

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Richard K. Rein
Patent Rights in the EU, page 6; Telluride Film Fest, 10;
Trenton Street Art, 29; Wyndham Forrestal Hotel Sold, 37.
From PR to Presenter
McCarter’s Dan Bauer, here
with Andie MacDowell,
screens his new film.
Preview
9
Opportunities
13
Singles
28
, 2012
R 19
EMBE
PT
© SE
PH: 609-452-7000 FAX: 609-452-0033
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I S O BAMACARE
R IGHT
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T HE
THE
7
Richard K. Rein 43
Dan Aubrey reports, page 20.
ON
Business Meetings
O NE H AND
...
B UT
ON THE
O THER
Princeton University
professors Fred Starr
and Elizabeth Bogan
critique the new
healthcare plan.
Michele Alperin reports, page 30.
SOCIOLOGIST STARR: ‘Republicans always refer
ECONOMIST BOGAN: ‘The trouble with political con-
to the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, as job
killing, but there is no responsible independent
evidence that supports that. . . The Affordable
Care Act is an example of a fiscally responsible
measure; it extends the life of the Medicare trust
fund by about eight years.’
trol of a lot of healthcare is that you get regulations that are supposedly protective but are
ridiculously expensive. . . I am concerned that
unless we do things to reduce the cost of medical
services and reduce the demand for end-of-life
services, we are on a complete collision course.’
H EALTHCARE S YMPOSIUM 2012
The Princeton Chamber tackles healthcare on September 27
Kathleen McGinn Spring previews how Fox Rothschild has added wellness
to its menu of employee benefits , page 31.
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U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
To the Editor:
Make Colleges
Adhere to Zoning
Richard K. Rein
differently than other non-profits,
such as hospitals, care centers, and
prep schools. There is no justifiable reason to exempt private colleges and universities from the
same requirements for businesses
and our own residents.
he mayors and governing
A bigger concern with this legisbodies of the Borough and Town- lation is that the public, in particuship of Princeton are opposed to lar, the residents impacted by the
legislation that would exempt pri- expansion of private colleges and
vate colleges and universities from universities, will not have the opmunicipal zoning.
portunity to comment on or object
S-1534 was approved by the to the increased demand for parkState Senate at the end of June. And ing, traffic, police protection, fire
now the Assembly companion, A- protection, and the like. As a result
2586, is projected to be put forth by of such expansion, the demand on
the Higher Education Committee municipal services would increase,
for consideration for a vote by the perhaps dramatically with little or
full Assembly this fall. This legis- no input from taxpayers, all of
lation passed in the Senate despite whom will bear the expense of
the efforts of the League of Munic- such demands.
ipalities, most of the mayors and
Furthermore, the new legislaelected officials of the impacted tion extends to any property that
municipalities, and
the private college or
the American Planuniversity owns or acBetween
ning Association,
quires, even if that
all of whom strongThe
property is not on its
ly oppose the legismain campus. That sitLines
lation.
uation has an enormous
If this legislation
adverse impact on our
were to become law, all private col- downtown residential neighborleges and universities would be ex- hoods and central business disempt from municipal zoning. Pro- tricts. That situation, without propponents of the legislation argue er planning and consideration of
that colleges and universities serve infrastructure impacts, allows for
a unique public interest and should the degradation of the fabric of our
not be subject to the additional ex- diverse community and a reducpense of meeting the requirements tion of the tax base of the municiof the local zoning and planning pality, as these institutions are exboards.
empt from property taxation.
On the contrary, there is no justiThis misguided legislation is
fiable reason why private colleges very troublesome. We encourage
and universities should be treated citizens to contact (via the NJ Legislature switchboard, 609-8473905) Jack Ciattarelli and Donna
U.S. 1 WELCOMES letSimon, our State Assembly repreters to the editor, corrections,
sentatives from the 16th District,
and criticisms of our stories
as well as our former District 15
and columns. E-mail your
representatives, Reed Gusciora
thoughts directly to our editor: [email protected]
Continued on page 4
T
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Contributors
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w w w. b r u n n e r m d . c o m
INSIDE
Interchange
Survival Guide
4
5
Help For Job Hunters
Intellectual Property Right in Europe
Business Meetings
Preview
5
6
8
9-29
Day by Day, September 19 to 26
Telluride Film Festival
Opportunities
Review: ‘Vania & Sonia & Masha & Spike
Escaping The Nazis
Land, Air, and Sea Meet Dance, Poetry, and Music
At the Movies
U.S. 1 Singles Exchange
Windows of Soul – How Art Takes Back a Street
Health Care Reform Dissected
Fast Lane
Classifieds
Jobs
Richard K. Rein
9
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Company Index
ACHRM, 32; AIL Research, 38;
Dynamic Air Quality Solutions, 6;
European American Chamber of
Commerce of NJ, 7.
Fox & Rothschild, 31; Frontier
Airlines, 37; InnZen Hospitality,
37; Jewish Center of Princeton, 4.
JobTalk4All.com, 5; Kooltronic,
38; Princeton Chamber, 31;
Princeton Three Hospitality
Group, 37.
Princeton University, 30; Stratford Financial Group, 32; Streamline Air, 37; Trenton-Mercer Airport, 37; Wyndham Hotel, 34.
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U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Letters to the Editor
Continued from page 2
and Bonnie Watson-Coleman, to
ask them to oppose A-2586. Sign
the petition that generates a letter
to the Governor and Assemblywoman Riley, chair of the Higher
Education Committee, by visiting
the www.princetonboro.org mayor’s page.
Yina Moore, Chad Goerner
Mayors,
Princeton Borough and Township
Bitter Pills
For Institute
I
n what must be bitter pills for
the Institute for Advanced Study,
the American Battlefield Protection Program Amendments Act
was passed by the U.S. House of
Representatives on Monday, September 10. This bipartisan bill,
which was produced by U.S. Rep.
Rush Holt (NJ-12), will offer competitive matching grants to preserve battlefields from the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, and
the Civil War, according to a press
release issued by Holt’s office.
Holt first introduced this legislation nearly one year ago.
I am told Holt is a physicist by
trade and friendly to the Institute.
He has instead, clearly spoken for
the people. What about David
Hacket-Fischer, absent during the
recent Planning Board hearings
between the IAS and the Princeton
Battlefield Society? The IAS
claimed he supported its position
on the battlefield. Instead, it would
seem, he was on Capital Hill
stumping for Holt’s bill.
You don’t have to be Einstein to
know that I am delighted. I welcome this act’s passage as a member of the Battlefield Society. The
interest in preserving this battlefield is growing nationally. The
Battlefield Society will celebrate
the passage at the already planned
events on Saturday, September 29,
at the Battlefield Park. General
Washington and his rag-tag Army
must be smiling right now.
J. Carney
Princeton Battlefield Society
The Battlefield Society will
sponsor “Colonial Days Revisited” on Saturday, September 29, beginning at 10 a.m. at the park on
Mercer Road. A colonial music
progrram will begin at 4 p.m.
INSIGHTS & ARGUMENTS
ESSAYS & SOLILOQUIES
INTERCHANGE
CONSIDERING THE TURNS NOT TAKEN
A
by Rabbi Annie Tucker
lthough I wouldn’t
quite consider myself a daredevil,
summertime generally ends up being when I indulge the more adventurous side of my personality. And
so I found myself this past July, riding on the back of a Vespa rented
with a good friend as he gamely
worked to navigate the crowded
streets of Savannah, Georgia.
As it turns out, driving a scooter
is far more challenging than it
might first appear to be and far
more nerve-wracking too. Fingernails digging into my poor friend’s
thighs, I held my breath as we careened around the charming
squares and Spanish-moss laden
buildings of the town’s historic district.
For all his bravado, my friend —
I believe — was a bit anxious too,
and I realized this only when I noticed that during the entire course
of our ride together we never made
a single left-hand turn. Right we
went, down towards Forsythe
Park. Right we went again, picking
out the old synagogue, Mickve Israel.
To get to City Market, way over
there on our left? Right and then
right and then right again, until we
finally reached the pedestrian mall
by a most circuitous route. As it
turns out, you can get pretty much
anywhere you need to be by making just right-hand turns! And after
a while, you sort of stop noticing
that you’re self-handicapping and
taking the far longer way.
The lack of left-hand turns was
my friend’s “tell;” it alerted me to
the fact that perhaps he wasn’t as
comfortable on the bike as he
claimed to be. Avoiding left-hand
turns (or difficult conversations or
professional risk-taking or whatev-
er it may be that each of us is most
afraid of) can also, however, too
easily become a way of life.
This Shabbat I welcome us all
back to the Jewish Center after
what I hope has been a relaxing and
enjoyable summer away. The synagogue has been far too quiet these
last few months, and I know that
our entire staff looks forward to
catching up with you and your families and to launching the new
school and programming year together as a community.
We return to shul this month
ready not only for a new beginning
here in our building, however, but
also approaching a new year on the
Jewish calendar as we stand poised
to welcome 5773 and to usher in
the High Holiday season.
There are many goals and messages of the Days of Awe, from introspection and teshuvah (sacred
return) to forgiveness, starting
Too often the limiting
patterns we create for
ourselves hold us
back from more
deeply connecting
with others and from
realizing personal or
professional goals.
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anew, and repairing damaged relationships. To these important
themes I add one more, inspired by
my Vespa-riding adventures down
South. I encourage us this coming
year to break patterns created out
of fear; I urge us to stop choosing to
make only right-hand turns because we’re too cautious to attempt
a left.
It was probably wise and prudent for my friend and I to keep
steering right as we rode around
Savannah. We were new to Vespariding, after all, and the risks involved were physical and serious.
But too often the limiting patterns
we create for ourselves no longer
serve any good purpose.
They are borne out of habit or
fear or a certain amount of laziness;
they hold us back from more
deeply connecting with others,
from realizing personal or professional goals, from helping ourselves to find happiness and fulfillment. This High Holiday season, I
urge each of us to take a breath and
to gingerly bear to the left. Who
knows what incredible discovery
might be in store for us!
Tucker is associate rabbi at the
Jewish Center of Princeton. Her
article on “What Matters — In Just
Six Words” appeared in the January 4, 2012, edition of U.S. 1.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
know where, and how, to look. There is no
mystery to job seeking, she adds. In fact, if
there is a “new rule” to looking for a job, it is
that the old rules still work the best.
Kaplan will moderate a three-part panel
discussion on careers at the Princeton Library over the next three months. The first is
Monday, September 24, at 7 p.m. It will focus on high school and college students.
“College Bound, Now” will feature a panel
of career experts discussing how to decide if
college is right for you, what type of college
experiences will help you to become competitive in the marketplace, and how to creEDITOR:
ate a network while still in college.
BILL SANSERVINO
The second discussion in the series, “Career Changers” will be on Monday, October
[email protected]
22, at 7 p.m. A panel of experts who have
personal experience in changing careers will
Monday, September 24
discuss strategies and approaches to make
the leap from one career to another.
On Monday, November 26, also at 7 p.m.,
a panel of Mompreneurs will round out the
series. The discussion will focus on how to
start a business that you can grow from your
home while raising your children.
Kaplan
opened
her
business,
e all know it’s a bad time to look for JobTalk4All.com, in 2011, after several
a job. Whether you are just out of college, years as a career counselor and a teacher.
hoping to make a career change, or have “I’m a career changer myself,” she explains,
been laid off with years of experience, you “I started the business as a way to move out
know the truth: jobs today are scarce, and of a teaching career.”
good jobs — the kind
A graduate of West
that lead to a long-term
Wi n d s o r- P l a i n s b o r o
People hire people
career in the field you are
High School “before it
interested in, with good
was divided into north
they know, so the
pay and benefits, of
and south,” she says, Kamore people you
course — are even harder
plan started college at
meet, the better
to find.
the University of VerWhile the most recent
mont, then transferred to
chances of getting
statistics listed unemArizona State University
the job you want.
ployment at just over
as “a way to see the west
eight percent, many excheaply.” She graduated
pert argue that the jobless
with a degree in relirate is really higher — that the statistics gious studies, with an idea of going into
don’t take into account the “discouraged,” academe, but decided that the “publish or
the untold number of people who have given perish” atmosphere of university teaching
up and just quit looking for a job, or are un- was not for her. She graduated in 1999 and
der-employed.
got a job as an academic advisor at Rio SalaBut there are jobs out there, says do Community College in Arizona. “I got
Suzanne Kaplan, an expert in helping others find the right career. You just have to
Continued on following page
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Continued from preceding page
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the job because I knew someone,
and they were looking for an advisor to who could speak Spanish,”
she says.
After a few more years in Arizona she decided to return to the
East Coast, and got a job teaching
English at her alma mater, West
Windsor-Plainsboro High School
South. She also returned to school
as a student and obtained her master’s in secondary english education in 2002 from Rutgers University.
But Kaplan found that the career
path isn’t always easy in teaching.
“I always had a job, but I couldn’t
get a tenure track position, and
with the current job situation for
teachers, the chances of getting one
were very slim.”
She decided to open her own
business, helping others to find the
right job, and in 2011 opened
JobTalk4All.com. “My parents
have been a big support and a big
inspiration to me,” she says. Her
father, after many years working
for Bell Labs, opened his own business, JK Group, which he then sold
a few years ago. Her mother is a
private practice therapist. “My
mom is my biggest cheerleader and
has always encouraged me to develop my interest in people and my
curiosity. My dad has been very
helpful in helping me to develop
the skills I need as a business owner.”
What Not to Do. “The biggest
mistake people make in searching
for a job today is in thinking that all
they have to do is to upload a resume to an online job board,” says
Kaplan. Whether it is a national or
a regional site, the number of resumes submitted for each job is often in the hundreds or even thousands, and it is difficult for any one
Job Talk: Suzanne
Kaplan hosts panel
discussions for job
hunters beginning
September 24.
people they know, so the more people you meet, the better chances of
getting the job you want.
Volunteer. “The truth is that in
today’s job market, young people
with little job experience will probably have to work for free,” says
Kaplan. Volunteering is an excellent way to gain experience. “It’s a
great way to display and to increase
your job skills, build a resume, get
experience, and develop better references.”
Even if the organization you
volunteer with does not have a job
opening, you will be out in the marketplace meeting people. “That
goes back to my first point — the
best way to get a job is to get to
know more people,” says Kaplan,
“and volunteering allows you to
show what you know by doing it.”
— Karen Hodges Miller
Thursday, September 27
person’s resume to stand out. “The
chances are, no matter how well
your resume is written, it’s going to
end up in a slush pile,” she says.
Of course, Kaplan doesn’t discount the need for an excellent,
professionally written resume.
“The rules for resumes have
changed. Today you need to understand which keywords are important for the job you are looking for.
Without the right keywords, your
resume probably won’t be seen.”
Get Out and Meet People.
Once you’ve got that great resume,
the best next step is to get out and
meet people. “Get out of your comfort zone. Go out and network. It’s
no longer a choice when you are
looking for a job, because if you
are not willing to do it, there are a
dozen other people who are just as
qualified as you who are out there
— and they are the ones who will
get the job,” she says. People hire
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Like many companies its size,
Dynamic Air Quality Solutions,
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Pennington Point West
2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
long time companies like this
would only file patents in the United States, figuring that most of
their products are marketed on this
content. The patent scene in Europe, by contrast, was viewed as
scary, complex, and expensive, and
companies worried that filing in
Europe would entail sending attorneys there to litigate.
But Cummins suggests it is time
for businesses to reconsider and
initiate or expand their patent filings in Europe. “Times are changing with the world getting smaller,” he says.
Cummins will speak on “Intellectual Property Rights in the European Union,” for the European
American Chamber of Commerce
New Jersey, Thursday, September
27, from 2 to 5:30 p.m., Alexander
Library, 169 College Avenue, New
Brunswick. Cost: $45. To register,
go to eaccnj.org.
He highlights several new realities that should encourage companies to explore European patents:
More countries savvy about
patent protection. Whereas the
United States has always led in intellectual property protection, other countries are catching up. Not
only do countries need to protect
indigenous products and processes, but they also need to give equal
protection to countries they have
agreements with.
Given the difficulties around intellectual property in Asia, where
regulations are either not implemented or not enforced, the European Union is seriously exploring
the implementation of an EU-wide
patent system. This would allow a
company to file a single application rather than individual ones in
27-plus European markets, which
would be very expensive.
United States more competitive in Europe. Not only is the
patent scene in Europe changing,
but American competitiveness in
Europe is increasing, with a weakened dollar and significantly lower
energy costs than in Europe.
Just for food, Cummins notes,
energy costs are 50 percent of the
overall cost from the time seeds are
put into the ground until it reaches
consumers. This relative imbalance in costs makes it cheaper to
buy American. “All of a sudden,
with 7 to 10 cents a kilowatt hour
here and 20 cents in Ireland, I say,
okay, the U.S. dollar is weak, my
energy costs are half — I can do
business in Europe and get half of
those empty containers out of
Newark,” says Cummins.
Varied European environ-
U.S. 1
Climate Change:
Marty Cummins says
the intellectual property rights in European countries are
catching up with the
Unites States.
ments to match different needs.
To decide where in Europe to file
patents, Cummins sat down with
his engineering and sales staff and
with his partner to decide what
made sense for his company.
“We picked about half to file in,
based on where we might want to
do work, where our products might
fit, and where there are companies
we might want to partner with,” he
says,
His company is looking for partner reps to spec and sell his products to companies in Europe. “By
not filing you may be losing opportunities for growing your company
through licensing agreements,” he
says. He is also interested in Amer-
Not only is the patent
scene in Europe
changing, but
American competitiveness in Europe
is increasing.
ican companies that have plants in
Europe, for example, New Jerseybased pharmaceutical companies
with manufacturing facilities in
Europe.
Cummins grew up in Belle
Mead. His father was a local developer, and his mother raised five
boys. His grandfather was a judge
in Bergen County.
Cummins studied political science at Rutgers College, but got
married during his senior year and
did not finish. He went into a management-training program for
Prime Motor Inns while still in college, and he stayed with the company for eight years. It grew from 5
to 500 hotels during his tenure, and
he left as executive general manager.
He then became president of
Vail Princeton Realty, which
owned and developed real estate
projects.
Fifteen years ago, his childhood
friend Duke Wiser was doing specialty engineering for sick building
syndrome. The two men came
across a company that manufac-
tured and designed air quality systems, Engineering Dynamics, in
Ontario, Canada, and bought it.
They still own a manufacturing
plant there, where they have about
30 employees, and they have another 30 in the United States. Wiser
is president, and Cummins is chief
operating officer.
The company has two divisions:
one makes residential electronic
air cleaners that it distributes
through Trane, Lennox, Rheem,
and Water Furnace; another designs air filtration systems for
commercial buildings. “That is
where the growth is going to be in
Europe for us,” he says. “We design and manufacture this equipment that replaces the traditional
bags and cartridge filters, and we
operate at a fraction of the horsepower they require.”
His product not only uses a fraction of the energy of other alternatives, but it can hold up to five
times the dust. “When you put
those two together, our filtration
systems will pay for themselves in
anywhere from two to four years,”
he says. “When you look at European opportunities, it may be one
to three years, because of the high
energy cost and lower dollar price
point.”
Initially the company focused
on the United States and North
America, but after his younger
brother Brian died in the 9/11
World Trade Center attack, Cummins developed a European connection. He settled his brother’s estate in 2002 and rented a castle in
Ireland for an extended toast to his
brother’s life.
During his three weeks in a little
village with thatched roofs, pubs,
and churches and with people on
horses, Cummins was drawn to a
high-tech manufacturing facility
Continued on following page
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U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Friday, September 21
Continued from preceding page
on its outskirts. “It became a passion of mine to go back every year
and see the opportunities for my
business,” he says.
Then with the weakened dollar
and higher energy costs in Europe,
he got interested in the European
American Chamber of Commerce.
“I had never considered Europe; I
thought it would be difficult,” he
says. But then he learned that
things were different than he had
perceived.
“American companies have an
advantage in that everyone speaks
English, especially on the technical side,” he says. Not only is there
a strong affinity between the United States and Europe, he continues,
due in part to historical commonalities, but Europe has a range of
economies, from emerging ones
like Croatia, Poland, Slovakia, to
advanced economies. “Depending
on what your company wants to do,
there is something for you,” says
Cummins. — Michele Alperin
Business Meetings
Wednesday, September 19
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EVENING AND WEEKEND APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE
5 p.m.: Middlesex Chamber,
“Largest Networking Party.” More
than 1,000 people expected to attend. Cost: $30 Rutgers Athletic
Center, New Brunswick.
https://www.mcrcc.org,
[email protected] 732-745-8090.
Thursday, September 20
7 a.m.: BNI Top Flight, weekly networking, free. Clairmont Diner,
East Windsor. 609-799-4444.
7 a.m.: Central Jersey Business
Association, weekly networking
breakfast, free. Americana Diner,
East Windsor. 800-985-1121.
7:30 a.m.: Bartolomei Pucciarelli,
Business Getting Results. Free
for first-time attendees, but registration is required. 2564
Brunswick Pike. www.bpcpas.com. 609-883-9000.
11:30 a.m.: Mercer Chamber, “The
Economic Impact of Non-Profits
in the Community,” Linda Czipo,
executive director, Center for
Non-Profits. Cost $55. RHO Ristorante & Discoteca, 50 Riverview
Plaza, Route 29, Trenton.
www.mercerchamber.com. 609689-9960.
Noon.: Women Interested In Networking, monthly luncheon, $20.
Every third Thursday. Villa Manino Restaurant, Route 130, Hamilton. www.whoscoming.com/WIN.
609-890-4054.
1 p.m.: Creative Computing, “Mac
in Business” at 1 p.m. “iPad in
Business” at 2:30 p.m. Free. Garden Theater, 160 Nassau Street,
Princeton. www.creativecomputing.com. 609-683-3622.
7 p.m.: Council for the Advancement of Muslim Professionals,
“The Importance of Community
Leadership,” Salim Patel, Passaic
Board of Education. Toros
Restaurant, 489 Hazel Street,
Clifton. www.camp-online.org.
877-999-3223.
ô
8 a.m.: ACHRM Corporate Health
Risk Innovation, “Health Reformation Update: Employers’ Key
Considerations and Value Based
Insurance Design,” Kathryn
Spangler, Partner, Kathryn Spangler, VBID Health. Cost $100.
Dow Jones, 4300 Route 1 South
Brunswick. www.achrm.org. 856979-2067.
9 a.m.: African American Chamber, 2012 Business Leadership
Conference. “The ‘$50 Million
Challenge’ Continues,’” Egbert
Perry, president and CEO of the
Integral Group. Cost: $65. Hyatt
Regency, New Brunswick.
www.aachnj.com. 609-571-1620.
9 a.m.: Princeton Future, “College
Towns II: Sustaining Princeton as
a Livable Community.” Free.
Princeton Public Library. , [email protected] .
10 a.m.: Professional Service
Group, weekly career meeting,
support, and networking for unemployed professionals, free.
Princeton Public Library.
www.mercopsg.net. 609-2927535.
Saturday, September 22
9 a.m.: YWCA Princeton, Retirement Readiness Workshop For
Women. Kirsten R. Braley. For
women within five years of retirement. Three consecutive Saturday sessions. Cost: $40 Bramwell
House, 59 Paul Robeson Place,
Princeton. www.ywcaprinceton.org. 609-497-2100.
Tuesday, September 25
7 a.m.: Capital Networking Group,
weekly networking, free. Princeton United Methodist Church, 7
Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.
609-434-1144.
11:30 a.m.: Mercer Chamber, “Update on New Identity Theft
Scams,” Joe Bocchini, mercer
county prosecutor. Cost $55. Villa
Romanaza, 429 Route 156,
Yardville. www.mercerchamber.com. 609-689-9960.
5:30 p.m.: ActionCoach Business
Coaching, Business Success
Seminar: 6 Steps to Massive Result, Sal Levatino. Cost: $15.95
Pellettieri, Rabstein and Altman,
100 Nassau Park Boulevard. actioncoach.com. 609-799-7177.
7 p.m.: Princeton PC Users
Group, monthly meeting. Free.
Lawrence Library. www.ppcugnj.org. 609-333-6932.
7:30 p.m.: JobSeekers, networking and job support, free. Trinity
Church, 33 Mercer Street.
www.trinityprinceton.org. 609924-2277.
Wednesday, September 26
7 a.m.: BNI West Windsor chapter,
weekly networking, free. BMS
Building, Pelletieri Rabstein & Altman, Nassau Park. 609-4623875.
7 p.m.: Homewood Suites, “Energetic Leadership: Actions for Sustainable Results,” Jennifer Smith,
leadership coach. Register by Email to [email protected] Free. 3819 Route 1
South, Plainsboro. www.growthpotentialcons.com. 732-2077922.
Got a Meeting?
Notify U.S. 1's Survival
Guide of your upcoming
business meeting ASAP.
Announcements received
after 1 p.m. on Friday may
not be included in the paper
published the following
Wednesday.
Submit releases by mail
(U.S. 1, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton 08540), fax (609452-0033), or E-mail ([email protected]).
All events are subject to
last minute changes or cancellations. Call to confirm.
Thursday, September 27
7 a.m.: Central Jersey Business
Association, weekly networking
breakfast, free. Americana Diner,
East Windsor. 800-985-1121.
7 a.m.: BNI Top Flight, weekly networking, free. Clairmont Diner,
East Windsor. 609-799-4444.
8 a.m.: Princeton Chamber,
Healthcare Symposium: “How
Government Decisions on Health
Care Directly Impact Individuals,
Businesses, and the Changing
Climate of Health Care in the
U.S.” Presented by Neil Sullivan,
state Banking and Insurance
commissioner, and Coleen
Woods, state Health Information
Technology Coordinator. Cost:
$75. Mercer College Conference
Center, Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor. www.princetonchamber.org. 609-924-1776.
8 a.m.: Mercer Chamber, Economic Breakfast Forum: “How to Ride
the Waiver Rule.” $15. Holiday
Inn & National Conference Center
of East Windsor, 399 Monmouth
Street, East Windsor. www.mercerchamber.com. 609-689-9960.
8:30 a.m.: Somerset County Business Partnership, “Retirement
Plans For Small Businesses,” Eric Suhr of Pathway Retirement of
Mahawh. Cost: $30. 360 Grove
Street at Route 22 east, Bridgewater. events.SCBP.org. 908218-4300.
5:30 p.m.: Mercer Chamber, MRCC Cocktails and Connections —
The chamber in conjunction with
the Hopewell, Lawrence, and Ewing Chapters holds a meet and
greet” event with food, cocktails,
and networking. $35. The Mega
Group, 2 Graphics Drive, Ewing.
www.mercerchamber.com. 609689-9960.
Friday, September 28
10 a.m.: Professional Service
Group, support, and networking
for unemployed professionals,
free. Princeton Public Library.
www.mercopsg.net. 609-2927535.
Saturday, September 29
9 a.m.: YWCA Princeton, Retirement Readiness Workshop For
Women. Kirsten R. Braley. For
women within five years of retirement. Cost: $40 Bramwell House,
59 Paul Robeson Place, Princeton. www.ywcaprinceton.org.
609-497-2100.
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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
ART
FILM
LITERATURE
DANCE
DRAMA
U.S. 1
9
MUSIC
PREVIEW
DAY-BY-DAY EVENTS, SEPTEMBER 19 to 26
For more event listings visit
www.princetoninfo.com. For timely updates, follow princetoninfo on
Twitter and Facebook. Before attending an event, call or check the
website. Want to list an event?
Submit details and photos to
[email protected]
For listings of meetings, networking groups, trade associations, and training organizations,
see Business Meetings in the Survival Guide section.
Wednesday
September 19
IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Music
Worthy of a Pulitzer
Wayside Shrines, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Original
songs with lyrics by poet Paul
Muldoon. Musicians include Timothy Chaston of Australia on violin, Ila Couch from New Zealand
on vocals, Chris Harford from the
United States on vocals, Ray Kubian from United States on
drums, Noriko Manabe from
Japan on keyboards, Kate Neal
from Australia on accordion, Nigel
Smith from the UK on bass, and
Muldoon from Ireland on guitar. 7
p.m.
Pieces of China
Peter Lighte’s 12 paintings representing the ancient Chinese signs
of the Zodiac will be on view at Princeton Day School from October 1
through 5. An opening reception and silent auction take place Friday,
September 28. Pictured: ‘Year of the Rat,’ left, and ‘Year of the Dragon.’
Live Music
John & Carm, Fedora Cafe, 2633
Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609895-0844. 6 to 9 p.m.
Arturo Romay, Jester’s, 233
Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown,
609-298-9963. www.jesterscafe.net. 6 to 9 p.m.
Mike Fineis and Chris Hoke,
Rocky Hill Inn, 137 Washington
Street, Rocky Hill, 609-683-8930.
www.rockyhilltavern.com.
Acoustic music. 6 p.m.
Open Mic Night, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. Sign up at
6:45 p.m. 7 to 8:45 p.m.
Wayside Shrines, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Original
songs with lyrics by poet Paul
Muldoon. Musicians include Timothy Chaston of Australia on violin, Ila Couch from New Zealand
on vocals, Chris Harford from the
U.S. on vocals, Ray Kubian from
United States on drums, Noriko
Manabe from Japan on keyboards, Kate Neal from Australia
on accordion, Nigel Smith from
the UK on bass, and Muldoon
from Ireland on guitar. 7 p.m.
Open Mic, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
World Music
Julia and Carlos Lopez, Malaga
Restaurant, 511 Lalor Street,
Hamilton, 609-396-8878. www.malagarestaurant.com. Flamenco
dancing. Cancelled.
Art
Art Exhibit, Za Restaurant, 147
West Delaware Avenue, Pennington, 609-737-4400. www.zarestaurants.com. Opening reception for “Conversations in Color,” a collection of impressionist
oil paintings by Lauren Acton.
Wine from Hopewell Valley Vineyards and appetizers from Za. On
view to December 15, 11:30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. 4 to 7 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Comedy about life
in Bucks County in a new play by
Christopher Durang, with David
Hyde Pierce and Sigourney
Weaver. $20 to $72. 7:30 p.m.
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of NJ,
F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew University, Madison, 973-408-5600.
www.shakespearenj.org. Adaptation by Neil Bartlett. Directed by
Brian Crowe. $32-$70. 7:30 p.m.
Film
Documentary Film Series: Power of Art, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000.
www.sbpl.info. “David with the
Head of Goliath.” Bring a brown
bag lunch. Free. 12:30 p.m.
On Stage
Dancing
As You Like It, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, Levin Theater, George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Students have recently returned from
a year’s study at Shakespeare’s
Globe in London. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Newcomer’s Dance, American
Ballroom, 1523 Parkway Avenue, Ewing, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com.
$10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Continued on page 13
EVENTS EDITOR:
LYNN MILLER
[email protected]
All Events, All the Time
For more event listings,
cancellations, and late listings, visit www.princetoninfo.com. For timely updates, follow princetoninfo
at Twitter and on Facebook.
Before attending an event,
we suggest calling.
Send listings for upcoming events to U.S. 1 Preview
ASAP (it is never too early).
Deadline for events to appear
in any Wednesday edition is
the previous Thursday.
Listings must include
date, time, place, phone, and
price. Listings submitted via
Facebook and E-vites are
usually not acceptable.
Submit press releases to
us by E-mail at [email protected]; fax at
609-452-0033; or mail to
U.S. 1, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton 08540. E-mail
photos (300 ppi and four
inches wide or larger) to
[email protected]
10
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Life’s Harsh Truths & Big Secrets at Telluride
T
he major themes at this
year’s Telluride Film Festival (my
15th) were violence, secrets and
deception, truths revealed, and history relived — on a political and
personal level. In short: Life!
You can’t see everything at Telluride, so I skipped the lighter fare
in favor of reality and what I
thought reflected today’s turbulent
times. The importance of these serious and often difficult films was
discussed at one of the many panels
featuring directors, writers, and
stars.
“Films are the way many Americans learn their history; movies
can change the world,” Ben Affleck (star/director of “Argo”) said.
“Art reflects what’s going on
around us, what the world is thinking about,” said one of the festival’s directors.
“Artists can reshape things,”
said political writer Mark Danner.
“The artist has to do his part to
change opinion.”
The Lebanese film maker Ziad
Doueiri (“Attack”) and his Israeli
counterpart Dror Moreh (“Gate-
by Phyllis Spiegel
keepers”) were part of this discussion. “‘Gatekeepers’has a bold and
important political message — listen and take it with you,” Danner
said. “It’s totally true but plays like
a spy thriller.”
There was also the introduction
of the idea of a “moral compass” at
this panel when participants
agreed that true heroism can be in
not following orders. In “Argo,”
the festival’s one sneak preview,
Affleck directs and stars as Tony
Mendez. The character is the CIA
officer who is ordered to abandon
the hostages he was saving in Iran
during the crisis in 1979 when the
American Embassy was stormed
to protest the brutish Shah being
sheltered in the U.S. Mendez concocts an outrageous plot to convince the government that
hostages are part of a film crew
and provides false identities and
documents.
Now a multi-faceted film that
can keep audience members on the
edge of their seats, it was not until
1990 that this mission was allowed
to become public. Because of its
appeal to audiences of all ages —
the young for the action, the older
for the history — I predict a booming box office for “Argo.”
Two films convinced us that it is
impossible to really know another
person, no matter how intimate the
relationship. The truths of a marriage and family secrets are revealed in the Israeli film “Attack,”
and the realities of one’s parent’s
life is depicted in Sarah Polley’s
autobiographical “Stories We
Tell.”
There’s mob mentality in places
from South America to Australia,
and as Julie Huntsinger, festival
co-director, said at our press briefing, “One man’s terrorist is another’s freedom fighter.” We shuddered through riots in Chile, Iran,
Israel, France, Denmark, and a few
that I missed. This must have been
a good year for “extras” around the
world.
I
n Israel, two brilliant films
showed both Arab and Jewish uprisings. “Act of Killing” contemplates the slaughter in Indonesia in
1965 but includes current interviews with the murderers, who
boasted about their crimes. The violence is on a smaller scale in
France’s “Rust and Bone” as ruthless boxers vie for huge payoffs.
Perhaps the most important offering here, the world premiere of a
documentary, had me in tears and
physical distress over the realities
it depicted. In “The Gatekeepers”
director Dror Moreh interviews six
former directors of Shin Bet, the
feared Israeli secret intelligence
agency whose members have never been interviewed about their
work. The consistent truths revealed by these leaders describe
that organization’s methods of infiltration, torture, and murder, and
that their bosses, Israel’s elected
leaders, “led the Jewish state into
unending occupation, hatred, and
conflict.”
“In ’67,” one ex-director said,
“one million Palestinians came under Israeli rule. Their historical
sites were no longer theirs. Our job
was to control these people.”
“Many of our missions were not
legal,” another said. “There was no
morality. There were brutal beatings, smashed heads, broken
bones, killing a prisoner whose
hands were tied, using live fire
against stone throwers.”
One of the retired directors predicts another political assassination coming from religious extremists who believe that their law overrides the government’s law. “It was
this group who assassinated Israel’s peace-dealing premiere
Yitzahk Rabin and who were detained in their plans to bomb the
Dome of the Rock and an Arab bus.
The government released members
of this Jewish underground,” he explained, “who were barely punished.”
“We saw that politicians can’t be
trusted,” was only one of the chilling messages of this film that anyone who is interested in Israel,
from any perspective, cannot afford to miss. The viewer saw sincere regret in the faces of these aging Israelis who relived their careers for the camera.
“Attack” also combines the per-
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
11
Political Plots: At left,
Laura Linney plays Daisey
Suckley, a distant cousin
of Franklin Roosevelt (Bill
Murray). Far right, Nina
Hoss plays a doctor in
1980s Berlin in ‘Barbara.’
Opposite page, the documentary ‘The Gatekeepers’ is based on interviews
with six former directors of
the Israeli intelligence
agency, Shin Bet.
sonal with the political as a celebrated Arab physician working in
Israel discovers the truth about his
beloved wife of 15 years. When he
travels back to revisit their roots,
the wife he never really knew is revealed to have been a suicide
bomber. The film takes us behind
the scenes in the Palestinian city
Nablus, with seldom-seen views of
residential interiors, a church, a
mosque, and the interior lives of
the people at home. Through the
doctor’s eyes, we experience the
security wall that Israel built and
the degrading treatment people receive when crossing the borders.
“It was not easy for me to go to
Israel to make this movie,”
Lebanese director Ziad Doueiri
said of his moving film “Attack.”
“I was brought up to believe this
was my enemy. We grow up looking evil in the face, yet we are so
much alike. Jews talk with their
hands and say they invented felafel
and the Arabs do the same; both
groups yell and talk over each other,” he said.
“Israelis today are reexamining
their foundation,” Doueiri said,
“but Arabs are still fighting the battle. They’re not yet making films
about it.”
The terror was subtle in “Barbara.” Germany’s entry into the
Oscars, the film tells the story of a
compassionate pediatrician in
1980s Berlin who was banished to
the provinces for trying to escape
to freedom. While still plotting to
emigrate with her lover, whom she
meets secretly, the Stasi is ever
present, watching her every move.
Her sacrifice and heroism evince a
morality difficult to sustain at that
time.
P
erhaps the most painfully
agonizing movie on a personal level was Michael Haneke’s
“Amour,” which won the Palme
d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.
In the film, the truth of aging is
poignantly depicted, along with the
superhuman efforts of a husband to
care for a wife in physical and mental decline after a marriage of many
decades.
In “Hyde Park on the Hudson,”
Laura Linney, a Telluride regular,
plays Daisy Suckley, a mousy distant cousin of Franklin Roosevelt
who becomes his intimate over a
long period of time. The story was
never revealed to the public until
Suckley died in 1991 at the age of
100.
Bill Murray, pretty believable as
FDR despite my early reservations,
pulls off my favorite scene in this
film with aplomb. In an after-dinner tete-a-tete between the president and England’s King George,
who has come to America to plead
for help in fighting the Nazis, the
king exclaims, “this damned stutter!” FDR responds, “this damned
polio!” It seemed that the two
world leaders were instantly bonded.
While a bit too homey for me,
the action takes place mostly in
Sara Delano’s (FDR’s domineering mother) country home, and the
film concentrates perhaps too
much on Franklin’s philandering
rather than his accomplishments.
But this is one small slice of the
32nd president’s life. In his time,
the press ignored the women in his
life as well as his disability. As one
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current reviewer said, “it seems
that he collected more than
stamps.” In this film, we see FDR
being carried from place to place
and in his wheelchair — something spared the public during his
lifetime. A hot dog picnic three
At the Telluride Film
Festival there’s only
one topic of conversation all weekend ––
the films.
months before the war — planned
to show the British royals the “real” America — was part of the
Brit’s visit.
“The skill of FDR,” said director
Roger Michell at the Q&A afterwards, “was to keep everyone happy. He gave the whole nation confidence. While we had a large German population in America, he was
able to convince the American people to form an alliance with Great
Britain.”
The Linney character, Daisy
Suckley, lived near FDR, and when
she died the unknown affair was revealed in letters found under
Daisy’s bed. The screenwriter,
Richard Nelson, said that the local
media covered the discovery.
Daisy was one of the few people
who was with FDR when he died,
and it was she who gave him his
dog, Fala.
Mads Mikkelson, the Danish
matinee idol, had two starring
roles here and was honored with a
tribute and retrospective of his
films. With a working-class background, he was a gymnastics star
and then a Martha Graham dancer.
He later attended drama school
and rose quickly to cinema fame.
In “The Hunt” he plays a warm
simpatico who after being downsized from his teaching job becomes an aide in a small-town
Danish kindergarten. When a child
falsely accuses him of immoral behavior, the man suffers shocking
repercussions and horror as the
Continued on following page
12
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Telluride
Continued from preceding page
power of violence and mob hysteria in a small town is revealed. This
film from Denmark gained
Mikkelson the Best Actor award at
Cannes.
In “The Royal Affair,” based on
historical events, Mikkelson is Johann Struensee, the German doctor
who becomes the confidant of the
mentally ill Danish king Christian
VII. Struensee uses his influence to
help bring Denmark out of feudalism and into enlightenment in 1770
— even before the French Revolution. While the doctor’s efforts create laws to protect the people,
eventual betrayal and a coup
against the king send the country
backwards and keep it there for
years to come. Struensee’s affair
with the unhappy queen helped expedite his downfall.
When interviewed about the intensity of the characters he plays,
Mikkelson said, “I try hard to let it
go when I go home to my family. I
don’t insist that my kids call me by
the character’s name.” As the audience laughed en masse, he added
“some people do that.”
Marion Cotillard, honored with
a retrospective of her work (she’s
36 and has made 36 movies—
playing Edith Piaf in “La Vie en
Rose,” Picasso’s amour in “Midnight in Paris,” and Dillinger’s girlfriend in “Public Enemy”) was
here with the new French film
“Rust and Bone.”
She plays a free-spirited trainer
of whales who experiences a lifechanging accident. Pairing her
with an improbable lover, the traditional “loser” played by Belgian
newcomer Matthias Schoenaerts,
this absorbing, creative movie
shows how trauma, like psychoanalysis, can heal and change lives.
The journey to resolution is gripping throughout.
At her tribute, Cotillard wore
tight black jeans and a white shirt,
vibrant with her long black hair
pulled back. She told the audience
that her parents were actors, her father a mime, and that their passion
for their work was contagious.
Starting life as a singer in a band,
she saved for two years to come to
New York to take the total immersion Berlitz course in English (“I
took it twice,” she said). She then
worked for four months with a dialect coach to lose her French accent to play Dillinger’s girl friend.
She describes herself as a mother
and an environmental activist.
The secrets on the big screens
here were personal as well as political. Canadian actress and director
Sarah Polley’s “Stories We Tell” is
her effort to understand the mysteries surrounding her actress mother
who died when Sarah was 11. In the
pursuit of truth, Polley interviews
friends, colleagues, and fellow actors and learns some shattering
truths that will forever change her
life.
I called Pablo Larrain’s “No”
the South American Mad Men. In
this funny yet serious film, a successful advertising campaign, using the techniques of marketing
consumer products, contributes to
the defeat of dictator Pinochet and
sets that country on the road to
democracy.
K
en Burns, a Telluride regular, and daughter Sarah Burns were
here with “The Central Park Five,”
directed by Burns and based on
Sarah’s book about the Central
Park jogger case in 1989. In that infuriating miscarriage of justice,
five young men from Harlem were
falsely accused, served time, and
were finally acquitted. All five are
interviewed in this film, which I
did not manage to fit into my
schedule.
Salman Rushdie was here with
the film version of his iconic novel
“Midnight’s Children,” which I
skipped and know I’ll get to see
with the huge Indian audiences
here in central New Jersey.
I was sorry to miss “Wadja,” the
first film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia and by a woman, no less. The
heroine is a resourceful 11-yearold determined to overcome the
harsh restrictions on women and to
preserve her own inner life.
If you go to the movies only to
be entertained, not to be shattered
by the realities of governments and
humanity, you’ll enjoy some of the
lighter fare that was popular with
Telluride audiences. There are always animations, comic shorts,
and silent films accompanied by
live music. Some of the newer offerings I’d like to see later are:
“Sapphire,” the story of the ascent of an Aboriginal countrywestern singing group in 1968
Australia, where white racism
rules. Audiences universally loved
this one, which is based on a true
story.
“Love Marilyn” shows a different Monroe through recently discovered diaries and letters. It features readings by Uma Thurman,
Lindsay Lohan, Glenn Close, Ellen
Burstyn, and Marisa Tomei. Included is previously unseen
footage from the Arthur Miller and
Truman Capote estates, adding
new dimensions to what we know
about the star.
“Frances Ha” is Noah Baumbach’s Gen X story about dating,
working hard to afford tiny apartments, and trying to get ahead.
People here called it smart and funny.
My own comic relief was “Superstar” with French comedy star
Kad Merad playing a retiring guy
who becomes a celebrity through
no effort of his own in this age of
social media — another example of
mob mentality and how the Internet can adversely affect a life. After
September 19
Continued from page 9
Literati
Althea Ward Clark Reading Series, Princeton University, McCarter Theater (Berlind), 609258-1500. www.princeton.edu.
Readings by poet James Arthur,
fiction writing Melinda Moustakis,
non-fiction writer Yasmine El
Rashidi, and playwright A. Rey
Pamatmat. All early career writers
who are in-residence at Princeton
for the academic year. 4:30 p.m.
Writers Workshop, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Beth
Plankey leads the group. 5 p.m.
Good Causes
Benefit Evening, Bordentown
City Cats, Artful Deposit Gallery,
201 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-324-3896. www.bordentowncitycats.blogspot.com. Wine and cheese evening
with proceeds from purchases of
art to benefit the organization’s
efforts to rescue, foster, provide
medical treatments, and find forever homes for the town’s stray
and feral felines. The organization has rescued more than 25
cats and kittens this year. 5 to 9
p.m.
Food & Dining
Cornerstone Community
Kitchen, Princeton United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer Street, Princeton,
609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals, prepared by
TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Health
Prostate Screening, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little
Albany Street, New Brunswick,
the protagonist’s initial turmoil, the
mob goes the other way and spurns
him with a vengeance. He eventually is able to return to normal life
–– albeit with a new love whom he
met when his fame took him to television notoriety.
Seen around town: Alice Waters, Dave Eggers, Laura Dern,
Dennis Quaid, Alexander Payne,
Sarah Polley, Sally Potter, Michael
Winterbottom, Ken Burns, Salman
Rushdie, Noah Baumbach, Roger
Corman, Leonard Maltin, Errol
Morris, and many other notables.
Ben Affleck and wife Jennifer Garner on hand with their baby boy
and daughters, 6 and 3, were spotted having dinner in a Colorado
Avenue restaurant one evening,
and Garner was in the public library one afternoon en famille. No
nanny evident. Affleck joked in a
panel discussion that his children
loved riding the gondola up to
Mountain Village and that it’s a
good thing it’s free, or he’d be
broke.
The Telluride Film Festival is
hard work — 12-13 hours door to
door, starting with train to Newark
Airport, flight to Denver, small jet
to Montrose, CO, and 90 minutes
in a van to this beautiful mountain
Life-Changing: Marion Cotillard and
Matthias Schoenaerts
star in the French film
‘Rust and Bone.’
paradise. Then it’s trying to handicap the schedule of more than 40
programs over four days, deciding
what are your “must sees” and then
standing in line hoping to get in.
But it’s like mass hypnosis for the
approximately 4,000 film goers
who include staff, guests, filmmakers and volunteers. There’s only
one topic of conversation all weekend — the films.
Except for the opening night
banquet and the closing picnic,
most of us eat on the fly, never taking the time to sit down for a meal.
And while I, representing this
newspaper, am invited to several
events that feature celebrities, I
choose to skip them and spend the
time watching movies. And
though everyone is exhausted
when we leave, there’s no thought
of not coming back next year for
the 40th annual festival.
732-235-8522. www.cinjfoundation.org. For men 40 and
older. Register. Free. 5 to 8 p.m.
Caregiver Support Group,
Alzheimer’s Association, RWJ
Center for Health and Wellness,
3100 Quakerbridge Road, Mercerville, 609-396-6788. www.alz.org. Free. 6 p.m.
For Families
Wellness
For Parents
Dance for People with Parkinson’s Disease, DanceVision,
Forrestal Village, 116 Rockingham Row, Plainsboro, 609-5141600. www.danceforpd.org.
Dancers who trained with the
Mark Morris Dance Group and
Brooklyn Parkinson Group collaborate with DanceVision and
Parkinson Alliance to present a
movement class for people with
Parkinson’s disease and their
caregivers. Register. Free. 1 to
2:15 p.m.
Community Yoga, Four Winds
Yoga, 114 West Franklin Avenue,
Pennington, 609-818-9888.
www.fourwindsyoga.com. Jill
Gutowski leads an all level class.
$5 benefits Global Seva India initiative to stop human trafficking. 7
to 9 p.m.
Traditional and Integrative
Treatment for Aches and Pains,
Robert Wood Johnson Hamilton Center for Health and Wellness, 3100 Quakerbridge Road,
Mercerville, 609-462-4023. www.rwjhamilton.org. Program includes home exercises, physical
therapy prescription, acupuncture, and restorative injection
techniques. Register. $5. 7 p.m.
Breastfeeding Support, La
Leche League of Princeton,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, Plainsboro, 609-7991302. Information and support for
mothers and expectant mothers.
Babies are welcome. Free. 10
a.m.
History
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey
governor’s official residence.
Group tours are available. Register. $5 donation. Noon to 2 p.m.
Read to a Therapy Dog, South
Brunswick Library, 110
Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. For children with special
needs and their families. Register. 6 p.m.
Lectures
Chamber Breakfast, Princeton
Chamber, Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, Princeton, 609-9241776. www.princetonchamber.org. “The American Boychoir
School: Celebrating 75 Years as
One of the Finest in the World”
presented by Dean Orton, the
new president and CEO of the
school and the Princeton Center
for Arts & Education at the new
campus in Plainsboro. Register.
7:30 a.m.
Get Organized, Pennington Library, 30 North Main Street, Pennington, 609-737-0404. www.penningtonlibrary.org. Diane Dalton from Order in the House
shares tips on getting your house
in order including how to clear out
drawers, closets, rooms, and
garages. 11 a.m.
Woodrow Wilson School,
Princeton University, Robertson
Hall, Dodds, 609-258-0157. futureofchildren.org. “Americans
Under Attack: Libya, Egypt,
Yemen, and American-Muslim
Relations” presented by former
U.S. ambassadors Barbara K.
Bodine and Daniel Kurtzer. Both
are lecturers at Woodrow Wilson
School. 4:30 to 6 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
13
Opportunities
For Baby Boomers
Aging in Place offers “Preparing Today for Tomorrow: Discovering Your Home Care and Care
Giving Options,” a participatory
forum, on Saturday, October 20
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the South
Brunswick Senior Center on Route
522 in Monmouth Junction.
It is focused on “those who have
been caregivers, those who are currently caregivers, those who will
be caregivers, those who will need
caregivers.” The forum is designed
to encourage the boomer and sandwich generations to discover questions they didn’t know they needed
to ask. Topics include hospital discharge, problems and information
gaps, questions nobody asks, getting things in place; family support
and personal advocate, financial
planning, insurance, housing,
transportation, resources, and
more. The keynote speaker is Dr.
David Barile, director of goals of
care: offering new approaches for
treating older adults.
Register before Monday, October 15 to receive a free lunch. Email [email protected], visit www.aginginplacepartnership.org, or call
732-305-7079.
50th Anniversary
The Shakespeare Theater of
New Jersey offers a limited number of seats to “Oliver Twist” for
$19.63 to celebrate the theater’s
50th anniversary season. Call the
box office at 973-408-5600 or visit
www.ShakespeareNJ.org.
Volunteer Please
MercerAlliance will be hosting
a tax volunteer information open
house on Thursday, September 27,
Welcome to Medicare Seminar,
Mercer County Connection,
957 Route 33, Hamilton, 609890-9800. www.mercercounty.org. Information on options and
choices. Register. Free. 6 to 7:30
p.m.
Outdoor Action
Guided Wildflower Walk, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve,
River Road, New Hope, 215-8622924. www.bhwp.org. Daily walks
except Mondays. Register. $5. 2
to 3 p.m.
Schools
Open House, Saint Raphael
School, 151 Gropp Avenue,
Hamilton, 609-585-7733. www.srsnj.org. 9 to 11 a.m.
Open House, Destiny Arts Theater, 4 Tennis Court, Hamilton,
609-586-2787. www.destinyartstheater.com. Classes in acting,
voice, music, dance, musical theater, and visual arts for ages three
to adult. 6 to 8 p.m.
Singles
Divorced and Separated Support Group, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad
Street, Hopewell, 609-452-8576.
www.hopewellpres.org. Register.
Free. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Socials
Moving On After Moving In,
Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, 609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. Weekly study
group for women designed to
help in the process of letting go,
starting over, and moving ahead
with life after a move. Classes include videos, reading, and a discussion. Presented by Cheryl
Mart, a registered nurse; and
Karin Brouwer, who has lived in
five different countries in 25
years. Register. Free. 10:30 a.m.
from 1 to 2 p.m., or 4:30 to 6:30
p.m. at United Way Conference
Room, 3131 Princeton Pike, Suite
113, Building 4, Lawrenceville.
The Mercer Alliance to End Homelessness is seeking volunteers during the upcoming tax season to
staff free tax preparation sites
throughout Mercer County. Register by Monday, September 24, by
calling 609-844-1008.
To be a volunteer tax preparer
you must participate in a training
program offered in the fall. Information includes practical knowledge in tax law, the TaxWise software, as well as hands-on practice
completing tax returns. You will be
required to pass the IRS test in Link
& Learn on IRS.gov.
Seeking Singers
Lashir, the Jewish Community
Choir of Princeton, is accepting
new members to sing in Hebrew,
Yiddish, and Ladino. Rehearsals
are at the Princeton Jewish Center
on Nassau Street, Thursdays at
7:30 p.m. Experience in choral
singing required. E-mail [email protected] for information.
Call for Film
New Hope Film Festival has a
call for entries in art house feature,
music video, screenplay, webisode, short, documentary, MidAtlantic, and student categories.
Submit at www.newhopefilmfestival.com. Deadline is Friday,
December 28. The fourth annual
festival runs July 12 to 21. Decisions will be E-mailed by Monday,
April 15.
Musical Notes
National Choral Conference
will be held at the American Boychoir School Thursday to Saturday,
September 27 to 29. Music educators and choral conductors will
convene to discuss choral music
and to explore Bodysinging, a musical philosophy developed by
Therees Hibbard, celebrating music as an intuitive and visceral experience. $350. For more information E-mail [email protected]
Actors Needed
Theater to Go, a theater company based in Lawrenceville, seeks
experienced comic actors ages 18
and older to increase its pool of
performers for several upcoming
shows. Actors should have experience with improvisation, dinner
theater, interactive theater, a very
outgoing personality, access to reliable transportation, and a flexible
schedule. All the shows are scripted but require interacting with the
audience and using improvisational skills. The shows may include
day or overnight gigs in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and
Connecticut. All positions are paid
$85 per performance. Visit www.theatertogo.com for more information. E-mail headshot and resume
to [email protected] Auditions will be scheduled by appointment.
Donate Candy
Moms Club of Robbinsville
seek contributions of Halloween
candy to send to U.S. troops. Operation Gratitude compiles and distributes care packages to troops
overseas. Donations may be left in
the MOMS Club Operation Gratitude box at the Robbinsville Senior
Center from Thursday, November
1, to Wednesday, November 14.
For more information visit www.momsclubofrobbinsvilleeast.org.
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping,
Hunter Farms, 246 Burnt Hill
Road, Skillman, 609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Rider University,
Luedeke Center, Lawrenceville,
609-921-2663. www.rider.edu/arts. Artist’s talk in conjunction with “John Suler: Photographic Psychology: Forces That
Shape the Psyche,” an exhibition
of works by Suler, a writer, photographer, and professor of psychology at Rider. On view to October 14. 7 p.m.
Classical Music
Faculty Series, Westminster
Conservatory, Niles Chapel,
Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu.
“Troupe du Jour” concert with
Danielle Sinclair, soprano; Denise
Mihalik, mezzo soprano; and
Kathy Shanklin, piano. Free.
12:15 p.m.
Bach on Thursdays, Fuma
Sacra, Trinity Episcopal Church,
Wednesday, September 19, 7-10pm
Beer Dinner featuring Flying Fish Brewery
September 26, 6pm • Limited Seating
6 Courses $50
Central Jersey’s Premier Gastropub
137 Washington Street (Rt. 518) • Reservations: 609.683.8930
www.rockyhilltavern.com
CASH
Highest Price Paid
GOLD • DIAMONDS • SILVER
Gold Jewelry (can be damaged)
Sterling Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware
Tea Sets • Silver Coins • Gold Coins
Dental Gold • Diamonds ¼ Carat & Up
Rolex Watches
Trent Jewelers
Golf Tournament, Our Lady of
Sorrows, Mercer Oaks West Golf
Course, Village Road, West
Windsor, 609-587-5613. www.ols-sa,org. Annual event includes
golf, cart, gift, lunch, and dinner.
Shotgun start at 1 p.m. Register.
$125. 11 a.m.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Mental Art
Back for a Second Performance
With the Precious Metal Market
at an All-Time High, Now Is the Time to Turn
Broken Jewelry and Unwanted Items to CASH!
Sports for Causes
Thursday
September 20
True Acoustic - Mike Findeis & Chris Hoke
16 Edinburg Rd. at 5 Points • Mercerville, N.J.
609-5
584-8
8800
All That Jazz: Trumpeter Chris Botti
makes his State Theater debut, Friday,
September 21.
33 Mercer Street, Princeton, 609448-1113. Concert by a vocal ensemble specializing in music of
the Baroque era. Andrew Megill
conducts. Free. 12:30 p.m.
After Noon Concert, Princeton
University Chapel, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Sook Hyun Kim
from St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church on organ.
Free. 12:30 to 1 p.m.
Musicology Colloquium, Princeton University Department of
Music, Woolworth Center, 609258-2800. www.princeton.edu\music. “Stainless Staining: Some
of My Music” presented by Donnacha Dennehy, global scholar
and visiting lecturer. Free. 4:30
p.m.
Continued on following page
DISTINCTIVE FLORAL DESIGNS
Events ~ Weddings ~ Mitzvahs
Custom Holiday Décor Services
Richard J. Kisco
- designer dD
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609.512.1521 | c. 609.504.1941
[email protected]
www.richardsdfd.com
14
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
September 20
Continued from preceding page
Folk Music
Infamous Stringdusters, Blue
Ridge Mountain Sports, Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North
Harrison Street, Princeton, 609921-6078. www.brms.com. Bluegrass band performs in celebration of the 40th anniversary of the
independent outfitter.Free. 5 p.m.
tographer, and professor of psychology at Rider. On view to October 14. 7 p.m.
Architecture
Spotlight on the Humanities: Architecture Series, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Esther da
Costa Meyer, a professor of modern architecture at Princeton University, talks about Vienna circa
1900. Noon.
Live Music
On Stage
Arturo Romay, Luchento’s, 520
Route 33, Millstone, 732-4464800. 6 to 9 p.m.
Al Oliver, Nick’s Cafe 72, 72 West
Upper Ferry Road, West Trenton,
609-882-0087. www.cafe72nj.com. Gentle jazz featuring saxophone, flute, and vocals. BYOB.
No cover. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Arnie Baird, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 9 p.m.
As You Like It, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, Levin Theater, George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Students have recently returned from
a year’s study at Shakespeare’s
Globe in London. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Comedy about life
in Bucks County in a new play by
Christopher Durang. $20 to $72.
7:30 p.m.
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. “Know the
Show” at 7 p.m. 8 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Rider University,
Luedeke Center, Lawrenceville,
609-921-2663. www.rider.edu/arts. Artist’s talk in conjunction with “John Suler: Photographic Psychology: Forces That
Shape the Psyche,” an exhibition
of works by Suler, a writer, pho-
Oliver, Somerset Valley Players,
689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough,
908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Musical. $15. 8 p.m.
Film
Glenn Beck’s Unelectable 2012,
Fathom Events, AMC in Hamilton and Multiplex in East Windsor.
www.fathomevents.com. Political
commentary. 8 p.m.
Dancing
Country and Western Dance,
Bordentown Elks, 11 Amboy
Road, Bordentown, 609-2982085. Lessons. 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 732789-5272. vivatango.org. Class
and practice session. $12. 8 p.m.
Literati
Poetry Reading and Open Mic,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org.
Nancy Scott reads from “On Location,” her new collection of poems. 7 p.m.
Interactive Workshop, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. “Technology
to Enhance Reading and Writing
Skills” presented by Brian Meersma of West Windsor. A junior in
high school, he has been using
Just Moved In? Karin Brouwer, left, and Cheryl
Mart lead ‘Moving On After Moving In’ at Princeton
United Methodist Church on Wednesday mornings, September 19 through November 14.
assistive technology to overcome
his dyslexia since the third grade.
He demonstrates how to turn an
iPhone into a scanner, how to get
technology to read novels and
textbooks aloud, how to use spell
checks, and more. 7 p.m.
Faith
Sukkah Building Clinic, Jewish
Family & Children’s Service,
Home Depot, 701 Nassau Park,
West Windsor, 609-987-8100.
www.jfcsonline.org. One-hour
clinic presented by a building expert. Register. Free. 7 to 8 p.m.
Food & Dining
Wine Dinner, The Frog and the
Peach, 29 Dennis Street, New
Brunswick, 732-846-3216. www.frogandpeach.com. Dinner with
David Powell, founder and winemaker of Torbreck Vintners. Register. $110. 6:30 p.m.
Farm Markets
Capital City Market, East State
Street between Warren and
Broad streets, Trenton, 609-3938998. www.trenton-downtown.com. Vendors, fresh New Jersey
fruits and produce, music. 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
Princeton Farmers’ Market,
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com.
Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, workshops, music, and more. Rain or shine. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Health
Prostate Screening, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little
Albany Street, New Brunswick,
732-235-8522. www.cinjfoundation.org. For men 40 and
older. Register. Free. 5 to 8 p.m.
Prostate Screening, Princeton
HealthCare System, One Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro, 888-8978979. www.princetonhcs.org.
Confidential screening performed
by a board certified urologist.
Register. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.
Caregivers Support Group,
Alzheimer’s Association,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, Plainsboro, 609987-8121. www.alz.org. 6:30
p.m.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory
Corner Road, East Windsor, 609448-1330. www.mcl.org.
FODMAP Diet presented by Dr.
Jabbar Zafer and Jane Schwartz,
dietitian. Register. Free. 7 p.m.
Wellness
Qigong, Ruth A. Golush, Center
for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-426-9693. www.ruthagolush.com. Meditative energy exercises for balance. Register. $20. 10 to 11 a.m.
Meditation Group, Mercer Free
School, Lawrence Community
Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing
Road, Lawrence, 609-403-2383.
For all levels in a sharing experience. Register. 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.
Sajaja Meditation, West Windsor
Library, 333 North Post Road,
West Windsor, 609-799-0462.
www.mcl.org. Energy based meditation. Register. Free. 7:30 p.m.
For Families
Read to a Therapy Dog, South
Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction,
732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. For
children with special needs and
their families. Register. 4:30 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Lectures
Computer Classes, Ewing Library, 61 Scotch Road, Ewing,
609-882-3148. “Introduction to
Word.” Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Computer Seminar, Creative
Computing, Garden Theater,
160 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-683-3622. www.creativecomputing.com. “Mac in
Business” at 1 p.m. “iPad in Business” at 2:30 p.m. Register. Free.
1 p.m.
PC Clinic, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000.
www.sbpl.info. Bring your computer and power cord; monitor not
needed. Cure is not guaranteed.
No Macs. Register. Free. 7 p.m.
Schools
English as a Second Language,
Princeton Adult School, Princeton High School, 151 Moore
Street, 609-683-1101. www.princetonadultschool.org. In-person registration for ESL for
speakers of other languages. 7 to
8 p.m.
Book Sale
Ewing Library, 61 Scotch Road,
Ewing, 609-882-3130. Hard cover
books, $1; paperbacks, 50 cents.
4 to 9 p.m.
Singles
Dinner, Yardley Singles, Non Solo Pasta, 900 West Trenton Road,
Morrisville, PA, 215-736-1288.
www.yardleysingles.org. Italian
food. Register. 6 p.m.
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping,
Hunter Farms, 246 Burnt Hill
Road, Skillman, 609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday
September 21
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Seeing Stars
Backyard Astronomy, Washington Crossing State Park, Visitor
Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609.
Sky maps, constellations, the celestial sphere, and more. Presented by David Letcher and Gene
Ramsey of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton. Enter from Bear Tavern
Road. Free. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Folk Music
Christine DeLeon and Bob Andrews, Folk Project, Morristown
Unitarian Fellowship, 21 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown, 973-335-9489. www.folkproject.org. $7. 8 p.m.
Michael Smith, Princeton Folk
Music Society, Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane,
Princeton, 609-799-0944. www.princetonfolk.org. Musician, songwriter, poet, and commentator on
life. $20. 8:15 p.m.
Jazz & Blues
Chris Botti, State Theater, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick,
732-246-7469. www.StateTheatreNJ.org. Theater debut for
trumpeter and jazz instrumental
artist and an evening of contemporary jazz. $35 to $75. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk
Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. www.allaboutjazz.com. Solo jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m.
Music, Pizza, and Wine,
Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46
Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-
4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Wine by the glass
or bottle, brick oven pizza, and
cheese platters are available.
Darla and Rich play jazz. 6 to 9
p.m.
Arturo Romay, Villa Romanza,
429 Route 156, Hamilton, 609585-1717. www.villaromanzanj.com. 6 to 9 p.m.
Bob Egan, Bowman’s Tavern,
1600 River Road, New Hope, PA,
215-862-2972. www.bowmanstavernrestaurant.com. Open mic
and sing-a-long night. 8 p.m.
Dapp, Dublin Square Pub, 167
Route 130, Bordentown, 609298-7100. www.dublinsquare.pubs.com. 21 plus. Free.
10 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 12:30 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Artworks, 19 Everett
Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436.
www.artworkstrenton.org. Reception and art talk in conjunction
with “Visions and Vignettes,” an
exhibition by career development
program fellows from the Center
for Emerging Visual Artists. On
view to October 13. 5 to 8 p.m.
Windows of Soul, Sage Coalition, 219 East Hanover Street,
Trenton. www.sagecoalitionnj.com. Opening of a three-day arts
celebration by an artist collaborative in Trenton. The exhibit includes artwork from professional
and amateur artists who transform abandoned buildings into
works of art. Workshops, a block
party, and more. Through Monday, September 23. 6 to 10 p.m.
Student
Special!
3 Treatments for
(plus tax)
(40% Savings)
Offer good through 9/30/12
(Valid for one time only.)
A COMPLETE APPROACH
TO SKIN CARE
Let our medically trained staff help to not only treat
current skin conditions, but educate you on how
to prevent future breakouts.
The Aesthetics Center at
Princeton Dermatology Associates
Monroe Center Forsgate
5 Center Drive • Suite A
Monroe Township, NJ
609-655-4544
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15
Say Om: Amy Weintraub, author of several books on yoga, presents ‘Yoga for
Mood Management and Depression,’
Friday to Sunday, September 21 to 23, at
Princeton Center for Yoga & Health.
Clear Skin!
$235
U.S. 1
Dance
Rep at Rider, American
Repertory Ballet, Bart
Luedeke Theater, Rider
University, 732-249-1254.
www.arballet.org. Season
preview performance includes Douglas Martin’s
“Ephemeral Possessions,” Patrick Corbin’s
“Follia,” and more. $20.
7:30 p.m.
On Stage
Black Tie, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766.
www.off-broadstreet.com. Comedy by A.R. Gurney focuses on
manners and morals of the upper
class. Cast includes Barry
Abramowitz of Lawrenceville and
George Agalias of Hopewell.
$29.50 to $31.50 includes
dessert. 7 p.m.
As You Like It, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, Levin Theater, George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Students have recently returned from
a year’s study at Shakespeare’s
Globe in London. $15. 7:30 p.m.
The Best Man, Actors’ NET, 635
North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Gore Vidal’s
drama about backroom politics.
$20. 8 p.m.
Born Yesterday, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Comedy
by Garson Kanin about politics,
corruption, and the power of female persuasion presented by
Yardley Players. $16. Opening reception with the cast and crew follows the performance. 8 p.m.
Sweet Charity, Main Street Theater Company, 3018 Bordentown Avenue, Parlin, 732-5531153. www.smstc.org. Musical.
$20. 8 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Comedy about life
in Bucks County in a new play by
Christopher Durang. Nicholas
Martin directs. $20 to $72. 8 p.m.
Present Laughter, Playhouse 22,
721 Cranbury Road, East
Brunswick, 732-254-3939. www.playhouse22.org. Light comedy
by Noel Coward. $20. 8 p.m.
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. 8 p.m.
Oliver, Somerset Valley Players,
689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough,
908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Musical. $18. 8 p.m.
Continued on page 17
16
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
‘Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Spike’
T
he good news is that the
traditionally off-the-wall, irrepressibly playful playwright
Christopher Durang seems to not
only agree with most scholars of
literary literature that Anton
Chekhov’s plays, notwithstanding
their tragic implications, are essentially comedies, but also thinks that
some of the great Russian playwright’s most familiar characters
are worthy of an even more farcical
approach.
Just how funny they should be,
or are when scrambled up by Durang, is the question partially answered in his newest play, the often
entertaining and just as often perplexing “Vanya and Sonia and
Masha and Spike” (now having its
world premiere at the McCarter
Theater).
Here Durang has cleverly reimagined and reassembled a few of
the most familiar of Chekhov’s
characters for incarnation in a 21st
century family drama (using the
last word most generously).
But, as Durang emphatically
states in a program note that his
play is “not a parody,” it only takes
a few minutes in the company of
his characters to become keenly
aware of their unquestionably parodic posturing and predicaments.
There is the unhappy, bipolar Sonia
(Kristine Nielsen) who “pines” for
her emotionally passive, intellectually unfulfilled playwright step
brother Vanya (David Hyde
Pierce). There is their self-centered, glamorous, successful sister/actress Masha (Sigourney
Weaver) who resents being the
family bread-winner and effusively gushes over her incorrigibly narcissistic boy-toy lover Spike (Billy
Magnussen). Then there is the ranting and raving prognosticating
housemaid Cassandra (Shalita
Grant), who has been lifted from
Greek tragedy. Lastly, there is the
demure, young and unsophisticated girl-next-door Nina (Genevieve
Angelson) who, as you may guess,
is destined to get a lift from Spike.
The bad news, and it’s not all
that bad, is that the play’s default
setting is a wildly paradoxical
world, one in which Durang’s cartoonishly conceived characters only fitfully inhabit the Chekhov-induced orbit assigned to them with
any degree of reality. Unquestionably the starry cast that, despite the
sometimes over indulgent direction of Nicholas Martin, manages
to punctuate and penetrate the
rather insubstantial core of Durang’s text. Funny lines and funny
business constitute Durang’s game
plan with only an occasional time
out for a glimpse at a Chekhovianesque character who may or may
not be desperately trying to become flesh and blood.
With inclusions and illusions-aplenty to such familiar Chekhov
classics as “The Seagull,” “The
Cherry Orchard,” “Uncle Vanya,”
and “The Three Sisters,” “Vanya
and Sonia and Masha and Spike”
purports to revisit the Russian
playwright’s interest in such
themes as sibling rivalry, suppressed desires, and the possible
loss of the estate. More purposefully we are revisiting Durang’s oeuvre, where just being recklessly
inane and irrepressibly funny may
be enough.
The play is set in the present
with the action confined to the airy
morning room of a rustic farmhouse in Bucks County, PA. Handsomely designed by David Korins,
the wicker furnishings and generally unpretentious decor gives us a
fine perspective of the largely
stone home where, following the
death of their parents, Vanya and
Sonia have drifted into a kind of resigned inertia. There’s discontent
afoot from the start as Vanya and
Sonia squabble over who should be
serving whom coffee.
What’s a few smashed cups
hurled across the room in rage by
Nielsen, who, as the love-starved,
deliriously dotty Sonia reveals her
frustrations to her gay step brother? And who could be more
demonstrably deadpan in his response than Pierce, who has to remind her that “I march to a different drummer”? Being different is a
state that apparently goes unnoticed in this household, particularly when it comes to Cassandra, the
by-visions-possessed housemaid
who cannot refrain from shouting
out the latest doom-and-gloom
bulletin as soon as it hits her. The
role is played by a wonderfully
A terrific confrontation between Masha
and Sonia brings long
overdue bite and bark
to the play. But It is
climaxed by a bit of
unfunny shtick.
funny, and intentionally designated scene-stealing Ms. Grant.
Warnings can do little to stop the
intrusion of the maddeningly selfadoring, condescending Masha,
who, as played with a brilliant disregard for subtlety by the stunning
Ms. Weaver, has both good news
and bad news to share. Accompanied by her facetiously fawning
young lover, and up-and-coming
actor, Spike (played with a spirited
exuberance in an out of his clothes
by Magnussen), Masha brings two
bits of news: one is that they have
all been invited to a neighbor’s costume party, and two, the house has
to be sold to pay the bills. Also invited to attend, only because she
seems to hang around waiting to be
either discovered or seduced,
whichever comes first, is the pretty
young aspiring actress Nina (nice
work by Ms. Angelson).
While there are occasions for
laughter, the primary delight of
Durang’s play is watching the
quirky Nielsen inhabit a character
who drifts from melancholy to
mean, from desperation to hope
without losing her emotionally
tight grip on the play’s most complexly considered character.
Ranting & Raving:
Shalita Grant and
David Hyde Pierce
posture in Christopher Durang’s paradoxical world.
With regard for a play that is primarily character-driven — periodically off a cliff — one is likely to
be a little disappointed by the main
plot device — a costume party that
serves to bring Sonia the prospects
of a new life — no, not in Russia.
But we’ll take what we get as
Masha decides that they all go to
the party as characters from “Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
Splendid recreations by costume
designer Emily Rebholz from the
classic Disney cartoon feature get
their deserved laughs.
Some judicious pruning is in order for this giddy lark that lasted
two and one half hours on opening
night. Vanya has a long-winded,
wearisome tirade late in Act II
about “missing the past” that may
be a tour de force for Pierce, but is
a digressive, often incomprehensible, drag on the play. At the top of
Act II, a terrific confrontation between Masha and Sonia brings
long overdue bite and bark to the
play. It is, unfortunately, climaxed
by a bit of unfunny shtick.
I have great admiration for the
scarily hilarious, joyously perverse
sociopolitical rants that ignite so
many of Durang’s plays, such as
“Miss Witherspoon” (originally
produced at McCarter before it
moved to New York), “Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who
Love Them,” as well such early
gems as “The Marriage of Bette
and Boo” and “Beyond Therapy”
(to cite a few). If I most savor the
memory of his most gloriously deranged farce “Betty’s Summer Vacation,” “Vanya and Sonia and
Masha and Spike” is also likely to
linger on as well, perhaps longer
than I am willing to concede at this
time.
I will be anxious to see this play
again when it moves to Lincoln
Center’s Mitzi Newhouse Theater
— after additional attention has
been paid to pacing, length, and
content.
— Simon Saltzman
“Vanya and Sonia and Masha
and Spike”, through Sunday, October 14, Berlind Theater at McCarter, 91 University Place,
Princeton. $15-$75. 609-2582787.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
17
A U.S. 1 ADVERTISING FEATURE
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September 21
Continued from page 15
God’s Favorite, Villagers Theater, 475 DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-873-2710. www.villagerstheatre.com. Comedy by
Neil Simon based on the Book of
Job. $18. 8 p.m.
God of Carnage, West Windsor
Arts Council, 952 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 609-7161931. www.westwindsorarts.org.
Drama by Yasmina Reza presented by Shakespeare ‘70. $18. 8
p.m.
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “The
Hunger Games,” a film about two
teenagers based on a book by
Suzanne Collins. 6 p.m.
Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25
South Union Street, Lambertville,
609-397-0275. www.acmescreeningroom.ticketleap.com.
Screening of “360,” a dramatic
thriller about interconnected romantic life in the 21st century. $8.
7 and 9 p.m.
Dancing
Outdoor Dancing, Central Jersey Dance Society, Hinds Plaza,
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. No partner
needed. Surface is smooth stone.
Free. 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Friday Night Social, American
Ballroom, 1523 Parkway Avenue, Ewing, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com.
$15. 8 to 11 p.m.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11
p.m.
Karaoke Dance, American Legion Post 401, 148 Major Road,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3299861. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Literati
Fund for Irish Studies, Princeton University, Lewis Center,
185 Nassau Street, 609-2581500. www.princeton.edu/arts. “A
Feverish Place: Ireland and the
English Literati, 1920-1945” presented by Eve Patten, Trinity College in Dublin. 4:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Francis Dunnery, Arts Council
of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, 609-924-8777.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
Benefit concert by the singer
songwriter followed by “Age of
Aquarius” cocktail reception. In
conjunction with the 45th anniversary. Register. $45 includes a sixmonth membership in the ACP.
7:30 p.m.
Comedy
Comedy Night, HA Comedy Productions, Grovers Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771. www.heleneangley.com.
Joan Weisblatt, Teresa DeGaetano, Tim Hayes, and Allen Finn
perform. Helene Angley of West
Windsor hosts. Free. 8 p.m.
Comedy, Rock Salt Comedy
Theater, Black Box Theater, Mercer County Park Ice Skating Rink,
West Windsor, 732-690-8694.
www.rocksalttheatre.com. Grown
up comedy and Halloween comedy shows. Ages 13 and up. Flexible seating in a cabaret-like setting. $10. 8 and 9 p.m.
Food & Dining
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Hallmark Wine Series, Rat’s
Restaurant, Toad Hall Shop, 126
Sculptor’s Way, Hamilton, 609584-7800. www.groundsforsculpture.org. “Spanish Wines”
presented by Alan Hallmark,
Rat’s resident wine expert and
beverage manager. Wine tasting.
Register. $10 (will be applied to
optional dinner at Rat’s). 5:30
p.m.
Farm Markets
Farmers and Vendors Market,
Cranbury Township, Park Place
West, Cranbury, 609-273-4811.
Farmers feature produce grown
in New Jersey. Noon to 4 p.m.
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park,
Main Street. www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers,
baked goods, music, and area
vendors. Paddle boat rides in
Peddie Lake available. 4 to 8
p.m.
Mental Health
Yoga for Mood Management and
Depression, Princeton Center
for Yoga & Health, Orchard Hill
Center, 88 Orchard Road, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Workshop
presented by Amy Weintraub, author of “Yoga for Mood Management: Be More Than Your Mood
with Yoga” and director of the
LifeForce Yoga Healing Institute.
Introductory session, $45. Weekend seminar continues Saturday,
September 22, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m., and Sunday, 9 a.m. to noon,
$295. 7 to 9 p.m.
Wellness
Qigong, Ruth A. Golush, Center
for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-426-9693. www.ruthagolush.com. Meditative energy exercises for balance. Register. $20. 10 to 11 a.m.
Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Stretching
and relaxation techniques with
Ann Kerr. Register. 2:30 to 3:30
p.m.
For Families
Recruiting Event, Cub Scout
Pack 759, Queenship of Mary
Church, 16 Dey Road, Plainsboro, 609-799-3971. www.cubpack759.org. For boys in first
to fourth grades and their parents.
E-mail [email protected] for information. 7 p.m.
Lectures
Workshop, Princeton Photography Club, Johnson Education
Center, D&R Greenway Land
Trust, 1 Preservation Place,
Princeton, 732-422-3676. www.princetonphotoclub.org. “Photo
Suite 5.5” workshop presented by
onOne Software. Refreshments
and networking followed by program. 7:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
DEEPEN YOUR OWN YOGA PRACTICE
BY BECOMING A YOGA TEACHER!
Now enrolling for Fall 2012
Email [email protected]
for information
Suffering form Migraines?
Try Craniosacral Therapy to relieve migraine pain.
60 Minutes $160 ~ 90 Minutes $195
609-924-4800 . www.onsenforall.com
[email protected]
Onsen For All . 4451 Route 27 at Raymond Road
Princeton, NJ 08540
18
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
September 21
Continued from preceding page
Science Lectures
Backyard Astronomy, Washington Crossing State Park, Visitor
Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609.
Sky maps, constellations, the celestial sphere, and more. Presented by David Letcher and Gene
Ramsey of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton. Enter from Bear Tavern
Road. Free. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Annual Native Plant Sale, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, Johnson
Education Center, 1 Preservation
Place, Princeton, 609-924-4646.
www.drgreenway.org. Quart and
gallon sized containers from $5 to
$12. 3 to 6 p.m.
Shopping News
Book Sale, Ewing Library, 61
Scotch Road, Ewing, 609-8823130. Hard cover books, $1; paperbacks, 50 cents. 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Fall Celebration, Fleur De Lis Interiors and Furniture Consignment, 225 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown, 609-424-3006.
www.fleurdelisconsignment.com.
Wine and cheese. 6 to 9 p.m.
Book Sale, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Preview of
papersbacks, hard covers, children’s books, movies, and music.
$5; $20 for booksellers. 6 to 8:30
p.m.
Singles
Drop-In, Yardley Singles, The
Runway, Trenton Mercer Airport,
Ewing, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Music by Rick
and Kenny, dancing, and cash
bar. 9 p.m.
Socials
Princeton Chapter, Gotham City
Networking, Eno Terra, Route
27, Kingston, 609-577-7096.
www.gothamnetworking.com.
“Critical Issues in the Upcoming
Presidential Election” presented
by the chair of Mercer County’s
Democratic Party, and a delegate
to the Democratic Party convention. She plans to address electoral issues from a non-partisan
viewpoint. Register. 12:15 p.m.
Drum Circle
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org.
Practice facilitated by drummer
Mike Buriani. Bring your own
drum, shakers, gongs, bells, or
other percussion. Refreshments
served. Register. 4:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Brown Bag Discussion, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
www.princetonsenior.org. “Smart
Steps,” a step pedometer walking
exercise program, presented by
Suzanne Rose, Princeton Regional Health Department. Each
participant receives a pedometer
and walking log. Bring your own
lunch. Beverages and desserts
provided. Register. Free. Noon.
Men in Retirement, Princeton
Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
www.princetonsenior.org. Inaugural meeting of a new social
group for men who are making or
who have made the transition into
retirement. Free. 2 p.m.
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping,
Hunter Farms, 246 Burnt Hill
Road, Skillman, 609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday
September 22
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
One If By Land
The Militia Is Coming, Rockingham Association, Historic Rockingham, Route 603, Kingston,
609-683-7132. www.rockingham.net. Captain John Outwater’s
Company of the Bergen County
Militia Regiment visits for an encampment and trade fair. Camp
life, soldier tents and gear displays, open fire cooking, musket
firing demonstrations, everyday
crafts including leather, spinning,
sewing, and woodworking. Tours
of Rockingham. Refreshments
available. Donations invited. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Folk Music
Dala, Concerts at the Crossing,
Unitarian Church, 268 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road,
Titusville, 609-406-1424. www.concertsatthecrossing.com.
Canadian folk pop duo return for
their third appearance to celebrate the release of their latest
CD, “Best Day.” Sheila Carabine
and Amanda Walther created the
duo’s name by combining the last
two letters of each performers first
name. $20. 7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Music, Pizza, and Wine,
Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46
Yard Road, Pennington, 609-7374465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Wine by the glass
or bottle, brick oven pizza, and
cheese platters are available.
John Bastiani with pop rock. 6 to
9 p.m.
Dick Gratton and Linda Lee, Halo Pub, 4617 Nottingham Way,
Hamilton, 609-586-1811. Jazz
guitar and vocals from the Great
American Songbook. 6:30 to 10
p.m.
Deni Bonet Trio and Kevin John
Allen, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown, 609-324-0880.
www.the-record-collector.com.
$15. 7:30 p.m.
Eryn Shewell Duo, Americana
Diner, 359 Route 130, East Windsor, 609-448-4477. www.americanadiner.com. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Hub City Sounds, New
Brunswick Cultural Center,
Elmer B Boyd Park, Route 18,
New Brunswick. www.newbrunswickarts.org. Cimarrones present percussion driven
musical traditions of Puerto Rico.
Bring chair or blanket. Food available for purchase. Free admission. 5 p.m.
Pop Music
Veggie Tales Live!, Ocean Grove
Camp Meeting Association, 54
Pitman Avenue, 800-590-4064.
www.oceangrove.org. Bob, Larry
and your favorite Veggie friends
are coming to Ocean Grove in
their new God Made You Special
Live tour! $10 to $15. 3 p.m.
Art
Windows of Soul, Sage Coalition, 219 East Hanover Street,
Trenton. www.sagecoalitionnj.com. Workshops in conjunction
with a three-day arts celebration
by an artist collaborative in Trenton. The exhibit includes artwork
from professional and amateur
artists that transform abandoned
buildings into works of art. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. See story, page
29.
Baroque Specialists: Vocal ensemble Fuma
Sacra presents ‘Bach on Thursdays,’ September
20 at 12:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church in
Princeton.
Artist Lecture, Grounds For
Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Ming
Fay, creator of “Canutopia,” a
botanical utopia filled with oversized plants, seeds, and vines,
talks. Register. $5. 1 p.m.
Annual Juried Exhibition,
Phillips Mill, 2619 River Road,
New Hope, 215-862-0582. www.phillipsmill.org. Annual fall juried
exhibition featuring artists of the
Delaware Valley. Oils, watercolors, prints, mixed media, drawings, and sculpture. Through October 27. $4. 1 to 5 p.m.
Festival of the Arts, Plainsboro
Public Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Artists
demonstrate various art forms
and visitors are invited to create
art. Have your name written in
Chinese calligraphy on a bookmark, paint a big box, learn Chinese knotting, how to mold porcelain, embroidery, or pet portraiture. Musicians present lessons in
harmonica basics, handmade
drum from Senegal, and singing
in four part harmony with barbershop quartet. Watch dance performances and musical performances. Free. “A View from Below/
A View from Above,” an exhibit by
members of the library’s art
group, is on view. “Earthloom,” a
seven foot structure will be constructed by Boy Scout Troop 168.
Rain or shine. 1 to 5 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Stover Mill Gallery,
852 River Road, Erwinna, PA,
610-294-9420. “Brush and Chisel,” an exhibit of original paintings
and sculpture by Christine
McHugh and Ron Bevilacqua. 1
to 5 p.m.
Highlight Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m.
Anniversary Celebration, West
Windsor Arts Council, 952
Alexander Road, West Windsor,
609-716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org. Celebrate
the second anniversary with
hands-on visual and performing
arts events. Refreshments, art,
and more. Free. 2 to 4 p.m.
Dance
Rep at Rider, American Repertory Ballet, Bart Luedeke Theater,
Rider University, 732-249-1254.
www.arballet.org. Season preview performance includes Douglas Martin’s “Ephemeral Possessions,” Patrick Corbin’s “Follia,”
and more. $20. 2 p.m.
Dancespora, Passage Theater,
St. Michael’s Farm Preserve,
Hopewell, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. Trenton’s
professional contemporary dance
theater company focuses on
dancing for land, history, environment, and art. $20. 2:30 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
Political Comedy:
The Yardley Players
presents ‘Born Yesterday’ at Kelsey Theater, weekends September 21 to 30. Jen
Hanselman plays Billie Dawn and Joe Zedeny plays Paul Verrall.
On Stage
Film
Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25
South Union Street, Lambertville,
609-397-0275. www.acmescreeningroom.ticketleap.com.
Screening of “360,” a dramatic
thriller about interconnected romantic life in the 21st century. $8.
7 and 9 p.m.
Dancing
Jersey Jumpers, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Swing,
jitterbug, and lindy hop. Lesson
followed by an open dance. $12
to $17. No partners needed. Beginners welcome. 7 p.m.
Ballroom and Latin Dancing,
Joy2Dance Studio, 178 Route
206, Hillsborough, 908-431-5146.
www.joy2dance.com. Class followed by a social. For singles and
couples. $15. 7 p.m.
Literati
Writing a Novel, West Windsor
Library, 333 North Post Road,
West Windsor, 609-799-0462.
www.mcl.org. “Discover the Basic
Elements of Writing a Novel” presented by Kristin Gleeson, a
writer, artist, and musician from
Ireland. She will discuss the path
to publication as well as plotting,
characterization, dialogue, and
scene structure. Register. Free. 1
to 3 p.m.
Good Causes
Ladies Auxiliary Craft Show,
Hope Fire Company, 82 Route
526, Allentown, 609-259-3505. A
day of shopping. Free admission.
9 a.m.
Flea Market and Silent Auction,
Prudential Fox & Roach, 44
Princeton-Hightstown Road,
West Windsor, 609-915-0913.
www.prufoxroach.com. “For the
Love of Stacey” is a benefit for
Greater Philadelphia ALS Chapter in honor of one of the co-workers, a 55-year old Lawrenceville
woman being treated for ALS. Donations of items to sell and gift
cards from businesses to use in
the silent auction are invited. 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Fish Fry, First Baptist Church of
Princeton, John Street and Paul
Robeson Place, Princeton, 609902-6435. Benefit for the youth
council. $12 for dinner; $7 for
sandwich. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Benefit Day, Eldridge Park
School, Captain Paul’s Firehouse Dogs, 2230 Princeton
Pike, Lawrenceville, 609-6715561. Noon to 5 p.m.
Rangeela 11th Anniversary,
March of Dimes, High School
North, 90 Grovers Mill Road,
Plainsboro, 609-448-7620. www.marchofdimes.com/newjersey.
Annual benefit evening of food,
music, and dancing presented by
the youth volunteers from West
Windsor, Plainsboro, South
Brunswick, Robbinsville, Princeton, and Lawrenceville. The
repertoire blends South Asian tradition, Indian classical music, and
contemporary dance. Full dinner
from Palace of Asia. All proceeds
benefit the March of Dimes. $35
to $50. 4:30 to 8:30 p.m.
One Voice, Trenton Children’s
Chorus, D&R Greenway Land
Trust Barn, Preservation Road,
Princeton, 609-466-7997. www.trentonchildrenschorus.org.
Cocktails, silent auction, live music, and a performance by mem-
bers of the chorus. The dress
code is fall flair. Register. $100 to
$1,000. 5 to 7:30 p.m.
Benefit Galas
Eden by Moonlight, Eden
Autism Services, Greenacres
Country Club, 2170 Lawrence
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-9870099. www.edenbymoonlight.org.
Benefit for children and adults
with autism. Casino gaming, jazz
salon, dancing, open bar, and dinner buffet. Register. $150. 6:30 to
11:30 p.m.
Joseph A. Ricciardi, DDS, PC
Family, Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry
Gentle, Comprehensive Dental Care
Comedy
Tracy Morgan, State Theater, 15
Livingston Avenue, New
Brunswick, 732-246-7469. www.StateTheatreNJ.org. Debut of
stand-up comedian, actor from
“30 Rock” and “Saturday Night
Live,” and author of “I Am the New
Black.” $32 to $65. 8 p.m.
Recycling
Household Chemical and Electronics Waste Disposal Day,
Mercer County Improvement
Authority, John T. Dempster Fire
School, 350 Lawrence Station
Road, Lawrence, 609-278-8067.
www.mcia-nj.com. Aerosol cans,
household, car, and rechargeable
batteries, photographic chemicals, used motor oil and oil filters,
lighter fluid, propane gas tanks,
pesticides/herbicides, pool chemicals, paint thinner, stains and
varnishes, anti-freeze, driveway
sealer, gasoline, and insect repellents. Rain or shine. Must show
proof of Mercer County residency.
8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Continued on following page
HEALTHY LIVING
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. 2 and 8
p.m.
Phantom of the Opera, State
Theater, 15 Livingston Avenue,
New Brunswick, 732-246-7469.
www.StateTheatreNJ.org. Fullystaged production from Royal Albert Hall features more than 200
cast members, musicians, and luminaries involved with the production during the past 25 years.
HD presentation on a 46 foot
screen. $12. 2 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Comedy about life
in Bucks County in a new play by
Christopher Durang. $20 to $72.
3 and 8 p.m.
Black Tie, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766.
www.off-broadstreet.com. Comedy by A.R. Gurney focuses on
manners and morals of the upper
class. Cast includes Barry
Abramowitz of Lawrenceville and
George Agalias of Hopewell.
$29.50 to $31.50 includes
dessert. 7 p.m.
As You Like It, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, Levin Theater, George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Students have recently returned from
a year’s study at Shakespeare’s
Globe in London. $15. 7:30 p.m.
The Best Man, Actors’ NET, 635
North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Gore Vidal’s
drama about backroom politics.
$20. 8 p.m.
Born Yesterday, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community
College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Comedy
by Garson Kanin about politics,
corruption, and the power of female persuasion presented by
Yardley Players. $16. 8 p.m.
Sweet Charity, Main Street Theater Company, 3018 Bordentown Avenue, Parlin, 732-5531153. www.smstc.org. Musical.
$20. 8 p.m.
Present Laughter, Playhouse
22, 721 Cranbury Road, East
Brunswick, 732-254-3939. www.playhouse22.org. Light comedy
by Noel Coward. $20. 8 p.m.
Oliver, Somerset Valley Players,
689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough,
908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Musical. $18. 8 p.m.
God’s Favorite, Villagers Theater, 475 DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-873-2710. www.villagerstheatre.com. Comedy by
Neil Simon based on the Book of
Job. $18. 8 p.m.
God of Carnage, West Windsor
Arts Council, 952 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 609-7161931. www.westwindsorarts.org.
Drama by Yasmina Reza presented by Shakespeare ‘70. $18. 8
p.m.
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• Crowns, Bridges
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Gum Treatments
• Whitening
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• Implant Dentistry
• Digital X-Rays
• Nitrous Oxide
609-586-6688
Evening and Saturday Appointments Available
University Office Plaza II
3705 Quakerbridge Rd.
Suite 203 • Hamilton, NJ
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19
20
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Escaping the Nazis: A Family Lives to Tell
D
an Bauer, veteran arts promoter and
McCarter Theater’s communications director, will move from behind the scenes to center stage when he premieres and leads a discussion on his film “Leben um zu Sagen”
(Live to Tell) on Sunday, September 23, at
the Princeton Public Library.
The 30-minute documentary captures the
living memories of Bauer’s 100-year-old
grandmother, his father, and an 86-year-old
cousin and allows the family to tell how their
Viennese lives — and those of other Jews —
were altered by the 1938 Nazi annexation of
Austria and the uncertain life journey that the
family was abruptly forced to face.
After the screening, Bauer will host a discussion on the film and related issues with
Paul Winkler, executive director of the New
Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education,
and Susan Hoskins, executive director of the
Princeton Senior Resource Center.
Bauer’s new film reflects both his interest
and his past. “This is my third creative project that addresses the Holocaust. It was only
after a friend made that connection that I realized the Holocaust really impacted my
family history and my own life. Until then I
had not considered myself to be a third generation Holocaust survivor. In talking about
the film, my friend (Princeton-based attorney and painter Ryan Lilienthal) told me that
his grandparents had also lived in Vienna at
the time and that his grandfather, like mine,
had also been deported to Buchenwald Concentration Camp. Ryan encouraged me to
write to the Buchenwald Archives to ask for
copies of my grandfather’s documents, and it
was Ryan who introduced me to Paul Winkler,” notes Bauer.
While the publicist turned director says he
had a general outline and idea as to how to
approach this project, he was inspired by
viewing a YouTube video of Holocaust survivor Hanna Bloch Kohner on the 1953 television show “This is Your Life.” That popular program organized a half-hour production around an unsuspecting public figure
who would suddenly be placed before the
camera to encounter past friends, family
Calm Before the Storm: Dan Bauer’s
grandparents, right, on their wedding day
in 1932. Below: The family, including
Bauer’s father, right, who became
a pediatrician in America.
members, and a lifetime of memories before
a studio and television audience, often with
emotional responses.
Bauer credits McCarter’s corporate and
foundation relations manager and dramaturg
Emila LaPenta in helping him to shape his
questions in a way that would tell a story. He
also enlisted her to conduct the film’s interviews. “I wanted the interviews to sound
fresh and told to someone who had no prior
knowledge of these stories, and felt that there
would be a certain warmness in telling the
story to a young person. I really sense that
comes across in the film,” Bauer says.
Additional creative and production support came from associates Susan Wallner, an
award-winning television producer and editor, and Mary Conlon, a young filmmaker
and daughter of filmmaker Joe Conlon, who
worked with Wallner on NJN’s State of the
Arts and other programs.
While it took five months to finish the
documentary, Bauer says that the interviews
Stressed? Depressed?
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were shot in a single day. “I wanted to include my grandmother’s 86-year-old
nephew, Heinz Herling, in the video, and he
came to New Jersey from Toronto where he
lives for my grandmother’s 100th birthday
celebration,” says Bauer.
Among the many moving aspects to making this highly personal film, the director
said one especially stands out: the discovery
of family photos and documents that he never knew existed. Calling them a “treasure
trove,” Bauer says, “What amazes me is
these family photos survived the journey
from Austria to Holland to America, which
included stops in New Jersey, New York
City, Boston, and, eventually Brocton, NY.”
Bauer was raised in Amherst, NY, a suburb of Buffalo, 60 miles north of Brocton.
When he finished his theater studies at the
State University of New York in Binghamton
in the early 1980s, he joined McCarter. Since
then he has assisted with numerous productions as well as serving as a public relations
September 22
Continued from preceding page
Food & Dining
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Hunter Farms
Princeton, New Jersey
Quality Riding Lessons for Children and Adults
Winery Tours and Tasting,
Unionville Vineyards, 9 Rocktown Road, Ringoes, 908-7880400. Wine tasting begins at
noon. Tours at 1 and 2:30 p.m.
Bring a picnic basket. Free.
Noon.
Grand Opening, Gelavino Gelato, Princeton Shopping Center,
301 North Harrison Street, 609921-9200. Face painting from 1 to
4 p.m. Clown performance from 4
to 7 p.m. Opera performance at 7
p.m. Bouncy castle for the kids.
Free. 1 p.m.
Spaghetti Dinner, American Legion Post 401, 148 Major Road,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3299861. $10. 5 to 8 p.m.
Farm Markets
Buy 4 lessons get the 5th lesson free!
To redeem mention this ad and pay for the 4 lessons in full.
All 5 lessons must be used within a six week period.
Call 609.924.2932 today to schedule a lesson!
Visit www.hunterfarms.us for more information.
Program under the direction of International Coach and former
United States Equestrian Team Rider Andrew H. Philbrick
1315 The Great Road, Princeton, NJ . [email protected]
Farmers’ Market, Jamesburg
Revitalization Coalition, East
Railroad Avenue, Veterans Park,
Jamesburg, 732-512-7417.
www.ilovejamesburg.com. Produce, non-profit organizations,
and specialty vendors. 9 a.m. to 2
p.m.
Montgomery Friends of Open
Space, Village Shopping Center,
1340 Route 206 South, Skillman,
609-430-0805. www.montgomeryfriends.org. Produce,
poultry, eggs, beef, flowers,
herbs, pies, coffee, honey, and
more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
West Windsor Farmers’ Market,
Vaughn Drive Parking Lot,
Princeton Junction Train Station,
609-933-4452. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org. Produce, flowers, baked goods, and
music. Blue Jersey Band plays
swing gypsy jazz and bluegrass.
Yes, We Can food drive. Blood
pressure screenings. Register to
vote with League of Women Voters. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
consultant to such state-based organizations
as the New Jersey Jewish Film Festival,
Newark Black Film Festival, Nassau Presbyterian Church, Trenton Children’s Chorus,
and Passage Theater Company. He is also a
certified indoor cycling instructor and a tour
guide with Princeton Tour Company.
With a wife and two daughters, Bauer
maintains his professional and personal
commitments, especially collecting and creating family history. In a recent interview for
the business blog Job Talk, Bauer gave a hint
of what could be his next project:
“I envision doing another story with my
father in which he revisits Austria; he was
four when he left in 1938 . . . I think that this
would be an interesting project if my father
were open to doing it.”
— Dan Aubrey
Leben um zu Sagen, screening at the
Princeton Public Library Community Room,
Sunday, September 23, 2 p.m. Free. For information, visit www.princetonlibrary.org.
Gardens
Wellness
Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, River Road, New Hope,
215-862-2924. www.bhwp.org.
“The Amazing Aster Family” at 10
a.m. Register. $20. 10 a.m.
Community Health Fair, Epsilon
Upsilon Omega Chapter, Joyce
Kilmer School, 1300 Stuyvesant
Avenue, Trenton, 609-394-7632.
“Don’t You Wanna Dance?” features lessons and demonstrations
of Zumba, line dancing, ballroom
dancing, salsa, and more. Health
screenings for vision, hearing,
dental, body mass index, glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure. “Culturally Specific Dance
Movement to Combat Obesity”
workshop with panelists of nurses, doctors, dietitians, and more.
Free. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
T’ai Chi Ch’uan, Todd Tieger,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren,
Plainsboro, 609-439-8656. All
levels. Free. 10 a.m.
Prenatal Yoga, Yoga Above, 80
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. www.yogaabove.com.
$25. 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Insight Yoga, Yoga Above, 80
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. www.yogaabove.com.
Etan Boritzer leads a slow yoga
flow with stretching, strength, and
balance. $25 donation. 12:30
p.m.
GiCheon, Princeton Center for
Yoga & Health, Orchard Hill Center, 88 Orchard Road, Skillman,
609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Workshop on the ancient Korean mind-body practice
aimed at strengthening the body’s
healing power. Presented by
Melinda Sherwood who discovered the martial art while living in
South Korea. Register. $65. 1 to
4 p.m.
Insight Meditation Open House,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, Orchard Hill Center, 88
Orchard Road, Skillman, 609924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Sitting and walking meditation and mindfulness with James
Pritchett and Martha Elliot. Register. Free. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Health
Blood Drive, American Red
Cross, 707 Alexander Road,
West Windsor, 800-448-3543.
www.redcrossblood.org. 7 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
Blood Drive, New Jersey Blood
Services, Twist Yogurt, 84 Nassau Street, Princeton, 800-9332566. www.nybloodcenter.org.
Noon to 4:30 p.m.
Health Fair, Saint Peter’s Hospital, Buccleuch Park, Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, 609-497597. www.saintpetershcs.com/urgentcare. In association with
the Telegu Association, a Princeton-based organization. Health
screenings, seminars, car seat
safety, fitness, foot and ankle
problems, and thyroid and hormonal health. Fasting is not required for any test. Flu shot will be
available. Face painting, moonwalk, balloons, and refreshments
for children. Free. 1 to 5 p.m.
Mental Health
Yoga for Mood Management and
Depression, Princeton Center
for Yoga & Health, Orchard Hill
Center, 88 Orchard Road, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Workshop
presented by Amy Weintraub, author of “Yoga for Mood Management: Be More Than Your Mood
with Yoga” and “Yoga Skills for
Therapists: Effective Practices for
Mood Management,” and director
of the LifeForce Yoga Healing Institute. Weekend seminar focusing on learning strategies to alleviate depression and anxiety includes experiential yogic tools for
managing mood. Continues Sunday, September 23, 9 a.m. to
noon. $295. 9:30 a.m. to noon.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
History
The Militia Is Coming, Rockingham Association, Historic Rockingham, Route 603, Kingston,
609-683-7132. www.rockingham.net. Captain John Outwater’s Company of the Bergen
County Militia Regiment visits for
an encampment and trade fair.
Camp life, soldier tents and gear
displays, open fire cooking, musket firing demonstrations, crafts
including leather, spinning,
sewing, and woodworking. Tours
of Rockingham. Donations invited. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Guided Tours, Historic Society
of Hamilton, Historic John Abbott
II House, 2200 Kuser Road,
Hamilton, 609-585-1686. Tours of
the historic home. Donations invited. Noon to 5 p.m.
Fonthill Museum, East Court
Street and Swamp Road, Doylestown, 215-348-9461. www.fonthillmuseum.org. One hour
guided tour. Register. $15. 1 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Ellarslie, Trenton
City Museum, Cadwalader Park,
609-989-3632. www.ellarslie.org.
Opening reception for “Naturally
Man-Made, in Full View: The Art
of Le Corbeau,” a retrospective
featuring 53 sculptural items from
the artist known as le Corbeau. A
West Coast native, Guillemin
made jewelry while studying
forestry, and then moved on to
sculpture, and later furniture and
decorative objects. He adopted
the name le Corbeau while
spending time with Native Americans in Sante Fe. Each person
adopted a persona and his name
stuck. He moved east to work at
the Johnson Atelier, established
his own studio in 1985, and created a larger studio and metal production facility in Hopewell in
2007. On view to November 4.
Gallery walk with Guillemin on
Sunday, October 14. 7 p.m.
For Families
Canning, Howell Living History
Farm, 70 Wooden’s Lane, Lambertville, 609-737-3299. www.howellfarm.org. Canning and
cooking program focusing on surplus cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, and more. Sample the results and take home recipes. First
day of the farm’s annual corn
maze. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fall Family Fun, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrenceville, 609-924-2310.
www.terhuneorchards.com. Wagon rides, corn stalk maze, adventure barn, and music. Rain or
shine. Food available. Wine tasting. “Picture Perfect at Terhune
Orchards,” a photography exhibit,
on view. Mark Miklos and Raritan
Valley Ramblers with music from
noon to 4 p.m. $5 admission. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m.
COLD SOIL ROAD
PRINCETON, NJ 08540
Grasshoppers for Families,
Stony Brook Millstone Watershed, Kingsford Community
Room, 31 Titus Mill Road,
Hopewell, 609-737-7592. www.thewatershed.org. Register. $5.
11 a.m.
Lectures
Retirement Readiness Workshop for Women, YWCA
Princeton, Bramwell House, 59
Paul Robeson Place, Princeton,
609-497-2100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Hands on, personalized program for participants
within five years of retirement,
willing to commit to three consecutive Saturday sessions, and
homework between sessions.
The workshop is presented by
Kirsten R. Braley, CFP, to assess
retirement readiness, identify
sources of retirement income, develop a net worth statement, and
review tax and legal documents to
prepare a customized retirement
plan. Register. $40. 9 to 10:30
a.m.
Great Decisions Discussion Forum, Monroe Public Library, 4
Municipal Plaza, Monroe, 732521-5000. www.monroetwplibrary.org. “U.S. Exit from Iraq
and Afghanistan” discussed. Register. Free. 10:30 a.m.
Outdoor Action
Saturday Morning Birding, Mercer County Park Commission,
Mercer Meadows, Federal City
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-3030706. Visit birding hotspots with
Tyler Christensen. Bring binoculars. For ages 12 and up. Free.
8:30 a.m.
Annual Native Plant Sale, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, Johnson
Education Center, 1 Preservation
Place, Princeton, 609-924-4646.
www.drgreenway.org. Quart and
gallon sized containers from $5 to
$12. 9 a.m. to noon.
Lumberton Paddle, Gazebo,
Main and Landing streets, Lumberton, 609-937-5700. www.lumbertonpaddle.com. Rent a canoe ($15) or bring your own for a
one hour paddle down the Rancocas Creek. Bring your own life
vest if you bring your own watercraft. Village fair with food and live
music. Tours of the fire station.
Rain date is Sunday, September
23. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Field Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, National
Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine, 609737-0070. Led by Lou Beck and
Brad Merritt. Register. Free. 9
a.m.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-896-0546. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
609-924-2310
www.terhuneorchards.com
FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL
EVERY WEEKEND 10AM-5PM
September 15 ~ October 28
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Everything Pumpkin
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Van Kirk Farm Every Day 9-5
LOCAL BANDS EVERY WEEKEND
9.15
9.16
9.22
9.23
9.29
9.30
10.6
10.7
Daisy Jug Band
Daisy Jug Band
Mark Miklos &
Raritan Valley Ramblers
Tom and Jerry
Riverside
Jimmy Lee Ramblers
Mountain Heritage
Stormy Horizon
10.8 Jay Smarr
10.13 Mountain View
10.14 Heavy Traffic
Blue Grass Band
10.20 Borderline
10.21 The Bon Ton Lizard Sauce
10.27 Swingin’ Dixie
10.28 Looking 4 Directions
Farm Open Every DayBNQNr'SFF
Weekend Festival admission $5 (kids under 3 free)
No admission charge for Market, Tasting Room, Pick-Your-Own
U.S. 1
21
Family Nature Programs, New
Jersey Audubon, Plainsboro
Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road,
Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. www.njaudubon.org. “Wildlife of Plainsboro Preserve.” Register. $5. 3:30
to 5 p.m.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour
Company, Witherspoon and
Nassau streets, 609-902-3637.
www.princetontourcompany.com.
$20. 8 p.m.
Politics
Sustainable Princeton, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822.
www.princetonlibrary.org. “Sustaining Princeton as a Livable
Community” presented by members of Princeton Future and
mayoral candidates Liz Lempert
and Dick Woodbridge. 9 a.m.
Marc’s Place Coffee House,
Central Jersey Coalition
Against Endless War, Reformed
Church, 19-21 South 2nd Avenue,
Highland Park, 908-783-8880.
www.againstendlesswar.org. “Indecision 2012: A Lively Discussion of Electoral Politics” with
panel of Spook Handy, a supporter of the Obama campaign;
Joanne O’Neill, supporter of
Rocky Anderson for President
campaign; Greg Pason, candidate for U.S. Senate, Socialist
party; and Ken Wolski, candidate
for U.S. Senate, Green party. Poetry by Sam Friedman. Donations
invited. 7:30 p.m.
Schools
Open House, The Lewis School,
53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org.
Information about alternative education program for learning different students with language-based
learning difficulties related to
dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college preparatory levels. 10 a.m.
Shopping News
Yard Sale, Princeton Korean
Community Church, 95 Washington Road, West Windsor, 732549-3422. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Book Sale, Ewing Library, 61
Scotch Road, Ewing, 609-8823130. $3 per grocery bag. 9:30
a.m. to 5 p.m.
Book Sale, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Donations
are always welcome. 9:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Singles
Dance Party, Steppin’ Out Singles, East Brunswick Elks Club,
21 Oakmont Avenue, East
Brunswick, 862-397-4723. www.steppinoutsingles.com. For ages
40 plus. $15. 8 p.m.
Strummin’: Christine
DeLeon headlines at
the Folk Project in
Morristown, Friday,
September 21.
Sports
Princeton Football, Princeton
Stadium, 609-258-3538. Georgetown. 7 p.m.
Horse Show, Princeton Show
Jumping, Hunter Farms, 246
Burnt Hill Road, Skillman, 609924-2932. Spotted Toad Equestrian at the new facility. 8 a.m.
Sports for Causes
5K and One-Mile Fun Run,
Parkinson Alliance, 101
Carnegie Center parking lot, 800579-8440. www.parkinsonalliance.org. 5K begins at 9:30
a.m., $25. One-mile fun run begins at 9 a.m., $12. Refreshments, music, moon bounces,
face painting, a clown, door
prizes, and awards. $25. Tyco International receives the King
Award. Rain or shine. 7:30 a.m.
5K Race and Fun Walk, Friends
and Neighbors in Action,
Thompson Park, Monroe, 609371-1137. www.fna5k.com. Benefit to the trust fund of Jake and
Ben Swomiak. The boys, 11 and
13, both have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and attend Millstone Township Schools. Register
online. 9 a.m.
Gymnastics Day, Gymland, 6
Tennis Court, Hamilton, 609-5847700. Benefit for Children’s Miracle Network. Register. 1 p.m.
Sunday
September 23
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Celebrate Judaism
Gala Dinner, Chabad Mercer,
Princeton Marriott, Plainsboro,
609-252-0124. Dinner buffet reception honors Phyllis Marchand,
Tita and Paul Celler, David Newton, Sally Steinberg-Brent, and
Dan Brent. Awards to Chana and
Payam Hanian. Celebrate 20
years of social services, education, programming, worship, and
Jewish connection. Register.
$250. 5 p.m.
Classical Music
Contemporary Piano Miniatures,
Westminster Choir College,
Bristol Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane,
Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. “Music from 1990 to the
Present” with Marvin Rosen on piano. Free. 3 p.m.
Continued on page 24
22
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Land, Air, and Sea Meet Dance, Poetry, and Music
C
by Ilene Dube
omposer John Cage
believed music is everywhere in
the ordinary moments of life — we
just have to learn to hear it. Former
U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins
said pretty much the same of poetry. Great musicians, artists, and
choreographers have the gift to
tune in and share it with the rest of
us.
The D&R Greenway Land
Trust, an organization tuned in to
the art of land preservation, has selected a group of performing
artists who hear the sounds and
feel the movements of the earth to
perform in three inspirational venues.
DanceSpora, the resident dance
company of Passage Theater in
Trenton, will perform a commissioned contemporary dance about
the land on Saturday, September
22, at St. Michaels Farm Preserve
in Hopewell, and again at Cadwalader Park in Trenton on Saturday, October 6.
Six-time Grammy winners the
Paul Winter Consort will interweave music with the soul-stirring
words of poet Jane Hirshfield in
Music and Poetry of the Earth on
Wednesday, October 10, at the
Princeton University Chapel, followed by a meet-the-artists reception in Firestone Library.
The common thread is the
search for a kind of Shangri-La, a
place where animals live off native
vegetation, where the sounds of
nature can conduct their own music, a space where poetry can be inspired.
“I am very excited about performing in the magnificent chapel,
with its magical acoustics,” says
Paul Winter, whose music embraces the cultures and creatures of
the earth. “I have admired the work
of D&R Greenway since I had the
privilege of playing at the opening
of the Scott and Hella McVay Poetry Trail there in 2010. My collaborations with the McVays goes back
to the ’70s with our mutual interest
in whales and poetry, which we
then celebrated during 25 years of
collaborations at the Dodge Poetry
Festival.”
Winter has been listening to the
songs of the humpback whales
since the 1960s, and refers to them
as “the greater symphony of the
earth.” In that spirit, wolves, eagles, elk, loon, and others not only
become part of the Consort’s chorus, but help awaken music lovers
to the plight of endangered
species.
Winter has traveled by raft, dog
sled, horse, kayak, and tug-boat to
52 countries and wilderness areas
on six continents to record the
symphony of the earth. As artistsin-residence at the world’s largest
Gothic cathedral, New York’s St.
John the Divine, the Consort has
for three decades presented annual
Winter and Summer Solstice Celebrations, as well as its ecological
liturgical work, Missa Gaia/Earth
Mass. Winter has performed at major venues around the world, including Washington’s National
Cathedral, the Grand Canyon, and
the Negev Desert.
There should be a warning on
the Consort’s 2010 release, Miho:
Journey to the Mountain: Do not
listen to while operating a motor
vehicle. The sounds of soprano
sax, keyboard, various string instruments, and calls of the wild can
send the spirit soaring in a way that
can be more mind-altering than alcohol. The first 11 tracks are titled
“Many Paths to Paradise,” and the
final two, “Shangri-La.”
With the songs of cicadas, elephants, birds, even humans, the al-
bum is a tribute to the I.M. Pei-designed Miho Museum just outside
Kyoto, Japan. When Pei first visited the mountainous site, it reminded him of the landscape of his native China and the story of “Peach
Blossom Valley” –– a Shangri-La
where the villagers were peaceful
and hardworking, a land where
peach trees filled the air with fragrance. In the tale, the fisherman
who discovered this magical place
returned home, yet could never
again find Shangri-La.
In his design for the Miho, Pei
sought to create a kind of ShangriLa, with a curving road lined with
weeping cherry trees leading to it.
The D&R Greenway,
dedicated to the art of
land preservation, is
collaborating with
artists who hear the
sounds and feel the
movements of the
Earth.
It was only after the museum was
completed that Pei learned the valley it looks over is named Peach
Valley.
“My experience of the Miho
was one of exaltation, the kind of
feeling I’ve usually known only
from places in nature,” Winter
writes. “I have never before fallen
in love with a building. The antiquities of the museum’s collection
come from ancient cultures
throughout Asia and represent a
kind of chronicle of the human
journey.”
The museum had just the kind of
acoustic spaces in which the Consort specializes in playing. A kiva
–– an octagonal stone room with a
large open air hole in the ceiling ––
had a similar reverberation to the
Cathedral of St. John the Divine.
The album reflects the museum’s
interweaving of ancient and con-
temporary, of art and nature, East
and West.
The voices serve as spirit guides
for the listener’s imaginary journey across the vast landscapes of
Asia, writes Winter. “These introspective soliloquies are meant to
awaken a mode of deep listening in
which the journey can be realized.”
Paradise, by any other name, is
not so much a space, but a state of
being, concludes Winter. The ensemble includes oboe, sarangi (a
short-necked 42-string cello), English horn, saxophone, koto (a 16thcentury stringed instrument, the
national instrument of Japan), keyboard, and more.
The Consort’s newest work
launched in spring, Flyways, celebrates the miracle of the great bird
migration from Africa through the
mid-East to Eurasia. It explores indigenous musical traditions from
each of the cultures over which the
animals fly, interwoven with the
vocalizations of some of these 350
species of migrating birds.
Winter and Hirshfield first performed together at the 2008 Dodge
Poetry Festival. This year Hirshfield will be a featured poet at the
Festival at NJPAC in Newark, October 11 and 12, making a stop in
Princeton to perform in Music and
Poetry of the Earth.
Born in New York City in 1953,
Hirshfield graduated from Princeton University in the first class to
include women, in 1973. After
publishing her first poem, she put
aside poetry to study for eight years
at the San Francisco Zen Center. “I
felt that I’d never make much of a
poet if I didn’t know more than I
knew at that time about what it
means to be a human being,” she
has said. “I don’t think poetry is
based just on poetry; it is based on a
thoroughly lived life.”
She uses short forms, spare
lines, and imagery of natural and
domestic settings, and her poems
find the sacred in the everyday and
frequently hinge on a turning point
or moment of insight.
Soulful Sounds: Poet Jane Hirshfield and the
Paul Winter Consort combine words and music
for Music and Poetry of the Earth, Wednesday,
October 10, at the Princeton University Chapel.
“My primary interest has always
been the attempt to understand and
deepen experience by bringing it
into words,” she has said. “Poetry,
for me, is an instrument of investigation and a mode of perception, a
way of knowing and feeling both
self and world.I am interested in
poems that find a clarity without
simplicity.”
H
irshfield has written nine
collections of poetry, an anthology
of women poets who throughout
history praised the sacred, and a
group of essays on entering the
mind of poetry, among other
works. She was featured in two of
Bill Moyer’s PBS television specials, Fooling With Words and
Sound of Poetry, and was elected a
Chancellor of the Academy of
American Poets in 2012.
Hirshfield’s most recent volume, “Come Thief,” evokes a common theme of Buddhist parables:
Welcoming the thief. “Come, thief,
the path to the doorway agrees,”
she writes in the title poem.
“All paths welcome whatever
wants to walk on them. The person
delivering the mail comes down
the path, the thief comes down the
path,” she said in an interview
taped by Voice of America. “Your
beloved comes down the path.
Your enemy comes down the path,
and the path never chooses. The
path says yes to it all.”
The real thief is time. The passage of time includes falling in
love, weddings, lost love, death.
“Time which brings us everything
that we will ever experience and
takes from us everything that we
will ever experience, and one of
the main threads of this book is
simply saying ‘yes’ to that
process.”
The work of poetry, she says, is
to make us permeable not only to
the experiences inside us, but what
goes on all around us.
Dancescapes New Jersey is a
world premiere contemporary
dance about and on the land. It will
begin with a choice of three walks
focused on nature, history, or poetry through the landscape, as well as
the sounds of live acoustic music
and bird song.
“People are inspired to care
about the environment in different
ways,” says Linda Mead, president
and CEO of the D&R Greenway.
“Some respond to scientific facts;
others respond to the beauty and
experience of nature. D&R Greenway has always connected to the
aesthetic in bringing people to our
work. Art, dance, performance,
and experiences on the land feed
the soul –– and open up creative
ways of thinking about how we as
individuals can make a difference.”
Passage Theater Company producer Kacy O’Brien and executive
artistic director June Ballinger say
they enjoy the partnership they
have had with D&R Greenway
since 2007. “It’s a win-win,” says
Ballinger. “The conservation
groups and land trust partners give
us access to new audiences, and
this gives them something different
to offer their constituency.
“DanceScapes is a further installment in Passage’s continuing
attempt to show that the arts — particularly live performance — offers an accessible and immediate
delivery system to reach more marginalized folks to learn about conservation,” Ballinger adds. “I
know I don’t go out of my way to
learn about the latest updates and
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
news on the environment, but if I
learn something from a story —
particularly a live, well told story
or something I can watch and be
delighted by — I will definitely
learn and remember and talk about
it at dinner parties, where I’ll have
more ears than if I recite facts from
an article or a white paper.”
“This year, we had a desire to
bring environmentally themed art
back to the land that inspired it,”
says O’Brien. “It spurred us to
unite town and country by performing in both Trenton’s historic
Cadwalader Park and the St.
Michaels Farm Preserve, which
D&R Greenway helped to protect.
The partnership with D&R Greenway allows us to work together to
share the story of conservation in
an entertaining way, and offers the
opportunity for all ages and backgrounds to enjoy these wonderful
parks.”
DanceSpora choreographs original works that fuse ballet and contemporary movement. Artistic directors Heidi Cruz-Austin and
David Austin met when she was
dancing for the Pennsylvania Ballet (the two are married and have
four children who sometimes perform Hip Hop with them).
David Austin, who grew up in serving the elements of nature.
Trenton, was familiar with Cad- “Dancers will portray Wind, Wawalader Park, Trenton’s “central ter, and Vine in a trio,” she says.
park” designed by Frederick Law “Each dancer approaches moveOlmsted. He remembers when El- ment in a different way to convey
larslie Mansion, now the home of the character.” There will be a duet
the Trenton City Museum, was a of trees coming to life. “It’s the
monkey house, and he recalls see- first time they’ve moved,” she
ing “the oldest living bear in cap- says.
tivity” in a cage near the building.
In an opening section, “Seed,”
Heidi, who grew up in Allen- women will be planting and paying
town, Pennsylvania, and David homage to the land while a man is
took a tour of St.
fertilizing. AnMichaels Farm
other section,
Preserve with
“Sun
and
‘We had a desire to
Greenway vice
Moon,”
will
bring environmenpresident
Jay
show the maletally themed art back
Watson
and
female balance.
learned about its
“It’s a celebrato the land that inhistory as an ortion of everyone
spired it,’ says Pasphanage and the
coming togethsage Theater proeffort to save it
er,” she says.
for open space
Speaking of
ducer Kacy O’Brien.
and recreation.
coming togethIn conversaer, DanceSpora
tions with O’Brien, Austin learned recently displayed its blend of balabout his own values of the land let, modern dance, jazz, contempoand its beauty: his relatives all had rary movement, Hip Hop and
farms, which exposed him to the house dancing this past summer at
land as a child, and he fondly re- Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in
members playing in creeks.
Beckett, Massachusetts. The perTo choreograph DanceScapes, formance was also on an outdoor
Heidi spent time at Cadwalader stage, one against the Berkshire
Park, finding the right spot, ob- Mountains.
U.S. 1
23
DanceSpora: Passage Theater’s resident dance
troupe will give performances at St. Michaels Preserve on September 22 and Cadwalader Park on
October 6, fusing ballet and contemporary
dance to represent the elements of nature.
Additionally, Heidi recounts
how she and David were professional partners before they became
romantic partners. “Our two styles
were so different, but I believed we
could create something out of
that,” she says. Her father, from
the Dominican Republic, was a
professional Dominican dancer,
and David’s mother, Wanda
Austin, ran the Capital City Dance
Company in Trenton. In the 1970s
Austin was one of Trenton’s Bboys, and from 2003 to 2007
danced with renowned Hip-Hop
troupe Rennie Harris Pure Movement.
“DanceScapes will take on two
different energies,” says Austin.
“But both will show that the land is
beautiful.”
Music and Poetry of the
Earth, Princeton University
Chapel. Wednesday, October 10,
7 p.m. A meet-the-artists reception
in Firestone Library follows from
8:30 to 9:30 p.m. with drinks and
dessert to benefit the D&R Greenway’s programs. $15 general admission to concert, $35 reserved
seating, $75 reserved seating at
concert and reception. Call 609924-4646 for reserved seating at
the reception. For tickets: 609258-9220,
www.princeton.edu/utickets, or in person at the Frist Campus Center
Ticket Office, Monday to Friday,
noon to 6 p.m.
DanceSpora, St. Michaels
Farm Preserve, Hopewell. Saturday, September 22, 2:30 p.m. Rain
date is Sunday, September 23. $20.
www.passagetheatre.org or 609392-0766.
DanceSpora,
Cadwalader
Park, Trenton. Saturday, October
6, 2:30 p.m. Rain date is Sunday,
October 7 $20. www.passagetheatre.org or 609-392-0766.
24
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
September 23
Continued from page 21
Jazz & Blues
Jarret Gilgore Quartet, Michener
Art Museum, 138 South Pine
Street, Doylestown, 215-3409800. www.michenerartmuseum.org. $25 includes museum admission. 3 p.m.
Sunday Jam, Trenton Marriott, 1
West Lafayette Street, Trenton,
609-915-9278. The Matthew
Whitaker Trio featuring the 11
year-old blind Hammond B-3
player and the Latin jazz sounds
of Luis “Loudmouth” Camacho.
$20 to $25 includes food or first
drink. 3 to 7 p.m.
Live Music
Jazzy Sundays, Hopewell Valley
Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Wine by the glass or bottle, brick
oven pizza, and cheese platters
are available. Ashley Pettitt presents jazzy pop. 2 to 5 p.m.
House Concert, Candlelight
Concerts for Epilepsy Awareness, Pennington. candlelightconcert.org. Young Dubliners performs. Register. Free will donation. 8 p.m.
3 Red Red Crowns, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 9 p.m.
Art
Windows of Soul, Sage Coalition, 219 East Hanover Street,
Trenton. www.sagecoalitionnj.com. Block party, performance by
Black Collar Biz, and art installation in conjunction with a threeday arts celebration by an artist
collaborative in Trenton. The exhibit includes artwork from professional and amateur artists that
transform abandoned buildings
into works of art. 1 to 6 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Stover Mill Gallery,
852 River Road, Erwinna, PA,
610-294-9420. “Brush and Chisel,” an exhibit of original paintings
and sculpture by Christine
McHugh and Ron Bevilacqua. 1
to 5 p.m.
Gallery Talk and Highlight Tour,
Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-2583788. artmuseum.princeton.edu.
Free. 2 p.m.
On Stage
Black Tie, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766.
www.off-broadstreet.com. Comedy by A.R. Gurney focuses on
manners and morals of the upper
class. Cast includes Barry
Abramowitz of Lawrenceville and
George Agalias of Hopewell.
$29.50 to $31.50 includes
dessert. 1:30 p.m.
The Best Man, Actors’ NET, 635
North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Gore Vidal’s
drama about backroom politics.
$20. 2 p.m.
Born Yesterday, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Comedy
by Garson Kanin about politics,
corruption, and the power of female persuasion presented by
Yardley Players. $16. 2 p.m.
Sweet Charity, Main Street Theater Company, 3018 Bordentown Avenue, Parlin, 732-5531153. www.smstc.org. Musical.
$20. 2 p.m.
As You Like It, Mason Gross
School of the Arts, Levin Theater, George Street, New
Brunswick, 732-932-7511. www.masongross.rutgers.edu. Students have recently returned from
a year’s study at Shakespeare’s
Globe in London. $15. 2 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.-
mccarter.org. Comedy about life
in Bucks County in a new play by
Christopher Durang. $20 to $72.
2 and 7:30 p.m.
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. 2 and 7:30
p.m.
Oliver, Somerset Valley Players,
689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough,
908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Musical. $18. 2 p.m.
God’s Favorite, Villagers Theater, 475 DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-873-2710. www.villagerstheatre.com. Comedy by
Neil Simon based on the Book of
Job. $18. 2 p.m.
Present Laughter, Playhouse 22,
721 Cranbury Road, East
Brunswick, 732-254-3939. www.playhouse22.org. Light comedy
by Noel Coward. $20. 8 p.m.
Film
Live To Tell, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “Live to
Tell (leben um zu zagen),” a documentary by Dan Bauer, McCarter
Theater’s publicist. The 30minute film focuses on his family’s
journey from 1938 Austria as told
through the eyes of his 100-year
old grandmother, his father, and a
cousin, all of whom talk about
how their lives were changed
when the Nazis took over Vienna.
A panel with Bauer, Paul Winkler,
executive director of the NJ Commission on Holocaust Education,
and Susan Hoskins, executive director of the Princeton Senior Resource Center. 2 p.m.
Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25
South Union Street, 609-3970275. www.acmescreeningroom.ticketleap.com. Screening of
“360,” a dramatic thriller about interconnected romantic life in the
21st century. $8. 5 p.m.
Dancing
Tango and Salsa, Joy2Dance
Studio, 178 Route 206, Hillsborough, 908-431-5146. www.joy2dance.com. Argentine tango
class at 5 p.m. Salsa and bachata
at 6 p.m. No partner needed. $15.
5 p.m.
Literati
New Jersey Storytelling
Festival, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Annual
festival features storytellers presenting programs throughout the
day for children, families, and
adults. Story slam with improvisational tellings in five minutes or
less. Two storytelling workshops
at 10 a.m. include “Imaginations
Take Flight” by Michele Belluomini for teachers and students; “The
Irish Storytelling Traditions” by
Yvonne Healy. Rain or shine. $12.
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Writing for Your Life, Center for
Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Writ-
Back for More: Pop
duo Dala returns to
Concerts at the
Crossing, Saturday,
September 22.
ing workshop presented by Susan Van Dongen, a writer, journalist, editor, author, and spiritual
seeker. An avid student of metaphysics, she has studied astrology since childhood. She wrote
“Houses: A Contemporary Guide,”
part of series published on astrology by Llewellyn Publications, under the pen name of Gwyn Bryan.
Register. $40. 2 to 5 p.m.
Author Event, Princeton Jewish
Center, 435 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-921-1944. www.thejewishcenter.org. Alicia Suskin
Ostriker reads from and discusses “The Book of Life: Selected
Jewish Poems, 1979-2011,” her
newest collection. A Princeton
resident, she leads writing workshops and teaches in the MFA poetry program at Drew University. 4
p.m.
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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Benefit Galas
Outdoor Action
Gala Dinner, Chabad Mercer,
Princeton Marriott, Plainsboro,
609-252-0124. Dinner buffet reception honors Phyllis Marchand,
Tita and Paul Celler, David Newton, Sally Steinberg-Brent, and
Dan Brent. Awards to Chana and
Payam Hanian. Celebrate 20
years of social services, education, programming, worship, and
Jewish connection. Register.
$250. 5 p.m.
Original Mind Zen Sangha, Fellowship in Prayer, 291 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. www.originalmindzen.com. Zen meditation and Buddhist services.
Free. 6:45 to 9 p.m.
Field Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, Featherbed
Lane, Hopewell, 609-737-0070.
Bird banding led by Mark Witmer
and Hannah Suthers. Register.
Free. 8 a.m.
Hike, Princeton Ski Club, Plainsboro Preserve, Scotts Corner
Road, 609-588-4737. www.princetonski.org. Search for
plants, birds, and flowers. Register. 1 p.m.
Bike Hike, Washington Crossing
State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. Guided
bicycle ride up the towpath towards Lambertville for pre-teens
and up (13 mile round trip). Bring
a bike and helmet. Register. 1:30
p.m.
Blood Drive
Singles
Princeton Jewish Center, 435
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609921-1944. www.thejewishcenter.org. Walk-ins welcome. Donors
should be between 16 and 76 and
have a photo identification. E-mail
[email protected] for an
appointment. 8 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
A Walk in the Park, Yardley Singles, Washington Crossing State
Park, Titusville, 215-736-1288.
www.yardleysingles.org. Meet in
front of public restrooms in picnic
area. Weather permitting. Dine at
It’s Nutts Restaurant. 4 p.m.
mouth Junction, 732-821-6196.
Gallery talk in conjunction with
“Through the Camera’s Eye,” a
photography exhibit featuring
works by Bob Ambrosio, Michael
Derer, Bill Hoo, and John Sandstedt.” Camera club meeting follows. Free. 6:30 to 9 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Gallery at Mercer
County College, Communications Center, West Windsor, 609586-4800, ext. 3589. www.mccc.edu. Gallery talk in conjunction
with “Robert Hane and the Big
Idea.” On view to October 4. 7 to
3 p.m.
Meeting, South Brunswick Arts
Commission, Public Works
Building, 540 Route 522, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000.
www.sbarts.org. 7 p.m.
Horse Show
On Stage
Latin Dance Technique,
Joy2Dance Studio, 178 Route
206, Hillsborough, 908-431-5146.
www.joy2dance.com. Class. No
partner needed. $15. 7 p.m.
Wellness
Princeton Show Jumping,
Hunter Farms, 246 Burnt Hill
Road, Skillman, 609-924-2932.
Spotted Toad Equestrian at the
new facility. 8 a.m.
Lend Us Your Ears Play Reading
Series, Shakespeare Theater of
New Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater,
Drew University, Madison, 973408-5600. www.shakespearenj.org. Reading of “Wittenberg” by
David Davalos. $15. 7 p.m.
Open House, Literacy Volunteers in Mercer County, 3535
Quakerbridge Road, Suite 104,
Hamilton, 609-587-6027. www.uih.org. Mini workshop for literacy
Faith
Classes, Onsen For All, 4451
Route 27, Princeton, 609-9244800. www.onsenforall.com. Introduction to yoga at 9:15 a.m.
Gentle yoga at 10:25 a.m. Multilevel yoga at 11:30 a.m. Register.
$15 each. 9:15 a.m.
Yoga in the Museum, Ellarslie,
Trenton City Museum, Cadwalader Park, 609-989-1191.
www.ellarslie.org. “Recharge
Body and Spirit” presented by
Christine Donahue. Bring your
own mat. Register. $15. 5 to 7
p.m.
Earth Gong Bath, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Immersion in the sound of the gong.
Register. $25. Bring a mat, blanket, pillow, and thick socks. 6 to
7:30 p.m.
Sports for Causes
5K, Gold’s Gym, 4152 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609275-8900. www.goldsgymlawrencevillenj.com. Benefit for
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer
County. Food, DJ, face painting,
massages, and more. Register. 8
a.m.
New Hope Lambertville AIDS
Walk, Fact Bucks County, 609537-7081. www.factbuckscounty.org. 9 a.m.
Monday
September 24
History
Market and Muster Day, Washington Crossing State Park,
Washington Crossing Historic
Park, Route 32, Washington
Crossing, PA, 215-493-4076.
www.washingtoncrossing.org.
Witness colonial townspeople at
the market place and soldiers
marching and firing muskets,
hand historic crafters sell their
wares. Face painting, hayrides, a
pie contest, and puppet shows.
$8. Rain or shine. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Guided Tours, Historic Society
of Hamilton, Historic John Abbott
II House, 2200 Kuser Road,
Hamilton, 609-585-1686. Tours of
the historic home. Donations invited. Noon to 5 p.m.
History Presentation, Kuser
Farm Mansion, 390 Newkirk Avenue, Hamilton, 609-890-3630.
“White City Lake and Broad
Street Park” presented by Tom
Glover includes pictures, articles,
and information about the historic
part of Hamilton. Bring a chair
cushion or a lawn chair. Register.
Free. 1 p.m.
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University. $7; $4 for
ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4 p.m.
For Families
Fall Family Fun, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrenceville, 609-924-2310.
www.terhuneorchards.com. Wagon rides, corn stalk maze, adventure barn, and music. Rain or
shine. Food available. Wine tasting. “Picture Perfect at Terhune
Orchards,” a photography exhibit,
on view. Tom and Jerry with music
from noon to 4 p.m. $5 admission.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Reading for Adults
Open House, Literacy Volunteers in Mercer County, 3535
Quakerbridge Road, Suite 104,
Hamilton, 609-587-6027. www.uih.org. Mini workshop for literacy
tutors is a refresher for existing
volunteers and an introduction for
new people. Refreshments. Tour
the office. New training sessions
begin on October 15. Free. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Classical Music
Musicology Colloquium, Princeton University Department of
Music, Woolworth Center, 609258-2800. www.princeton.edu/music. “Listening to Schumann,
Listening to Heine” presented by
Don Randel, president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Free.
4:30 p.m.
Rehearsal, Voices Chorale, Music Together, 225 PenningtonHopewell Road, Hopewell, 609924-7801. www.musictogetherprinceton.com. Register. 7:30
p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, 112 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732-4693983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members
are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
Rehearsal, New Jersey Gay
Men’s Chorus, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street,
Princeton. www.njgmc.org. New
members are welcome to join the
all inclusive, non-discriminatory
chorus. E-mail
[email protected] for information. 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Art
Camera Club, South Brunswick
Arts Commission, Municipal
Building, 540 Ridge Road, Mon-
U.S. 1
25
Of ‘30 Rock’ Fame:
Tracy Morgan presents his stand-up routine, Saturday, September 22, at 8 p.m.
at the State Theater.
Dancing
Literati
tutors is a refresher for existing
volunteers and an introduction for
new people. Refreshments. Tour
the office. New training sessions
begin on October 15. Free. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free Write, Trenton Writes, Trenton Library, 120 Academy Street,
Trenton, 609-392-7188. trentonlib.org. An opportunity to write on
randomly selected topics for 20
minutes and share results in a
supportive space. Free. 6 p.m.
Continued on following page
26
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
September 24
Continued from preceding page
Food & Dining
Wine 101, Crossing Vineyards
and Winery, 1853 Wrightstown
Road, Washington Crossing, PA,
215-493-6500. www.crossingvineyards.com. “Wines of the
World” presented by Eric Cavatore, sommelier. Register. $30.
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Farm Markets
Robbinsville Farmers’ Market,
Routes 33 and 526, Robbinsville.
Local produce, honey, eggs, beef,
pickles, baked goods, wine, barbecue sauce, and pet treats. Email [email protected] for information. 3 to 7:30 p.m.
Mental Health
The Push Group, Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 465 Paxton
Avenue, Hamilton, 609-291-0095.
For men and women with anxiety
disorders. Free. 7 p.m.
Wellness
Fall Prevention and Awareness
Day, Robert Wood Johnson
Hamilton Center for Health and
Wellness, 3100 Quakerbridge
Road, Mercerville, 609-584-5900.
www.rwjhamilton.org. Program
about preventing serious falls includes information about balance
and blood pressure screenings
and exercise classes. Free. 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Gentle Yoga, Heart to Heart
Women’s Health Center, 20 Armour Avenue, Hamilton, 609-6893131. Gentle alignment-focused
class includes elements of
breathing, basic yoga postures,
and meditation techniques. Register. $15. 7 to 8 p.m.
For Teens
College Bound, Now What?,
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Information about making informed choices about a career
path. Panel with Alex Freund,
founder of Landing Expert Career
Coaching; Holly Bull, of the Center for Interim Programs; Paul
Scutt, of Princeton Learning Cooperative; and Suzanne Cunningham, gardening teacher at the
Waldorf School. 7 p.m.
Computer Class
Ewing Library, 61 Scotch Road,
Ewing, 609-882-3148. “Internet
Basics.” Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. www.groversmill-
Tall Tales: Yvonne Healey presents ‘The Irish
Storytelling Traditions,’ Sunday, September 23,
at the New Jersey Storytelling Festival at
Grounds For Sculpture.
coffee.com. Drop in for soups,
sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee, and conversation. Register at
http://ht.ly/3gd9w 6:30 to 8 p.m.
For Seniors
Memoir and Creative Writing,
Hamilton Public Library, 1 Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr. Way, 609581-4060. hamiltonnjpl.org. Introduction for writing and sharing life
experiences. Register by E-mail
to [email protected]
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Job Search Strategies for Older
Workers, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road,
East Windsor, 609-448-1330.
www.mcl.org. Focus on the
changing structure of the job market, ageism in the job market, using the Internet for job searches
and networking, and how to avoid
scams on the Internet. Register.
Free. 7 p.m.
Tuesday
September 25
Yom Kippur begins at sunset.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
En Francais
French Theater Festival, Princeton University, Lewis Center,
185 Nassau Street, 609-2581500. www.princeton.edu/arts.
“French Theater Today,” a panel
discussion moderated by Florent
Mass, department of French and
Italian, at 4:30 p.m. “La Derniere
berceuse” presented by Louis
Arene at 7 and 9 p.m. Register by
E-mail to [email protected]
Free. 4:30 p.m.
Sports for Causes
Pop Music
Golf Outing, Isles, Springdale
Golf Club, 1895 Clubhouse Drive,
Princeton, 609-341-4739. www.isles.org. Golf, lunch, cocktails,
dinner, and awards. Register online. $400. 10:30 a.m.
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449. www.menwhosing.org. Men of all ages
and experience levels are invited
to sing in four-part harmony. The
Doctor. Donor.
non-profit organization presents
at numerous charities. Free. 7:30
to 10 p.m.
Art
Meeting, New Hope Art League,
Gold Light Studios, 30 Bridge
Street, New Hope. www.newhopeartleague.com. “Color Theory” presented by Neilson Carlin,
founder of Studio Rilievo in Kennet Square, Philadelphia. Carlin
seeks a volunteer model for a portrait. Free. Noon to 9 p.m.
On Stage
French Theater Festival, Princeton University, Lewis Center,
185 Nassau Street, 609-2581500. www.princeton.edu/arts.
“French Theater Today,” a panel
discussion moderated by Florent
Mass, department of French and
Italian, at 4:30 p.m. “La Derniere
berceuse” presented by Louis
Arene at 7 and 9 p.m. Register by
E-mail to [email protected]
Free. 4:30 p.m.
Now Theater Company, West
Windsor Arts Council, 952
Alexander Road, West Windsor,
609-716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org. The new series of play readings focuses on
the development of original plays
written by area residents Ian August, Lynne Elson, James Christy,
and EM Lewis. The theater company was founded in 2011 by Elson and Scott Langdon, a Plainsboro resident and an Equity actor.
Reading of “Put Them Away,” a
drama about a child, his parents,
and the FBI, by James Christy.
$6. 7 p.m.
Oleanna, Bristol Riverside Theater, 120 Radcliffe Street, Bristol,
215-785-0100. www.brtstage.org.
Drama by David Mamet focuses
on a professor, a student, and
sexual politics. $30 to $34. Preview performance. 7:30 p.m.
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. 7:30 p.m.
Dancing
...Believer.
Rachel P. Dultz, MD
Breast Surgical Specialist, LLC
Ballroom and Latin Dancing,
Joy2Dance Studio, 178 Route
206, Hillsborough, 908-431-5146.
www.joy2dance.com. Learn to
dance. No partner needed. $22. 7
p.m.
International Folk Dancing,
Princeton Folk Dance, Riverside
School, 58 Riverside Drive,
Princeton, 609-921-9340. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Ethnic
dances of many cultures and
countries using their original music. Beginners welcome. For all
ages. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3. 7 to 9
p.m.
Good Causes
She gave to the Design for Healing
Campaign to build a new hospital.
Meeting, Allies, 1262 WhitehorseHamilton Square Road, Hamilton,
609-689-0136. For adult volunteers with hobbies or interests to
share with adults who have developmental disabilities. Register
with Linda Barton. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
You can too.
Faith
www.princetonhcs.org/foundation 609-252-8710
Follow us on Facebook at Princeton HealthCare System Foundation
or Twitter @PHCSFoundation
Yom Kippur Services, Center for
Jewish Life, Princeton, 609-2583635. www.princeton.edu/hillel.
Reform at Nassau Presbyterian
Church at 6:30 p.m.; conservative
at Richardson Auditorium, 6:15
p.m.; orthodox at CJL, 6:20 p.m.
Register. $180. 6:20 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Yom Kippur Services, String of
Pearls, Unitarian Universalist
Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill
Road, Princeton, 609-430-0025.
www.stringofpearlsweb.org. Kol
Nidre. 7:30 p.m.
Yom Kippur, Temple Micah, Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church,
Route 206, 609-921-1128. www.temple-micah.org. Kol Nidre service. No tickets or membership required. 8 p.m.
Mental Health
NAMI Connection, NAMI Mercer,
3371 Brunswick Pike, Suite 124,
Lawrenceville, 609-799-8994.
www.namimercer.org. Support
group for people affected by mental illness. E-mail [email protected] for information. 7
to 8:30 p.m.
For Families
Read and Pick Program, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-9242310. www.terhuneorchards.com. “Tractors.” Register. $5 per
child. 9:30 and 11 a.m.
Lectures
Meeting, Princeton PC Users
Group, Lawrence Library, 2751
Route 1 South, 609-423-6537.
www.ppcug-nj.org. Free. 7 p.m.
Schools
Open House, Destiny Arts Theater, 4 Tennis Court, Hamilton,
609-586-2787. www.destinyartstheater.com. Classes in acting,
voice, music, dance, musical theater, and visual arts for ages three
to adult. Wellness program for
adults and teens features Zumba,
yoga, meditation, and Reiki. 6 to
8 p.m.
Singles
Pizza Night, Yardley Singles,
Vince’s, 25 South Main Street,
Yardley, PA, 215-736-1288.
www.yardleysingles.org. Register. 6 p.m.
Public Speaking
Mid-Day Toastmasters, Robbinsville Library, 42 AllentownRobbinsville Road, Robbinsville,
609-585-0822.
4139.toastmastersclubs.org.
Members meet for prepared and
impromptu speeches to improve
as speakers and as leaders.
11:30 a.m.
Public Speaking for the Shy, Introverted, or Anxious, Speaking That Connects, Eileen N.
Sinett Communications, 610
Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro,
609-799-1400. www.speakingthatconnects.com. Develop
speaking confidence through lifechanging skills with Eileen N.
Sinett, author of “Speaking That
Connects.” Register. $50. 7 to 9
p.m.
Socials
Meeting, Rotary Club of Plainsboro, Guru Palace, 2215 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732213-0095. www.plainsbororotary.org. 7:30 p.m.
Trivia Night
Pure Restaurant and Lounge,
3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-0770. www.pureprinceton.com. Drink and appetizer specials, prizes. 8 to 9
p.m.
For Seniors
Coffee Talk, PEAC Fitness, 1440
Lower Ferry Road, Ewing, 609883-2000. www.peachealthfitness.com. “Kin Sin Jyutsu:
Healing Ourselves with Accupressure” presented by Kerry
Kay, a holistic healing practitioner. Register. Free. 11:15 a.m.
Memoir Writing Workshop,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township, 609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Introductory course for seniors to reflect on a significant life
experience and put it on paper.
Facilitated by Maria Okros. E-mail
[email protected] Register.
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday
September 26
Yom Kippur.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT:
Dizzy Yet?
Classic Film Series: Alfred
Hitchcock, South Brunswick
Library, 110 Kingston Lane,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3294000. www.sbpl.info. “Vertigo,”
1958. Free. 6:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Soundtracks, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Princeton
Public Library, 609-497-0020.
www.princetonsymphony.org.
“The Art of China, Past and Present” presented by Caroline Harris, curator of education and academic programs at the Princeton
University Art Museum, focuses
on the museum’s extensive Chinese art collection. Refreshments. Free. 7 p.m.
Rochelle Ellis, Westminster
Choir College, Bristol Chapel,
101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu. Solo
recital by soprano. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Live Music
Arturo Romay, Jester’s, 233
Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown,
609-298-9963. www.jesterscafe.net. 6 to 9 p.m.
Open Mic, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
On Stage
French Theater Festival, Princeton University, Lewis Center,
185 Nassau Street, 609-2581500. www.princeton.edu/arts.
“Hope” presented by Victoire
DuBois at 6 p.m. “Faust” presented by Elie Triffault at 8 p.m. Register by E-mail to [email protected] Free. 6 p.m.
Oleanna, Bristol Riverside Theater, 120 Radcliffe Street, Bristol,
215-785-0100. www.brtstage.org.
Drama by David Mamet focuses
on a professor, a student, and
sexual politics. $30 to $34. Preview performance. 7:30 p.m.
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), 91 University Place,
Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Life in Bucks County in a new play by Christopher
Durang. $20 to $72. 7:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
U.S. 1
27
At the Movies
Mainstream Movies
Confirm titles, dates, and times
with theaters.
2016 Obama’s America. Documentary. AMC, Multiplex.
The Amazing Spiderman. Action with Andrew Garfield playing
the role of Peter Parker. AMC.
Arbitrage. Drama about business stars Richard Gere. Montgomery.
Barfi. Hindi drama. Multiplex,
Regal.
The Bourne Legacy. Thriller
with Jeremy Renner as Aaron
Cross. AMC, Destiny, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
The Campaign. Comedy with
Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis.
AMC, Destiny, MarketFair, Multiplex.
Celeste and Jesse Forever.
Film about a divorcing couple stars
Andy Samberg and Rashida Jones.
Multiplex.
Chicken with Plums. Poulet
aux prunes. Montgomery.
The Cold Light of Day. Thriller
with Bruce Willis. AMC, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
The Dark Knight Rises. Christian Bale portrays Bruce Wayne
and Batman. AMC, Destiny, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog
Days. Based on the novel. AMC,
Multiplex.
Dredd. Bloody thriller. AMC,
Destiny, Regal.
The End of Watch. Jake Gyllenal in police drama. AMC, Destiny, Regal.
The Expendables 2. Violence
with Sylvester Stallone. AMC,
Destiny, Multiplex, Regal.
Finding Nemo 3D. Animated
film is now in 3D. AMC, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Hit & Run. Romantic comedy
with Kristen Bell and Bradley
Cooper. AMC, Destiny.
Hope Springs. Comedy with
Meryl Streep and Steve Carell.
AMC, Multiplex.
House at the End of the Street.
Opens Friday, September 28.
Multiplex.
Ice Age: Continental Drift.
Animated comedy with the voice
of Ray Romano. AMC, Destiny.
The Intouchables. Biopic
about a wealthy man from France
and his caretaker. Montgomery.
Last Ounce of Courage. Drama about a family who loses a father, son, husband in war. MarketFair, Regal.
Lawless. Western drama with
Tom Hardy and Guy Pearce. AMC,
Destiny, MarketFair, Multiplex,
Regal.
Life is Beautiful. Teluga romantic comedy. Multiplex.
Marvel’s The Avengers. Sci-fi
action with Robert Downey Jr.
Destiny.
Moonrise Kingdom. Drama
with Bruce Willis, Bill Murray, and
Frances McDormand. Multiplex.
The Odd Life of Timothy
Green. Sci-fi comedy with Jennifer Garner. AMC, Destiny, Regal.
ParaNorman. Animated with
voice of Casey Affleck. AMC, Destiny, Multiplex, Regal.
Pitch Perfect. Musical with
Elizabeth Banks. AMC.
The Possession. Thriller with
Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra
Sedgwick. AMC, Destiny, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Premium Rush. A bike messenger and a dirty cop. AMC.
Resident Evil. The horror continues. AMC, Destiny, MarketFair,
Multiplex, Regal.
Samsara. Documentary filmed
in 25 countries. Montgomery.
Sleepwalk with Me. Semi-autobiographical story about Mike
Birbiglia. Garden, Montgomery
Fish Flick: ‘Finding
Nemo,’ back in theaters in 3D, is now
playing.
Sparkle. Drama with music
stars Whitney Houston with Jordin
Sparks as her daughter. AMC, Destiny.
Ted. Comedy with Mark
Wahlberg. AMC.
Trouble with the Curve. Clint
Eastwood portrays an aging baseball scout. Destiny, Regal.
Unconditional. Drama with
Lynn Collins and Michael Ealy.
AMC.
The Words. Drama about a
“writer” stars Bradley Cooper.
AMC, Garden, MarketFair, Multiplex, Regal.
Venues
AMC Hamilton 24 Theaters, 325
Sloan Avenue, I-295 Exit 65-A, 888262-4386.
Destiny 12, 2465 South Broad
Street, Hamilton, 609-888-1110.
Garden Theater, 160 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-683-7595.
MarketFair-UA, Route 1 South,
West Windsor, 609-520-8960.
Montgomery Center Theater,
Routes 206 and 518, Rocky Hill,
609-924-7444.
Multiplex Cinemas Town Center
Plaza, 319 Route 130 North, East
Windsor, 800-315-4000.
Regal Theaters, Route 1 South,
New Brunswick, 732-940-8343.
28
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
SINGLES
MEN SEEKING WOMEN
WOMEN SEEKING MEN
WOMEN SEEKING MEN
51 year old handsome, unmarried,
US raised & educated professional
from India interested to meet an Indian/south Asian girl between 40-49 years
of age for long term relationship & marriage. I look much younger than my age.
I am interested in healthy lifestyle, good
food, arts, music, movies, sight-seeing, etc. Please reply with phone number and/or e-mail. Box 238308
Mature African American Women
seeking gentlman over 60 for companionship, day trips, vacations and walking
the beach. If you would enjoy the friendship of a lady that is active and fun loving
please drop me a line with contact information and a photo if available. Box
235462
Told I’m beautiful by everyone, not
marriage-minded, young, 50s, passionate about animals, highly educated,
own home and am retired. If you are
beautiful too, in heart, mind, and
physique, I’m interested in knowing you.
Let’s share further details in future days
of fun. By the way, I’m Caucasian, Anglo-Saxon of English descent. If you are
the same, similar, or of Spanish descent, I welcome your response. Box
238322
Confirmed bachelor 6’4”, blonde,
young 50s, retired, is hoping to be
pleasantly surprised by a zaftig woman
who loves animals as I do, who can
draw me out of my shell, who can expect
to be treated well, and who enjoys dry
humor (so my sister says.) I may just be
the prize at the bottom of the CrackerJacks box. I’ll be your Sir Lancelot and
you’ll be my Lady Guinevere. Box
238323
Handsome but short retired engineer/novelist from India, living in central NJ, looking for someone interesting
lady who loves to travel, the arts and
NYC. I want to travel the globe, from
Aregentina to Zambi, and of course
Antarctica. I am 68, look sixty-one-and a
half with energy of a man forty and a
half. As for the travels, I will pick up a lion’s share. History and politics are my
passion. I am a liberal, an atheist and a
humanist and love animals. Don’t bother if you are a conservative. Box
238299
SWM 6’1” 45 Handsome man with no
kids, clean cut, looking for a woman, 4050 years old, friendly, nice, understanding. No drugs, no alcohol, good companion. Send picture with ideal first
date. Box 238312
Naughty and Nice 59-year-old white
lady, attractive, fun loving. Seeking her
Prince Charming for a lifetime of happiness. I have a great sense of humor and
love to smile. I am seeking a gentleman
59 to 62 years old, tall, medium weight,
who is easy to get along with and can
put a smile on my face. White or bluecollar worker ok, and above-average
looking. Prefer someone clean-cut. I enjoy moonlit walks, dining in or out, dancing, movies, and oldies music. Please
respond only if serious. Enclose note
and phone number. No e-mail. Let’s
have fun. Box 237369
Tennis anyone? After a lengthy hiatus, I am getting back into it and am looking for a patient and competitive partner
to hit balls with in Thompson Park in
Jamesburg/Monroe Township before
the days get too short and the weather
gets too cold. I am 5’5”, a 55 year old single Jewish professional woman who is
passionate about dogs, especially rescues. I am well-educated, with a great
sense of humor, love to read and keep
up with current events; especially business news, the stock markets and politics. I have no children, but don’t mind if
you do. Whether the glass is half full or
half empty is of absolutely no consequence to me. Please be a non-smoker,
except I love the smell of good cigars;
and within 10 years of my age either
way, at least 5’8”, intelligent, well-read,
and financially secure. Let’s play soon,
so send me a note with photo! Box
236864
When you see me you won’t be disappointed! 25 yr old seeking mature,
educated, chivalrous professional who
is between 28-35 yrs old for the possibility of a blossoming romantic relationship. All the scaredy cats can now run
along (smile). In search of someone
who lives alone and is also financially independent. I am a single, petite, Jamaican with a great sense of humor.
Prefer polished, passionate, renaissance gentleman who enjoys one
woman at a time. I enjoy music, travel,
deep conversation, fine dining, and all
athletic activities. Interested in an emotionally secure, 5’11” or taller, athletic
build, who loves to cook. If you’re still
reading this and intrigued, send me an
email with your best photo. Box 238298
HOW TO RESPOND
How to Respond: Place your note in
an envelope, write the box number on
the envelope, and mail it with $1 cash to
U.S. 1 at the address below.
HOW TO ORDER
Singles By Mail: To place your free
ad in this section mail it to U.S. 1, 12
Roszel Road, Princeton 08540, fax it to
609-452-0033, or E-mail it to [email protected] Be sure to include
a physical address.
We W ill PURCHASE Your GOLD
and JEWELRY ON THE SPOT!
Gold • Silver • Platinum
Sterling Silver • Coins
You Can Trade In Your Metals
for Store Merchandise at a Discount Price!
September 26
Continued from preceding page
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist,
Shakespeare Theater of New
Jersey, F.M. Kirby Theater, Drew
University, Madison, 973-4085600. www.shakespearenj.org.
New Jersey debut of adaptation
by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Brian
B. Crowe. $32 to $70. 7:30 p.m.
Film
Classic Film Series: Alfred
Hitchcock, South Brunswick
Library, 110 Kingston Lane,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3294000. www.sbpl.info. Screening
of “Vertigo,” 1958. Free. 6:30
p.m.
Dancing
Newcomer’s Dance, American
Ballroom, 1523 Parkway Avenue, Ewing, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com.
$10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Literati
Writers Workshop, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Beth
Plankey leads the group. 5 p.m.
Yom Kippur Services
Center for Jewish Life, Princeton, 609-258-3635. www.princeton.edu/hillel. Reform at
Nassau Presbyterian Church at
10 a.m. and 5 p.m.; conservative
at Richardson Auditorium, 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m.; orthodox at CJL, 9:15
a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Register.
$180. 9 a.m.
Har Sinai Temple, Hopewell Valley High School, 259 PenningtonTitusville Road, Pennington, 609730-8100. www.harsinai.org.
Morning service begins at 10 a.m.
Junior congregation service for
children in grades 3 to 6 at 12:30
p a.m. Young children’s service at
3:15 p.m. Yizkor service at 4:30
p.m. 10 a.m.
String of Pearls, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry
Hill Road, Princeton, 609-4300025. www.stringofpearlsweb.org. Morning service includes
yizkor. Children’s service at 11
a.m. Afternoon workshops begin
at 1:45 p.m. Evening services begin at 6:15 p.m. Break fast community potluck at 7:30 p.m. 10
a.m.
Temple Micah, Lawrenceville
Presbyterian Church, Route 206,
609-921-1128. www.temple-micah.org. Regular service at 10
a.m. Yiskor at 12:30 p.m. Informal
discussion at 3 p.m. Family service at 4:15 p.m. Concluding service at 5:15 p.m. Break fast follows. No tickets or membership
required. Child care available. 10
a.m.
For Families with Special
Needs, Congregation Beth
Chaim, 329 Village Road East,
West Windsor, 609-799-9401.
www.bethchaim.org. Musical and
interactive service designed to be
accessible and sensitive to a variety of needs. Open to members
and non-members of all ages.
Free. 2 to 3 p.m.
Faith
Tuesday - Saturday
10-5:30 pm
Closed Sun. & Mon.
Model Seder Dinner, First Presbyterian Church of Titusville,
48 River Drive, Titusville, 609737-1385. www.titusvillechurch.org. Dinner followed by conversation about mission work in the Democratic Republic of Congo presented by Elsie McKee, a professor at Princeton Theological
Seminary. Raised in Congo, she
is the daughter of a missionary.
$5. 7 p.m.
Food & Dining
104 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542
(609) 924-1
1363 • www.ForestJewelers.com
Cornerstone Community
Kitchen, Princeton United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer Street, Princeton,
609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals served, prepared by TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Farm to Table Dinner, Slow
Food Northern New Jersey,
Fosterfields Living Historical
Farm, Morristown. www.slowfoodnj.org. Farmer Rob
Kibbe presents a five-course organic dinner. Music by Paul Meyers from his latest CD, “Welcome
Home.” Register online. $155. 5
to 8 p.m.
Health
Establishing Patient Goals in
Geriatric Medicine, Princeton
HealthCare System, Princeton
Fitness & Wellness Center,
Princeton North Shopping Center, 1225 State Road, Princeton,
888-897-8979. www.princetonhcs.org. Program focuses on the Physician Orders for
Life-Sustaining Treatment
(POLST), a program for those
who are seriously ill or wishing to
improve quality of care at the end
of life. Register. Free. Noon.
Wellness
Dance for People with Parkinson’s Disease, DanceVision,
Forrestal Village, 116 Rockingham Row, Plainsboro, 609-5141600. www.danceforpd.org.
Dancers who trained with the
Mark Morris Dance Group and
Brooklyn Parkinson Group collaborate with DanceVision and
Parkinson Alliance to present a
movement class for people with
Parkinson’s disease and their
caregivers. Register. Free. 1 to
2:15 p.m.
Community Yoga, Four Winds
Yoga, 114 West Franklin Avenue,
Pennington, 609-818-9888.
www.fourwindsyoga.com. Jill
Gutowski leads an all level class.
$5 benefits Global Seva India initiative to stop human trafficking. 7
to 9 p.m.
History
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton
Street, Princeton, 609-683-0057.
www.drumthwacket.org. New
Jersey governor’s official residence. Group tours are available.
Register. $5 donation. Noon to 2
p.m.
For Families
Read to a Therapy Dog, South
Brunswick Library, 110
Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. For children with special needs and their families.
Register. 6 p.m.
Lectures
Homewood Suites, 3819 Route 1
South, Plainsboro, 732-2077922. www.growthpotentialcons.com. “Energetic Leadership: Actions for Sustainable Results”
presented by Jennifer Smith,
leadership coach and consultant.
Register by E-mail to
[email protected] Free. 7 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Guided Wildflower Walk, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve,
River Road, New Hope, 215-8622924. www.bhwp.org. Daily walks
except Mondays. Register. $5. 2
to 3 p.m.
Schools
Open House, Destiny Arts Theater, 4 Tennis Court, Hamilton,
609-586-2787. www.destinyartstheater.com. Classes in acting,
voice, music, dance, musical theater, and visual arts for ages three
to adult. 6 to 8 p.m.
Singles
Divorced and Separated Support Group, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 80 West Broad
Street, Hopewell, 609-452-8576.
www.hopewellpres.org. Register.
Free. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping,
Hunter Farms, 246 Burnt Hill
Road, Skillman, 609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
ART
FILM
LITERATURE
DANCE
DRAMA
U.S. 1
29
MUSIC
PREVIEW
Windows of Soul – How Art Takes Back a Street
T
by Dan Aubrey
he decaying facades of
one of downtown Trenton’s oldest
blocks will be transformed into an
outdoor art gallery when a group of
motivated artists — and art loving
volunteers — join forces during
three days of art, education, and urban beautification from Friday to
Sunday, September 21 through 23.
Dubbed Windows of Soul, the
event to return life to the 200 block
of Hanover Street is the brainchild
of Trenton based artists Will “Kasso” Condry and Leon Rainbow.
The two muralists, who work together and independently, devised
the project after nearly a decade of
successfully creating scores of murals throughout the city.
Says Rainbow, “Two years ago
me and ‘Kasso’got the idea to paint
over the boarded up parts of the
abandoned buildings. We really
want to do the whole city.”
Rainbow’s goal is no exaggeration and is already in gear.
Over the past several years the
two artists, along with other artists
of mixed background and race, decided that there was too much decay and not enough art. Instead of
complaining or accepting it, the
artists launched an offensive
against urban blight with an arsenal
of talent, creativity, humanity, and
aerosol paint.
While the latter is the medium of
choice for these muralist inspired
by the 1980s graffiti movement,
“Kasso” (the name the artist uses to
represent himself and work) and
Rainbow take the high road and
work in partnership with property
owners and community organizations.
The obvious fruits of their efforts are their varied themed murals blossoming throughout the
city, including a recently sprayed
one at the entrance to the First
United Methodist Church on South
Broad Street, several blocks from
the state house dome.
There is also the annual Jersey
Fresh Jam held in Trenton.
Launched in 2005 by artists with a
desire to get other young mural
artists together, it’s now touted as
New Jersey’s premier Hip Hop
Festival. That festival of aerosol
and music attracts hundreds to
Trenton and is hosted by the Trenton based recycling company, TerraCycle.
While freshly painted city walls
and people showing up usually
equal success, the two artists do
something more, something intangible yet vital. Their efforts help
galvanize young creative talents,
energies, and imaginations. By doing so, they seem to be to be in tune
with influential American poet and
New Jersey native William Carlos
Williams whose words on the human imagination are apt: “If it is
not a dance, a song, it becomes an
outcry, a protest. If it is not flamboyance it becomes deformity; if it
is not art, it becomes crime.”
Trenton native “Kasso” says his
actions are deliberate and focus on
the positive. “I looked around and
said, ‘It doesn’t have to be like
this.’ You just have to take the ini-
tiative. Then others will join in.
Then there’s power in the numbers.”
Windows of Soul is one such opportunity for others to join in, view
art, take mural and graffiti workshops, and even help install the
fifty art panels over the windows
and doors of soulless structures.
The weekend will end with a block
party and a ribbon cutting ceremony to announce the transformation
of street to gallery.
Developed in cooperation with
the Trenton Downtown Association (TDA) and the Trenton Atelier,
an active group of downtown Trenton artists, the soul event is clearly
Trenton based, but its vision is
global.
“Kasso” and Rainbow, working
through the newly formed nonprofit organization SAGE (Stylez
Advancing Graffiti’s Evolution)
Collective, decided that artists outside the city should also have the
opportunity to get involved. So the
mid-30 year old coordinators digitally invited the world. Now art
from Belgium and Italy, to name a
few places, will mix with American art on Trenton walls.
Although Rainbow concedes
that the event’s epicenter at TDA’s
219 Hanover Street gallery and office space is “a kind of rough
block,” he says the weekend is
about learning how to make art that
can change the environment. Since
the art work will be preselected,
visitors should join in the spirit of
supporting the current effort and
learning for the future.
When asked about the backgrounds that have led to careers
teaching, designing, and creating
murals and art, “Kasso” and Rainbow draw attention to their formative years.
While “Kasso” says he came
from a poor section of Trenton, he
notes that his family — a truck
driving father and stay at home
mother — gave him simple gifts
that continue to give. “My family is
very artistic. My brother is a graphic designer. My sister works as a
manager for a non-profit and is a
poet. My parents are not visual
artists, but they’re great story
Graffiti: ‘Kasso,’
above, on Hanover
Street in Trenton.
At right, an image by
Leon Rainbow.
tellers. We were really poor so we
had to improvise. All my subject
matter is story-based. It has a beginning, middle, and end. That
comes from my family. I remember
the stories like movies. My mother
was supportive and bought us
sketch pads,” he says.
The sketch pads led the young
artist to an interest in creating
drawings influenced by graffiti and
comic books. The free Saturday art
classes offered by Artworks in
Trenton fed his hunger to learn
more and was part of the path that
took him to the College of New Jersey to study fine arts and art history.
An interest in mural painting
connected him to the internationally recognized Philadelphia Mural
Program, where he was employed
for five years as a member of their
educational program and an assistant muralist. Of his time in
Philadelphia, “Kasso” says, “I
learned how massive projects are
organized. Since I never got the opportunity to do my own projects, I
left and took what I learned for my
own projects. I’ve always been my
own person. I am not going to wait
for someone to make an opportunity. I make my own.”
R
ainbow too makes his own
opportunities. A native of San Jose,
CA, Rainbow (a family name from
the Quechan tribe in Arizona) is a
Trenton transplant. After his draftsman step-father and his mother,
who had a house cleaning business
and other jobs, moved the family to
New Jersey in the late 1990s, Rainbow gravitated to the Trenton area
and studied web design at Mercer
County Community College.
With an early interest in art encouraged by his mother, Rainbow
began mixing graffiti and drafting.
He also took art classes at the col-
lege, including those conducted by
prominent New Jersey artist Mel
Leipzig.
“The two of them are really terrific,” says Leipzig who has a long
history of coordinating and contributing to art projects in the
state’s capital city. Graffiti art, the
artist says, “is a new form of art. It’s
not what I do, but I respect these
artists. It’s not easy. “
About his former student, the
senior artist says, “Leon’s been a
force for the arts in Trenton. He just
keeps going at it. He’s dogged in
his pursuit of his art and his commitment to the city. It’s terrific that
there’s someone like him in Trenton. “
Of “Kasso” and Rainbow’s current efforts, Leipzig says, “It is one
positive thing in Trenton during at
time of unbelievable negativity. It
shows that there are good decent
people and young artists in the city.
It’s not a monetary thing. It’s just in
their nature to do something. And
artistic creativity is a boon for the
city, take Hoboken and Brooklyn.
Everywhere artists go, they do
something good. It’s a ray of hope
in the city. “
Trenton resident and creator —
along with famed writer Norman
Mailer — of the seminal book on
the American graffiti art movement, “The Faith in Graffiti,” Jon
Naar agrees. “I think they’re important artists who are doing a superb job of organizing in a city in
the state of collapse, where we’re
Trenton-based artists ‘Kasso’ and Leon Rainbow devised Windows of
Soul after nearly a decade of creating murals throughout the city.
not getting the leadership. They are
far more than graffiti writers. They
work with children and the community. They are important mural
artists who should be recognized,”
says Naar.
The 92-year-old Naar, whose
photographs are in numerous museum collections, says that he plans
to photograph the artists over the
block transformation weekend and
adds, “This is absolutely way to
go” to take back the city.
The taking back is already in action. Thirty students from the Bonner Center for Civic and Community Engagement at the College of
New Jersey recently arrived on
Hanover Street to clear trash from
the lots set for the block party. Art
work from both professional and
amateur artists is arriving for consideration. Calls for donated materials and support are being answered. And given the draught of
good news coming from Trenton,
the event is generating light and
hope.
As for the souls who have been
attempting to open the windows for
the past few years?
“It’s a long time coming, but it
feels great,” says “Kasso.”
“I’m so excited that it’s all coming together. I think it will be a
great inaugural,” says Rainbow.
Windows of Soul, TDA’s
Gallery 219, 219 East Hanover
Street. Opens Friday, September
21, 6 to 10 p.m. Activities continue
Saturday, September 22, with art
workshops and demonstrations
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The event
concludes on Sunday, September
23, with music, art installation, and
dedication, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. http://sagecoalitionnj.com/
30
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Obamacare & Health Care Reform: What Comes Next?
H
aving gained the imprimatur of
the United States Supreme Court, the Patient
Protection and Affordable Care Act, dubbed
ObamaCare by its opponents, is here to stay,
at least for the moment. Its ultimate impact
on business, the economy, and the healthcare system is still in the making, but that it
will have far-reaching effects is beyond
doubt.
Paul Starr, professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton University is largely
comfortable with the law, emphasizing in
particular its responsible self-financing.
Economist Elizabeth Bogan, senior lecturer in the department of economics at
Princeton University, is comfortable with
providing insurance for the uninsured and
with the efficiencies the law introduces, but
she is very concerned about the costs it adds
to the existing mix of services.
The Affordable CareAct and other healthcare issues facing business today are the focus of several symposiums and workshops in
the coming weeks, including the Pronceton
Chamber of Commerce’s second annual
Healthcare Symposium to be held at Mercer
County College on Thursday, September 27.
See story on page 31.
According to Starr, the impetus for the Affordable Care Act is the breakdown of the existing system for health-care financing, with
fewer and fewer people getting health care
from their employers. “This law is a way to
strengthen that system and help it survive,”
he says.
Coverage is declining, he says, because of
rising health-care costs, and as a result many
new businesses are not offering benefits. “If
we did nothing, employer coverage would
drop,” says Starr. “There is vast evidence that
changes through this legislation will help sustain the employer-based financing system.”
Offering context for the law’s evolution,
Starr sets out the constellation of affected
parties in the original debate over the legisla-
by Michele Alperin
tion. Most health-care groups, he says, supported the legislation, including the American Hospital Association and the American
Medical Association. The pharmaceutical
and hospital industries negotiated deals with
the White House and the Senate Finance
Committee that satisfied their concerns
about the law.
The insurance industry was divided. Initially the major insurance lobby, America’s
Health Insurance Plans, was favorably disposed to the law’s general approach, but insurance companies were sharply divided internally and five commercial insurers ended
up opposing the bill, financing big ads
against it. Nonprofit insurers, however, supported it by and large. Due to these conflicting views the insurance lobby took no position for or against the legislation.
The employer groups were relatively unconcerned with the upcoming law. “They
didn’t see it as a big problem and had other
things on their minds,” Starr says. This differed from 1993-’94 when major business
groups were very opposed to the Clinton
health plan and its employer mandate.
The Affordable Care Act, however, does
not require employers to offer health insurance, although it does invoke a penalty on
employers of a certain size who do not.
Effective January 1, 2014, employers with
50 or more full-time employees that do not
offer coverage and have at least one full-time
employee who receives a premium tax credit
(a subsidy made available to low-income
families to help them purchase health insurance) will be charged a fee of $2,000 per fulltime employee, excluding the first 30 employees from the assessment.
Employers with more than 200 employees
are required to automatically enroll their employees into health insurance plans that they
offer. Starr notes that very small firms as well
as companies with largely high-income employees will not be affected.
Expert Views: Paul Starr, Princeton professor of sociology, is
optimistic about the Affordable Care Act, while economist Elizabeth Bogan, a senior lecturer at the university, has concerns
about the law’s financial impacts.
In any case, providing insurance will benefit employers who do. “Why do most companies offer insurance?” asks Starr. “Because it is an attraction to employees; people
prefer jobs with health benefits, and this law
will strengthen the interest of employers in
supplying that benefit.”
Yet there is some concern about the bill’s
impact on employers. Conservatives point to
surveys of benefit managers who suggest
that they will drop health coverage, notes
Starr. But the more impartial studies he has
seen do not agree with that.
“The evidence from Massachusetts — after Massachusetts instituted very similar reforms that included an individual mandate
— is that more employers offered insurance,” he says. In any case, there is no employer mandate, even though there are incentives in the form of tax credits.
Many conservatives also believe the legislation will cause job losses. “Republicans always refer to the Affordable Care Act, or
Obamacare, as job killing,” says Starr, “but
there is no responsible independent evidence
that supports that.”
What the existing health-insurance environment has caused is “job lock,” where people will stay in a job rather than go out on their
own and start a new business because the job
they have provides health benefits, and if they
go out on their own, it would be difficult for
them to get affordable health insurance. The
new legislation effectively eliminates this
“job lock,” says Starr. “It is good for the economy. It is better for people to exchange jobs
freely, and it is very good in terms of small
business creation. This is the kind of effect
that many conservatives are ignoring.”
A vital element of the law is the establishment of health insurance exchanges. Starr
cites a working example — the Health Connector in Massachusetts. “It works like buying a ticket for air travel on Expedia,” says
Starr. “It makes it much easier and cheaper to
buy health insurance.”
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government and the overall costs public and
private. He quotes estimates by the Congressional Budget Office that this legislation will
reduce the deficit by more than $100 billion
chronic illness or otherwise difficult medical over the next 10 years.
histories — something that would be either
In Starr’s view, the law is responsibly fidifficult or available only at an exorbitant nanced in two different ways.
rate in the existing system.
First, to balance the additional costs of
Apoint that is “crucial to the whole genius covering the uninsured, the law reduces
of health insurance exchanges,” but hard to spending in other areas. “These reductions
convey is that from the consumer standpoint come through Medicare, but no Medicare
the rates are the same regardless of health, benefits have been reduced,” he says.
but the insurers get paid according to the risk
The Congressional Commission on
of the subscribers they enroll.
Medicare found that Medicare payments to
Through a system called “risk adjust- private Medicare insurance plans have been
ment,” a fund is created in the exchange and excessive, costing the government 12 to 13
insurers who get relatively healthy sub- percent more than the traditional Medicare
scribers get paid less whereas those who get program. The Affordable Care Act cuts back
relatively unhealthy subscribers get paid these payments, as does the budget prepared
more. So both the insurers and individuals Congressman — and GOP vice presidential
are protected, says Starr.
candiate Paul Ryan. Yet none of these comInsurance exchanges are not a left wing panies has withdrawn from the Medicare
idea, says Starr. They
market.
were championed by the
Second, the Senate FiHeritage Foundation, a
nance Committee found
There is vast evigroup sympathetic to
that hospitals and other
dence that changes
Mitt Romney, and before
medical providers are gothe last few years coning to get back billions of
through this legislaservative
health-care
dollars from people who
tion will help sustain
economists viewed them
used to leave unpaid bills
the employer-based
enthusiastically.
but will now have insur“It is a way to mainance. But because the
financing system,
tain a private insurance
purpose of the bill is not to
says Starr.
system, but get everycreate windfall profits for
body covered,” says
hospitals from this addiStarr. Individuals and
tional revenue, some of
small businesses get the advantage of being this will be taken back by reducing future inpart of much larger group, that is, everyone creases in Medicare hospital payments.
in the exchange.
There will also be a fee on medical equipFurthermore, the existing insurance mar- ment makers that will “claw back” some of
ket for individuals and small groups has the additional revenue that these companies
been very inefficient due to a complex, bu- will be getting as a result of the bill.
reaucratic system of insurance brokers as
“This is all a way of financing health-care
well as individual insurers who do the under- reform from within the existing expendiwriting and require each person to have a tures,” says Starr. “It covers the uninsured
medical exam.
but is not providing windfall profits in doing
They then judge each individual appli- so.”
cant, which is very expensive. As a result, 30
The clawbacks pay for about half of the
cents of every dollar go to administrative additional cost of the law, and the other half
costs. Theoretically, Exchanges will stream- will be covered by additional taxes, the most
line this whole process, although there will important being an increase of .9 percent in
be some startup costs.
the Medicare taxes for a family making more
When looking at the costs of the Afford- than $250,000.
able Care Act to government, Starr says it is
Continued on page 33
critical to distinguish between costs to the
‘I
have 3,032 steps on my pedometer soaring to an extent that even very well comso far today,” says Felicia Smith, director of pensated attorneys were feeling sticker
human resources at Fox & Rothschild, the shock.
“I saw where medical inflation was golaw firm 997 Lenox Drive, at well before
noon on a recent weekday. After interrupt- ing,” says Smith. “I knew we really had to
ing an interview to sprint down the hall to take a longer-term view.” She promptly inanswer a managing partner’s question, she stituted a multi-pronged initiative to keep
says she is having a jam-packed week, but is the firm’s rates from rising into the stratodetermined to make it to the firm’s sphere. Abig part of her strategy was the creation of a comprehensive, extensive health
lunchtime yoga session.
She is also happy to report that she spot- and wellness program.
Smith speaks at the 2012 Healthcare
ted a new walking partner at 6:30 a.m. that
morning. As she was getting ready for work, Symposium sponsored by the Princeton Regional Chamber of Comher neighbor strode purmerce on Thursday, Sepposefully by outside her
tember 27, at 8 a.m. at the
window. “I wouldn’t
Instituting a wellness
Conference Center at
normally get out at that
program
for
employMercer County Commuhour,” she says, but she
nity College. Call 609ees is one way busidecided on the spot that
924-1776 for more inforher days would now
nesses can reduce
mation. The half-day
start with a brisk turn
healthcare costs.
event features a CEO
around the neighborroundtable, presentations
hood with a new walkby Colleen Woods, NJ
ing buddy.
Not particularly active before becoming Health Information technology coordinator,
the first head of Fox & Rothschild’s newly and Neil Sullivan, NJ Banking and Insurcentralized HR department in 2007, Smith is ance Commissioner.
There will be three breakout sessions.
now a fitness “convert,” and she has the
prominent law firm’s woeful demographics Topics are Accountable Care Organizations,
Workers Comp, and the topic on which
to thank.
One of Smith’s jobs at Fox & Rothschild, Smith is speaking, “Wellness and Preventawhich has 950 employees, is to choose tive Care: Effective or Not?”
An attorney and a professional with
healthcare plans, and the minute she arrived
decades
of HR experience, Smith knows
she knew it was going to be a daunting task.
“The demographics!” she exclaims. She that fitness at work involves much more
saw that the employees, most of them than pedometers and group yoga sessions.
lawyers, were “getting older.” That’s natu- In fact, when she mentioned her plan for a
ral, of course, she points out, in a profession health and fitness program at a regional
that involves a lengthy education and values meeting of law firm administrators, she was
experience. But when you add age to the practically laughed out of the room. “They
sedentary lifestyle and crushing stress that is said it would never work with lawyers.”
She knew what the administrators were
practically part of the job description, you
have a mix that creates the kind of health saying. “Lawyers’ focus on client service
problems that tend to make insurance premi- and billable hours is so great that they tend
not to pay attention to anything else,” she
ums soar.
Smith’s job was to obtain top quality admits.
Smith had her work cut out for her when
healthcare insurance for the firm and she
saw it was getting much harder to get it “at a
Continued on following page
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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Healthcare Symposium
Continued from preceding page
the program launched in 2009, and
she laid the groundwork carefully.
“I read more and more,” she says.
“I went to seminars.” Armed with
knowledge of workplace fitness
practices as well as with marketing
savvy, she created branding for the
program, naming it “Fox Fit &
Well” and setting up a website for it
on the company intranet.
Elements in the program include
group salad lunches, sneaky vending machine pricing, advanced biometric testing — and exciting
prizes. Smith’s budget for the
health and fitness program is
$175,000, an amount she acknowledges is generous for a firm of her
size. Giant corporations may spend
much more, but she is convinced
that the main elements of “Fox Fit
& Well” can lead to large changes
in health — and in healthcare insurance premiums — at even the
smallest companies.
Work
your
insurance
provider’s tools. “Aetna has incredible wellness help,” says Smith
of the carrier her firm has chosen. It
will provide fitness assessments,
track progress, answer questions,
and provide help on everything
from nutrition to workout routines.
She suggests that any firm start a
health and wellness program by
checking what its insurance company offers. The help is free and,
she says, and is available from
every insurance company, making
it an especially big help for small
companies.
Get physical, together. Fox
Rothschild has a number of group
fitness activities in addition to the
yoga classes Smith attends at her
Philadelphia office. The firm has
17 branches nationwide, each with
its own culture. What works at one
office, she knows, may not be a
good fit at another.
“We did yoga in San Francisco
first,” she says. “San Francisco is
very health conscious. They all like
to ride their bikes to work. They
love this!”
Other offices needed a slower
start. Some have two types of yoga
classes — chair yoga for the beginners and mat yoga for the more fit.
Some have zumba. At the Palm
Beach office, “salad bowl Wednesdays” have been a big hit. “Everyone brings in ingredients and they
make and eat salads together,” says
Smith. Philadelphia has recently
added Tai Kwan Do classes, while
the firm’s Bucks County office is
broadening the scope of health and
fitness even further by bringing in
speakers to talk with “sandwich
generation” employees about coping with elder care issues.
Next on the menu is a nutrition
program that will be kicked off by
Will Clower, a “fitness guru” who
impressed Smith at an event she attended. He will give a webinar that
will be followed up by a series on a
variety of nutrition topics.
Not only do all the activities get
Fox Rothschild’s employees moving, but Smith says they also create
an “esprit de corps.” Partners and
receptionists working out on adjacent yoga mats, she says, tend to
come away with a different view of
one another.
Deep six the donuts. “We still
have bagel Fridays,” says Smith
with a barely perceptible sigh. And
the events still include bagels, but
the muffins, pastries, and donuts
that used to sit beside them are
gone, replaced by fruit and
“healthy spreads.”
Smith’s director of health and
fitness is in the process of drawing
up suggested menu protocols for
firm meetings — “fruit instead of
cookies,” for example. But she
knows that just yanking the goodies all at once will not work. “I still
get E-mails asking `where are the
donuts,?’” she says.
Tinker with the vending machines. Again, Smith says, people
tend to get edgy when their snacks
are attacked. This could be particularly true late at night as a big deadline looms. So, the offices that have
always had vending machines still
have them. But they look a little
different.
Before, the firm just let the
vending machine companies put
whatever they wanted in the machines. No more. The high calorie
energy drinks are gone, replaced by
many varieties of water. Chips are
still there, but the lower fat variety
is predominant.
“We changed positions,” says
Smith. “We put four rows of water
on top. You have to hunt for the unhealthy stuff.”
She then hesitates. “Maybe I
shouldn’t say this,” she adds, “but
we tweaked the pricing. It’s higher
for higher calories.”
Get serious. At the beginning of
the health and fitness program, in
2009, employees were being given
$100 a year for any fitness item
they purchased. “They would write
and say `I bought sneakers so I
could start a fitness program.’
Everybody took advantage. It was
like throwing money out the window.”
Take that money, add some to it,
and get an integrated personal
health and fitness program that really works, Smith told the firm’s
managers. They agreed, and after
an extensive search the firm signed
a contract with Vitality.
The fitness company provides
personalized plans that are integrated with Aetna’s health data for
each employee and with the results
of biometric tests done by Quest
labs that measure things like heart
disease and diabetes risk, kidney
function, liver health, and iron and
calcium levels. (The firm does not
get results by name or even individual results, Smith stresses. It only
gets aggregated data.)
Vitality gives each participating
employee customized goals and
suggestions. One of Smith’s goals,
Smith says that employees are becoming enthusiastic.
Busy people, Fox
Rothschild’s employees are beginning to
make time to create
healthier lives.
for example, is walking 5,000 steps
a day, using a pedometer that links
to Vitality’s website. E-mails and
reminders are sent to keep employees aware of their performance.
“It really works,” says Smith. If
goals aren’t being met, “you’re really disappointing yourself.”
Provide meaningful rewards.
Fox Rothschild had been rewarding participation with a yearly gift
of $300. The amount was taxable,
and, says Smith, it was really not
enough to get the attention of many
firm employees. “Our lawyers are
well paid,” she explains.
Vitality has ratcheted up the rewards. Employees’ progress puts
them in one of four categories —
bronze to platinum. Reaching goals
at each level lets them choose gifts
from Vitality’s catalog. “There are
really good things,” says Smith.
“High end electronics and travel.
You can stay at a Ritz hotel for almost nothing!”
Seeing results all around the
firm, Smith says that employees
are becoming enthusiastic. Busy
people, Fox Rothschild’s employees are beginning to make time to
create healthier lives.
Health Ways: Felicia
Smith talks about
wellness and preventative care at the
Princeton Chamber’s
Healthcare Symposium on Thursday,
September 2.
Smith herself is an example. If
she can make time for fitness, anyone can. Asked about her household, she draws a breath before beginning to enumerate its many
members.
There’s her husband, Albert
David Smith, whose careers have
included Foreign Service, the military, and IT. After stints with IBM
and EDS, he was laid off “in his
early 50s” when GE Financial Assurance bought out the company he
was working for. Always interested
in medicine, he became a nurse and
now delights in a career in rehabilitation medicine, while at the same
time indulging another passion.
“He wanted to own his own
business,” says Smith. When a
neighbor asked advice on selling a
hydroponic and organic gardening
supply company, he bought it. The
couple now own two Healthy Gardens and Design stores, one in
Delaware County, Pennsylvania,
and one in Pensacola, Florida.
She has also had an extraordinary life. Her parents, Israel and
Dora Zeltman, escaped from Warsaw during World War II as a 17year-old engaged couple. Her father ended up in a munitions factory in Siberia, her mother in a factory in the Ural Mountains. After the
war, in which most of their family
perished, they were reunited with
an aunt who lived in Brussels.
From there they immigrated to the
United States.
“I was eight. I remember it all,”
says Smith. “I saw the Statue of
Liberty. We landed in Hoboken.
We had left everything behind.”
Her parents went to work in Manhattan’s garment district, where her
father, a handbag manufacturer,
eventually opened a small factory.
Her mother worked as a seamstress.
Smith’s parents didn’t live very
long after reaching the United
States, so her older sister helped to
raise her. She started college at
Hunter, then continued her studies
at the University of Brussels, married, traveled around the world
with her husband, who was then in
the military, and graduated from
the University of Maryland in
1978. She earned her law degree in
1991 from the Delaware Law
School, now part of Widener University.
A career in employment and labor law combined with a number of
top HR positions in large companies culminated in her job with Fox
Rothschild, where, she says, the
answer to “Wellness and Preventative Care: Effective or Not?” is a
resounding yes.
This is a period of rapidly rising
healthcare costs, yet, at Fox Rothschild, says Smith: “Premiums
have been dropping steadily.”
Beyond substantial monetary
savings, employees throughout the
firm are beginning to feel the benefits of the wellness program, forming lunchtime gym-trip groups,
proposing new fitness classes,
meeting goals, and in at least one
case telling Smith that they owe
their very lives to the interventions.
“You have to be ready to make
the change,” says Smith. When that
time comes, she has seen, an employer with a strong health and fitness program can make the crucial
difference.
— Kathleen McGinn Spring
Other Events
“Employers' Key Considerations and Value Based Insurance
Design (VBID).” A workshop
hosted by ACHRM on Thursday,
September 20, at Dow Jones at
4300 North Route 1 in South
Brunswick at 8 a.m. Cost: $50. Go
to achrm.org/events/event-9-212012.php to register.
The speaker at the event is
Kathryn Spangler, of VBID
Health, based in Washington, D.C.
She is the former deputy health policy director of the U.S. Senate
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and also senior
advisor to the University of Michigan Center for Value-Based Insurance Design.
Under the VBID concept, patients out-of-pocket medical costs
are based on the value of a service
to their health rather than its price.
For example, a company could offer certain drugs to its employees
for free, while reqiring higher payments for certain proceedures
Health Reform Update. At the
end of September, the Stratford Financial Group in Wayne has
planned two free seminars featuring information about the Affordable Care Act.
Topics include: the employer
mandate; the small employer tax
credit; affordable employee contributions; qualified plans; minimum
essential benefits; employer plan
maximum deductible and out-ofpocket; medical loss ratio rebates;
and the Cadillac Tax.
The seminars begin at 9 a.m.
with a continental breakfast served
a half hour before. They will be
held on Thursday, September 20, at
the Mountain Ridge Country Club,
713 Passaic Avenue, West Caldwell, (register at www.rsvpbook.com/healthcare); and Thursday,
September 27, at the North Jersey
Country Club, 594 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne (register at www.rsvpbook.com/stratford). For more information call Daniel Ritter at 866217-9053 x 202 or E-mail [email protected]
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
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Affordable Care Act
Continued from page 31
“The Affordable Care Act is an
example of a fiscally responsible
measure; it extends the life of the
Medicare trust fund by about eight
years,” he says. “The Republicans’
promise to repeal would make
Medicare financially weaker, but
most seniors do not understand
this.”
Starr’s father, who died when
Starr was 15, was a pediatrician,
and when they lived in Brooklyn,
his office was right below Starr’s
bedroom. “When I was growing
up, there was always a waiting
room full of babies and kids that
was right in our house,” he says.
His mother, who was born in 1907,
earned a master’s degree in bacteriology, although her focus was on
raising her children.
Starr earned a bachelor of arts in
history and sociology at Columbia
University in 1970 and has adoctorate in sociology from Harvard
University. His 1984 book, “The
Social Transformation of American Medicine,” won the 1984
Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and
Bancroft Prize in American History. He analyzed the historical development of the communication
industry in “The Creation of the
Media,” and his most recent book,
“Remedy and Reaction,” traces the
history of healthcare reform.
Sandra Starr, Paul Starr’s first
wife, died in 1998. Now married to
Ann Baynes Coiro, he has four
children and three stepchildren.
Central to the discussion of
health-care reform is the fact that in
national health expenditures, both
public and private, the United
States spends vastly more on health
care than other countries — in spite
of the fact that we have had nearly
50 million people without health insurance. Starr explains, “The difference between the United States and
other countries is not that Americans get more health care but that
prices are higher. There is huge bureaucratic overhead in the system.”
Employer Penalties: A flowchart designed by the
non-profit, non-partisan Kaiser Foundation illustrates the potantial impacts of the Affordable Care
Act on business owners.
Another worry people may have
given the expected addition of nearly 30 million people to the healthcare system is what they will add to
the already high costs of health care
in this country. Starr estimates that
the increase in total health expenses, both public and private, will be
on the order of one percent when
compared to total consumption of
health care. “There’s no reason to
fear that this will greatly affect the
overall level of use of healthcare
services,” he says.
Bogan’s View
E
lizabeth Bogan is less sanguine about the financial impacts
of the Affordable Care Act and
notes that the savings of $100 billion over 10 years that Starr cites is
“nothing” in a budget of way over a
trillion dollars.
Her concern is projected total
expenditures for Medicare and
Medicaid given the current realities plus the Affordable Care Act,
as set out in the Congressional
Budget Office’s 2010 projections
of government spending out to the
year 2050. These estimates also include the effects of increases in the
elderly population and assume that
cost increases over the last couple
of decades for a variety of things
will continue.
They also include the interest
that the government will eventually
have to pay on its bonds. The resulting projection is that current promises embedded in Social Security,
Medicare, and Medicaid leave the
government responsible for 40 percent of gross domestic product.
The problem, suggests Bogan, is
that current tax collections are only
a little over 18 percent of gross domestic product, and, except in ex-
treme situations, the government
has never collected over 21 percent
in income taxes.
“Even with high tax rates, people
don’t pay them, they avoid them, or
they don’t work,” she says. “If you
look at the whole period of time
since World War II, the amount collected is 18 to 20 percent most years
— even in the years after World War
II when the tax rates went very high
on big incomes.”
The Affordable Care Act itself
adds about a trillion dollars in costs
over the 10-year horizon and more
beyond that, suggests Bogan. “The
act appears to be self-financing for
the 10 years because new taxes are
included in it,” she says. “But the
total taxes that the Federal government is projected to collect (which
is assumed to be no more than 20
percent of GDP per year) won’t pay
for existing Medicare/Medicaid or
the extensions.”
The additional taxes specified in
the act include: a .9 percent
Medicare surtax on wages in excess
of $200,000 for single taxpayers
and $250,000 for married couples;
a 3.8 percent tax on investment income of high earners; annual fees
from insurers and drug and medical
device companies (adding up to
$93 billion over 10 years); limits of
$2,500 a year on what employers or
employees can contribute to healthcare flexible-spending accounts; a
new 40 percent excise tax on highcost health plans (coverage costing
$10,200+ for a single employee);
and a 10 percent excise tax on tanning parlor services.
“The point is these new taxes in
the Affordable Health Care Act were
already insufficient to pay for existing projections of Medicare and
Medicaid, although the whole bill
pretends that we start from everyContinued on following page
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34
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Continued from preceding page
thing being OK so we could just add
some taxes on the rich and pay for
the new bill,” Bogan explains.
Continuing to describe her problems with those who believe the act
will be self-sustaining, she expresses grave concerns about the
assumption by Starr and others that
over the next 10 years part of the
act’s costs will be funded by the
$700-plus billion in reductions of
payments to health-care providers.
“Both the Republicans and the
Democrats are lying about this,”
says Bogan. “The Republicans say
Obamacare takes this out of
Medicare. The Democrats that this
reduced payment will save the indicated money.”
A provision similar to this one,
explains Bogan, was passed a
decade ago to reduce Medicare expenses and has been rescinded
yearly by Congress “after the medical community scares patients that
if they don’t get paid the providers
will cut care.”
For her, this history provides
clear evidence that Congress will
not cut payments to providers. “So
it is a farce,” she says, “and the bill
alone actually will add to the
deficits (about $600 billion over
the next 10 years). These taxes are
not enough to pay for the existing
projections so it is a bit of a joke to
say that the bill is self financing.”
Bogan is also worried about the
expanding cost of coverage as
medicine advances. “Health-care
coverage is very expensive because we keep inventing new ways
to care for people, find more expensive things to do, and expand
what can be done — what we call
‘reasonable medical care,’” she
says.
“I am concerned that we have set
ourselves up through this program
for a continually expanding share
of GDP to go to health care —
through Medicare, Medicaid, and
the requirement that employers
cover everybody and, if they are
not covered by their job, they can
have subsidized coverage for a private premium,” she says.
On the other hand, Bogan accepts that universal care is important. Once you say that anybody
can get insurance without a penalty
for prior health conditions, she
says, the individual mandate to either purchase insurance or pay a
penalty is necessary. “Otherwise
everybody would wait until they
were sick to get insurance — unless
their employer covered them or
they have Medicare or Medicaid.”
Calling the mandate a “middleclass tax,” she adds, “it is not necessarily bad if you believe it is what
we have to do.” Since many people
believe in universal coverage, she
says, “if we start with that, then
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what we are doing is a reasonable
approach to universal coverage.”
She is somewhat worried about
the impact on employers with under 50 employees that get some tax
credit for offering health insurance.
Some, she says, must pay as much
as 35 percent of the cost of coverage. “On a small employer, this is a
huge burden,” she says.
But overall, if the subsidies and
insurance exchanges outlined in
the act work well, she thinks it may
not be too expensive a burden on
small business.
But she has some concerns that
the requirement to buy health insurance at 50 employees may encourage businesses not to grow. She has
heard of companies with 45 employees saying they would not go
over 50 because then they would
have to buy everyone health insurance. “Every time we put more
things on business, it tends to mean
it is too expensive to hire labor in
the U.S., and even small businesses
find they can outsource accounting,
say, to Bangladesh,” she says. “I
think it ultimately hurts economic
growth in the United States.”
This tradition of employers providing health insurance has been a
voluntary one since World War II.
It is the “must cover” that makes
Bogan a little nervous. The question for her is what exactly will be
included in the mandated policies
and what are we saying that people
are entitled to?
In this country, suggests Bogan,
the prevailing ethos is that everyone deserves the “best” medical
care. This is not true in other domains. Not everyone is required to
have the most crash-worthy car nor
is there a rule that people can’t live
in trailers because a storm might
destroy them.
Bogan makes the somewhat
controversial point that whereas
everyone deserves access to good
medical care, everyone does not
need to have “equal” care. She
would like to see a less expensive
system where no one is denied
care, but not everyone may need
immediate access to a medical doctor.
The smart diagnostic systems
now being developed, which can
be run by technicians, may do just
as well for mundane complaints.
“There would not be a huge demand for doctors and therefore it
would not keep driving their
salaries up,” says Bogan, adding
that it would not pull down doctors’
salaries either. “If they are doing
specialty stuff that requires expertise, they should be paid for it.”
Bogan would like to see a more
corporate model in medicine, with
doctor as CEO. “I think the model
should be doctors at the top, and
there should be extensive medical
care available for everyone, but not
everyone is entitled to see an MD in
every situation,” she says. That is,
unless they pay for it privately.
The view that everyone deserves
the best inspires regulations that
may get in the way of providing
care efficiently and cost-effectively. “The trouble with political control of a lot of healthcare is that you
get regulations that are supposedly
protective that are ridiculously expensive,” she says.
For example, when she had to be
on crutches and wanted to buy
some secondhand, she found out
that this was illegal, even though a
pair of disinfected, used crutches
would have suited her perfectly.
“Politicians love to say things like,
`If anything happens to you, you
deserve the best, only new stuff,”
she says.
The best, she concludes, gets in
the way of the good — a long-term,
viable system of healthcare for
everyone.
What is important going forward
is to find ways to keep costs in line,
and Bogan advises that we both reduce what will be covered and ex-
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
gery on top of another, whereas
people in Minneapolis tend to use
hospice and spend a lot of time with
sick relatives.
As a result, Miami doctors perform more invasive procedures,
doctors are paid more, and costs are
higher, but the results are no different. “If outcomes are no better
when we spend twice as much, then
we are wasting money — that is the
meaning of inefficiency,” says Bogan.
plore ways to reduce the costs of
good medical care. If the costs of
both Medicare and Medicaid are
not reduced, she says, they will be
in default within the next 50 years.
Contributing vastly to healthcare costs in the United States is
end-of-life care, and Bogan faults
the Republicans for taking out of
the bill support for discussions between patients, families, and their
doctors about end-of-life care and
instead damning these provisions
with the phrase “death panels.” She
characterized these provisions as
“some discussion at the end of life
about what we should do, whether
we should do hospice care or continue to do invasive surgery.”
“We as a society are spending
billions of dollars on dying people,” she says. Although she agrees
that there is room for different perspectives on what constitutes loving care for the dying, she herself
leans in the direction of hospice.
In a decade-old economic study,
economists compared expenditures per Medicare registered person in Miami and Minneapolis and
found that the expenditures in Miami were twice as high as those in
Minneapolis. On the face of it, one
might wonder whether perhaps Miami simply had a sicker and older
population, but a regression analysis holding constant age and diagnosis found that people don’t live
longer in Miami than in Minneapolis, despite the extra medical care.
“That means that we’re wasting
all the money,” says Bogan. But not
only that. “There is plenty of evidence that end of life care reductions in expensive surgery and using hospice instead may increase
the quality of life at the end,” she
says.
The difference is cultural — the
two cities define what is loving
end-of-life care in different ways:
in Miami it means putting one sur-
B
ogan adds another caveat.
Although laypeople and some doctors may believe that tons of surgery extends life for a few months,
in reality, some people get infections in hospitals that they would
not get otherwise, and sometimes
the body of an older person simply
cannot take the shock of late-age
surgery.
Although certainly there are stories of late-age surgeries that extend life significantly, the statistics
tell a different story. “The problem
with journalism,” says Bogan, “is
that people don’t want to look at the
statistics; they want to hear the stories, and you can always twist a story in a thousand ways.”
Sometimes the issue is not hospice versus invasive surgery, but
simply whether to fund certain
kinds of “treatments” at the end of
life. Bogan relates a personal experience when her mother was dying
of Alzheimer’s. The nursing home
pushed her to have her mother do
physical therapy, and Bogan happened to observe the 15-minute
session, which consisted of having
her mother pick up a balloon to try
to improve her balance. The nursing home billed the government
$945 for the session.
“Part of the problem of extending the government’s payment of
more and more care is that there is
Thompson Management
no mechanism for an individual to
say, ‘This is not worth my doing’—
because someone else pays the
bill,” she says. “I am worried that,
while this bill is not the horrible
thing that many Republicans think
about it; at the same time, it doesn’t
attack the problem that we are
wasting resources on medical care,
especially for the very old.”
“I’d rather see preschool education,” she says. “Everything has an
opportunity cost; if you’re doing x,
you’re not doing y.” One example
she raises is paying under Medicaid for people in nursing homes
who are often comatose. “We have
made some very weird decisions,”
she says. “My concern is that those
decisions have been pushed by free
Medicare, because people don’t
think about the true costs.”
In addition to reducing invasive
care for the dying, Bogan suggests
that we need to revamp payment
systems and incentives. A positive
aspect of the bill is its creation of a
commission to find ways to reduce
medical costs and test innovative
payment methods.
One is to pay for outcomes instead of inputs. “Now if a doctor
runs 30 tests, he gets paid for 30
tests; if the person gets no better, he
still gets paid,” she says. Now they
are testing ways of paying doctors
for health outcomes.
Some language in the bill also
allows for experiments with reducing costs. One permits Medicare
Advantage to pass on to a patient
some savings for accepting generic
instead of patented drugs. It turns
out that many people were willing
to accept the generics, thereby reducing the cost of prescription coverage. “For economists, if you
make someone gain by choosing
something, they will usually do it,”
Continued on following page
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36
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Affordable Care
Continued from preceding page
says Bogan. “My hope is that we
can push savings by changing
some of the incentives.”
Bogan is not so happy with
changes in health savings accounts
that she says save money in the
short term by increasing taxable income, but may reduce pressure on
the system to be more efficient.
Under the 2003 Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and
Modernization Act, a health savings account could be as large as
the deductible on an insurance policy but not exceed $5,000 for an individual or $10,000 for a family.
The Affordable Care Act will reduce allowed contributions to
$2,500 a year, increased annually
for cost of living.
With a tax-free health savings
account, she says, people have a
reason to look at the health-care
system more carefully. If they did
not spend the money, they could
roll it over into the future. This
change, however, reduces the
amount of medical expenditures
that a person will evaluate closely.
Bogan also has another nit to
pick with the Affordable Care Act’s
changes in health savings accounts
— the money in them cannot be
spent to buy over-the-counter medications. This raises somewhat
government monies, but there is a
big negative side. People who
could buy nose drops over the
counter, for example, will often get
a prescription for something that is
insignificantly different because it
will be covered.
As a result, they end up using
medical services and $300 worth of
a doctor’s time to get a nose spray
that will save them $10 or $20.
“These are little things, but they are
all part of the problem,” says Bogan. “If there are things a third par-
ty has paid, you will use it, even if it
costs a lot. Since prescriptions are
covered but over the counter is not,
there is a huge incentive to go to the
doctor. If OTC was covered, it
would cost less and you would use
it.”
As for the insurance exchanges
mandated by the act, Bogan thinks
they are a good idea and is sorry
that some states are resisting them.
“I think that this is a genuine attempt at bi-partisanship by the Democrats,” she says. “They are looking for a way to make markets be
the way that lovers of markets think
they should be — to make for a
more efficient system and reduce
the cost of insurance by having
competition created in state markets.”
Bogan would also like the government to grant any insurance
company that gets a license to sell
in one state a license to sell in every
state. “I think it would reduce the
cost of insurance, because it would
add more competition,” she says.
She thinks this would also help
address the problem of states that
do not have enough insurance companies. Noting that many people
fear this would mean a less regulated market and would create a “race
to the bottom” attitude, she responds, “That depends on how
much you distrust markets. I think
everyone should have a little distrust, but I think that many times
having many buyers and many sellers is a way for something to be delivered at its cost, including some
profit.”
Another way to reduce costs is
to increase efficiency. “Pressure
must be put into the system for cost
controls,” she says. “People (doctors and patients) have to be made
more cost conscious and cheaper
ways of delivering care with smart
computer systems and lower level
personnel need to happen. “
Bogan’s push toward lower
costs with greater efficiency should
raise health outcomes. She writes,
“Better electronics will reduce hospital deaths from medication errors. Bundling care and letting lower level people reach out to the
chronically ill more frequently by
phone and E-mail will encourage
people to take their medications
and thus not end up with much
more expensive care later, etc.”
Bogan grew up in Basking
Ridge. Her father was a research
scientist for Bell Telephone Laboratories and in the 1950s was the
Bogan says she has
heard of companies
with 45 employees
saying they would
not go over 50 because they would
have to buy everyone
health insurance.
co-inventor of the Bell solar battery. Her mother was a commercial
artist in New York during the Depression and painted indoor golf
scenes on the walls of putting parlors in the 1930s. Later she stayed
at home with her children.
While in a great books course in
high school, Bogan read Adam
Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations”
and was fascinated by it. With siblings who were liberal arts types,
Bogan, as winner of the mathematics prize at her high school, was her
dad’s “son” — the scientist who
loved physics and math and ultimately economics. In 1966 she
graduated from Wellesley College
with a degree in mathematics and
economics.
Marrying after her junior year,
she followed her husband, who
graduated from MIT, got an MBA
from Wharton, and then joined the
Navy as a commissioned officer
and went to New Hampshire where
he was involved in building submarines. Bogan earned a master’s
degree in quantitative economics at
the University of New Hampshire.
When the family moved to New
York City, she was accepted at Columbia University to do a doctorate
in economics, where she explored
the economic conditions that cause
a company to cancel its plans for
expansion.
Bogan was treated well at Columbia, although during her tenure
the school was not so accustomed
to women in the economics department. But one incident belied her
total acceptance. As she was
preparing to deliver a preliminary
talk on her dissertation, she picked
up her handouts in the department
office. Because her topic had been
listed with only her last name, professors had no idea she was a
woman; one man, therefore,
walked into the office and asked
her to get him a cup of coffee. Thirty minutes later when he walked into the room where she was to speak,
“he was gentleman enough that he
blushed from ear to ear when he realized that I was giving the seminar.”
After receiving her doctorate,
Bogan was pregnant and was planning to take a couple years off, but
her thesis advisor urged her to interview at a New Jersey school
close to her home in Short Hills.
She got her first position at Fairleigh-Dickinson University, where
she became a full professor and
eventually chair of the economics
and finance department all while
raising her two sons.
But after 20 years at FairleighDickinson, she was able to move to
her dream job at Princeton University, with the help of a little push
from her older son, Nathaniel. Determined to go to MIT, he came to
her with his acceptance letter from
Princeton, and said to her, “Mom,
you’re the one who always wanted
to go to Princeton; I want to go to
MIT.”
So Bogan wrote to Allen Blinder
to see if she could teach at Princeton for a semester while she was on
sabbatical. He invited her to teach
the introduction to microeconomics in the fall of 1990. The students
in the class then petitioned the department and the university to find
a way to keep her permanently. At
the same time, Princeton had been
thinking about creating a new senior lecturer position for people who
taught well but did not necessarily
publish a lot. Two years later, she
was teaching in this position at
Princeton.
Her son Nathaniel does technical mathematical programming for
Cognex in Native, Massachusetts.
Her son Andrew, who did go to
Princeton and earned a doctorate at
the University of California, San
Francisco, in biophysics, followed
his father into money management,
and the two of them run the Bogan
Science Fund and the Bogan Infrastructure Fund.
“I am concerned that unless we
do things to reduce the cost of medical services and reduce the demand
for end-of-life services, we are on a
complete collision course,” says
Bogan. “It can’t be done; we can’t
spend 40 percent of GDP and only
tax 20 percent.” She even suggests
that a 20 percent value added tax
that, although regressive, would
fund the difference in a way that income tax will not be able to.
“We’ve got to change productivity or this Obamacare is not going
to work; it is too expensive,” she
concludes.
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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Life in the Fast Lane
O
ne commercial airline
is shutting down at Trenton-Mercer Airport just as another is about
to start up.
Streamline Air, little more than a
year old, suspended operations on
its route from Trenton to Bedford,
MA, effective September 14.
Streamline’s 12 employees lost
their jobs as a result of the closure.
The action leaves Trenton-Mercer without a commercial carrier
until November, when Frontier
Airlines has announced it will begin service between Trenton and
Orlando, FL.
Streamline has not shown a
profit since the spring, and aircraft
provider Charter Air Transport in
early September deemed Streamline to be a “non-strategic asset”
and terminated the lease on the 30seat commuter plane that Streamline used for its route.
Streamline is the brand name
that represents Charter Air, based
in Cleveland, OH. Charter Air
takes care of the flying part of the
business, and Streamline interfaces
with the customer — marketing
and selling the flights and providing customer service.
In April, 2011, Streamline began
offering four weekday flights to
and from suburban Boston’s
Hanscom Field, located 20 miles
northwest of Boston. The run was
the airline’s only route and the
company struggled to make a profit despite launching with a media
blitz that included numerous newspaper and radio advertisements.
Streamline is the 14th commercial
carrier to leave Trenton-Mercer
since 1983.
County officials are now looking to Frontier Airlines to fill the
void left by Streamline. Frontier,
based in Denver, CO, will begin
operations betwen Trenton and Orlando on November 19. It will be
operating 138-seat Airbus 319 aircrafts with television service and
stretch seating.
Frontier is a wholly owned subsidiary of Republic Airways Holdings, an airline holding company
that also owns Chautauqua Airlines, and Republic Airlines. Currently in its 19th year of operations,
Frontier offers service to some 80
destinations in the United States,
Mexico, Costa Rica, Jamaica, and
the Dominican Republic.
Although disappointed by the
T
loss of Streamline, Mercer County
Executive Brian Hughes said that
the addition of Frontier “is an exciting development for our region.”
“More than any other destination, residents of Mercer County
have made it clear to me that Orlando tops their list, and I am so
pleased that we are able to deliver,”
Hughes said. “With rapidly increasing passenger numbers in this
region, we know consumers are
clamoring for an alternative to
metropolitan Philadelphia International and Newark-Liberty airports,” Hughes added.
Continued on following page
37
Recreation-Office-Warehouse
Wyndham Forrestal Hotel Sold, To Be Divided
he 364-room Wyndham
Princeton Forrestal Hotel and
Conference Center has been sold
by USBank to a company led by
Sunil Nayak — the CEO of a
Monmouth Junction hotel owner
and operating firm called
InnZen Hospitality.
Nayak’s newly-formed holding company, Princeton Three
Hospitality Group LLC, plans to
divide the property into two separate operations — a Holiday Inn
Express and a Crowne Plaza hotel with a conference center.
According to Lester Varga,
Plainsboro director of planning
and zoning, the township planning board was expected to consider the first step in the process
of dividing the site — an application for signage for the Holiday
Inn Express on Tuesday, September 18.
Varga said the hotel was originally built in 1985 as part of Merrill Lynch’s Scudders Mill Road
campus. “It wasn’t even a private
hotel, it was a private conference
and corporate training center, so
it had a couple of different wings
— a conference center wing, a
hotel wing, and an executive
suites wing. The executive suites
wing is going to be a Holiday Inn
Express,” Varga said.
A raised, covered walkway
connects the future Holiday Inn
Express and the main body of the
current Wyndham Hotel, which
will eventually become the
Crowne Plaza hotel.
Varga pointed out that Holi-
U.S. 1
day Inn is a part of the Crowne
Plaza brand.
“It’s not like two separate and
competing hotels will chop the
building in half,” said Varga.
“For business reasons the
Crowne Plaza brand decided to
make part of the building a Holiday Inn Express. Corresponding
to that they need some signage to
distinguish it from other buildings on the campus.”
He said that the township has
not yet received plans for any
changes other than signage.
US Bank took ownership of
the property in 2009 instead of
foreclosing on a loan to owner
Merritt Capital Investors of New
Canaan, Connecticut. Merritt is
headed by Scott Toombs, who
bought the center in 2004.
Toombs was not new to the
Princeton development scene —
he was behind the construction
of Princeton Forrestal Village in
1986 as a mixed use office and
upscale retail center. When the
market did not respond to the
concept the Village reverted to
the Bank of New York in 1991,
the year that Toombs founded
Merrit.
Toombs updated the hotel at a
cost of $6 million, named it the
Lakeside Princeton Conference
Center, and turned it over to
Paramount hotel management.
Because of its unusual location
on a corporate campus, marketing was a problem. Wyndham
was brought in as its manager in
2008.
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38
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1 Classifieds
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OFFICE RENTALS
Weidel Commercial 609-737-2077
www.WeidelCommercial.com
Hopewell Boro 83 Princeton Ave.
near Main St. Rent one or more of five
rooms with shared waiting room and
kitchenette form $300 to $700 per
month all inclusive. In elevator office
building good parking. 609-529-6891.
Pennington - Hopewell: Straube
Center Office from virtual office, 12 to
300 square feet and office suites, 500 to
2,400 square feet. From $100 per
month, short and long term. Storage
space, individual signage, conference
rooms, copier, Verizon FIOS available,
call
609-737-3322
or
e-mail
[email protected] www.straubecenter.com
Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in
well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate
AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]
Prime Princeton Office Space
available for rent. Beautiful 1st floor
690 sq ft., 5-room suite. Walking distance to arts center, library, downtown
restaurants and shopping. Quite, friendly office environment. On-site parking
and utilities included. Reasonable rent $1775/month. Interested parties contact
[email protected], Doug 603642-8692 or Jill 603-315-9867.
Airport
For Lease:
Continued from preceding page
:DUHKRXVH)OH[6KRZURRP2IÀFH6SDFH
Directly off Route #130.
Close proximity to exit
#8 New Jersey Turnpike,
Route #33 and 295
Windsor
Industrial
Park
1RUWK0DLQ6WUHHW:LQGVRU5REELQVYLOOH0HUFHU&RXQW\1GREAT RENTS & LOW CAM / TAXES
Available Spaces:
Building #20
Unit C 13,500 sq. ft. (3,500 sq. ft. office
ED
space/10,000 warehouse
5 drive thru doors
LEASspace)
truck wash bay, 1/4 acre of outdoor storage/parking.
Building #18
Unit G/H 12,500 sq. ft. ( +/- 4,000 sq. ft. office
space, 8,500 sq. ft. warehouse)
2 tailgate loading
ASED
E
L
doors, 1 drive in door, racking in place, commercial
dishwasher and counters, 20’ ceilings in warehouse.
Units A/B/C 7,500 sq. ft., 1,000 sq ft. of office,
3 tailgate loading, 22’ ceilings
Building #15
16,000 sq. ft. (1,500 sq. ft. office, 14,500 sq. ft.
warehouse distribution space), 9 loading docks,
tractor trailer parking.
Building #8
12,000 sq. ft., 16 ft.Lceilings,
EASEDdivisible, dead storage
- $3.00 psf.
Building #7
6,000 sq. ft. 1/2 acre of private paved area, private
ASED will build interior to
LEheight,
parking, 24’ ft. ceiling
suit, 2 drive in doors.
Building #6
Unit A: 4,000 sq. ft., 2000 sq. ft. of office space,
one overhead door, column free
Unit B: 4,000 sq. ft., one overhead door, column
free storage space.
Unit C 3,200 sq. ft. of office/showroom/sales space.
According to Hughes, the addition of Frontier will help TrentonMercer achieve its goal — the ability for passengers to Trenton-Mercer to numerous U.S. and international destinations with one plane
change.
Hughes also said that Mercer
County has made “significant” investments to the airport in the past
few years. “We continue to make
upgrades and improvements at
Trenton-Mercer that keep our airport competitive with other regional airports and attractive to potential carriers.”
To that end, the county announced earlier this month that it
has received a grant of some $1.4
million from the state Department
of Transportation to fund an airport
security fence. The new fence will
be 10 feet high, which is consistent
with current safety standards.
Work is scheduled to begin mid
2013.
Crosstown Move
AIL Research Inc., 57 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 205,
Hopewell 08525; 609-9259002; Andrew Lowenstein
PhD,
president.
www.ailr.com.
AIL Research, a green energy
R&D company, moved from
Washington Road to 57 Hamilton
Avenue in Hopewell.
The Hamilton Avenue building
formerly housed Kooltronic — a
provider of cooling technologies
for the electronics, computer, and
telecommunication
industries,
which moved to 30 PenningtonHopewell Road in 1999.
AIL, founded in 1990, develops
products such as liquid dessicant
air conditioners, thermal desalination systems, and plastic heat exchangers.
Deaths
&DOO7RGD\ZZZHYHUHVWUHDOW\QMFRP
No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made
to the accuracy of the information contained herein and
same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of
price, rental or other conditions, This listing may be withdrawn without notice.
BROKERS PROTECTED
Peter Kay Hexter, 94, on September 16. He was the founder of
Lenape Products, a porcelain company, and developed the Pennington Industrial Park
Gustave L. Schweickert, 83,
on September 12. He was plant
manager for Jingoli and Sons in
Ewing for many years.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
OFFICE RENTALS
COMMERCIAL SPACE
HOUSING FOR RENT
Princeton Office Suite for Lease
Central downtown location w/ University
view. Great layout, 1,400 SF, reception
+ 3 private offices. Weinberg Management 609-924-8535 [email protected]
HAMILTON & LAMBERTVILLE 300
to
50,000
SF
Office/WH/Flex/Showroom/Studios.
Amazing spaces in extraordinary buildings! Low rents / high quality units with
all you need! Brian @ 609-731-0378,
[email protected]
ough Parking - Spruce Street near Nassau Street for $95 monthly, includes
snow removal and maintenance. Call
609-924-9201 from 9 - 1, or e-mail us at
[email protected]
Princeton Professional Office:
14.5’ x 16.5’. Private garden setting.
Waiting room, parking, utilities. Secretarial space available. Will sublet. North
Harrison Street. Available immediately.
609-865-3443.
US Route 1 and Wynwood Drive South Brunswick Township adjacent to
Home Depot shopping center, office
suite consisting of 980 sq ft with 4 rooms
in 16 unit professional building.
$1,200/month. 609-529-6891
INDUSTRIAL SPACE
Unique Rental Space zoning (I3), ordinance passed for retail and recreation
activities, ample parking all utilities, one
1200’, one 2000’, one 2500’ one 3600’,
and one 10,000. Located at 325 and 335
New Road, Monmouth Junction. Call
Harold 732-329-2311.
Wet Chemistry Lab for rent, located
at Levittown, PA, easy commuting, low
rate, 5,000 or 10,000 sf. 609-865-5071
or [email protected]
STORAGE
902 Carnegie Center, Princeton:
Clean, dry, humidity controlled storage
on Route 1 in West Windsor. Spaces
start at 878 SF. Please call 609-9216060 for details.
Kuser Plaza, Hamilton: 1077 & 6333
SF (divisible) storage/warehouse space
available immediately. Please call 609921-6060 for details.
HOUSING FOR RENT
For Rent: Robbinsville $1500.00
month includes maintenance fees. 2
bedroom, 1 bath, tenant pays utilities.
Security required. 609-577-1632
Princeton Apartments - $1,395 One
bedroom: living room, eat in kitchen,
many windows. Close walking distance
to downtown Princeton and one block to
Nassau St. Well maintained older building on Spruce St. with parking and basement laundry. Two bedroom: private
fenced side yard, eat in kitchen, washer/dryer. Located in Kingston, three
miles from downtown Princeton. Bor-
INVESTMENT
PROPERTY
U.S. 1
Office Opportunities
Pennington - Retail, 23,000 SF
Rt. 31 South @ Tree Farm Road.
1,265 SF Available - Retail
Princeton Investment Opportunity
197 Witherspoon Street. Three Unit
Apartment. Building with rear storage
garage RB Zone - Possible conversion
of first floor to office use. Broker: Weinberg Management. [email protected] 609-924-8535.
CLEANING SERVICES
Free: Have your own business. No investment. No risk. Join today and receive $50 just for trying. I will help you
become
successful.
http://10apower.com/127091.
House cleaning by Polish woman
with a lot of experience. Excellent references. Good price. Own transportation.
Please call Barbara: 609-273-4226
Monica’s Cleaning Service. Highest
quality, reasonable prices, free estimates. 609-577-2126.
Al Toto - [email protected]
Office - Pennington Point
450 - 2,370 SF Office
FREE RENT and FLEXIBLE LEASE TERMS.
Immediate occupancy.
Continued on page 42
Al Toto [email protected]
Visit www.penningtonpointoffice.com
Hopewell Boro, Office/Professional/Records
500-30,000/SF Office & low priced storage, warehouse
William Barish [email protected]
Plainsboro Office For Lease
1,000 SF Suite. 1,200 SF Suite. 1-Room Office.
Close to all amenities and new medical center.
Al Toto [email protected]
Pennington Office For Lease
Howe Commons, 65 S. Main St., Downtown Pennington.
342 SF - 1,315 SF. 1 to 5-Year Term. Close to
restaurants, banks and shopping. Ample parking on site.
Al Toto [email protected]
www.cpnrealestate.com
For more information and other opportunities, please
call Commercial Property Network, 609-921-8844
39
40
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
41
42
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
Employment Exchange
Can You Deliver?
HOW TO ORDER
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
Fax or E-Mail: That’s all it
takes to order a U.S. 1 Classified.
Fax your ad to 609-452-0033 or
E-Mail [email protected] We will confirm your insertion and the price. It won’t be
much: Our classifieds are just 50
cents a word, with a $7 minimum.
Repeats in succeeding issues
are just 40 cents per word, and if
your ad runs for 16 consecutive
issues, it’s only 30 cents per
word. (There is a $3 service
charge if we send out a bill.)
Questions? Call 609-452-7000.
sirable. Please email resume
with salary requirements and references to: [email protected]
experience, and have great
grammar and proofreading
skills. No exceptions. Send resume to [email protected]
HELP WANTED
Client Assistant Part time position in East Windsor. Start out
working 10 hours per week with
potential 20 hours after training
period. We require mature individuals with strong organizational and communication skills.
Business computer knowledge,
bookkeeping experience are de-
Leasing Administrator —
entry level for small commercial
property firm. A/R a plus. Immediate fulltime position with benefits.
Send
resumes
to
[email protected]
Property Inspectors: Parttime $30k, full-time $80k. No experience, will train. Call Tom,
609-731-3333.
Recent College Graduate work from home and learn digital
court transcription. Income to
$22/hr. Paid 3 month training
program. Work 6 hrs./day and 35
hrs./week, during business
hours. Some overnight and
weekend assignments. This isn’t
for part-timers. Must have 4 yr.
college degree, be a quick study,
have digital audio (unzipping)
CLEANING SERVICES
Continued from page 39
Polish cleaning service by Lucy.
Trustworthy, responsible, excellent references. Please call for free estimate.
201-786-3877.
Window Washing and Power
Washing: Free estimates. Next day
service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning
available. 609-271-8860. References
available upon request. 30 years experience.
HOME MAINTENANCE
A Quick Response Handyman: will
give you a free estimate for electrical,
plumbing, painting, repair or other project around your house. Please call 609275-6631
Handyman For All Home Repairs.
Specializing in kitchen and bath remodeling, drywall, painting, ceramic tile,
wood flooring. 35 years experience.
New Jersey Licensed and insured. Call
908-966-0662 for a free estimate.
Painting: Interior/exterior. Experienced craftsmanship. Reasonable
rates. Small jobs. Call Brian. 609-6729446.
robthehandyman- licensed, insured,
all work guaranteed. Free Estimates.
We do it all - electric, plumbing, paint,
wallpaper, powerwashing, tile, see website
for
more:
robthehandyman.vpweb.com [email protected], 609-269-5919.
Sump Pump Failed? How can you
survive when your sump pump fails or
the power is out? Want to avoid a flooded basement? For a low cost plan,
please call 609-275-6631.
DECKS REFINISHED
Cleaning/Stripping and Staining of
All Exterior Woods: Craftsmanship
quality work. Fully insured and licensed
with references. Windsor WoodCare.
609-799-6093.
www.windsorwoodcare.com.
Every Wednesday we deliver 19,000 copies
of U.S.1 Newspaper to 4,500 business locations
in the greater Princeton area. Every other Friday
we deliver the West Windsor & Plainsboro News
to homes in those towns. We welcome people
with common sense, curiosity, and a reliable car
to help us do the job.
SALES - REAL ESTATE
Need a Change? Looking to get
a RE License? We take you by
the hand to ensure your success
and income! FREE Coaching!
Unlimited Income! No Experience needed! Contact Weidel
Today! Hamilton: Judy 609-5861400,
[email protected];
Princeton: Mike 609-921-2700,
[email protected]
Earn $100 per day! Plus Mileage!
Plus Bonuses for information you provide our editors!
Mail or fax us a note. We hope to hear from you.
Tell us about yourself and why you
are free to deliver on Wednesdays.
Mail to U.S. 1 Delivery Team, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton 08540; or fax to 609-452-0033
JOBS WANTED
Job Hunters: If you are looking for a full-time position, we
will run a reasonably worded
classified ad for you at no
charge. The U.S. 1 Jobs Wanted
section has helped people like
you find challenging opportunities for years now. We reserve
JOBS WANTED
JOBS WANTED
JOBS WANTED
the right to edit the ads and to
limit the number of times they
run. Mail or Fax your ad to U.S. 1
Jobs Wanted, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton, NJ 08540. Include
your name, address, and phone
number (for our records only).
Capable Caring Female Assistant available to shop, run errands, drive to appointments,
help with paperwork, provide
complete personal/companionship care. Call 609-309-5537
and leave message.
Need Help??? Very reliable
home health aide, caregiver.
Can travel anywhere to you.
Please call if you need help.
Thank you. Cell 609-222-2727 or
home 609-392-2610.
BUSINESS SERVICES
HEALTH
INSTRUCTION
INSTRUCTION
Bookkeeper/Administrative Specialist: Versatile & experienced professional will gladly handle your bookkeeping and/or administrative needs. Many
services available. Reasonable rates.
Work done at your office or mine. Call
Debra @ 609-448-6005 or visit www.vyours.com.
European Massage: On Route 1
North by Princeton BMW. Minutes from
Trenton. 609-716-1070.
Math, Science, English, ACT & SAT
Tutoring: Available in your home.
Brown University-educated college professor. Experienced with gifted, underachieving and learning-disabled students. Web: http://ivytutoring.intuitwebsites.com Call Bruce 609-371-0950.
Watercolor Workshops for Women
- Two day workshop at the NJ Shore
(Lavallette) designed for artists of all levels. Includes lodging, art materials,
breakfast, light snacks. Both Studio and
on site instructional painting. Evening
artist bio films and discussion. $390.00
[email protected]
Cranbury
Station Galleries 609-921-0434.
Writer/editor for books, articles,
business plans and other projects.
Expertise in business, technology, investments. Former Computerworld and
McKinsey Quarterly editor. Drafted Wall
Street Journal columns, wrote New York
Times articles. Helped Bobby Kennedy
Jr. write Harper Collins book. Business
plans used to raise $70 million.
[email protected] or 646-528-3231.
COMPUTER SERVICES
Computer problem? Or need a
used computer in good condition $80? Call 609-275-6631.
MARKETING SERVICES
Princeton ad/pr agency founder
seeking freelance assignments for
small businesses and non-profits.
Research, marketing strategies/plans,
ads, brochures, sales promotion, publicity, special events, websites/social media. Experienced with name-brand
clients; very reasonable fees. Call
Chuck Rose for confidential discussion,
consumer/trade portfolio, no obligation
meeting. 609-434-1146.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Accounting and tax services for individuals, families, and businesses;
free initial consultation in home or office;
CPA, 30 years experience in healthcare,
small business and other areas of accounting.
908-907-3702,
e-mail
[email protected]
TRANSPORTATION
Personal Driver seeking to transport
commuters, shopping trips, etc. Modern, attractive car. References provided.
E-mail to [email protected] or call
609-331-3370.
Able Cleaning Service
877•225•3253
“More Cleaning - Less Money”
>EMAIL [email protected]
>WEB www.ablecleaninginc.com
Massage and Reflexology: The
benefits are far-reaching — release of
tension, improved health on many levels, heightened well-being. Holistic
practitioner
offering
reflexology,
Swedish, shiatsu, chair massage at the
work site, etc. Gift certificates, flexible
hours. Call Marilyn: 609-403-8403.
Shiatsu and Qi Gong: Identify health
needs early. Maintain emotional and
physical balance. Manage pain and discomfort effortlessly. Enjoy, relax, and
learn from Shiatsu and Qi Gong expert.
609-742-3140 Andrzej. www.healingtouchhealingmovement.com
Therapeutic Swedish massage for
women combining reflexology and acupressure in a soothing body-mind treatment. At Ariel Center for Wellbeing. $49.
609-454-0102. www.arielcenterforwellbeing.org.
MENTAL HEALTH
Having problems with life issues?
Stress, anxiety, depression, relationships. Free consultation. Working in person or by phone. Rafe Sharon, Psychoanalyst 609-683-7808.
INSTRUCTION
Biology Tutor: high school, Mercer
County only. 609-392-8897.
Chemistry & Math Tutoring: FullTime HS Teacher (20 years). 2012
American Chemical Society Award for
Outstanding HS Chemistry Teacher. AP,
Hon, Reg. UPENN-Stanford Ed. Call
Matt 609-919-1280. Near Market Fair,
Princeton.
Fear Away Driving School Learn to
drive from the best. Special rate. 609924-9700. Lic. 0001999.
Learn to play the Cello. Special Introductory Summer Rates. 6 lessons for
the price of 5. Certified NJ and Suzuki
Cello Teacher. Now accepting new students ages 4-8. Call Alan for details.
609-558-6175. E-mail [email protected]
www.thecellolearningcenter.com
Music Lessons: Piano, guitar, drum,
sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo,
mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more.
$28 half hour. School of Rock. Adults or
kids. Join the band! Princeton 609-9248282. Princeton Junction 609-8970032.
Hightstown
609-448-7170.
www.farringtonsmusic.com.
Outstanding Experienced Chemistry Tutor: Penn MS Degree. College/high school instructor. NJ Certified.
Also for Basic Math/Algebra. Competitive rates. (Nicki-609-586-6962)
Piano & Flute Lessons. Experienced
instructor,
M.A.
All
ages/levels/recitals. Plainsboro studio
or your home. 609-936-9811.
Science and Math Tutoring: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra, Geometry.
Taught by college professor. 18 years
experience. Recipient of two national
teaching awards. Discoverygenics 609581-5686.
User-Friendly Tutor: Experienced
Princeton University graduate; MA
Teaching; perfect SATs. SAT prep, essay writing, testing & study skills, grade
6 to AP math, science, English, Spanish.
Public, private & homeschooled. See
www.BrightTigerTutoring.com for references
&
more!
609-610-2896,
[email protected]
Violin, Viola, and Cello Lessons:
Princeton String Academy, your premier
source for Suzuki music lessons. Conveniently located in West Windsor and
serving the greater Princeton area. Five
faculty members with graduate/post
graduate degrees from Manhattan
school of Music, Peabody Institute and
U. Michigan. Visit us at www.stringacademy.net and call to schedule your free
introductory lesson today. Paul Manulik,
Director: 609-751-7664.
MERCHANDISE MART
1966 Live Action TV series Batmobile Replica Only 2,500 made, retails
$250, now $180. Also comic books, variant covers, action figures. Send me your
wants.
E-mail
[email protected], 848-459-4892.
For sale: Furniture, 2 wing chairs
$75. each, cherry curio cabinet $ 225. All
in excellent condition. Please call 609577-8244.
GARAGE SALES
Yard Sale: October 27 at 8 a.m. at the
Elks, 42 DeCou Avenue, Ewing. Tables
$10. Food and drinks available. 609571-1186 or 609-882-5000.
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
I Buy Guitars and All Musical Instruments in Any Condition: Call Rob at 609457-5501.
WANTED TO BUY
Antique Military Items: And war
relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. “Armies of the
Past LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave.,
Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail
outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00, or by
appointment.
OPPORTUNITIES
A successful entrepreneur seeking
business partners who have management experience with tracking records
of getting things done. Please inquire
[email protected]
Lightyear Wireless - At last a wireless provider that pays you and allows
you to earn free service. 1-800-2832819.
OWNERS OF INCOME PROPERTY
- Would you like to lower your operating
costs and increase your net income? Let
my 30+ years’ experience as a broker
and property manager review your operating expenses and recommend solutions for lowering costs. I look at your
service and utility contracts, building
material costs, and let you know where
you are overspending and how you can
obtain better services at less cost. Contact Steve at [email protected] for an initial, no obligation meeting.
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
U.S. 1
Richard K. Rein
H
ere’s some free advice
(for whatever that’s worth) to the
Princeton Borough Council (soon
to be the Princeton Council, once
the borough and township forms of
government have merged). The advice is about those two octagonalshaped information kiosks on Nassau Street, one at the corner of
Witherspoon Street, across from
Nassau Hall, the other at Vandeventer, in front of the Garden
movie theater.
If you ever walk down Nassau
Street and take a quick look at the
kiosks you might think they are a
grade school papier-mache project
run amok. The word “plastered” is
used in most every news reference
to kiosks, as in “plastered with paper,” in all shapes and sizes, colors
and grades, announcing all sorts of
news and views. Lots of these postings come with handy pre-cut tabs
at one end of the sheet, so that you
can pull off a little reference note.
I stopped by the other day and
grabbed contact information for a
kids’ music program, a room for
rent, a math and chemistry tutor, an
opportunity to be a volunteer for a
psychology experiment at $12 an
hour, a new website (yet another)
for Princeton-based Nintendo
gaming
enthusiasts,
Sunday
evening meetings of Zen devotees,
and a job opening for an administrative assistant for the owner of an
“art investment company.”
When viewed at a distance of
about eight feet or more, all of it appears to be a mess — an inchoate
jumble of paper flapping in the
wind. But, up close, depending on
your interests, there might be some
snippet of useful information.
Moreover, most of the postings are
current. I saw notices for garage
sales happening in the next day or
so. I saw nothing that seemed out
of date on a mid-September day.
But some of the politicians on
Borough Council, encouraged by
the Chamber of Commerce, see a
different opportunity for the
kiosks: A 21st century upgrade
with interactive touch screen computer displays that would bring a
dazzling array of information (possibly in several languages) to visitors, some other snappy presentations highlighting the cultural and
educational resources in town, and,
oh yes, some paid advertising. The
chamber and the municipality have
talked about splitting that revenue
once the chamber’s initial investment in the technology was paid
off. The most recent proposal has
been tabled for further discussion,
but it’s not off the table.
[email protected]
Like it or not, the kiosks represent something very healthy about
Nassau Street in Princeton that
cannot be said about the main drag
of many cities in America today.
There’s a street life to Nassau —
and the kiosks are only one mani-
At a distance the Nassau Street kiosks appear to be a jumble of
paper flapping in the
wind. But up close
there might be some
snippet of useful information.
festation of it. Labyrinth Books
and Landau’s clothing store both
place merchandise on display on
the sidewalk. People stop and
browse. Buskers play their guitars,
cases open awaiting contributions.
Panera Bread and PJ’s Pancake
House now have tables on the sidewalk — at PJ’s the Saturday or
Sunday line waiting to get in some-
times begin to block the flow of
pedestrians. At that point a restaurant manager appears, herding people back into line.
While some restaurants reach
out to the street, another one now
allows the street to reach in. The
newly opened Cheeburger Cheeburger has sliding windows that in
nice weather allow diners inside to
sit on the edge of an al fresco dining experience. Walk by and you
can smell the artery-clogging beef
sizzling on the plate. Yum.
That’s the beauty of a vibrant
street life. The taxpayers have to
pay for a street cleaner to come
through once in a while.
Thorny issues like free speech
get taken care of in the open market. If some nut wants to proclaim
that the Holocaust never really
happened or that the CIA planned
the 9/11 attacks, he can be ignored,
or shouted down. If he adds his
wacky musings to the kiosks they
can be torn down. And torn down
again if they reappear.
So that’s my free advice on
kiosks and on free speech (for what
that is worth).
OPEN SUN. 1-4 PM
OPEN SUN. 1-4 PM - NEW PRICE
COMMERCIAL SPACES FOR LEASE
LAWRENCE - 5,000 sq. ft. office can be subdivided.
Will renovate to your specs.
EWING - 800-2,000 sq. ft. in professional park, near Rt. 31 and TCNJ.
- 1,000 sq. ft. office space near Lawrence border. First month free.
HAMILTON - 650 sq. ft. office/retail at signaled intersection.
- 1,250 - 5,000 sq. ft. office ideally suited for many uses.
- 550, 650, or 1,100 sq. ft. medical/office space
in high profile building near Applebees.
FAIRLESS HILLS, PA - 500 - 4,000 sq. ft. suites near Oxford Valley Mall
ideal for medical or office.
FLORENCE - 2,000 to 12,000 sq. ft on Rt. 130 at NJ Turnpike entrance.
PENNINGTON - 400 sq. ft. office space at Pennington Circle.
DOYLESTOWN, (CHALFONT) PA - 2,000 sq. ft.
Ideal for office or medical. Near PA Turnpike
BUILDINGS FOR SALE
EWING - 6,300 Sq. ft. multi-tenant
office building. Great upside
potential. Reduced for quick
sale - $395,000.
LAWRENCE - 11,000 sq. ft.
multi-tenant office building
(2 bldgs). Ideal for
user/investor. $995,000
www.HowcoManagement.com
OPEN SUN. 1-4 PM
Hopewell $329,900
68 E Prospect Street
Beautifully maintained 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Colonial, hwd flrs,w/Wrp-around porch, 1 Car
Garage, Walking Distance to Main Street.
Dir:Take Broad Street (518) to Princeton Avenue
and Left onto Prospect Street.
Hamilton $186,000
6 Laurel Court
Ravenscroft 2BR/1.5BA Townhome with garage.
LR with fireplace and French doors that lead to
paver patio, EIK with pantry, new carpeting and
freshly painted. Dir: Kuser Rd, L Willowbend,
L Raintree, R Laurel
Hamilton $239,900
7 Quimby Avenue
3BR Cape w/2 updated baths located on a cul-desac. Maintenance free exterior, formal LR/DR,
new roof, newer windows, fin bsmt, EIK, fenced
yard w/new shed. 1C garage. Move-in ready. Dir:
Whitehorse Ham Sq Rd to Quimby
609-921-2700
609-586-1400
609-586-1400
ID#6098901
ID#6098671
ID#5978076
OPEN SUN. 1-4 PM
Lawrenceville
$269,900
12 Catbird Ct.
Stunning
3-story 3 BR
Th on a cul-desac boasts
New Kitchen
w/39” Cherry
cabs, galaxy
black granite
countertops
& GE stainless
appliances!
LR w/cozy
fireplace; main
floor FR & paver patio! Dir: Denow Rd. to
Sturwood Way to Wexford to Featherbed Ct. to
Catbird Ct. 609-921-2700 ID#6056110
NEW LISTING
WELL MAINTAINED 4 BEDROOM 2.5 BATH COLONIAL
Pennington $329,900
112 Blackwell Road
4 four BR split level home on almost an acre
of land w/ HW & ceramic tile floors, E-I-K, LR,
lower level FR, and master BR w/ sliders to deck
overlooking the spacious back yard.
609-921-2700
East Windsor $359,900
30 Hankins Road
Hickory Acres section of East Windsor.
Features Living Room, formal Dining Room,
large Family Room and Office/Den. Move in
Ready.
(609)586-1400
NEW LISTING
East Windsor $138,000
1832 Old Stone Mill Dr.
Windsor Mill condo w/ 2 BR, 2 full baths. Freshly
painted, New floors in kit. & foyer. Gas heat Lovely
complex with clubhouse, Pool, tennis courts &
playground. Near transportation and new
Hospital.
609-921-2700
ID#6102191
ID#6106558
ID#6031515
NEW PRICE
NEW LISTING
NEW PRICE
Lawrenceville $202,000
1302 Golden Pl.
Inside feels like a NY APT w/ gorgeous HW flring
& spotless décor!Outside views of trees & open
space surround you! The best of both worlds in
this spacious main floor condo w/attached 1 car
garage!
609-921-2700
ID6011704
Lawrenceville $231,999
314 American Eagle Ct.
Eagles Chase Condo. New kit. w/granite counters,
laminate flrs in kit., LR &DR. 2 BRS, 2 Full Bath,
Loft & one car garage. Great commuter Location!
Move in condition!!
Hamilton $292,500
230 George Dye Rd.
Well maintained 3 BR, 2 full BTH Ranch in
Steinert School District. Hardwood flrs., marble
countertops, center island, SS appls., plenty
Storage. Fin. BSMT & 1 car garage.
Hamilton $199,900
424 Route 156 - New Price
Outstanding investment..or live here and rent out
an Apt. of this Yardville, 2 Family. Steinert.
Modern 1BR Apt + 3BR Apt. Call today!
609-921-2700
609-921-2700
609-586-1400
W
e can all imagine the arguments in favor of this move. Revenue for the town government.
Revenue for the chamber. A content management system that will
eliminate clutter. A sleek, high tech
kiosk design that will dazzle a
teenager from Japan.
We can also imagine how the inevitable objections can be dismissed. People need places to advertise or publicize spur-of-themoment enterprises. Craig’s List
can handle that, and no one uses
classified ads anymore, either.
People want to proclaim a political
opinion. They can stand on the corner and hand out flyers. Of course,
it would be preferable if they just
posted their opinions online.
As neat as this idea sounds, my
free advice is simple: Don’t do it.
Leave the kiosks where they are,
and allow them to function as they
have been functioning. If you want
an interactive electronic kiosk put
it somewhere else.
ID#6097855
ID#6048937
NEW PRICE
NEW PRICE
NEW PRICE
Bordentown $119,900
575 Route 206 - New Price
3BR/1BA Cape with attached garage & full basement. Fenced yard w/plenty of parking. Nice size
Kitchen w/walk in pantry. Short sale being sold
"As Is". Needs some TLC.
609-586-1400
ID#6053134
Hamilton $145,000
152 Churchill Ave. - New Price
Colonial Manor Cape 3BR/2BA, Great Kitchen
Corian countertops & tile floor, Skylight, lots of
closets, part fin bsmt, security system.
Lawrenceville $169,900
64 Betts Ave - New Price
Unique-Mint-Exciting 3BR Gem featuring remodeled kit w/granite and complete S/S appliance
pkg, FP wall unit, Remodeled bath, new tiling,
W/W carpeting and wood flooring.
609-586-1400
ID#6003298
609-586-1400
ID#5620326
ID#6090018
NEW PRICE
Ewing $119,980
169 Clover Ave - New Price
3BR Brick Ranch with new carpet, HW floor and
newer windows. Interior just painted. Large EIK,
CA, full bsmt plus covered patio & fenced rear
yard. Move in ready home.
609-586-1400
ID#5938911
43
U.S. 1
SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
fennelly.com
609-520-0061
Is... Class A Office Space
500 Alexander Park, Princeton, NJ
902 Carnegie Center, Princeton, NJ
Palmer Square, Princeton, NJ
Matrix Corporate Center, Cranbury, NJ
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Prime Downtown Princeton Location
Unit Sizes from 2,150 to 5,500 SF Available
Passenger Elevators in Buildings
Parking Deck at Rear of Building
Located Across from Princeton University
Walk to Train Shuttle
Convenient to Dining & Shopping Right
within Palmer Square
Is... Office/Medical Space
Constitution Center
2650 Rt. 130, Cranbury, NJ
Bordentown Professional Plaza
163 Route 130, Bordentown, NJ
VanNest Office Park
Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, NJ
Q Office/Medical for Lease
Q Unit 1: 2,350 SF on 1st Floor
Q Unit 2: 4,000-6,000 SF on 2nd Floor Divisible
to 2,000 SF
Q Unit 3: 1,854 SF on 2nd Floor Built-out
Medical Space
Q Unit 4: 2,154 SF Corner Office Unit
Q Perimeter Windows Throughout
(Windows Operate)
Q Monument Signage Available
Q Convenient to NJ Turnpike Exit 8A
Q Great Location for Office or Medical Space
with Highway Frontage & Visibility
Q For Lease – Office/Medical
Q Immediately Available – Great Rental Rates!
Q 3,600 SF Medical Unit on 1st Floor – Beautiful
& Ready to Go
Q Additional Units for Lease: 1,000 to 5,000 SF
on 1st or 2nd Floor
Q Plenty of Parking Available
Q Good Location Close to New Construction
Medical Facility
Q Highway Frontage on Route 130
Q Convenient to I-295, I-195 & NJ Turnpike
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Is... Flex Space
1589 Reed Road, Pennington, NJ
4 Crossroads Drive, Hamilton, NJ
1880 Princeton Ave., Lawrenceville, NJ
Q 15,000 SF Unit for Lease – Will Divide
Q 6,000 SF of Office on 2nd Floor
Q 9,000 SF of Warehouse/Production/
Lab Space on 1st Floor
Q 4 Drive-in Doors, 22’ Ceilings
Q Convenient access to I-95, Routes 1, 31,
202 & 206
Q Unit 2: 8,000 SF of Office
(Includes 1,875 SF Warehouse)
Q Unit 3: 4,000 SF of Warehouse
Q Unit 4: 5,700 SF of Office/Warehouse
Q Warehouse Equipped with Drive-in Doors,
18’ Ceilings
Q Abundant Parking Available
Q Close Proximity to Route 130,
I-195 & the NJ Turnpike
Q Office/Warehouse for Lease
Q 13,000 SF – Will Divide
Q Heated & Air-Conditioned
Warehouse/Production space with Tile Floor
Q Large kitchen/breakroom & Bathrooms
Q 2 Loading Docks, 12’-19’ Ceiling Height,
400 Amp, 3 Phase Electric
Q Abundant Parking
Q Perfect for mailing/printing companies,
Warehouse Storage & Assembly
Q Potential Location for Sports &
Entertainment use
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Is... Buildings For Sale
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Q For Lease or Sale – Office or Medical
Condominium
Q For Lease: 2,000 SF with 4-5 Perimeter
Offices, Conference Room & Open
Bullpen Area
Q For Sale: 5,200 SF Condo on the 2nd Floor
Consisting of Many Perimeter Offices,
2 Conference Rooms, Open Area,
Kitchen & Bathrooms
Q Elevator Serviced, Ample Parking, Building
Built in 2007
Q Convenient Location Close to Hamilton
Train Station, I-295 & Route 1
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Q For Sale or Lease
Q 5,000 to 30,000 SF Buildings Available
for Sale or Lease
Q Join AmeriHealth, Bracco Research, ADP
& Innophos
Q Own or Lease Your Own Building
Q Strategic & Convenient Location with
Turnpike Frontage
New Office/Medical Space for Lease
1,000 SF to 25,000 SF Available
Build to Suit – 1st or 2nd Floor Units
New Brick Construction Situated
in an Attractive Corporate Setting
Q Perimeter Windows Throughout Overlooking
the VanNest Forest Reserve
Q Close Proximity to Hospitals, Route 1,
I-295 & the Hamilton Train Station
Longford Corporate Center
3379 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, NJ
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Matrix Corporate Center
259 Prospect Plains, Cranbury, NJ
Class A Office for Lease
5,000 to 30,000 SF Buildings Available
Corporate Campus Setting
New Cafeteria & Amenities Building
Under Construction
Q Building Signage Available
Q Join AmeriHealth, Bracco Research,
ADP & Innophos as Tenants
Q Own or Lease Your Own Building
Q Strategic & Convenient Location
with Turnpike Frontage
21 Hillside Avenue, Trenton, NJ
1226 Route 130, Robbinsville, NJ
20 North Pennsylvania, Morrisville, PA
Q Flex Building for Sale or Lease
Q 10,000 SF Single Story Building
Q 3,200 SF of Office & 6,800 SF
of Air Conditioned Production/
Warehouse Space
Q 2 Loading Docks, 12-14’ Ceilings,
3 Phase Electric
Q Excellent Highway Location Close
to NJ Turnpike, I-195 & I-295
Q Sale Price: $875,000
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Q 8,200 SF Free Standing 2-Story Building
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Q 5,500 SF on 2 Floors Plus a 2,700 SF
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Finished Basement
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Q Beautiful Stone Building, Well Maintained
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with Many Upgrades
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Q Perfect for Attorneys, Banks, Architects,
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Real Estate Offices
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Q Plenty of On-Site Parking
Q Easy Access to Route 1, I-95, NJ & PA Turnpike
Q Sale Price: $675,000
Office Building for Sale
11,070 SF Two-Story Office Building
5,500 SF on both floors
Zoning: BH – Business Highway
Well-Maintained Building Built in 1984
½ Acre Lot, Gated Parking Lot with 29 Spaces
Minutes to Route 1 and Downtown Trenton
Sale Price: $675,000
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4,886 SF Available
Class A Office Space
Princeton’s Premier Office Building
High End Space! Move Right In!
Fully Furnished, Plug & Play
Onsite Cafeteria and Fitness Center
Prime Time Route 1 Office Space Right
Next to Market Fair
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Class A Office for Lease
Available: 48,000 SF; Divisible to 3,000 SF
Three Story Corporate Office Building
16,000 SF on each floor
Multi-Tenant or Single Tenant Opportunities
Perimeter Windows Throughout
with Pond Views
Upscale Corporate Setting –
Corporate Headquarters Location
Property Manager on Site
Cafeteria at 600 Alexander Park
Building Signage Available
Route 1 Amenities Nearby
Walk to Princeton Junction Train Station
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10 Abeel Road, Monroe, NJ
Q Office/Warehouse Building for Sale
Q 45,000 SF Building on 2.3 Acres
Q 20,000 SF of Office & 25,000 SF
of Warehouse
Q Zoned Light Impact Industrial
Q 24’ Ceilings in Warehouse, 4 Loading Docks
&1 Drive-in Door
Q Located 1/4 Mile to NJ Turnpike, Exit 8A
Q Great User or Investor Building —
6 year lease in place