Providing Permanent Supportive Housing in Rural Alabama

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Providing Permanent Supportive Housing in Rural Alabama
Presented by:
Mande Ellison-Weed
Aresia Spear
Lecia Whiteside
Lillian Zaworski
What is the Supportive Housing
Program?
“The Supportive Housing Program is designated to
promote the development of housing and
supportive services to assist homeless persons in the
transition from the streets and shelters to
permanent housing and self-sufficiency.”-SHP Desk guide
Overview of ARCH Connect 1 and
Changing Lives
 ARCH Connect 1 and Changing Lives are “Master
Leasing” programs.
 They provide housing and case management for
homeless persons diagnosed with disabilities,
including but not limited to physical disabilities and
severe mental illness, who’s income falls at or below
the very low income guidelines set forth by HUD.
 These PSH Programs have the capacity to provide 60
units of housing in Rural Alabama.
Overview of ARCH Connect 1 and
Changing Lives
 They currently provide housing units in 8 rural
counties of Alabama:
Lee, Macon, Russell, Dallas, Walker, Cullman,
Talladega, & Hale
 These programs can pay 100% of rental costs as long as
the rent falls with FMR limitations.
Necessary Components of SHP
 Established and mutually supportive partnerships with
local service providers
 Strong Relationships with local landlords
 Case Managers trained in Housing Case Management
styles
 Regular chart monitoring and review of program policies &
procedures
SHP Participant Successes
 Over 107 formerly homeless people have been housed through
these programs since 2013.
 12 participants have gained employment.
 10 participants have started receiving benefits. (SSI, SSDI etc.)
 11 participants and families have left the program to go on to
self sustained housing .
 2 participants have exited the program for more mainstream
housing assistance such as Section 8 or Public Housing.
Barriers Encountered
 Limited decent and affordable housing stock.
 Limited number of agencies in rural areas with capacity to
successfully provide SHP services.
 Finding participants who meet the guidelines set forth by the
program.
 Limitations related to utility payments for leased units.
Aresia Spear
Alabama Rural Coalition for the Homeless
Permanent Supportive Housing Case Manager
Topics
• Assessments
• HMIS and Case Management
• Safety Tips and Unit Checks
• Program Compliance
• Barriers
• Joys of Housing Case Management
• Questions and Autographs
Assessments
 Current Housing
 Homeless Status
 Verifiable Disabling Condition
 HUD Income Limits
 Highest Need
 Household Members
 Criminal Background Disqualifiers
 Application and Supporting Documentation
 Developing Housing Case Plan
Sample Goals & Objectives
GOAL 1
GOAL 2
GOAL 3
To obtain and remain in
permanent housing
To increase skills and/or
income.
To achieve greater selfdetermination.
Objective 1
Objective 1
• To apply for Disability
benefits through SSI
Objective 1
• To obtain ID
Objective 2
• To obtain CDL License
• To obtain GED
Objective 2
• To take budgeting class
• Apply for Public
Housing/Section 8
Objective 2
• Start savings account for
trailer purchase
($15/month)
• To obtain associates
degree
• Working on better
relationship with family
HMIS and Case Management
 Releases of Information (5 years)
 Proper Training and Active Use
 Contact with HMIS Administrator
 Data Entry and Service Transactions
Safety Tips and Unit Checks
 Inform supervisor of scheduled visits
 Be aware of immediate surroundings
 Report and document issues of concern
 Make contact with Local Law Enforcement
 Perform unit checks during move in, monthly unit
checks, and exiting of the program.
 Report and Document damages observed and repairs
needed immediately.
Program Compliance
 Establish clear professional boundaries
 Clearly explain program requirements and termination
policies
 Inform participants of rights to file a grievance
 Develop Housing Case Plan and update appropriately
 Encourage participants to remain in compliance
 Provide documentation of violations and program
terminations
Barriers
 Applicants who don’t meet HUD eligibility
requirements
 Housing not available in each county
 Limited units for 3 bedrooms and large families
 Immediate program terminations
 Abandonment of units
Joys of Housing Case Management
 Acceptance into the program
 Moving participants into program units
 Soliciting donations and partnering with
local agencies
 Establishing rapport while providing case
management
 Sharing in participants success
Questions and Autographs
Importance of
Community
Partnerships in
Supportive Housing
Provision
Lecia Whiteside
[email protected]
SAFE Family Services Center
256-245-4343
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
PARTNERSHIPS
What are
community
partnerships?
Who are
community
partners?
Why are
partnerships
created?
Key
Characteristics
Goals
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
WHAT ARE
COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS?
Connections between and among people
and groups to share interests, concerns
and create visions for the future.
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
WHY ARE
PARTNERSHIPS CREATED?
• When it does not seem possible to solve the
problem or address the situation by just one group.
• The cost of solving the problem or addressing the
issue is too costly for one group.
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
WHO ARE
COMMUNITY PARTNERS?
 Sub grantees(SAFE)
 Housing Communities
 Utility Companies
 Food Banks
 Community Action Agencies
 Red Cross
 Local Churches
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
KEY CHARACTERISTICS
Shared Vision
Comprehensive & Collaborative
Assessment of Local Needs and Priorities
GOALS
• Blend the housing community with the disabled homeless
population in order to help provide tools to overcome
adversity and to live a happy stable rewarding life.
• Homeless Prevention/ Housing Retention.
Importance of Community Partnerships
in Supportive Housing Provision
Q&A
What are
community
partnerships?
Who are
community
partners?
Why are
partnerships
created?
Key
Characteristics
Goals
HMIS
Homeless
Management Information Systems
What is HMIS?
The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development also
known as HUD has been directed by Congress to gather
information on homeless people by 2004. Congress has indicated
that states should be collecting information on homelessness,
including the use of services and the effectiveness of the local
homeless assistance programs. This information gathering is
known as Homeless Management Information Systems or HMIS.
According to HUD, any person seeking our shelter services is
considered to be homeless.
Why is this important to YOU?
 All entities receiving HUD funds are required to
participate in HMIS.
 Properly entered, valid and reliable data entered
into HMIS, results in accurate Annual Progress
Reports (APRs) that are necessary for all CoC grant
reporting.
Red Flags
 Data entry errors or omissions can trigger audits.
 We may know that our client is eligible for services
under specific grants.
 If the information is not entered into HIMIS
properly, the report will reflect deficiencies and you
could lose your grant.
Don't Know
or Refused
Missing
Data
First Name
0
0
Last Name
0
0
SSN
0
0
Date of Birth
0
0
Race
0
0
Ethnicity
0
0
Gender
0
0
Veteran Status
0
0
Disabling Condition
1
0
Residence Prior to Entry
0
0
Zip of Last Permanent Address
0
0
Housing Status (at entry)
0
0
Income (at entry)
0
0
Income (at exit)
0
0
Non-Cash Benefits (at entry)
0
0
Non-Cash Benefits (at exit)
0
0
Physical Disability (at entry)
0
0
Developmental Disability (at entry)
0
0
Chronic Health Condition (at entry)
0
0
HIV / AIDS (at entry)
0
0
Mental Health (at entry)
0
0
Substance Abuse (at entry)
0
0
Domestic Violence (at entry)
0
0
Destination
0
0
Data Element
Suggestion
 Ask your HMIS contact to run a report for you, so
you can determine if information is missing or has
been entered improperly.
 Doing this periodically during the grant year can
eliminate pressure when the APR is pending.
Where do we go from here?
 Continue to provide housing in Rural Alabama.
 Continue and strengthen relationships with grant
partners.
 Continue to provide comprehensive case management
for program participants.
 Garner leases and establish relationships with more
rural housing providers, in order to continue forward
program progress.
 Continued compliance with HMIS guidelines to support
better reporting and grant renewal efforts.

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