DESERT EXPLORERS

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DESERT EXPLORERS
DESERT
EXPLORERS
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
4WD
SECTION OF
THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
Rendezvous Trip
Schedule Plan
Friday
Inbound
Jaussaud
Saturday Rattlesnake Canyon
Johns
Saturday Lucerne V. & Cement Plant Neill
Saturday Blackrock Mine
Given
Saturday Rodman Mountains
Harada
Saturday Jelly Roll Rocks
Dodds
March 18-20
Sunday Rodman Canyon Petros Martin
By Marian Johns
Sunday I-15 alternate way home Johns
UR ANNUAL RENDEZVOUES IS ONLY A couple of weeks away. Registration forms Sunday Trip with the wolves Betty/Don
are in this issue. We only have this big
event of fun and camaraderie once a year, so
come on out!
The Lone Wolf Colony RV park is located
about 10 miles east of the I-15 freeway at
23200 Bear Valley Road. There is lots of room
for all types of camping and a large meeting
hall (160 people) for the Saturday night
catered dinner and the Friday night potluck
dinner. The hall will also be open Sunday until
we head for home.
If you just can't manage to camp with the
Friday March 18
rest of us, there are plenty of motels clustered
around I-15 and one a little closer - the Apple
Leaders: Bob and Sue Jaussaud
Valley Motel, located on Hwy. 18. I do not know
CB: 13
their prices nor their ratings.
(Museum sponsored)
We will be making day trips mostly to the
east of Apple Valley - in the Lucerne Valley area.
(See Bill Mann's "Guide to the Beautiful and
AJON PASS, BESIDES BEING BEAUTIFUL, IS VERY
Historic Lucerne Valley and Vicinity".)
historic. Many trails and roads have used
Hope to see a big turn out! Apple Valley is
Cajon Pass to wind their way into, or out
right in our own back yard - close enough for of, the San Bernardino area. Most Desert
those who hesitate to drive long distances. And Explorers will use Cajon Pass inbound to the
this is a great opportunity for new and old 2005 Rendezvous. On our “Inbound Trip 2005”
Desert Explorers to get acquainted or reac- we’ll travel along some remnants that remain of
quainted and swap tall tales about past desert the old routes over Cajon Pass. Along the way,
adventures.
we’ll detour up a side canyon and 4WD our way
See you there!
to the top of the mountains for a breath taking
view of Cajon Pass and the surrounding areas.
Rendezvous 2005 at
The Lone Wolf Colony
RV Park Apple Valley
In this issue:
• Rendezvous 2005
1
• Rendezvous Trips
1
• New Subscribers
2
• Trip Schedule
2
• Panamint trip report
3
• Shoshone Mammoth Awards 6
• Future Trips
7
• Next Meeting
7
• Fine print
9
• Leader list
10
• Subscription Apps.
10
• Rendezvous Registration
11
O
rendezvous
TripS
Inbound Trip 2005
C
Issue Number 107
Our meeting place, Friday morning
Please welcome
10 a.m., is the Devore Exit near the INorco
15 and I-215 junction. Be aware that Matt Jones
those heading north on I-15 need to
and welcome back
take the I-215 SOUTH ramp to access Matt Westlake
Saugus
the Devore exit.
There is a coffee shop of unknown
quality at the Devore Exit that advertises
their restrooms are for customers only!
Sue and I plan to get something there and
make use of their facilities before the trip.
Glen Helen Regional Park Campground is
nearby, but we will not be stopping there
on the trip and have not checked it out.
Please e-mail [email protected], by
Saturday March 19
March 14 if you can join us. Thanks,
Leaders: Sunny Hansen &
BobnSue.
RAVEL TO AND VIEW THE BLACKHAWK
Mine and the landslide from about
4000+ feet where you get as good a
view as your are likely to get of the slide
without being in an airplane; then on to
the Green Rock Quarry; on the way back
to camp, and, time permitting, a quick
side trip off highway 247 towards
Barstow.
T
Deep Tank
Petrogylphs Hike
Lucerne Valley &
Cement Plant Tour
Saturday, March 19
Leader: Bill Neill
CB: 23
(Museum sponsored)
T
HIS OUTING WILL BE A MODIFIED REPEAT
OF Willie Walker's BRE trip along the
east side of Lucerne Valley in
October 1993. We'll drive around Cougar
Buttes, stop at the Silver Reef Mine and
Lester Dale Mine, then have a guided tour
of the Mitsubishi Cement Plant at
Cushenbury Springs. In Bill Mann's Vol. 5
guidebook, these are map locations 17,
35, 32 and 43. Send an e-mail to
[email protected] to receive pre-trip
information about local mining history
and the Blackhawk Landslide.
Desert Explorers
Trip Schedule
March 12-13
March 18-20
March 19-26
April 8-10
April
April 30
May 14-15
September
2
Mojave Road
Rendezvous 2005
Arizona Strip
Granite Mt. Work Party
Anza-Borrego
MRVM annual BBQ
Patton Camps
Canyonlands
Johns
Committee
Messersmith
Hill
Page
Anderson
Stoll/Johns
Rattlesnake
Canyon
Saturday March 19
Leader: Marian Johns
8:00 a.m.
CB:13
Jerry Harada
CB: 10
(Museum sponsored)
E WILL LEAVE THE RENDEZVOUS CAMP
W
site and drive to Rodman
Mountain Petrogylphs site in Bill
Mann’s Guide to 50 Interesting and
Mysterious Sites In The Mojave Volume
#1. See page 59. Sunny and I have
planned to park our vehicles here. We
will hike about 1 to 2 miles to Deep Tank
Petrogylphs. See page 61 in Bill Mann’s
Volume #1 We plan to show you some
interesting archeological sites along the
way. Plan on packing a lunch, water, camera, and good walking shoes. In the
words of that famous desert author and
Eagle Scout Bill Mann, “Be prepared”.
Sunny Hansen will be walking point, and I
plan to walk drag to ensure everyone
makes this hike. Trail: We will be following a closed dirt road that is now part of
the Rodman Mountain Wilderness area.
Most of the hike will be over flat land with
some little hills.
Blackhawk Mine &
Green Rock
Quarry
Saturday March 19
Leader: Dave Given
CB: 33
(Museum sponsored)
(Museum sponsored)
ATTLESNAKE CANYON, EAST OF LUCERNE
R
Valley, is a narrow, scenic route that
winds from the desert floor up to
the San Bernardino National Forest east of
Big Bear. It separates two sections of the
Bighorn Mountain Wilderness, and it's
open to vehicles! It's has a sandy wash
bottom with an occasional bedrock stair
step to climb up and over. It may well
have some water flowing at this time of
year. If time permits, we'll connect to the
Pipes Canyon road and then on to Hwy. 18
which will take us back to Lucerne and
Apple Valley.
Jelly Roll Rocks
Saturday March 19
Leaders: Bob and Nancy
Dodds
CB: 18
(Museum sponsored)
E WILL VISIT:
2 CANYONS WITH A
1,400 year old cave & Indian
Sleeping Circle & 3 mines
(depending on time)(East Ord
W
I've learned....
That one should keep his words both
soft and tender, because tomorrow he
may have to eat them.
D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Mountains) Ford Mine, Grandview Mine,
Ord Belt Mine
some photos. Reference Bill Mann’s
Volume 1 and volume 5.
A Trip with the
Wolves
Cajon Pass; an
Alternate Route
Via Dirt Road
Sunday March 20
Leaders: Betty and Don
Close in to Lucerne Valley
CB Channel determined at
sign-in
(Museum sponsored)
Sunday March 20
Leader: Marian Johns
10:00 a.m. CB:13
Alan Romspert/ Silent Auction
Jefe
TRIP
REPORTS
Panamint Valley
Jan. 14-16, 2005
(Museum sponsored)
T
HERE ARE A COUPLE OF WAYS TO BYPASS
OU’VE ALL SEEN WOLVES IN MOVIES AND
Y
on TV. Here is a chance to pet and
hug real wolves and maybe even be
kissed by a few. Trip starts Sunday at 10
a.m.. For a nominal fee of $10 per person, you can help keep wolves from
becoming extinct, and, at the same time,
enjoy yourself. Over 17 wolves, who love
people, are outdoors where you can walk
around with them for an hour or more.
See and hear them howl. Feed them.
Be sure to bring your cameras and
minicams to take lots of pictures. But
wear no jewelry or hats, dresses, high
heels or shiny satiny pants. Jeans are preferred, and solid shoes no flip flops.
Children are allowed but they must wear
jeans and solid shoes or tennies. The trip
is easy driving, no 4-wheel drive necessary and accessible to all vehicles. It’s an
experience few have the chance to have,
and the memory will last a lifetime.
Rodman Canyon
Petroglyphs
Sunday 1/2 day 8:30 a.m.
Leader: Bob Martin
CB: 33
(Museum sponsored)
T’S A
42 MILE DRIVE ON PAVEMENT AND
graded road then 2 miles of two track
and a hike to this canyon full of petroglyphs. You will need four wheel drive
on the last 100 yards. On the way there is
a great view of the very colorful Pitman
Crater quarry. We will have lunch at the
petroglyphs and should be back to camp
by 1 p.m. For those who have a little more
time we can stop at Hercules Finger for
I
3
the traffic on I-15 through the
Cajon Pass and get from the high
desert down to the L.A. basin. We'll
explore one of these routes on our way
home from the Rendezvous.
DESERT EXPLORERS’
SILENT AUCTION
N
OW IS THE TIME TO START LOOKING FOR
By: Nan Savage
TTENDEES: RUTH AND EMMETT
HARDER,
Bill and Barbara Gossett, Matt and
Maggie Jones, John Page, Jim
Proffitt, Robert Shannon, Bob and Sue
Jaussaud, Marian and Neal Johns, Allan
Wicker, and Nan Savage.
If you were not there, what a trip you
missed! We gathered at the Old Guest
House Museum in Trona on Friday morning. Trona is a small town, so the Desert
Explorers were not hard to find. After
assembling, Jim Fairchild of the Searles
Lake Gem and Mineral Society introduced
us to the history of the Searles Valley
Chemical Plant and to some of the
unusual minerals in the region. Quite an
expert, Jim has written, directed, edited,
and narrated two DVD’s on the subjects;
Sue Jassaud showed his DVD on the
Society’s Annual Mineral Show and Field
Trip at our January meeting. The Society’s
building is actually the old barracks for
A
those special items that you thought
were very necessary when you
bought them but have never been used by
yourself, but could prove useful for
another Desert Explorer member. These
are the items that we need you to bring to
the Desert Explorers’ Rendezvous this
next March. If you happen to also have a
white elephant or two that could liven up
the auction that might also be an item to
consider bringing. I want people to bring
their items to the
Rendezvous where I
will take charge of
them. If you will not
be able to attend the
Rendezvous but have
an item or items that
you want to contribute, please get
them to another DE
member who is
going
to
the
Rendezvous
for
inclusion in the auction. Thank you in
Photo by Allan Wicker
advance for your
Below Great Falls
contributions.
D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Photo by Allan Wicker
Camp at Bill Gossett’s place
Jim Fairchild
Photo by Allan Wicker
Junk art
Photo by Allan Wicker
Photo by Allan Wicker
CCC camp site
Photo by Allan Wicker
Ancient Trail, Panamint
the Trona chemical plant. The company
employed only men at first; later it
allowed families to join them. From day
one, Trona was a company town.
The Searles Valley Chemical Plant
mines and processes minerals. I recognized two of their products, borax and
boric acid, which derive from the same
compound, because borax goes regularly
into my wash and boric acid kills my termites. Currently, the plant operates
Photo by Allan Wicker
Valley
Bill
Gossett
on
townsite
twenty-four
hours
around the clock in two shifts, a night doing, evidently word had not gotten to
and a day one, with employees working him about us. However, the very name
three days on one shift, taking four days “Jim Fairchild,” opened all doors, and we
off, then switching to the opposite shift. were graciously invited into the control
Most folks who work at the plant past the room which governs the central operafirst few years stay on for life. We drove tions of the plant. Computers report and
through the facility in an old yellow regulate diverse functions of the plant
school bus with Jim as our tour guide. and can also down the entire place. The
The plant manager stopped us, wanting to owner has a computer at home where he
know who we were and what we were can completely operate the facility off-
4 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Digital Photo by Jim Profitt
Auto Club Humor?
site. As we drove along, I noticed outdoor
sodium chloride deposits on the large
pipes - intense salt deposits creating stalactites as if from a magical and eerie
world - reminiscent of several caves I
have visited.
Next we saw the Trona Museum,
opened just for us. Local docents
explained Trona’s history via photographs, memorabilia, and books. Trona
was once a booming town, but
Ridgecrest, where most plant employees
now live, has surpassed it. In its heyday a
town bus took folks to Los Angeles for
weekend excursions, and formal dances
were held at Valley Wells on summer
evenings with men in suits and ladies in
ball gowns. In addition the town boasted
the second largest outdoor swimming
pool in the state of California; from the
pictures I’d call it more of a lake than a
pool. Trona even had the first “mall of
America,” a large building called Austin
House, where all the desert town’s businesses congregated, including the post
office, general store, and sheriff’s station.
In the open-air courtyard, the town set
out chairs to show movies under the
stars. In windy weather they covered the
courtyard with a large tarp and the film
went on. Unfortunately, when Austin
House was razed, the entire town lost its
central landmark.
Inspired to join the Trona museum,
Neal handed one of the museum’s
docents a $20 bill for dues, but she said
that in order to become a member, Neal
would “have to fill out a sheet.” He
responded in surprise, “You mean, you
want me to get under the sheet with you!”
Much laughter ensued as the ladies wondered what would be required if Neal
applied for a $200 lifetime membership!
5
Digital Photo by Jim Profitt
Ruth to Emmett “No I won’t go back to that!”
Next, we visited a typical company
house built by the chemical plant in the
1920’s (now run by the Trona Historical
Society) - again open just for us. It is one
of several homes built along Panamint
Street by the mine for its top management. The house has been re-furnished
by volunteers with period furniture and
amenities, creating a living trip back in
time. All the houses share a distinctive
square design with a bathroom placed
across from the front door “You can tell a
man designed this house,” remarked one
of the docents. Heavy mixed concrete and
asbestos roofs encircle the houses, creating huge overhanging eaves that provide
shade and natural air conditioning in the
severe summer heat. The original color of
the houses, both inside and out, was
green, known locally as “Trona green”even the linoleum was green - perhaps
because it was just about the only green
Photo byAllan Wicker
you would see in the town. However, a
photograph from the 1940’s shows that
Reilly ruin
mature shrubs and trees did line
Panamint Street; it seems the town had Gossett’s). Saturday, Bill Gossett, a native
much pride in those days and is now re- and lifetime resident of Trona (except for
gaining it. Behind the house sits an old a “brief stint in Vietnam”) shared his
railroad caboose along with other pieces knowledge of the land and history of the
of machinery and equipment from the Panamint Valley. He and Emmett were
early days.
perfect complements to each other; a
After lunch we visited Great Falls, a story by one stimulated another tale in the
lovely waterfall or cascade in a canyon other.
with massive boulders and dramatic
Saturday morning, we visited China
wash-outs created from the recent heavy camp where the Chinese who worked in
rains. Friday night we camped at Valley the region made rustic homes. One ruin
Wells, the facility built by Trona for its arranged stones in a spiral to protect the
community events. We tried to figure out house’s entrance from wind, much like
which way the morning sun would rise an igloo does. We saw the old stagecoach
because IT WAS VERY COLD!!! In sub- switch station where, in the 1880’s, teams
freezing temperatures the night covered alternated along the stagecoach route. We
us with a thick layer of ice. (Emmett and lunched at Reilly Townsite and Anthony
Ruth Harder wisely stayed at Bill Mill, the ruins of a mine with astonish-
D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Digital Photo by Jim Profitt
Chinese Camp
ingly well-crafted rock walls. The mine,
established in 1882 with an initial investment of $200,000, yielded over its lifetime a meager $21,500 in silver. However,
the homes perched along the side of the
mountain, complete with hand-made
stone fireplaces, commanded a magnificent view of the snow-covered mountains
across the valley. Over lunch Bill told us
the story of the Ballarat Bandit who cleverly evaded the law until Rangers finally
cornered him, whereupon he committed
suicide rather than surrender to the
authorities. This story set off a spree of
accounts between Emmett and Bill of
adventures in the region, each account
seeming to end up with one or more dead
bodies.
We explored Panamint Crater, a large
sink hole thought at one time to have
been a potential meteor site. However,
scientists who drilled over 300 feet down
found no fragments of a meteor.
Nevertheless, lifting the unlocked wooden
trapdoor over the hole, we checked the
scientists’ findings by dropping pebbles
into the shaft and counting the seconds
before they landed.
Digital Photo by Jim Profitt
Allan watching John organizing camp
In the late afternoon Bill Gossett took lots of broken chinaware, soda bottles
us to his mountainside home with exquis- and machinery. Bob Jaussaud, with the
ite views of the Valley. Bill acquired this shrewdest eye, spotted a miniature cobalt
property over twenty-five years ago. When blue Vicks Vapor jar, still intact, measurCongress subsequently declared it part of ing only about an inch in height - also two
the wilderness area, he fought to have his lovely old shell buttons.
land removed. After many years, and with
Next, Bill took us to a site of Native
the help of his congressional representa- American geoglyphs along the old Indian
tive, a bill passed excluding his property. Panamint trail. The geoglyphs crisscross
Surrounded now by BLM land, Bill has no in designs resembling intersecting
fear of noisy neighbors.
snakes. They recall the undulating images
We camped in his front yard, sharing a used in a number of world mythologies to
festive and abundant potluck dinner. Over denote healing energy - for example, the
the campfire, Bill and Emmett continued Greek caduceus, the double staff of the
their colorful telling of local calamitous god Hermes, the traditional symbol of
tales, until we cried out in unison, “No western medicine. These Native American
more dead bodies!” It was time for bed. glyphs might also have denoted such
Sunday morning brought a brilliant, healing energy. Bob Jaussaud again disclear sunrise in a pink-tainted sky. We fol- covered a remarkable rock which
lowed Bill and Emmett up to the ruins of appeared to be incised by hand with a
the Wildrose CCC camp, passing the meet- petroglyph. Clearly a fragment, we all
ing place of the annual California agreed it certainly looked hand-made.
Association of Four Wheel Drive Clubs After admiring the stone we returned it to
November Panamint Valley Days gather- its desert home.
ing. The camp probably housed over a
Meanwhile, Bill told us another story
hundred men who built improvements from an out-of-print book called The
and trails in Death Valley. We rummaged Great Understander about a native squaw
through the remains of the camp, noting who was killed for adultery in the valley. I
later located a copy of the book from the
Los Angeles Public Library and provide
It’s a museum potluck and the second annual Mammoth Awards Presentations
here a brief synopsis of the story:
Saturday, April 2, 2005
A young man found his way West and
took upon himself various odd jobs
Shoshone Museum building
throughout the Panamint Valley, including
These awards are so big they have to be called Mammoth
being a pony express rider and a body
Bring your Academy Awards garb and a dish to share,
Des er t E x pl or er s
(eating utensils would be good too) and join us as we honor those who have
Newsletter
given so much to the museum this year.
Editor: Bob Martin
Potluck begins 1:00 p.m.
Awards following
Asst. Editors: Marilyn Martin,
Call Kari for details, 760-852-4524
Marian & Neal Johns
6 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Next Meeting
Tuesday March 1
6:00 p.m.
Allan & Ding Wickers’
1430 Sitka Ct., Claremont
909-445-0082
Gate code: 037
guard. One day, as he rode through the
desert, “at the foot of Lookout
Mountain…I looked ahead and saw an
old squaw with a big rock in her hand.”
She was ready to kill a young Shoshone
squaw and a white miner - ‘entertaining
themselves,’ as Bill discreetly put it. “As
soon as I saw what the old squaw
intended to do, I pulled my pistol and
commanded her to stop. She looked at
me in surprise and went away in a rage.”
Fontaine, the young man, told the white
miner that he had better get himself and
the young Indian woman out of the country as they were in for a nasty time. I
“started to give the white man a lecture,
but he said he “simply did not care” for
the squaw’s safety.” Finally Fontaine persuaded him to take her to safety in a cabin
in town. For several days the Indians
swarmed the town looking for the couple,
trailing Fontaine, and even watching him
through the windows of his residence at
night as he lay in bed, hoping he would
lead them to the offending couple.
Several days later, when the Indians
had left, Fontaine rode into Wildrose
Canyon “through the hot sand. This country is quiet as death and one can hear any
sound a long way off. Suddenly I heard
a…terrifying cry that echoed for miles
along the mountain side…It almost made
the earth tremble…It was an uncanny
diabolical noise.” He hid himself and saw
the Indians, several hundred of them,
“painted with many colored mineral
paints which the Indians gather through
the mountains,” tying the same squaw to a
tree stripped of its bark, in preparation to
burn her. As he watched the death spectacle unfold, he wanted to put the young
woman out of her misery, as she was
grossly mistreated, but he halted for fear
of his own life. Her killing haunted him
for a long time afterwards.
Bill continued the story saying that the
7
offending miner escaped through a shaft
that dropped from the top of a mountain
all the way down the inside and out the
bottom through a tunnel. He thought such
a shaft could not have really existed, but
one day, on one of his excursions, he
found it.
After such stories from the past, we
returned to the pavement and civilization,
said our good-byes and headed for home
with many thanks to Emmett for arranging
such a fascinating journey into Panamint
Valley.
Future
TripS
All trips require a fourwheel drive vehicle and a
working CB unless otherwise
specified by the trip leader.
Non-complying vehicles will
not be allowed on trips.
Leaders may authorize a variance at their discretion.
The Mojave Road
March 12 - 13, 2005
Leader: Neal Johns
This is a joint trip with the Old
Spanish Trail Association
N THE MID-1800’S THE U.S. ARMY TROOPS
I
in Arizona were being supplied by
wagon trains overland from Kansas. It
was a long route, with native Americans
that had no sense of humor about being
invaded, and formidable natural obstacles, including the Grand Canyon.
Secretary of War Jefferson Davis
ordered former Naval Lieutenant (and
former California Superintendent of
Indian Affairs), Edward Fitzgerald Beale
to find and survey a wagon road from Fort
Defiance, across Arizona to the Colorado
River. California had been the subject of
several surveys so Beale’s instructions did
not include continuing onward.
Nevertheless, he continued onward to
Photos
Needed!
A few of your very
best DE trip photos for
display at the MRVM
Museum barbeque on
a DE storyboard! Send
them to Marian Johns
or bring them to the
next DE meeting.
Include SASE if you
want them returned.
Drum Barracks in Wilmington on the
coast.
Enter the one man most responsible
for preserving what we now know as the
Mojave Road, Dennis Casebier. Dennis
served as a young Marine at the 29 Palms
Marine Core training area and fell in love
with the desert. He was also interested in
history, and went to the foremost Eastern
Mojave Desert historian of the time, E.I.
Edwards, with a question on a dotted line
found on old topo maps with the notation,
Old Government Road. Edwards
explained the background of this supply
route and shared his mantra with Dennis.
“It’s not enough to just study the paper,
you must wear out a pair of boots on the
ground to really understand the history of
an area”. Dennis has gone on to take the
place of Edwards (deceased), worn out
several sets of boots, and with the help of
his Friends of the Mojave Road organization, has marked the Mojave Road (Old
Government Road) with rock cairns and
written a guidebook (revised several
times) for 4WD travel over it. The Mojave
Road Guide contains directions, history,
botany, geology, and archeology, all keyed
to the 130 mile distance of the trip from
the Colorado River to Barstow. It is available from several sources, including
Friends of the Mojave Road, Goffs
Schoolhouse, 37198 Lanfair Rd. G-15,
Essex, CA 92332-9786 postpaid for
$24.55, (make checks payable to
MDHCA) and it is highly recommended
for participants of this trip to have along.
Dennis is now constructing a museum
at Goffs, CA to hold the tens of thousands
of old photographs, hundreds of tran-
D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
scribed oral interviews with old time
desert dwellers, and the best desert
library in California along with the outdoor mining and ranching artifacts
donated. The museum is built around the
restored 1914 Goffs schoolhouse.
The two day trip will start at Needles,
CA at 8:30 a.m. 12 March, in front of the
former railroad station, El Garcés downtown area, and end near Barstow, CA the
afternoon of the second day. Four wheel
drive is required and a CB radio is highly
recommended (Channel 13) for receiving commentaries as we go along. We will
camp at the Goffs, CA, headquarters of the
Friends of the Mojave Road at the end of
the first day. For reservations, contact
Neal Johns, 909-887-1549 or [email protected]
Arizona Strip
Co-Leaders: Dan W.
Messersmith and Buffalo
Hayden.
March 19-26
MOE trip, DE’rs invited
HIS WILL BE A LITTLE EARLY IN THE YEAR,
T
and it can be a bit cool in the
evenings; but we have done it before
and had a great time. Put it on your calendar and consider making this trek to
one of Arizona’s best remote areas with
spectacular scenery and some of the best
Grand Canyon overlooks that most people
will never see. E-mail Dan for directions
to the meeting place ([email protected]).
a willing attitude to do whatever they need
done. We may be involved in painting or
constructing sheds. Who knows?
Join us for a fun weekend and remember, no dogs please. Any questions? Send
me an e-mail.
Granite Mt. work
Party - Round Two
George Patton
Training Camps
April 8-9-10 2005
Leader: Vicki Hill
CB: 13
May 14-15, 2004
Coordinator: Reda Anderson
CB: 13
(Museum sponsored)
N EDUCATIONAL, EXPLORATORY TRIP TO
A
some of General George Patton's
WWII training camps is planned for
May 14-15, 2004 with co-leaders Don
Hunt, teacher, and Roger Baty, retired
professor of anthropology.
We will camp at Coxcomb Camp (Delorme
page 109 A/B-7) Friday night, exploring it, and
Rice Camp (page 100/101 D-4) on Saturday.
Time permitting, we will also explore Iron
Mountain Camp and/or Granite Camp (page 100
D-1). Sunday, we'll visit Desert Center Airport, and
Camp Young, Patton's main camp, which lies
north
and adjacent to I-10 between Desert
Think you know every? Centerof(page
109 C-6) and the main entrance to
thing?
Joshua Tree National Park to the west. The camps
are currently in a state of extreme disrepair. You'll
The words ’racecar,’ ’kayak’
learn about the exciting plans to revitalize the
and ’level’ are the same
camps with the help of the BLM and a private citwhether they are read leftizensto
group.
Roger Baty will bring his book about the area,
O
NCE AGAIN WE HOPE TO GET TOGETHER
a group of enthusiasts who want to
experience the beauty of Granite
Cove and help out with some work that
needs to be done at the Sweeney Granite
Mountains Desert Research Center.
On Friday, April 8th we will camp near
the Reserve and work on Saturday.
Sunday will be a day for hiking, rock art
and enjoying what the area has to offer.
Please bring gloves, sturdy shoes, and
Some good folks to know...
Mojave River Valley Museum
Friends of the Mojave Road
http://www.mvm.4t.com
Dedicated to the preservation and promotion of
the scientific, historical and cultural heritage of
the Mojave Desert.
■
Discover Baja Travel Club
(800) 727-BAJA and on the web at
www.discoverbaja.com
Great newsletter, spectacular insurance prices,
weather and road reports, etc.
■
Colorado River Historical Society and Museum
220l Highway 68, Bullhead City, AZ
Located in historic 1940's Catholic Church
(520) 754-3399 e-mail: [email protected]
Exhibits: steamboats, early ranching, mining,
Mojave Indians, Hardyville, gifts. Open daily, l0:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. AZ time Closed Mondays.
■
www.eco4wd.com . [email protected]
Harry Lewellyn leads desert trips and teaches offhighway driving through several Orange County
colleges. He also stocks good maps and books, and a
killer tire repair system that is worth its weight in
gold.
■
37198 Lanfair Rd.G-15 Essex, CA 92332
(760) 733-4482
http://www.mdhca.org/
Historian Dennis Casebier writes desert guidebooks,
leads trips, builds museums(!) and has other odd
habits. Newsletter subscription is $20.
■
Searles Valley Historical Society Museum
In Trona just off the main highway
■
Friends of the Eastern California Museum
Map & Compass
Independence, CA
Check them out! Open weekends. Old farm
machinery, bookstore, reference library, great old
photos and Owens Valley memorabilia. Nice folks,
too.
■
Shoshone Museum Association
118 Hwy. 127 PO Box 38 Shoshone, CA
■
[email protected], (714) 647-2352
Navigation Classes by David Mott.
■
Mohave Outback Explorations
2945 Leroy Ave. Kingman, AZ 86401
[email protected]
Motto: "The world isn’t too bad if you can just get
out in it!"
■
8 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
Current Desert Explorers with e-mail
Warren Alksnis
Robert L. Ammons
Paul Bakkom
George Baskevitch
Steven Bein
Ted Berger
Susan Berry
Robert Bolin
June Box
Steve Burks
Jim Byrne
Roger Cannon
Nick Cataldo
Tom Church
Herb Clark
Lorene Crawford
Joseph A. Daly
Alona Daudel
Robert J. Day
Herb Deeks
Robert DeWolf
Dan Dinsmoor
Robert Dodds
John Downing
Bill Dunlap
Paul Ferry
John M. Fickewirth
Robert Floth
Brian Flynn
Leonard Friedman
Ann Fulton
George Gilster
David P. Given
Nancy Gorham
Pauline A. Goss
Sunny Hansen
Jerry K. Harada
Emmett Harder
Terry Hardwicke
Vicki Hill
Dean W. Hilleman
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
jim [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
jkh357.sbcglobal.net
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
John Hoopes
[email protected]
Charles Hughes
[email protected]
Robert J. Jacoby
[email protected]
Bob Jaussaud
[email protected]
Neal Johns
[email protected]
George Johnston
[email protected]
Matt Jones
[email protected]
Chuck Kalbach
[email protected]
Richard Kenney
[email protected]
Jerry Koplowitz
[email protected]
Joann E. Kovaleski [email protected]
Chuck Lahmeyer
[email protected]
Jay Lawrence
[email protected]
David Legters
[email protected]
Ken Lengner
[email protected]
Larry Lesh
[email protected]
Ron Lewis
lrgmrgazAyahoo.com
Ron Lipari
[email protected]
Ed Manes
edmanes @juno.com
Steve Marschke
[email protected]
Bob Martin
[email protected]
Dave McFarland
[email protected]
Joan McGovern-White [email protected]
Homer Meek
[email protected]
Dan Messersmith
[email protected]
Debbie Miller
[email protected]
Chuck Mitchell
[email protected]
David Mott
[email protected]
Emily Murphy
[email protected]
Robert M. Myers
[email protected]
Deborah Nakamoto [email protected]
James Neeld
[email protected]
Bill Neill
[email protected]
Stuart Nicol
[email protected]
Doug Nunn
[email protected]
Terry Ogden
[email protected]
Bob Oliver
[email protected]
John Page
[email protected]
Mel Patterson
[email protected]
Robert Peltzman
[email protected]
John Perko
[email protected]
Leroy C. Pilkenton
Richard Pope
Jim Proffitt
Don Putnam
Bruce M. Rausch
Bob Rodemeyer
Ana M. Romero
Alan Romspert
Ron Ross
Nan Savage
Sherry Schmidt
Allan Schoenherr
Ken Sears
Dale Self
Robert L. Shannon
Julian Singer
Jerry Smith
Mark Soden Jr.
Chris R. Stahl
Ed Steiner
George Stoll
Donald Sweinhart
Richard Taylor
Bob Thille
Matt Thoma
Gary Thomas
Al Thompson
Brad Thompson
Tom Thompson
Loren Upton
Christine Urbach
Willie Walker
Betty Wallin
James Watson
Matt Westlake
Rick Whitaker
Allan Wicker
Bob Wieting
Gordon Wilcher
Jamie Wyatt
Bob Younger
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
anamarie [email protected]
[email protected]
rgrossjr @jpl.nasa.gov
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Organizational Fine Print and Choice Pieces of Potentially Useful Info
General Trip Information
1. The Mojave River Valley Museum has two sections (groups) that explore the desert environment (Museum
membership required):
a. The Desert Explorers, who use 4WD vehicles and cover the Southwestern states and Mexico/Baja, camping out
wherever nightfall catches them. The trips are led by numerous experienced Desert Explorers subscribers. The
Desert Explorers newsletter is available for $18 a year.
b. The Mojave River Explorers, who establish a base camp in the Mojave desert, usually with motorhomes and
trailers, and make daily 4WD/2WD sorties, attempting to find seats for those without 4WD vehicles, returning to
camp each night. The trips are led by experienced Museum members who, collectively, have spent decades learning
the hidden wonders of the Mojave. Their newsletter is available for $7/year from editor Gene Stoops (760) 2532419.
2. You MUST be a member of the Mojave River Valley Museum to attend a trip. Membership applications are included
in every newsletter on the back of the last page.
3. When you join a trip, you agree to abide by the decisions and directives of the leader throughout the trip or until
such time as you inform the leader that you are leaving the group to proceed on your own. The leader may, if his
decisions or directives are not followed, inform a participant that his participation in the trip is terminated.
4. The Desert Explorers is a family oriented 4WD organization. Spouses and kids are welcome. Friendly dogs are OK as
specified below. Trips will meet and depart from somewhere near the trip route, usually not from the Museum.
5. To receive the Desert Explorers’ Newsletter, send $18 for a subscription to Marilyn Martin, PO Box 291759, Phelan, CA
92329-1759. Make the check out to Desert Explorers.
Communications: CB is required and is the normal mode of communications between vehicles on a trip. Channel 13 is
the Desert Explorers’ channel. Its a good idea to monitor it whenever you are driving so that other members can
contact you should they spot your vehicle on the road.
Weekend Trips: There is normally one major trip each month. This will be the trip on which you can look around and
find old friends, new friends, collect debts, flirt with other wives/husbands and lie about other trips. There may be
another trip during the month for people who have time for it or can’t make the main trip. The purpose of all this
is to generate more coherence as a group and get everybody to know everybody. We stole this idea from the Mojave
River Explorers. Don’t forget their fixed-camp trips on the first weekend of the month.
Trip Coordinator: John Page. Send your trip proposals to John. John will resolve any time conflicts and maybe bug you
if you are late with a promised trip write-up. He will also coordinate private trips for subscribers upon request (see
below).
Non Museum sponsored trip Point of Contact: We publish reports of subscribers’ non museum sponsored trips in order
to fill the pages, encourage you to get out into The Great American Desert, and to amuse and entertain you. Some
trips, because of time or limited number of people, are not suitable for official museum trip status. Our Trip
Coordinator is the point of contact for Subscribers having or wanting to go on a non musuem sponsored trip.
Potluck: There will be a Potluck on Saturday night of our weekend trips unless otherwise noted by the Leader.
Trip Details: Participants may be required to send a SASE to the trip leader to receive information on trip meeting place
and other details. A SASE is a self addressed stamped envelope.
Finances: The cost of preparing and mailing the Desert Explorers newsletter is covered by the annual subscription fee
as are extraordinary out-of-pocket expenses by Trip Leaders or members, which are incurred as a result of Desert
Explorers activities. These expenses include costs of telephone calls, office supplies and postage but do not include
any travel expenses, vehicle damage or personal injures. Other extraordinary expenses must be authorized by the
Executive Committee.
Hot Tips for Leaders:
1. The leader is responsible for sending the trip announcement and trip report to the newsletter editor. The write-ups
should be detailed enough so the participants will know what to expect and, if possible, have enough information
in it so that a SASE is not necessary. (See the ones in this issue for examples.)
2. Try not to schedule trips on the first weekend of the month. This weekend is used regularly by the Mojave River
Explorers for their outings.
3. Try not to use a reservation system or vehicle limits unless absolutely necessary. This will save paperwork for
everyone. Request a SASE if necessary for sending out further trip details, meeting place, time, etc.
4. Support your other leaders’ trips (by attending) or the Trail Gods will get you.
5. Maximum loss (vehicles or people) is 10% per trip.
6. Leaders, please put your CB channel 13 (or other channel if circumstances prevent using Desert Explorers’ channel
13) in your trip write-up.
Dog Policy:
Dogs can become a problem in camp mainly because of the large number of them and the sometimes blind eye of
their humans. Therefore, and forevermore we will have a Dog Policy so that shy leaders will not have to make ad
hoc policy.
1. Bringing a dog on a trip requires the ADVANCE PERMISSION of the Leader!
2. Dogs will be leashed/confined during happy hour & mealtimes.
3. People with dogs will be expected to clean up any poop in the campsite.
4. Dogs that fight, harass wildlife, eat small children etc., will be confined and banned from future trips.
9 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
•Our Fearful Leaders•
NAME
E?MAIL
KNOWN AS
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
Reda Anderson
Robb Anderson
Robert Bolin
Shirley Bolin
Lorene Crawford
Robert Dodds
Paul Ferry
David P. Given
Jerry K. Harada
Emmett Harder
Vicki Hill
Bob Jaussaud
Sue Jaussaud
Marian Johns
Neal Johns
Chuck Kalbach
Jay Lawrence
Bob Martin
Marilyn Martin
Joan McGovern-White
Dan Messersmith
Debbie Miller
Bill Neill
John Page
Ana M. Romero
Alan Romspert
Allan Schoenherr
Diane Sears
Ken Sears
Anne Stoll
George Stoll
Donald Sweinhart
Betty Wallin
Dusty
RawbananaRob
Stamp Licker
Stapler & Folder
The Smile
Bob-Rock Bucket-Nancy-No More Rocks
El Cocinero
P.O bx. 3096
1161 W. Duarte Rd. #4
1606 Corsica Pl.
1606 Corsica Pl.
128 Anita Court
20035 Hodge Rd.
P.O. Box 1428
12871 Gifford Way
13342 Cypress St.
18201 Muriel Ave.
26111 Parmelee Ct.
P. O. Box 789
P. O. Box 789
406 Lytle Creek Road
406 Lytle Creek Road
9930 Johnson Road
530 Ohio Ave.
P.O. Box 291759
P.O. Box 291759
33624A Winston Way
2945 Leroy Avenue
710 Orangewood Lane
4900 E. Glenview Ave.
3675 Gingerwood Ct.
1161 W. Duarte Rd. #4
605 No. Pomona Ave.
414 Bluebird Canyon Dr.
P.O. Box 4689
P.O. Box 4689
143 Monterrey Drive
143 Monterrey Drive
P.O. Box 23061
68200 Calle Bonita
Beverly Hills
Arcadia
Costa Mesa
Costa Mesa
Redlands
Barstow
Point Roberts
Victorville
Garden Grove
San Bernardino
Hemet
Lone Pine
Lone Pine
Lytle Creek
Lytle Creek
Phelan
Long Beach
Phelan
Phelan
Temecula
Kingman
San Dimas
Anaheim
Thousand Oaks
Arcadia
Fullerton
Laguna Beach
Cerritos
Cerritos
Claremont
Claremont
Santa Ana
Desert Hot Springs
California 90212-3096
California 91007
California 92626
California 92626
California 92373
California 92311
Washington 98281
California 92392
California 92843-1123
California 92407
California 92544
California 93545-0789
California 93545-0789
California 92358
California 92358
California 92371
California 90814
California 92329-1759
California 92329-1759
California 92592
Arizona 86401
California 91773
California 92807-1141
California 91360
California 91007
California 92832
California 92651
California 90703
California 90703
California 91711
California 91711
California 92711 3061
California 92240
Desert God in Training
Scotty
Glyphartist
Sue’s Husband & Co-Chairman
Toby Feeder & Co-Chairman
Woman of Considerable Will
Chm. Emeritus, Aridologist, Asst. Ed.
Zanjameister
Quicksand Guy, Editor Emeritus
Newsletter Editor
Subscriptions & Newsletter Prooferer
Asst. Stamp Licker
M.O.E. Chief & Jeep Sleeper
Roadrunner
Tamarisk Eradicator
Ajg., Webdude
RawbananaAna
Flower Child
The Good Allan
Webchick Emeritus
Money Man
Canologist
Lens Cleaner
Mr. Nice
Blender Queen
ZIP
HOME PHONE
CELL PHONE
310-772-0112
626-572-6015
714-549-4361
714-549-4361
909-793-1004
760-253-7506
360-945-2715
760-956-7675
714-537-4899
909-887-3436
951927-6476
818-585-6468
818-585-6468
909-887-1549
909-887-1549
760-868-6059
562-439-5323
760-868-6606
760-868-6606
909-659-5126
928-757-8953
909-592-1939
714-779-2099
805-493-1128
626-821-0044
714-870-0946
949-494-0675
562-404-1772
562-404-1772
909-621-7521
909-621-7521
310-429-2558 [email protected]
[email protected]aol.com
714-473-1564 [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
jkh357.sbcglobal.net
[email protected]
[email protected]
951-318-1444 [email protected]
951-318-1444 [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
760-774-4885 [email protected]
[email protected]
760-641-1483 [email protected]
760-641-1483 [email protected]
909-966-2191 [email protected]
928-715-0363 [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
805-660-1218 ) [email protected]
626-483-6540 anamarie [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
562-650-0461 [email protected]
909-730-0137 [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
760-329-2403
[email protected]
Museum Membership Application - Send a separate envelope to and a check made out to:
Mojave River Valley Museum Association, Inc.
PO Box 1282, Barstow, CA 92312-1282 • Phone: (760) 256-5452
Family - Annual - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$20.00
entitles family to all privileges of membership (One vote per Annual Membership) including Museum Newsletter, ten per
cent discount on publications sold by the Museum, participation in Association activities.
Individual - Annual - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$15.00
Name
Spouse
Address
Children
City
State
Zip
Phone (
)
E-Mail
Desert Explorers newsletter subscription form
To subscribe for one year to the monthly newsletter of the Desert Explorers of the Mojave River Valley Museum
send check for $18.00 made out to: DESERT EXPLORERS, to Marilyn Martin, PO Box 291759, Phelan, CA 92329
Name
Spouse
Address
Children
City
State
Home Phone (
)
E-Mail
Cell Phone (
)
Ham Call Sign
You MUST be a Mojave River Valley Museum member to go on field trips... See above:
10 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
Zip
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
DEsert Explorers
Rendezvous 2005
Registration Form
At Apple Vallley Calilfornia
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY March 18-20 , 2005
Return with a SASE
All Names in party ________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
Address________________________________________________________________________
Phone _____________________________e-mail_______________________________________
Saturday night banquet
Tri-tip with mushroom sauce, roasted lemon-marinated chicken, oven-roasted seasoned red potatoes, rice pilaf,
tossed green salad with ranch-style dressing, Italian mixed vegetables, dinner roll and butter, chocolate cake
and lemon bars, iced tea, lemonade and coffee.
Registration Fee (per vehicle) $5.00 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$ 5.00
Meals:
Adult and Child 10 and up - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$20.00 X_____=$__________
Vegetarian - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$2000 X_____=$__________
Child (6 to10) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$10.00 X_____=$__________
Child (0 t0 5)- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Free
Camping:
Tent camping per vehicle per day - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -$12.00X_______days=$__________
Camper/motorhome dry camping with tent campers (recommended) per day - -$12.00X_______days=$__________
Camper/motorhome water and electricity - no sewer, has dump station per day -$20.00X_______days=$__________
GRAND TOTAL (Registration, meals and camping) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -=$________
Make check out to Desert Explorers, Include SASE.
Send to Marian Johns, 406 Lytle Creek Rd. Lytle Creek, CA 92358 before March 4, 2005
Notes: Trips (full and half day) may be signed up for with Leader prior to Rendezvous. You must be a member of MRVM to go on trips.
11 D ESERT E XPLORERS 4WD SECTION OF THE MOJAVE RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM
NO. 108 MARCH 2005
DESERT EXPLORERS
OF T HE M OJAVE R IVER VALLEY M USEUM
Marilyn Martin • PO Box 291759 • Phelan • California • 92329-1759
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