Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier

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Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Volume 3, Issue 2
May 2016
Job Corps Civilian
Conservation Center Courier
Ravalli Electric Cooperative Teams Up with the Trapper Creek Job Corps for Some Impressive Energy Savings
Jim Maunder, Member Services Manager, Ravalli Electric Cooperative, Corvallis, Montana—Reprinted with permission from the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin magazine.
©2015 by the Northwest Public Power Association. All rights reserved.
In 2011 the Bonneville Power
Administration (BPA) notified
Ravalli Electric Cooperative
(REC) that their wholesale power
cost was going up. In turn, REC
alerted its membership of the
pending rate increase. So, consequently it was no surprise
when REC’s largest consumer of
electricity, the Trapper Creek
Job Corp (TCJC), contacted Ravalli Electric to learn how they
could become more efficient.
Not only were they interested in
saving money, but Executive
Order #13423 requires federal
agencies to reduce their energy
consumption by three percent
each year to hit 30-percent reductions by 2015 from 2003
levels. As a federal agency, TCJC
had to comply and wanted to
start the process of improving
the center’s energy efficiency.
From that point on, the wheels
were set in motion: Ravalli contacted its energy efficiency representative at BPA, Dan Villalobos, to get some technical
assistance from BPA’s energy
engineers; Villalobos put Ravalli
in contact with Erik Boyer in
their Spokane office; and an
energy scoping audit with Boyer
and TCJC staff was set up for
mid-July 2011. The objective of
the energy scoping audit was to
investigate TCJC’s energy use
and to provide general recommendations for site energyefficiency measures.
“Establishing the working relationship with Bonneville Power
and Ravalli Electric Co-op has
proved to be a very rewarding
experience. Their assistance
has brought our 50-year-old
facility out of the dark ages in
terms of energy efficiency,
and from that we’ve become
much more responsible facility stewards,” said Daniel
Gager, work programs officer
for Trapper Creek Job Corps.
“We’ve seen remarkable
return of investment. We’re
not only improving our facilities’ efficiencies, but were
also saving significant taxpayer dollars, at a time when
program budgets our shrinking.”
So far, the outcome has
been quite remarkable —
through October 2015, the
energy-efficiency measures
installed at TCJC have decreased their annual energy
consumption by more than
14 percent in the past four
years.
(continued on page 3)
Wilderness Discovery Certification Program
Tina J. Terrell, National Director, Job Corps National Office
In 2015, the
Trapper
Creek Job
Corps Civilian
Conservation
Center
(JCCCC), located in Darby Montana, partnered with the Bitterroot National Forest and the Arthur
Carhart National Wilderness
Training Center to develop the
Wilderness Discovery Certification (WDC) program. The WDC
provides Job Corps students
with the knowledge, skills and
abilities needed to complete
wilderness and trail work on
public land through classroom
and hands-on learning and work
opportunities.
This training program has been
implemented at Trapper Creek
for two years and is being implemented on eight other Job Corps
Civilian Conservation Centers
(continued on page 2)
Page 2
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
From the Desk of the National Office (continued from page 1)
Tina J. Terrell, National Director, Job Corps National Office
Last year 11 students
worked on the SelwayWilderness on the Bitterroot National Forest; this
year 27 students are completing the WDC training
program at Trapper Creek.
(JCCCCs) located across the
United States in 2016. The eight
week classroom training will
provide wilderness awareness
to JCCCC students who are all
too often unfamiliar with these
special places.
The WDC program students train
to be familiarized with the Wilderness Act, its proponent Aldo
Leopold, and the special requirements for visiting or working in wilderness areas. The
classroom training is accompanied by traditional skills training
such as ax use and cross-cut
saw training.
Last year 11 Trapper Creek students worked on the Selway
Wilderness on the Bitterroot
National Forest; this year 27
students are completing the
WDC training program. Additionally, the training has been exported to eight other JCCCCs
with the intention of expanding
the program to hundreds more
youth.
The Forest Service Job Corps
program anticipates the training
offered at JCCCCs will grow with
each successive year. This
unique training and work experience can be transformative for
students who may not otherwise
see, work on, or appreciate our
national wilderness areas.
Students who participate in the
training are educated on wilderness stewardship and develop a
land ethic which can help them
apply for temporary and permanent wilderness, recreation, or
environmental education positions with a public land management agency.
Wilderness Discovery Certificate Program participants remove tree from the Tin Cup Creek trail on the
Selway Wilderness on the Bitterroot National Forest. Photo courtesy of Adam Washebek.
Students who graduate from the
WDC program obtain a certificate
from the Arthur Carhart National
Wilderness Training Center and
are certified to lead or participate
on wilderness crews.
The mission of the Arthur Carhart
National Wilderness Training
Center is to equip and inspire
agency leaders and partners to
ensure that America's National
Wilderness Preservation System
endures for future generations.
The Center accomplishes this
mission through training, information, and education.
The Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center is being
supported by all four land manWilderness Discovery Certificate Program student works on reconstruction a 35’ bridge on the Selway
Wilderness on the Bitterroot National Forest. Photo courtesy of Adam Washebek.
Pathway to Employment
Wilderness
Discovery
Certificate
Employ & Engage Program
graduates are prepared for
immediate employment and
can hit the ground running!
agement agencies: the National Park Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of
Land Management and the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
In its recent newsletter, the
Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center’s
“Certification to Professionalization” diagram described
the three focus areas of the
Wilderness Discovery Certification program that is featured at left.
Page 3
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Ravalli Electric Cooperative Teams Up with the Trapper Creek Job Corps for Some Impressive Energy Savings
(continued from page 1)
Jim Maunder, Member Services Manager, Ravalli Electric Cooperative, Corvallis, Montana—Reprinted with permission from the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin magazine.
©2015 by the Northwest Public Power Association. All rights reserved.
“It’s a great project to be involved in, helping Trapper Creek
achieve their energy efficiency
goals,” said Mark Grotbo, general manager for Ravalli Electric
Cooperative.
pentry shop, dormitories, gymnasium, education building,
recreation center, and the three
emergency backup generators
for the food service, water, and
wastewater systems.
Background
In the spring of 2012, the energy-efficiency measures that
were installed included the following: performance testing and
sealing the ductwork for the
forced air heating systems in the
dormitories; and installation of
ductless heat pumps in the student transitional houses as well
as ceiling insulation.
Trapper Creek Job Corp is located south of Darby, Mont., up the
west fork of the Bitterroot River.
The campus serves on average
about 225 students in addition
to 50 permanent and 20 temporary employees. Students have
two main breaks during the year
from June 28 to July 19 in the
summer, and December 19 to
January 5 in the winter. Most
campus buildings operate during the hours from 7:30 a.m. to
4 p.m.
The campus was originally built
in the 1960s and is currently
used as a Job Corps Center. Job
Corps is a no-cost education
and career technical training
program administered by the
U.S. Department of Labor that
helps young people ages 16
through 24 improve the quality
of their lives through career
technical and academic training.
TCJC has 20 main buildings of
significant loads with many other small outbuildings/storage
structures.
Baseline monitoring completed
in 2011 and 2012 indicated
that the buildings with the largest energy consumption were
the welding shop, food service
building, gym, carpentry shop,
recreation building, and the
dormitories.
Highlights of the energy efficiency projects
With the large loads identified,
energy monitoring and data
logging began by the end of
2011 (and continued through
2012) in the following center
buildings: food service, car-
Measurement and verification of
the energy-efficiency measures
installed in the dormitory buildings was impressive. The duct
testing and sealing, plus ceiling
insulation, for Dorm #1 showed
annual savings of 56,321 kilowatt-hours (kWh), a savings of
48 percent over the previous
year’s bill.
Residence #28 of the transitional houses showed great annual
savings as well. Residence #28
posted a savings of 50 percent.
The prior year’s usage was
24,966 kWh compared to
12,444 kWh after the ductless
heat pump was installed.
To date, Trapper Creek Job Corp
has achieved over 14 percent
energy savings since the project
was started.
2010-11 were used as part of
the BPA Scoping Audit in late
2011. The documents helped
identify the buildings to install
energy-monitoring equipment
and data loggers: food service,
dormitories, education, recreation, carpentry, welding, gymna-
sium, administration, and the
healthcare facility. The transitional student houses were also
analyzed.
Some of the issues identified by
the scoping audit included
(continued on page 4)
Project overview
A review of TCJC’s five-year average showed an annual energy
usage of approximately
3,200,000 kWh a year. The
center had a summer peak of
125,000 kWh per month and a
winter peak of around 422,000
kWh a month; their non-weather
consumption averaged 135,000
kWh a month.
An energy study from 1997 and
a facility study conducted in
BPA’s Erik Boyer checks the monitoring equipment on the HVAC system for the education building.
Page 4
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Ravalli Electric Cooperative Teams Up with the Trapper Creek Job Corps for Some Impressive Energy Savings
(continued from page 3)
Jim Maunder, Member Services Manager, Ravalli Electric Cooperative, Corvallis, Montana—Reprinted with permission from the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin magazine.
©2015 by the Northwest Public Power Association. All rights reserved.
deteriorated ductwork and antiquated thermostats in the dormitories. Aging HVAC systems in
the food service, education, and
recreation buildings, as well as
antiquated and non-functioning
packaged thermal air conditioner units in the welding shop
were also identified. The backup
emergency generators located
adjacent to the food service
along with the center’s water
supply and wastewater systems
were monitored as well.
50-percent energy savings in the
first year.
EnergyEnergy-efficiency measures
highlights
The administration and
healthcare buildings had duct
testing and sealing performed
on their HVAC systems along
with the installation of Webenabled programmable thermostats and their attics were upgraded to R-49 insulation levels.
In addition, Ravalli Electric retrofitted 38 existing security lights
that had 175-watt high-pressure
sodium fixtures to 50-watt LED
ones.
The energy monitoring of the
heating system run times provided valuable information as to
how the furnaces were being
operated in the dormitories. The
run times of the furnaces in
each dormitory did not match
each other. Some showed run
times when the students were
out on campus attending class,
while others had different zones
of the building off when the
areas were occupied. It was also
noted that center staff and students complained about comfort
levels in the dorms. The energyefficiency measures installed in
the dormitories included duct
sealing and repairs, air sealing,
attic insulation, and the installation of Web-enabled programmable thermostats.
The energy savings for the
dorms after the energy efficiency measures were installed had
a simple payback of two years.
The center has three transitional
houses for students in their last
semester of study; each house
has four students living in it. The
houses were constructed in
1967 and they have electric
baseboard heat. The energy
efficiency measures identified
for the houses were to upgrade
the attic insulation to R-49 and
install a ductless heat pump in
Project savings
As 2015 comes to an end, TCJC
is on its way to achieving even
more energy savings. They have
completed an LED retrofit of all
of the center’s emergency exit
signs, and they have installed
four commercial-grade ductless
heat pumps in the education
building as well as an LED lighting retrofit.
The average annual energy consumption for Dorm #1: the red line is the baseline annual energy
consumption; the blue line is the post-energy consumption; and the green line is the annual energy
savings.
Ravalli Electric Cooperative teamed up with Trapper Creek Job Corps to investigate the center’s energy use and to provide general
recommendations for site energy-efficiency measures. The results for the dormitory buildings (pictured above) were impressive, resulting in an
annual savings of 56,321 kilowatt-hours, a savings of 48 percent over the previous year’s bill.
In 2016, the recreation building’s HVAC system is scheduled
to have duct testing and sealing,
Web-enabled programmable
thermostats installed, and the
attic upgraded to R-49 insulation. BPA also conducted a scoping study to look at the feasibility of installing a geothermal
(continued on page 5)
the main living area of each
house.
Residence #28 achieved some
very impressive annual energy
savings. The year prior to the
ductless heat pump being installed, the house had an annual energy use of 24,966 kWh;
the year after, the annual energy
use was 12,523 kWh.
Residence #28 had a one-ton
ductless heat pump installed in
December 2012. With the installation of the ductless heat
pump, Residence #28 achieved
The graph shows the pre– and post-energy use for Residence #28.
Page 5
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Ravalli Electric Cooperative Teams Up with the Trapper Creek Job Corps for Some Impressive Energy Savings
(continued from page 4)
Jim Maunder, Member Services Manager, Ravalli Electric Cooperative, Corvallis, Montana—Reprinted with permission from the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin magazine.
©2015 by the Northwest Public Power Association. All rights reserved.
heat pump system
to handle the center’s gymnasium,
which has a very
antiquated forcedair electric furnace
with no ventilation
air capabilities to meet current
building codes. The U.S. Forest
Service is looking at upgrading
the HVAC systems in the dormitories as well; they’re considering installing heat recovery ventilators and heat pump upgrades.
“We’re excited about some of
our future efficiency projects
that include providing better
living conditions for our dormitories and replacing obsolete
HVAC with a ground source
heating/ cooling system,” said
Gager.
The graph tracks the energy savings at TCJC from 2011-2015. The cumulative energy savings for TCJC is
approximately 14.6 percent. Energy savings continues to grow as other efficiency projects are
completed.
Ravalli Electric Cooperative,
BPA, Trapper Creek Job Corp,
and the U.S. Forest Service continue to work together on this
ongoing project and are eager to
see what progress lies ahead.
Trapper Creek Job Corps Facts
Students: 217
Employees: 67
Associated Forest:
Bitterroot National Forest
Program Year 2014 Graduate
Placement Rate: 91.6%
Vocational Trades
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Culinary Arts
Electrical
Office Administration
Facilities Maintenance
Forestry Conservation and
Firefighting
Union Carpentry
Union Cement Masonry
Union Painting
Welding
Boxelder Job Corps Center Greenhouse and Garden Project Expands
Bonnie Fuller, Academic Manager, Boxelder Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
The Boxelder Job Corps Center
Greenhouse and Garden project
began in 2011. In 2015, the
Center began working with the
non-profit Seed Savers Exchange, procuring 36 heirloom
seed packets to plant in its version of a Peoples’ Garden.
The Peoples’ Garden has been a
huge success incorporating
both classroom instruction,
experimentation, recycling, and
teaching responsibility. This will
be the second year that the
Boxelder Garden and Greenhouse has included an apiary
and chickens into its learning
environment.
The chickens were donated by a
Boxelder employee. The assimilation of living things into the
classroom and living environ-
ment has greatly benefited the
students. The garden provides a
great opportunity to connect
staff and students in a positive,
relaxed, and constructive way.
Boxelder is implementing a new
practice by inviting teams of
staff and students to manage a
plot. This is in hopes that all
staff and students will feel as
though they have ownership and
rights to the garden, to support
an overall sense of belonging,
and foster good relationships.
Historically, staff and students
who are “in the right place at the
right time,” have enjoyed the
benefits of this space. The new
structure is intended to broaden
the access so that more people
can enjoy and contribute to the
Peoples’ Garden. Ideally, inter-
ested staff from
each department
will work alongside students.
Students and
staff will attend
mini-classes to
learn gardening
skills like how to
run the temperamental water
pump, basic plant
(L-R) Boxelder Science Teacher Michelle Crane assists student Ibrahim
biology, harvestKhatib with the Center’s apiary. Photo courtesy Bonnie Fuller.
ing seeds, and
chicken hypnotism.
When they opened the hives to
This last winter season was the
first for the bee hives and everyone was anxious to see if the
bees had sustained themselves
through the winter.
observe the survival rate, they
found that one hive had survived
and one had not. The hive that
survived appears to be “bee”
taking honey from the failed hive
(continued on page 6)
Page 6
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Boxelder Job Corps Center Greenhouse and Garden Project Expands (continued from page 5)
Bonnie Fuller, Academic Manager, Boxelder Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
Center’s culinary
arts department.
The eggs are free
range; they are not
considered organic
at this time, but
could easily be up
for certification at
a later date. Sixty
dozen eggs have
been produced in
less than six
months.
Boxelders Big
Green Garden and
Greenhouse proJasmine the chicken enjoys the view from Boxelder student Dan Sierra’s shoulder. Photo
(L-R) Boxelder students Joseph Nimubona, Blu Gay, and Tayvis Harris eating honey
vides a sense of
courtesy of Bonnie Fuller.
fresh from the honey comb. Photo courtesy of Bonnie Fuller.
home and belonging to the students
Boxelder students have been
chicken feed until the staff can
option of participating in halfby creating a community that
able to enjoy honey fresh from
become certified in eggday science labs once a week.
supports itself and in which they
the honeycomb and learn bee
handling.
participate in work, food producThey are learning about chicken
keeping skills such as how to
tion and the nurturing of other
Students
care
for
the
chickens
reproduction,
comparative
anatapproach the hive and sedate
living things.
through daily chores and other
omy, species hardiness through
the bees.
maintenance, and they find
natural selection, and artificial
Although this quality is more
This year, the goal for the bee
discipline in their work.
selection for human purposes.
difficult to measure, it is by far
hive is for the students to learn
the most important. Boxelder
The
students
have
helped
in
Importantly,
these
animals
also
about animal behavior. The stustudents, who come from varidesigning, repairing, and buildallow students to connect to
dents will research anatomy,
ous backgrounds and countries,
ing
a
new
coop
and
fence
to
their
food
sources.
Caring
for
pollen production, honey prooften have previous experience
house
the
chickens.
They
also
the
chickens,
egg
collection
and
duction, and bee behavior.
with poultry production. They
learn to mitigate the problems
remember this and feel at home.
of predators and inclement
Boxelder Job Corps Facts
Students: 169
Employees: 55
Associated Forest: Black Hills
National Forest
Program Year 2014 Graduate Placement Rate: 83.5%
Vocational Trades:
Boxelder student Tristian Pope weighs an egg produced by a Boxelder chicken. Photo courtesy of
Bonnie Fuller.
Interactions with domestic animals provides students a direct
learning connection to biology
education standards. They participate in lab-based lessons
that revolve around the chickens and the students have the
cooking with the eggs allow
students to gain a deeper understanding of the energy inputs, including labor, that food
production requires.
The eggs also are offered in
exchange for a donation toward
(L-R) Boxelder students Delano Jackson and
Neil Smith ponder the chicken or the egg
question. Photo courtesy of Bonnie Fuller.
weather that impact the chicken
operation.
The chickens’ egg production
could significantly offset the
costs of purchasing eggs in the
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Culinary Arts
Electrical
Facilities Maintenance
Nursing Assistant Home Health
Aide
Office Administration
Union Carpentry
Union Painting
Welding
Page 7
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Centennial Job Corps’ Ranking Returns it to the Top Tier of the Nation’s 125 Job Corps Centers—
Best Practices on Improving Your Job Corps Center’s Performance
Mike Delaney, Career Technical Training Manager, Centennial Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
departmental communications. We agreed that
staff had to work together, as a team, toward
student retention.
Without all staff having
the same commitment to
moving in the same direction, the Center was destined to fail again in the
new program year.
(L-R) Centennial Job Corps fire camp crew members Larissa Peppers, Cibrianna Wood, and Joshua
Hensley. Photo courtesy of Mike Delaney.
To the disappointment of all its
staff, Centennial Job Corps had
the worst performance year in
its history during the 2014 program year (PY).
Centennial’s drop to a ranking
of 94 after being a consistent
Top-50 Center was alarming.
As of February 2016, Centennial
rose to an overall rating of
105.50% and is now ranked
number 9 out of the 125 Job
Corps Centers across the nation.
The closure of the Treasure
Lake Job Corps Center, although
due to consistently poor performance, made Centennial’s leadership and staff realize that
changes had to be made in the
way that Centennial Job Corps
was doing business as we entered the new program year.
The Center’s biggest issue in
PY14 was student retention. We
were losing many of our students due to resignations and
absent without leave separations. We also had disciplinary
separations, but those were to
be expected.
Student dropouts were our main
concern because as Department of Labor Program Manager Brendan Kenney said to me
during our Department of Labor
Regional Office Center Assessment, “If today’s students don’t
like a situation, they will vote
with their feet and just walk
away.” Looking back over the
past year, Centennial’s staff
members agreed with his assessment.
The correction plan to end the
Center’s downward trend began
with a group of staff volunteers
who formed an Outcome Measurement System (OMS)
workgroup. The group’s goals
included determining the various reasons of why students
were walking away and developing a list of changes to stem the
tide of non-completers. The
OMS workgroup also wanted to
make the Center more pleasant
and user-friendly.
Before the first OMS workgroup
meeting, a survey was sent out
to staff members asking them to
poll their students to get feedback on what they perceived as
the reasons so many students
were leaving the program. Center staff came to the first meeting with a laundry list of issues
to begin the discussion.
One of the first things that the
work group addressed was inter-
“We have to remember that
students are our customers.
Without customers we don’t have
a job.”
Mike Delaney,
Career Technical Training Manager,
Centennial Job Corps
As career technical training
(CTT) Manager, I was tasked
with visiting each department to
train staff on the OMS; most
staff had heard of the OMS, but
not all of them understood how
the pools and credits impact a
Center’s performance. The work
group realized that the Center
had to maintain a focus on OMS
ratings and rankings.
The OMS training was also designed to show how each staff
member’s actions and interactions with students could impact
the Center’s OMS standings on
a month-to-month basis.
Centennial Job Corps implemented many new best practices. One change made was to
reduce the size of new student
input groups to allow Center
staff to spend more one-on-one
time with new students and help
them adjustment to their new
environment.
Working with Outreach and Admissions Counselors, we also
are actively recruiting students
to fill open trade slots. New students have a reserved slot in
their trade of choice. This helps
Centennial Job Corps welding student. Photo courtesy of Mike Delaney.
the Center to not loose students
because they are not able to get
into their preferred trade.
Center staff are also trying to
get new students involved in
student committees, so that
they feel ownership, that they
are making a difference, and
that their presence and participation helps to make Centennial
Job Corps a better place for all
students.
To reduce the number of quitters, we took steps to improve
communication amongst students and staff.
Staff are doing a better job at
treating students like customers
and also treating them like we
ourselves would like to be treated if we were students.
The “golden rule” works very
well here. Sometimes, we all get
caught up in the “us versus
them” mentality and that can kill
a Center. This is a thought process that, if it’s not monitored
by Center management, can be
in danger of allowing staff to fall
back into their old ways.
Center staff also are trying to
find “outside the box” ways to
work with students, so that we
can achieve a win for both the
student and the Center.
Staff are not letting students
slide on issues, but we are letting them know where they need
to improve and then rebuild
their self-esteem during behavior discussions. This way, students leave feeling like they can
make a change and get out from
under whatever issue they are
facing.
(continued on page 8)
Page 8
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Centennial Job Corps’ Ranking Returns it to the Top Tier of the Nation’s 125 Job Corps Centers—
Best Practices on Improving Your Job Corps Center’s Performance (continued from page 7)
Mike Delaney, Career Technical Training Manager, Centennial Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
We work hard with problem students, but there is a point where
you have to cut ties and let
them go.
Centennial Job Corps computer technology
student. Photo courtesy of Mike Delaney.
Job Corps’ Zero Tolerance policy
on drugs, alcohol, and violence,
and other serious behavior issues, are dealt with according
to the Policy and Requirements
Handbook requirements. However, where there is flexibility in
dealing with minor behavioral
issues, we work with students to
allow them to stay on-Center.
There is a fine balance between
the human side of Job Corps
statistical metrics. In most cases, Center staff try to make their
decisions in the best interest of
the student; however, there are
times when a Center has one
student whose behavior is so
disruptive that it causes other
students to leave the program.
We work hard with problem
students, but there is a point
where you have to cut ties and
let them go. When dealing with
the OMS, you have to understand that for every negative
(non-completer) it takes about
1.5 completers to make up the
difference.
When dealing with the OMS, you
have to understand that for
every negative (non-completer)
it takes about 1.5 completers to
make up the difference. In the
end, the formula is pretty simple
--you have to put out more completers than non-completers
every month.
Sometimes, it’s hard to stay
focused on those reasons because staff can get caught up in
the negative daily dramas that
occur on every Job Corps
Center.
Keep in mind that problem
students make up about
ten percent of your student
population. Take time every day
Centennial staff members examine the OMS numbers on a
month-to-month basis because
the Center can control our student flow better over shorter
periods of time.
Your time will be well spent, and
you’ll brighten someone else’s
day. Your day will definitely
change for the better. Remember that it costs you absolutely
nothing to be nice to someone.
Remember what
inspired you to work at a Job
Corps Center. Most of us
come to Job Corps to have a
positive impact and help our
young
people change their lives.
The bottom line is that Job
Corps Centers live or die based
on the OMS. Low performing Job
Corps Centers should look at
what other high performing Centers are doing and try to model
their processes.
Sometimes it’s hard to stay
focused on those reasons
because staff can get caught
up in the negative daily dramas that occurs on every Job
Corps Center.
Lastly, Centennial’s management is working towards total
Center involvement in reaching
OMS goals.
Every staff member has either a
positive or negative effect on
student retention. In most cases, that effect comes from how
a staff member interacts with
the students.
to walk your Center and pat the
other ninety-percent of students
on the back and thank them for
doing a good job and making
changes in their lives.
Centennial students working an Earth Day trail
rehabilitation project for the U.S. Forest Service
Lucky Peak Plant Nursery. Photo courtesy of
Mike Delaney.
Mike Delaney,
Career Technical Training
Manager, Centennial Job
Corps
As a staff, we all know that we
have to do better in this area
because we all sink or swim
together.
I have one parting thought about
Center performance and how all
of the Civilian Conservation Centers can do better.
In the end, the formula is pretty simple--you have to put out
more completers than noncompleters every month.
We have to remember that students are our customers. Without customers, we don’t have a
job.
Mike Delaney,
Career Technical Training
Manager, Centennial Job
Corps
Remember what inspired you to
work at a Job Corps Center.
Most of us come to Job Corps to
have a positive impact and help
our young people change their
lives.
Centennial Job Corps nurse assistant home health aide. Photo courtesy of Mike Delaney.
Page 9
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Columbia Basin and Ft. Simcoe Job Corps Centers Aid the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest
Karl Lester, Center Director, Columbia Basin Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
Columbia Basin Job Corps Facts
Students: 280
Employees: 68
Associated Forest: OkanoganWenatchee National
Program Year 2014 Graduate
Placement Rate: 85.3%
Vocational Trades:
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
Computer Networking/Cisco
Culinary Arts
Facilities Maintenance
Nurse Assistant Home Health
Aide
Office Administration
Pharmacy Technician
Union Carpentry
Union Cement Masonry
Union Painting
Union Plastering
SVACT– College
As part of the continued relationship building between Job
Corps Civilian Conservation Centers and national forests, Columbia Basin Job Corps Center Cement Instructor Harry
Kozachenko and cement students Krystal Hartshorn, Collin
LaClair, Alexander Tolley, Unique
Washington, Eric West, Kalen
Perrone, and Robert Fielding,
with the assistance of Ft.
Simcoe heavy equipment operations students, completed a
cement project for the Entiat
Ranger District on the Okanogan
-Wenatchee National Forest. Ft.
Simcoe Job Corps hauled up
heavy equipment to remove old
trip hazard cement sidewalks
from around the District Ranger’s office. Columbia Basin Job
Corps cement students then
poured new sidewalks. The project was a huge success and
provided great training opportunities for both Centers. Columbia Basin’s dormitory staff member, Belinda Thompson, chaperoned the students in the District’s bunk houses for four
nights and culinary arts student
Capri Lawrence cooked and
prepared meals for the team.
Columbia Basin Job Corps Cement Instructor Harry Kozachenko kneels in front row. (L-R, back row)
Cement students Robert Fielding, Capri, Collin LaClaire, Kale Derrone, Unique Washington, Krystal
Hartshorn, Eric West, Tolley Alexander, and Tristan Barnes. Photo courtesy of Belinda Thompson.
“As a big supporter of the Job Corps program, I
was impressed with the speed and quality of
the work performed at the Entiat Ranger
Station. The work leader and students were
attentive to the needs of the USFS and learned
‘real life’ construction skills. I look forward to
working with the Job Corps again.”
Brantley Bain, P.E.
Forest Facilities Engineer
Okanogan Wenatchee National Forest
Ft. Simcoe Job Corps Facts
Students: 170
Employees: 50
Associated Forest: OkanoganWenatchee National
Program Year 2014 Graduate
Placement Rate: 89.2
Vocational Trades:
♦
♦
♦
♦
Automobile Technician
♦
♦
Union Carpentry
♦
Union Heavy Construction
Equipment Mechanic
Brick Masonry
Culinary Arts
Heavy Truck Driving
Mechanics
Union Heavy Equipment
Operations
Page 10
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
News from the World of Civilian Conservation Centers
On Wednesday, May 4, 2016, Job Corps National Director Tina Terrell
presented Flatwoods Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center with the
2016 National Director’s “Center of the Year” honor award; Center Director David Scholes accepted the award. Flatwoods Job Corps was selected
for this honor based upon a number of program year 2014 accomplishments, including its high ranking amongst the top 25 Job Corps Centers
out of the 125 Centers nationwide, a ranking that it has maintained for
three consecutive program years.
The “Center of the Year” award is the highest honor awarded by the Job
Corps National Director. Winning this award this year was an especially
sweet reward to the staff at Flatwoods because the Center had been
placed on a performance improvement plan (PIP) in 2010 due to declining performance ratings. To graduate from a PIP, a Job Corps Center must
receive a regional office center assessment score of at least 4.0, maintain a vacancy rate no higher than 5%, maintain student on-board
strength of 98%, and receive student satisfaction scores at or above the
national average, all of which the Center accomplished.
On November 4, 2015, the Department of Labor identified Flatwoods as
meeting all the performance requirements needed to be removed from a
PIP. Congratulations to the hard working and dedicated staff at Flatwoods Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center!
Using its computer numerical control table router and recycled furniture from its student dorms, Wolf
Creek Job Corps constructed a table and benches for the Umpqua National Forest Supervisor’s Office
reception area. Photo courtesy of Sidney Lilienthal.
(L-R) Cass Job Corps students Maxwell Drizner, Trey Oleson, Darryl Dannie, Robert Slaughter and
Maylin Gomez were amongst 130 Cass Job Corps students who collected 193 bags of litter along the
Ozark-St. Francis National Forest “Pig Trail.” Photo courtesy of Darrell “Wallie” Shaw.
(L-R) Flatwoods Job Corps Center Director proudly accepts the 2016 Job Corps National Director’s
“Center of the Year” honor award from National Director Tina J. Terrell based on upon the Center’s
exceptional performance in program year 2014. The “Center of the Year” award is the highest honor
awarded by the Job Corps National Director Photo courtesy of Steve Lenzo.
(L-R) Frenchburg Job Corps wildland firefighters, the “Frenchburg Firebirds,” Ansel Cole and Joseph
Powell, crew boss Brad Adkins, and students Catherine Oxley and Jazrielle Wilson deployed on April 21,
2016, on a 14 day detail to the Silver Mine Fire in Hot Springs, N.C. Photo courtesy of Brad Atkins.
Coasters produced by the Collbran, Harpers Ferry, Schenck and Weber Basin Job Corps Centers in
celebration of the Albuquerque Service Center’s (ASC)10th anniversary celebration held on April 21,
2016. Photo courtesy of ASC.
Page 11
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Anaconda Job Corps Center Constructs Ladder for Anaconda Local Development Corporation
Anaconda Job Corps cement students Jeff Exline, David Montoure, Hunter Weber,
Tanis Peterson, Ethan Marple, Lane George, George Herdt and Aiden Peterson recently constructed a ladder for the Anaconda Local Development Corporation’s
(ALDC) road crew. The crew needed a ladder for their crusher to make it safer for
workers to walk up into and down from the machine with tools.
The students applied skills mastered during their vocational training and learned
valuable lessons, including how to work safely in outdoor conditions, measuring and
laying out stairs, calculating angles on channel and pipe, squaring, coping and
mitering of pipe, and building handrails, stairs and ladders according to Mine
Safety and Health Administration and Occupational Safety and Health
Administration standards.
(L-R) Welding students Hunter Weber and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of Ronnie
Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students Ryan Phillips, Ethan Marple, and George Herdt. Photo
courtesy of Ronnie Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students David Montoure and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of
Ronnie Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students Tanis Peterson and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of Ronnie
Morgan.
Welding student Ethan Marple. Photo courtesy of Ronnie Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students Hunter Weber and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of Ronnie
Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students Hunter Weber and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of Ronnie
Morgan.
Welding student Aiden Peterson. Photo
courtesy of Ronnie Morgan.
(L-R) Welding students Tanis Peterson
and Jeff Exline. Photo courtesy of Ronnie
Morgan.
Page 12
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Angell Job Corps Center Restores Historic Silcox Hut on the Mt. Hood National Forest
Stan Esler, Career Transition Liaison, Paradigm Works Group, Inc./North West Dynamic Education Systems Inc.
Originally built in 1939 as the
upper terminal for the Magic
Mile chair lift, Silcox Hut sits at
6,950 feet above sea level on
Oregon’s Mt. Hood. Named after
the fifth Chief of the Forest
Service, Ferdinand Silcox, the
hut was abandoned in 1962
after the chair lift was relocated.
In 1985, the hut was added to
the National Registry of Historic
Places, and in the early 1990’s,
a nonprofit organization known
as the Friends of Silcox Hut
began restoration efforts.
In August 2015, Mark Roddy,
the International Masonry Institute instructor at Angell Job
Corps and an original board
member of the Friends of Silcox
Hut, travelled to Mt. Hood with
three masonry students to continue restoration. Roddy and
Angell masonry students Steve
Hartman, Sam Thompson, and
Jamie Watson, repointed the
west wall, pressure washed and
reset the stone stairs for the
bunk room door, and applied
sealant to the windows in order
to prevent snow infiltration. The
crew will continue restoration in
the fall of 2016.
(L-R) Angell Job Corps masonry students Jaimie Watson and Sam Thompson
mix mortar. Photo courtesy of Angell Job Corps.
(L-R) Angell Job Corps students Steve Hartman, Jaimie Watson, and Sam
Thompson repoint the structure’s west wall. Photo courtesy of Angell Job
Corps.
(L-R) Angell Job Corps masonry students Steve Hartman and Sam Thompson
reset stone stairs. Photo courtesy of Angell Job Corps.
Angell Job Corps masonry student Steve Hartman pressure washes the
stone stairs of the Silcox Hut. Photo courtesy of Angell Job Corps.
Forest Service Washington Office Staff Visit Harpers Ferry Job Civilian Conservation Center
(L-R) Business Operations Supervisory Budget Specialist Tracey Hanson, Public Affairs Specialist
Tiffany Holloway, Business Operations Project Manager Bill Helin, Center Director Ralph DiBattista,
Business Operations Chief of Staff Anna Briatico, and Job Corps National Director Tina Terrell learn
about the Computer Technician A+ program from Instructor Kevin Shirley on February 12, 2016.
(L-R) Public Affairs Specialist Tiffany Holloway, Business Operations Supervisory Budget Specialist
Tracey Hanson, and Business Operations Project Manager Bill Helin tour a Center dorm, led by
Residential Living Supervisor Earthene Sibley, of the student dorms. Photo courtesy of Alicia D.
Bennett.
Page 13
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Curlew Job Corps Complete an “Extreme Makeover” of the Spokane Humane Society
Watch Curlew students performing this
extreme makeover:
http://www.kxly.com/
news/spokanenews/curlew-jobcorps-pitches-in-onspokane-humanesocietymakeover/38156094
Page 14
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Been There: Trapper Creek Instructor Is Former Student
Perry Backus, Associate Editor, Ravalli Republic, Originally published in The Missoulian and Ravalli Republic
sas City to those in Denver. Often, they were homeless.
“We were evicted time after
time,” he said. “I remember
being awakened in the middle of
the night and my mom loading
us up in an old station wagon for
a drive to the next homeless
shelter.”
Trapper Creek Job Corps Fire Training Specialist
Danny Atkinson. Photo courtesy of Stephanie
Israel.
Danny Atkinson knows what it’s
like to make the best of a
second chance.
Trapper Creek Job Corps’ newest natural resource instructor
wants to pass that on to a new
generation of young men and
women who’ve faced their own
demons in their lives.
“I was the elite of the dysfunctional,” said the 36-year-old
Atkinson. “I was very violent. I
hated everything. I hated everyone. I didn’t care if I lived or
died.”
He was youngest of five in a
family that moved between the
mean streets of downtown Kan-
Atkinson burnt down an apartment building when he was
nine. By the time he was in his
teens, he had been charged
with assault numerous times. “I
joined a gang,” he said. “I felt
like they gave me a sense of
family, but it ended up being
never even close to that. I had
no sense of responsibility. No
vision. I didn’t care about anything.” As he grew into young
manhood, a lot of friends either
killed themselves or got killed by
others.
Atkinson’s sister asked him to
go with her to a Christian camp.
“I got there and everyone was
talking about God and about
Jesus,” he said. “They were all
running around and smiling, and
there I was going through my
own Armageddon. I just wanted
to get out of there.”
After one of the talks, Atkinson
went outside and looked toward
the sky. “I said: ‘Where are you
man. What’s this all about. Show
me something.’” Of course, nothing happened. When his sister
found him, he said he wanted to
leave. He told her he didn’t belong there. “Look at these people. They are all so different than
me,” he said.
About that time, the pastor
walked by. Atkinson reached into
his pocket, where he kept his
knife. When the pastor stepped
closer, Atkinson told the man:
“Don’t you ever touch me. I will
cut you open.” The pastor was a
large Asian man. He looked at
the young teen and said he just
wanted to tell him something.
Atkinson stared back defiantly.
“He said to me: ‘When I look into
your eyes, I see a little boy just
wanting to be loved for who he is
and not judged for what he
does.” Atkinson remembers that
he started to cry. “I never really
cried before,” he said. “I had
been taught not to show my emotions.” Atkinson handed the pastor his knife. And the man responded with a hug. “And God
came into my life,” Atkinson said.
Atkinson was doing his best to
stay away from trouble after that,
but there were peaks and valleys
“Determination and
perseverance will take you to
places that you have never
dreamed of. That’s what this
place did for me. Without it, I
was dead or in prison, for
sure.”
Danny Atkinson
Fire Training Specialist
Trapper Creek Job Corps
as he remained in a place where
everything seemed bad.
He was working construction in
downtown Denver when he noticed a Job Corps advertisement
stapled to a telephone pole. He
met with a Job Corps screener in
1997. The next year, he was
enrolled at the Job Corps Center
at Trapper Creek.
When he arrived, his reading and
math skills were at a fourthgrade level. Beyond the huge
challenge of catching up academically, Atkinson came with
his mind set on embracing this
second chance in life. He found
his passion in the yellow and
green Nomex of the wildland
firefighters.
“I was finally away from all the
negative stuff in my life,” he
(continued on page 15)
News from the World of the Civilian Conservation Centers
The International Masonry Institute in the Job Corps program’s Region 2 awarded its Project of the
Quarter award to the Pine Knot Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center. Photo courtesy of Pine Knot Job
Corps.
(L-R) Cass Job Corps students Derrell Robinson and Zachary Bieber observed Meadors Lumber
Company Yard Manager Mike Frazier on Groundhog Job Shadow Day which allows students to learn onthe-job skills and receive exposure to new jobs and expand their network of employers.
Page 15
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Been There: Trapper Creek Instructor Is Former Student (continued from page 14)
Perry Backus, Associate Editor, Ravalli Republic, Originally published in The Missoulian and Ravalli Republic
said. “I was out of the conflict
zone. That’s huge. In this place,
you get away from everyone you
know and everything that people
know about us. It gives you the
opportunity for a second chance
to change your life from the
inside out.”
Atkinson embraced all of it. He
took advantage of all the leadership positions that were offered.
By the time he graduated, his
reading and math skills were
just short of being equivalent to
a college freshman.
“I had it in my head that I was
nobody when I first came here,”
he said. “I wanted to be somebody. I wanted to do great
things. This place, this staff,
“I could remember that
small voice inside of me
that said ‘You can be
somebody.’ And now I
hope that I can help others find that little spark
that can change their
lives. I can’t teach them
that. It’s something that
they have to find themselves, but once they get
it, the floodgates come
open.”
helped me achieve that. They
gave me the tools that I needed
to be successful.”
“If I can do it,
everyone can
do it.” That’s
the message
that he brings
to his 30
students in
the natural
resources
program at
Trapper
Creek.
Determination and perseverance will take you to places that you have never dreamed
of,” he said. “That’s what this
place did for me. Without it, I
was dead or in prison, for sure.”
“It doesn’t matter who you are
or how you’ve lived. If you are
willing to change and find something that you are passionate
about, you can go places that
you never dreamed were possible,” Atkinson said. “It’s a powerful thing to see when someone
overcomes all the obstacles that
were there in front of them. I
know what it takes. I’ve been
there. I’m one of them and now I
want to pay it forward.”
On that first day of teaching at
Trapper Creek, he walked into
the classroom and looked out
the young faces staring back at
him. “It was just surreal,” he
said. “I looked at them and I saw
me.”
Atkinson said he couldn’t believe all of his hard work and
determination had brought him
full circle back to
the very classroom
where his second
chance on life had
started. “It had
brought me to a
place where I not
only have the opportunity to help
other students,
they help me at the
same time,” he
said. “There was
just a flood of
memories that
came back when I first stepped
into that classroom.
“I could remember that small
voice inside of me that said ‘You
can be somebody.’ And now I
hope that I can help others find
that little spark that can change
their lives. I can’t teach them
that. It’s something that they
have to find themselves, but
once they get it, the floodgates
come open. They know they
want to be somebody. I want to
help them find that.”
He knows they will have to face
all kinds of challenges along the
way. When those happen: “I look
them straight in the eye and tell
them: ‘I believe in you. We’re
going to do this together.’”
Sometimes, Atkinson looks back
at his life and wonders how it
could all be true. “I can hardly
believe it,” he said. “It seems
like yesterday that I was sitting
in those same blue chairs in the
same classroom where I now
After he graduated from Trapper Creek, Atkinson went to
work with the U.S. Forest Service wildfire fighting corps.
When he accepted the job to
teach at Trapper Creek this
year, Atkinson was serving as a
division trainee with the federal
agency.
“I was in charge of millions of
dollars of equipment,” he said.
Trapper Creek Job Corps forestry students study alternatives available to remove a fallen tree from the
Tin Cup Creek Trail on the Bitterroot National Forest. Photo courtesy of Adam Washebek.
“We all want to be respected
for the right reasons.”
teach. I can’t believe what a
difference God has made in my
life. I can’t believe the difference that Trapper Creek Job
Corps has made in my life. It’s
made me the person that I am
today.”
Atkinson was married in March.
The young couple bought a
house and is settling in for the
long haul. “I’m going to be here
until God tells me something
different,” he said. “I’m so happy that my perseverance and
attitude has brought me full
circle back to this place. There
is no other explanation than God
is good.”
“In the end, all of us just want
somebody to love us for who we
are,” Atkinson said. “I care for
all of these students immensely.
I want to do whatever I can for
them.”
Atkinson knows the importance
of being real with his students.
“I know that I need to just be
me,” he said. “I want to show
them that I’m excited about my
life. I want to show everyday that
I’m excited about being here.”
“They can take it or leave it, but
when they come into my classroom, we’re at full throttle,”
Atkinson said. “We will be great.
We will do great things … People
are here to better themselves.
You don’t want to get in the way
because we’ll run you right
over.”
Every student at Trapper Creek
comes with his or her own story
about how they ended up here.
“Yet, we’re all here wanting the
same thing,” he said. “We want
to change our lives and be
somebody. We all want to be
respected for the right reasons.”
Page 16
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Cass Job Corps Students Enter the High-Tech Video World
Darrell “Wallie” Shaw, Teacher, Cass Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
Cass Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center students participating in ‘Jobs for America’s
Graduates’ (JAG) are taking the
lead in developing interactive
virtual reality (VR) scenarios for
the their Center located in
Ozark, Arkansas.
(L-R) Cass Job Corps students Kimberly Heath, Elijah Coleman and Elisa DeManty practice their virtual
reality development skills. Photo courtesy of Darrell “Wallie” Shaw.
The JAG students are developing
a virtual tour of their campus
which will ultimately lead viewers through each vocational
trade program as well as other
areas of center life.
The VR environments will also
connect traditional Science,
Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM) learning
techniques with Cass trade programs.
The JAG students are using the
project to develop environmental sustainability VR environments.
Interested persons can flip
through the virtual tour of Cass
Job Corps’ at:
http://108.174.199.16/.
http://108.174.199.16/.
Pine Knot Job Corps Cleans Up During the Clean Sweep of U.S. Highway 27
Donna Coffey, Support Services Supervisor Pine Knot Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
On Thursday April 21st, 2016,
20 Pine Knot Job Corps students and four staff members
participated in the “No Place
Like Home Clean Sweep of US
27,” part of the 2016 Personal
Responsibility in a Desirable
Environment (PRIDE) Spring
Cleanup. Sixteen students
worked to remove trash and
debris from the roadside and
four culinary arts students pre-
pared and served lunch to hungry volunteers. Students and
staff reported that everyone felt
a sense of accomplishment in
helping the community and the
environment. Pine Knot students always appreciate the
opportunity to volunteer and
enjoy and look forward to supporting local community events
throughout the year.
Golconda Job Corps Camp Crew and Community Partners Cleanup Lake Glendale Recreational Area
Steven Beattie, Works Program Officer, Golconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
At 8:00 AM on a Saturday morning late in April 2016, Golconda
Job Corps’ camp crew loaded
onto a bus headed for the Lake
Glendale Recreation Area on the
Shawnee National Forest. On an
event long in the planning, the
eight member crew, along with
Job Corps Works Program Officer Steven Beattie and Motor
Vehicle Operator Hassan Lot,
picked up trash on the three
mile trail around Lake Glendale.
The crew had breakfasted on
meals ready to eat; however,
after a hard morning’s work, the
students sat down for a BBQ for
lunch. After lunch, the crew
learned how to properly ignite
camp fire from pine needles and
sticks. Volunteer events like the
cleanup teach students the
importance of maintaining the
nation’s public lands alongside
community partners.
Page 17
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Angell Job Corps’ Honor Guard Develops Young Leaders While Assisting the Local Community
Mikell P. Sumerau, Center Standards Officer, Angell Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
I started the Angell Honor Guard
in February 2012. The idea was
to create a group to work with
students who had aspirations of
joining the armed forces when
they completed the program.
Since its inception, the Honor
Guard Program has grown to
include students from all over
center without regard to future
armed services goals. The program has grown in complexity
and drive with duties that include but are not limited to the
following:
Most Angell Honor Guard
members complete the
program with high honors and
move on to advanced training,
the armed forces or emergency
management services.
organization. Training includes
the following:
♦
Advanced 1st aid, including
C.P.R., A.E.D., Triage, Extraction, Scene Security,
I.C.S. 100, Initial Vital
Signs, and SOAP report
(40 hour course).
♦
Advanced Leadership, including normative culture,
mentoring, peer counseling,
performance appraisals,
incentives, and discipline
(20 hour course).
♦
Security on center
♦
Critical Emergency Response to community
events;
♦
Maintenance and care of
veterans memorials and
burial sites;
♦
♦
Assisting the elderly with
labor intensive assignments;
Verbal conflict resolution in
the form of Verbal Judo
(8 hour course).
♦
Drill and Ceremony, including forming of ranks, chain
of command, marching,
flag responsibilities, and
ceremonies with flags.
♦
Supporting Forest Service
law enforcement with cleanup of illegal camp sites;
♦
Assisting local law enforcement with running aid stations on hiking/biking
events;
♦
Maintaining the Centers
normative culture.
The Honor Guard is supported
by the Oregon National Guard,
Veterans of Foreign Wars, The
American Legion, The Tribal
counsel of the Confederated
tribes Siletz, and the Oregon
Disabled Veterans Group. The
support comes in training materials, event sponsorship, and
letters of recognition.
Members of the Honor Guard
receive training not offered to
other students and in return for
the training credentials the Honor Guard swear to provide community service to all nonprofit
organizations at no cost to the
Most Angell Honor Guard members complete the program with
honors and move on to advanced training, the armed forces or emergency management
services.
These select few students operate by the decree “Take a personal responsibility for the success of others.”
The Honor Guard has helped
halt numerous behavior incidents on the Center, from drug
use to violence. With its help,
the culture at Angell Job Corps
Center has been changing for
the better.
Every time the Angell Job Corps
Honor Guard meets a goal, it
simply sets the bar higher—and
it starts working on a new
challenge.
Page 18
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
Golconda Job Corps Participates in America the Beautiful Quarter Unveiling
Bob Coulson, Center Director, Golconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
(L-R 1st row) Golconda Job Corps students Johnnie Moore, Angelique Fortier, and Caprice Burley. (L-R 2nd row) Golconda
students Beto Obuy, Blake Czak, Cody Teen-Southard, and Dariana Robinson. (L-R 3rd row) Golconda student Ruben
Maldonado, Shawnee National Forest Supervisor Allen Nicholas, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, and Golconda
student Zachary Neswick. (L-R 4th row) Golconda students Jess Dale, Zack Garner, Duvante Dean, Jermaine Phillips, and
Diez Carter. Photo courtesy of Golconda Job Corps.
On February 4, 2016, the Golconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center joined U.S. Forest
Service Chief Tom Tidwell and
the U.S. Mint to celebrate the
unveiling of the America the
Beautiful Quarter® Program
honoring the Shawnee National
Forest.
The Golconda Job Corps Center
is associated with the Shawnee
National Forest. Eighteen student leaders, each representing
a Center trade, were chosen to
attend the coin release ceremony. Forest Service Chief Tom
Tidwell served as a guest speaker at the event.
Golconda students had the opportunity to meet Chief Tidwell
and share their experiences at
the Center and explain their
leadership positions and
individual trades.
The quarter honoring the Shawnee National Forest features the
Garden of the Gods’ Camel
Rock. The quarter is the 31st
release in the U.S. Mint America
the Beautiful Quarters Program.
The Garden of the Gods is full of
sandstone rock formations and
is one of the Shawnee’s and
Southern Illinois’ most visited
recreation sites.
Of the many formations at the
Garden of the Gods, Camel Rock
is unique in that it resembles a
calm camel looking over the
care of the Forest and spectacular landscape like a silent sentinel.
have performed over
the past 50 years
include cement masonry crews building
and maintaining the
walk ways by placing
and securing the
sandstone paths
and stone steps,
urban forestry students trimming trees
along pathways and
camp sites and
clearing away
ground clutter, the
welding trade fabricating a locking
system for the water
station, and carpentry students
replacing kiosk
roofs.
Not only is the
Shawnee National
Forest a WorkBased Learning site for Golconda students, Center recreational
staff often take students on
trips to the Garden of the Gods
where they can walk along the
pathways, climb rocks, and enjoy the scenery. Many of the
Golconda’s students come from
around the Chicago urban area
and have never experienced
nature.
Golconda Job Corps Facts
Students: 187
Employees: 50
Associated Forest:
Shawnee National Forest
Program Year 2014
Graduate Placement
Rate: 82.1%
Vocational Trades
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
Brick Masonry
Construction
Craft Laborer
Medical Office Support
Union Carpentry
Urban Forestry
Electrical
Union Painting
Welding
After the official coin release,
Golconda Job Corps students
had the opportunity to participate in a coin exchange, with
each student receiving a commemorative coin. The students
wrapped up the day by going to
the Garden of the Gods for a
group photo at Camel Rock.
Golconda Job Corps
Center is intricately
connected to the Shawnee National Forest
and Garden of the
Gods Recreational
Area.
Many of the Center’s
trades have assisted
the Shawnee National
Forest Supervisor’s
Office with the improvement and maintenance
of the Supervisor’s
Office and on the national forest.
Highlights of the work
the Center’s students
(L-R) Golconda students Cody Teen-Southard, Johnnie Moore, Robert Dancy, Zachary Neswick, Caleb Pretzler, Jesse
Dale, Ruben Maldonado, Brian Jordan, Beto Obuy, Blake Czak, Zack Garner, Angelique Fortier, Darren Spearman,
Diez Carter, Jermaine Phillips, Caprice Burley, and Dariana Robinson display their commemorative coins at Camel
Rock in the Garden of the Gods on the Shawnee National Forest. Photo courtesy of Golconda Job Corps.
Page 19
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
A Farrier Comes to the Pine Ridge Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
Carpentry Students Romulus Kost and Chase Engel and United Brotherhood of Carpenters Carpentry Instructor Kevin M. Miller, Pine Ridge Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center
On the morning of February
25th, 2016, Jacob Butler
brought his equipment and expertise in horse shoeing to the
Pine Ridge Job Corps Civilian
Conservation Center. Butler
works with his father and brother at the Butler Professional
Farrier School, located near
Crawford, Nebraska.
of creating nail holes which requires repeated heats of the
metal. The hot metal is placed
over a square hole, called a
hardy hole, in the top of the
anvil and a punch and hammer
is used to make the perforations
in the flat face of the shoe. Butler made 3 nail holes ¾ to 1
inch on each side of the shoe.
Each year the school trains new
farriers from around the United
States as well as the world.
Egg Bar horseshoes start out in
a similar fashion except that the
toe bend on each end is replaced with a ½ inch scarf in
preparation for welding the two
ends together.
Butler conducted a one hour
demonstration on how to forge
different types of shoes in front
of close to 30 welding apprentices and Center Welding Instructors Ira Mckillip and Ken Winner.
Also attending were two carpentry apprentices who had an
interest in the farrier arts and
blacksmithing.
During Butler’s presentation he
hammered out regular and Egg
Bar horseshoes. He used a portable propane forge for his
demonstration instead of traditional coal forge because propane forges can be set up more
quickly and are smaller in size
yet capable of substantial heat.
With each type of shoe, Butler’s
process began in the same way.
First he took a length of 5/16th
inch by ¾ inch mild steel bar
which he placed into the gas
forge and heated (1900-2000°
F) to a light yellow color.
Butler then used the face of his
anvil and hammer to make a toe
bend on one end of the steel.
Once completed, he reversed
the material and inserted it back
into the fire in order to heat the
other end.
Once hot, the steel was returned
to the anvil and a second toe
bend was created. That completed, the material began to take
on the appearance of a traditional shoe.
Next, Butler began the process
Once the scarfs are completed,
a flux is applied and both ends
are heated to a welding temperature well over the temperature
needed previously to shape the
metal. One end overlaps the
other and the ends are permanently attached together using
anvil and hammer. Butler's preferred flux for this process is
Iron Mountain brand.
Pine Ridge Job Corps welding apprentice and carpentry students gather around Farrier Jacob Butler as
he prepares a Egg Bar horseshoe. Photo courtesy of Kalli Streit.
Once welded, the shoe is in the
shape of a circle. A fuller tool is
used to form a crease on both
sides of the shoe where the nail
With each type of shoe, Butler’s process began in the
same way. First he took a
length of 5/16th inch by ¾
inch mild steel bar which he
placed into the gas forge and
heated (1900-2000°F) to a
light yellow color.
Farrier Jacob Butler finishes a forge weld with his hammer, permanently connecting the two ends of a
horse shoe. Photo courtesy of Ken Winner.
holes will eventually be
punched.
According to Butler, this crease
creates more shoe traction.
However, before creating these
holes over the hardy hole of the
anvil, final shaping occurs
around the anvil horn while the
metal is hot. Since the shoe is
made of mild steel, it can still be
reshaped to fit a specific horse
when the horse is being shod.
Using a punch and hammer over the hardy hole of the anvil, Farrier Jacob Butler creates nail holes
that will be used to attach the horse shoe. Photo courtesy of Ken Winner.
Page 20
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
What Can Civilian Conservations Centers Do For Your National Forests and Grasslands?
Sample Work
Forest Service Job Corps
Civilian Conservation Centers
National Forest Systems
Recreation
•
•
Trail construction, trail maintenance
•
•
Installation of picnic tables, fire rings
Recreation site improvements: painting (signs, picnic tables),
facilities maintenance, construction, brush removal, mowing,
trailhead maintenance)
Kiosk construction and installation
The Forest Service is facing critical shortages of workers. Job Corps is an ideal source from which to recruit
and improve the diversity of its permanent workforce. The partnership between the Forest and Job Corps
Civilian Conservation Centers (JCCCCs) can benefit both parties through development of Work-Based
Learning (WBL) opportunities that provide on-the-job training for students and help the Forest Service
meet mission critical project goals. Looking to add professional, trained, youthful, diverse staff to your
project or office? Forest Service JCCCC students or Mobile Corps can be a valuable addition to your next
project.
Mobile Corps projects are larger scale, multi-student and/or multi-center projects. These projects have
ranged from painting/maintenance at Grey Towers National Historical Site, building smaller buildings and
campsite projects, to the construction of ranger stations and staff housing. A formal application process
must be completed for project consideration.
Forestry
•
•
•
•
Pre-commercial thinning, tree planting, timber marking
Stream maintenance -gabion installations
Nursery work -tree lifting and packing, seedling planting
Cone collection
Job Corps students are eligible for federal employment. As students they can be hired using the Pathways
Program. They may also qualify for the Public Lands Corps Act (PLC). Students are able to compete through
the traditional federal hiring ; however, using these two authorities might expedite JCCCC student hiring.
Contact Cyndi Szymanski at 303-275-5074 or e-mail at: [email protected] for additional
information.
Wildlife/Fisheries/Hydrology/Soils
•
•
•
•
•
•
Install Inserts for Red Cockcaded Woodpecker
Boundary marking of Red Cockcaded Woodpecker area
Snag/grouse drumming log creation
Mid-story removal
Gabion installations
Infestation surveys
Engineering
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pine Ridge Job Corps students on deployment to Colorado in response to
a 2013 1,000 year flood event. Photo courtesy of Pine Ridge Job Corps.
Carpentry, painting
Heavy equipment repair and maintenance, auto maintenance
Electrical, plumbing, welding
Brick and concrete masonry
Fashion stone foundations for forest portal signs
Ouachita Job Corps urban forestry graduate
Sandra Machado working at Garvan Woodlands
Gardens. Photo courtesy of the Sentinel-Record.
Stream inventory
Boundary/landline location, marking, inspection and maintenance
•
Road Maintenance - sawing and chipping for site clearance on
FS roads
•
Greening of Job Corps Centers, research stations, and district
offices
Applied learning in academics at Boxelder Job Corps. Photo courtesy of
Bonnie Fuller.
Administrative
•
•
Front desk operator /services
Data input, clerical, computer installation (Job Corps IT Team),
record keeping
State and Private Forestry
•
•
Fire suppression, rehab, mop-up, catering
•
•
Data collection
Prescribed fire
Research
Inventory
Columbia Basin Job Corps culinary arts students serve a Thanksgiving
meal to local community. Photo courtesy of Columbia Basin Job Corps.
Oconaluftee Job Corps student helps construct a
retaining wall on the Cheoah Ranger District on
the National Forests in North Carolina. Photo
courtesy of Oconaluftee Job Corps.
Page 21
Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Courier
1964 — 2014
Conserving America’s
Natural Resources
for 50 Years
Job Corps is the nation’s largest
residential, educational, and
career technical training program that prepares economically disadvantaged youth, ranging
in age from 16 to 24, for
productive employment.
The JCCCCs provide a unique
opportunity for at-risk youth to
take control of and steer their
lives in a positive direction and
contribute to the conservation of
the nation’s public natural resources.
USDA Forest Service operates
27 Job Corps Civilian Conservation Centers (JCCCCs) with a
capacity to house, educate, and
train over 5,200 enrollees.
JCCCCs are associated with national forests or grasslands and
are operated by the United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Forest Service in partnership with
the Department of Labor (DOL).
Students attend academic and
vocational classes and learn
critical life skills in preparation
for long-term employment, careers in natural resources, continued education or military
service.
USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To
file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of
the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC
20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay),
(866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).
Alicia D. Bennett
Public Affairs Officer/Editor
USDA Forest Service Job Corps
740 Simms Street
Golden, CO 80401
Phone: 303-275-5934
E-mail: [email protected]
Assistant Editors: Program and
Policy Analyst Joy Nasados
To subscribe to the Courier, send
your e-mail address to:
[email protected]
We’re On the Web:
http://fsweb.jc.wo.fs.fed.us/

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