The meeting that never wa - The Courier Archive

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The meeting that never wa - The Courier Archive
The newspaper of the University DC Newcastle upon Tyne
T N the last few weeks
1 rumours have been
circulating
that
the
lease of Eustace Percy
Hall is due to fall in at
the end o f this year and
that it w ill not be
renewed. Dr. Bosanquet,
the Vice Chancellor, has
now stated that there is
no truth in these allega­
tions..
BUNGL
E
The meeting
THE THREEMOST
that never wa
ten .year lease was last
renewed Jn 1996.
Only wfoen an additional
hail for 2,000 student*? has
been built w ill Eustace Percy
Hall b« replaced, and the
Wiildirpg will then be used by
the. corporation lo r another
purpose, possibly as a hoepiAddltional
male accom­
modation is visualised for ISO
students when -the Regent
Hostel in Osbo*n*«Jk>ad,
owned by the University, is
converted, and development
in the dining haJd and kit­
chens of Ethel Williams, to be
cooaiJJeted fo r October, wiM
increase Ethel’s capacity by
from left to right : BfHy Hatton, Dove Loveday,
Brian O'Horo.
Photo by Hamilton Caldwell.
T AST Saturday's Union Rava was a great succass,
1 despite the fact that the Fourmost were only
the " Threemost," Their rfty+hm * auitam t>-^ike
MiIIward, * in hospital with o growth in hfc throdt.
Tha group played on without him and gore us
their twb hit records— '"Hello Little Girl/' and their
present entry in the top 20 " I'm In Love."
The supporting group at the dance were Ken
and the Rebels, who were also well received.
U.S.S.R.
EXEIC. HOWLER
NORTH AND AGRICULTURE
DOMINATE IN llONOURS
iddis the
jries.
Mrs.
1 on
Rod Brasslngton, vicepresident off the Union,
In c h a r g e of U n i o n
catering.
P h o to by Dave Surfleet.
Union mural scheme
were too dry and the next
day too soggy, but at a cost
of 10d., they should improve
— given time.
Toasted
tea-cakes
have
been introduced in the after­
noon
and these too have
proved popular. It is also
hoped
that chocolate
and
wrapped biscuits will be on
sale in the Bun Room before
long.
These ideas
come
from
students — so if you partic­
ularly want to see something
new being introduced, contact
Rod Brassington, the Union
catering official, or use the
Suggestions
Book
in
the
Union.
T R A V E L IN
Have you seen this week’s New Statesman?
— special
1964
enlarged
O nly Is . as usual.
issue
1— C O U * t€ R , T d U t & P A Y , J A N U A R Y 30. 1SS4
Editor: JE R R Y N O R M A N
Assistant Editor: Sieve Roper
Executive Editor: Godfrey Ptiilbin
Business Manager: lain Bowden
Editorial Board:
Christine Rourke, Joyce Foster, Clive Walter,
Moyra MacKenzie, Neville Hodgkisson, Martin Pinder.
John Evetts
J A N U A R Y 30, 1M4
■Hi
v .v
\
*
RE you satisfied with Hie organisation of
Rag? Do you tfimk th at Hie Union
Society and the Students' Representative
Council ore scrying their purpose effec­
tively? W hat new ventures would you
likek to rfsee launched?
*
v
«i « \y
GOOSEBERRY
PRUNING
BUSH
PFRSO NAL CO LU M N
O O F T ! See the stork, with sling in beak, now perch,
^
Obedient on the branches of research.
Tamely she waits while nursery doors stand shut,
And chimney-stacks are stopped for fear of glut.
So rests her swaddled load upon the bough,
And seed-time waits till science free the plough.
She sees the profaned old rites of spring-time woods,
And sadly pencils ‘undelivered goods’ '
Across her charge, then flies frustrate! home.
But carefree man now chums the sterile loam.
And round the gooseberry bush torks in the muck.
He packs its roots, and then begins to pluck
Berries that on the twig grow green and round,
But leaves the windfall lying on the ground.
Once, when the gardener sowed his little plot,
Nature decreed which seed should grow, which not.
He sought her bounty on the fa ffer seed,
And cheerful risked it. when he sowed a weed.
But now. to curb her cenerositv.
i
Abortions infinite hpvp
fce .
Jt is now over six months since the A ct ,was passed,
separating Durham University and King's
College, Newcastle.
In the edition of Courier
Which ushered in the new University, Cyclops saw
With sodium chloiuic utptf may rouse the soil,
Or
in shell the seed with poison spoil,
fit to write: "Welcome to Newcastle, intellectual
Refusing
thus fruition of his toil.
mecca of the frozen North-East.
You are the
He may in autumn now, the seed let freeze,
new intelligentsia, the revitalising life blood
Until it’ s wafted seaward on the breeze.
transfusion of this rotting morass which every day
And when such varied means his choice defy,
A catalogue tells what to choose, and why.slips further into the coaly Tyne."
Aecording to the liturgx of ‘Which’,
In the space of tme which divides us from those
And non-productive is the creative itch.
Once, when the bee was welcomed by the flower,
propitious almost stirring words little has hap­
The fruit began to form that very hour:
pened to dissuade Cyclops from thinking that he
Now, w le n she waits the same guest to receive,
uttered in vain.
What the result may be, fche can’t conceive.
Let nature now to science pass the buck;
True the New Union has opened with a rather pro­
longed and diluted flourish and elsewhere v She’ll plan our families by thought, not luck.
Children in order w ill be generated
building development continues at the rate of
Like nests o f tables, evenly graduated.
/
some E lm . outlay each year, but this is more a
Sisters and brothers sedately w ill process*
v
Through youth: and p aren ts guardedly confess,
matter of expediency rather than new, fa r­
They’d rather have the g o o d old-fashioned -mess.
sighted thinking.
More encouroging Is the creation of U.S.E.C. and the
"
...................................
accompanying policy of big-time entertainment;
the ambitious 1964 Arts Festival and the Inter­
national Debating Tournament — on exciting
breok-through of considerable worth.
Largely for geographical reasons, Newcastle
University is rarely remembered when outsiders
turn to discussing the Redbrick University. It is
therefore the duty of all students who are here
S f am beginning to feel that the long buried
a t the start of this new venture to put Newcastle
institution, S.N.E.C, had at least one good point; it
on the map.
j
gave a choice o f dance music.
,
v
This University is in the uriique position of having
This
could
have
been
(and
should
have
been)
none of the problems that face a totally new
introduced into the new U.S.E.C., as all this is doing
institution struggling to establish itself.
is bringing rock bands, which play the same tunes
W e already have a well founded framework. W hat
in the same cacophonous style week after week.
is now needed is the new thinking which will make
Is this due only to an over­
this University a University in its own right and whelming popularity (I think
not just the amputated arm of a living, divorced not), or just to the organisers’
own interests being satisfied?
body.
N
I, and iftany others, would
T his can only be done by ,shading the worfd that Uke
bear, for a change,
here amidst the cool heaps there is a living, some good Jazz.
X£$t&r as J can see, the
breathing, creative body surging upwards towards financial
side woudd be no
greater heights and achievements. A body which great wotfry, since the Com­ seek guidance from a senior
i f able to reappraise this contemporary scene, mittee a.re prepared to pay member, who could advise
£130 foe a
defence and appeal.
decide what is wrong and change it. A body which approximately
group of four (only three him fa his
Yours, etc.
is prepored to take an interest in itself and eventually appearing) to play
kEDBklCK
through this set standards which may be followed for one hour, they would
Courier
surely be witting to pay a
by
***
few more pounds for a top
questioned
As the only effective mouthpiece for student jazz band (of six or seven),
-What
is the |
_
opinions we appeal to our readers to come forword which would play for the of Sir,courier? Many student*
whole
evening.
with*tr»efr ideos. To express the problems as they
have
probably
asked the
Yours, etc..
question before. One thin,
see them and if possible to suggest solutions.
D. BROOKS.
should not be is a
Finally, do not just read these words and then put
Superior
advertisements.
this edition away with the rest. Stir yourself, and
Granted, revenue must be
* Oxbridge?
sought in places other thaq'
think afresh.
We await your letters, your
Sir, — WMle leisurely
our weekly threepenny
offeriv 01
ideas, YOU.
perusing the columns of last
£11h
Cyclops
popular ?
R. WAUGH LIMITED
W A U G H t have been supplying books
and stationery to students of K in g’s
. College, now Newcastle University fo r
many, many years.
And not only books and stationery . . .
but artists’ materials and drawing instru­
ments o f fine quality are also available.
The lighter sides of university life are
not overlooked.
Hava you seen our
humorous greeting card department?
W A U G H 'S is a pleasant shop in Ridley
Place Just round the com er from North­
umberland Street
Quite a students’ haven in fact.
4 & 6 RIDLEY PLACE
NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE, 1
Telephone 25927 8 29716
ing. but I ask you to look at
week’s Sunday Times, I
last we*k » Courier. The mein
found this latest manifesta­ feature Of the back page Was
tion of an age-old bone of
the General Post Omoe The
contention in Universities.
, trend was similar throughout
The rustication Of one the paper.
And what of the lack of
male and the sending down
of another after they had photographs and the site of
those present. Does Courier
been found with women in
their rooms has caused the only have a Brownie?
Yours, etc*
Oxford University Students
MURIEL WARD
Council to set up a committee
to report on college disci*
pttae.
The report states “that
when e man sleeps with a
Continued from P e g i 1
woman In his coMme room,
A t the actual ceremony
the only breach a# discipline
there will be many distin­
is the violation of the ndes
guished
guests.
including
appertaining to visiting hours.
members
of
the
Court.
Immorality, while being a
matter for college responsibi­ Senate and Council, as well
as representatives of all the
lity is "Wot one for college
other
Universities in the
d iscipMne.”
United Kingdom
Furthermore scouts who
Tatevised
are appointed to report on
breeches Of the regulations
It Is hoped there will be
are open to bribes. Indeed
room for about 50 students in
many may even encourage
the gallery of King’s Hall and
breaking the rules in return
that a further hundred •will
for a "small favour ”
be able to see the ceremony
The report
recommends
in the Physics Building by
that visiting hours in men’s means of a closed circuit
and women’s eoMoges shotfld colour television.
be
Mine, and that college
S R C , will probably be
disoipMne be left to lodge holding a ballot to And out
porters and senior members
how many students would
In serious disciplinary mat­ like to attend—it is expected
ters the student should be
that no lectures will be given
given evsry opportunity to on April 30
HONOURS
Aaonrz'scmentt
C O U R IE R
PstsomoI
tor th*
CoUrwn
will be accepted at the rats of
3d. per lln* (average five words
U»
_»*«» fc* ntfed
Ts.o ^-mid _ _ _ _ _ _
WORK—Do you find It Inters
* Rev. Erie*Patten will be
afclog on his work in a
London Mission
___ to Metih.
I So<
Sunday. Feb. end at 4 o
a
1
____
land JSettKxi; •
.%
should aroint
'who
atteiu;
RETREAT—Not a coward's wflv
ted that
6c prepaid It is
out but a move towardno responsibility ean < i accepted
advance A n Anglican Meth
lions.
for errors or
odist Retreatt wffi be held
(•end. Jan 3lst-Feb
OAN YO U w a u c t ? Then how
at CuBercoate. Retreat
Ideas and
about B elping
begins at 6.45 p.m. for tea
any lunch
wefc
promises
promises> welcomed
ho’j r next week.
AM
YO U HUMAN? Well Rag
Twenty-six foreign govern­
Come along any
n e e d s you.
t« next week.
ments are this year offering
lunch time
AIMTAft
WANTED. Pragarabl
over 170 scholarships at their
SB»ndsh style.—Apply M ck. In .y universities and colleges.
THE ARTS F E S T IV A L__ _____
So
does
arte i national
Coombs Weak 16*4.
Help
W ANTED. Visiting student wishes
to rent flat or bedtiMar for
weekend I4th-l7th February.
Contact Pat R-chardson via in­
ternal mail or Pbone 811454.
“HOW T O BORE an Engineer­
ing Soo:ety”-Hnear atf about it
from Prof. Caasie tonight—
Room 309 Civil Eng. Building;
5.15 p.m.
QlfAICH
COMPETITION
TIME
has arrived. Hear Prof. Cassie’s
introduction tonight at 5.15 p.m.
and see the contests: Feb. 6th,
13th and aoth. Room 017, Civ.
Eng. Building at 5.15 pan.
JOURNALS of the
■ Society now ready On w le
the Ufiion and from Committee.
A ll members should harve one.
“HOW M ANY PEASANTS have
you shot thds season, old chap?
Don’t forget, the season ends
on Saturday!”
GENTLEMAN to chare luxury
flat— prefer final year staident.— Write or call, S9im Oavenddsh Place, or phone 27809
en 10 a m , and 5 pjn.l
Y in Juaftiry flat for
jenUemsE' preferably
final Jear.— Write or call, 39
Cavenglsh Place, or phone
t^27809 (between^ -10 a.m. and
3 p jn .).\
WHO W A S MITHRAS?
A
LONDON MISSION. Rev
Erie Patton wEi tafc about
his work In a mission, on
Siinday. Feb. 2nd at 4.0 p.m
at Jeemond Methodist Church
WOR HOOS. Doubl-e room vacprovided. TV. bathJtttchen,-— Apply Dick
3pept o f Zoology.
Most of the awards are for
graduates wishing to under­
take advanced study or re­
search in academic, scientific
or technological subjects, but
there are some awards for
artists and musicians.
Details of awards are given
in the booklet “ Scholarships
abroad,”
which
can
be
obtained from any British
Council office.
Patch work
“Gentlement are not ex­
pected to wear opennecked shorts”
—K. Hiscock, Warden,
Eustace Percy.
“Get off that radiator—
you’ll be corrugated for
life”
—Dr. R i c h a r d s o n ,
Botany Dept.
“After the campaign in
North Africa the Allies
prepared for the in­
vasion of Syphilis”
—Prof. Enslie - Smith,
Microbiology Dept.
“Babies don’t a r i s e
spontaneously”
—Prof. J. H. Burnett,
Botany Dept.
tJvm*
0h
-
.
*
Sk&estrlHfl
•
Practically everyone has to — from the invctrratn
midnight oil burner to the most dedicated Union
type. Some people, of course, manage better than
others. It** all a question of balance and balance is
exactly wbat yon will bare if you open an account
•t the Midland Bank.
There’s nothing difficult about opening aa account
with tbe Midland; just a few simple formalities and
the job’s done. Have a word with the manager ef
your nearest branch.
You'll find him very helpfnL
MIDLAND BANK
COURIER, T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 30, 1 9 6 4 —3
What has happened to our shipyards?
Why have/they lost so much trade, causing so many ;
redundancies?
latejy been given a great deal
/CERTAIN elements of the Press and the B.B.C.
•• have attempted to answer these questions
as though the blame for these redundancies lies
with the ship-bulldlng sompanies alone.
For example, a “Tonight” reporter was
searching round the yards for pictures of any­
thing that would belittle the industry.
“Ah, this has been imported from Germany,
hasn’t it ? ”
“ No, that came from our factory a t ___ ”
u Oh. Leave it. Slim.”
Once great
The North-east was once
one of the most flourishing
areas of industry in the UJC.
Its activity
was
centred
around its richness in coal.
The proximity of the coal
seams to the coast facilitated
the creation of a great ship­
building industry; this indus­
try in turn served the coal
magnates with easy transport
of their product to the London
Market
When the railways were
built, the coal industry in the
region suffered, fot other
areas, notably the Midlands,
were provided with transport
of their coal to London, and
the monopoly of the North­
east was overcome. Naturally
a decline in the shipping
industry was the result.
But up to this day, the
North . east
shipbuilding
industry has retained its
lead over other regions. It
still has some natural advan­
tages and, of more importance,
it has a strong tradition
behind it. The reasons for the
difficulties of the industry
have been reasons common to
all yards: firstly, a decline in
wottd demand, particularly
for
passenger ships,
and
secondly, increased competi­
tion from abroad.
Redundancies
Because of the importance
o f shipbuilding to the Northeast, these
thee* difficulties
diffl
have led
to redundancies, which have
of publicity.
We arranged interviews
with Mr. Rudkin, a director of
Vickers - Armstrong (S h ip ­
builders) Ltd., and with Mr.
Hunter, Chairman of Swan
Hunter* Ltd. The object was
to find out more about the
reasons for the decline of the
industry and to ascertain the
present position
of their
companies and whether more
redundancies can be expected.
There has been a large
influx of competition into the
shipbuilding market. Many
countries who
have now
established themselves on a
sounder economic footing are
building their own ships,
which up to now Britain
might have supplied. Theie
are far too many yards in
existence for the number of
ships actually being built.
The result is cut-throat com­
petition.
Each country is
anxious to keep its own ship­
building industry alive, and
consequently losses are being
incurred, rather than further
closures being allowed.
Japanese cheapness
Particular difficulties are
caused by Japan, who is pro­
ducing ships far cheaper
than is possible in the West,
at present. Lower labour costs
and differential prices in
9teel are making it possible
for her to produce almost
anything cheaper than her
competitors.
The ship-repairing side of
SHIPBUILDING —
AN EXAMINATION
the
Industry employs an
average of 40 per cent of the
labour total in shipbuilding
in this country. Freight trade
is at the moment going up,
with the result that ship­
owners are unwilling to bring
their ships in for repair.
This is a difficulty of a
temporary nature, however;
of more importance is the
decrease in the world passen­
ger trade, on account of
competition from
airlines.
British shipyards have always
had a very diverse produc­
tive c a p a c i t y , and the
North-east in particular has
produced
more
passenger
ships than some o f its rivals.
But this is not now standing
it in good stead.
Tailor-made
Quite a large proportion of
the redundancies have been
caused among fitters. It is
the bulk carriers which are
in greatest demand, and the
comparatively
new
shinbuilding industries, notably
of Japan and Sweden, have
from the start been able to
specialise in these. The big
Swedish yards are able to
build more runs o f identical
ship6. British shipowners are
apparently still much of a
mind that they want to take
tailor-made ships to suit their
individual requirements, and
this has been a restriction
upon a change coming about
in the form of British ship­
w o rld demand for ships may
increase if world trade in­
yards.
creases.
£7’ million in low interest
loans have been allowed to
shipowners, and have stimu­
lated orders.
World freight
rates are much better than
they have been'for the last
five or six years, and a large
D em arcatio n w a s ta g e
number o f orders have been
placed.
The North-east has
booked a higher proportion
of work than other regions in
recent months.
Precarious
Thus no more unemploy­
ment need be expected to
arise from the shipbuilding
industry io the North-east in
the near future. But the posi­
tion is falsified
by
the
Government loans. Most of
the orders completed rim at
a very narrow margin of
profit, some at a loss. This is
not to deny the social value
of maintaining employment
as far as is possible. But it is
a matter o f concern to all
parties as to what the out­
come of the present precari­
ous position will be.
Mr. Hunter's opinion was
that most yards are at the
moment enjoying a mere
breathing apace. Hie evil day
has been put oft, he said, to
keep work people in employ­
ment. Further rationalisation
must be implemented before
shipbuilding can be con­
sidered to be in an economic
position. The smafliler yards
must go out of business in the
next few years. The bigger
shipyards only wiflt survive.
A further drop In trade
must be anticipated for the
industry. But Mr. Rudkin
pointed out that this had at
least been postponed for the
next eighteen months bv re­
cent orders. During this” time
there is a possibility that
We were told that the pros­
pect* for the North-East are
as good if not better than for
the rest of the country.
The
yards are well aware of the
necessity to reduce costs and
strenuous efforts seem to be
being made to do this.
But
wihere most is lost to over­
seas competitors is in the use
of labour. Demarcation dis­
putes are not the time losses
of importance. It is the vast
wastage o< time which occurs
because of the need to keep
bringing another man to con­
tinue the same piece of
work.
‘There is great scope for
improvement
in
Union
Organisation,” said Mr. Rudkin. “ You can see this kind of
thing through the whole
nation — we are just not pro­
ductivity minded. If the gas
man is to run a pipe to your
house the first thing he does
is to pitch a tent, light a fire
and brew a cup otf tea. Ship­
building is not the only in­
dustry to suffer from this. In
Germany and Scandinavia,
they work more steadily,
more consistently. And they
are more ready to accept
change and improvements.
W e don’t like change.’’
Abandon tradition
Mr. Rudkin is right. B u t
his words appffy to the manament as w el as to the
workers. We can never hope
to compete with the massproduction techniques of the
yards abroad until a far
higher degree of specialisa­
tion is achieved in our vards.
kf passenger ships don’t pay,
the yards must abandon their
traditionafl policy of main­
taining an “extremely diverse
range of ships.”
Two views
of Healey
Peter Tomlinson writes:
RESEARCH
THE SPRINGBOARD OF PROGRESS
.
*
v
*£•
f
v
The steady flow of new ideas from I.C.I. laboratories springs from many minds. Not
only chemists, but also chemical engineers, engineers, mathematicians, physicists and
graduates in many other disciplines—all can make their specialist contribution to the
development of a new process or a new technique that means a step forward in some
field of endeavour. It is teamwork of this kind, in I.C.T. laboratories up and down
Great Britain, that is translating the Company’s £18,000,000-a-year research and
development programme into positive benefits for industry, medicine and agriculture.
Here are three examples:
Denis Healey MP., the shadow Minister of Defence,
MR. gave
a welcome talk on Foreign Affairs to the Labour
Club on Friday last.
He made it clear that Labour Foreign Policy would not
consist o f the pyramid of disparate personalities—whose
present apex was Sir Alee Douglas-Home—in current, de­
generate vogue with the Tories. Rather, he impressed, the next
government's foreign policy would, by its own happy integra­
tion, reflect a proper socialist attitude to the rest of Mankind.
Which is a ndce idea.
LIMITED
GROWTH
Because trees only grow so big, Communism will let Marx
down and will, in fact has, stopped spreading. Which would
be another nice Idea were it not fo r the fact that China is not
yet consolidate with an articulated Communist System. In fact
we must forget Power Politics and expend effort in keeping
Communism from the great areas of poverty by providing
food for the hungry, except in China; there it’s too late.
Mr. Healey was, U we can aooount for his complacency by
his admirable compression, aware of the real problems of the
ending o f the classical Cold War, and its unavoidable reemergence when settling the futures of embryonic nations;
that unwilling subje<4s did not always become willing part­
ners. H e seemed to hope that disarmament would intervene
before a Labour government had to really abandon independ­
ent nuclear arms.
INCONSISTENT
DICHOTOMY
Here again however, It seemed that a real attempt to com­
press, and not to generalise, was responsible for some of the
inconsistencies between Mr.
Healey’s human/political
dichotomy. Not the least of which was that the money saved
on H-bombs would be spent upon army recruitment, v
AID TO TIOPICAL MEDICINE
There a n tea million sufferers from leprosy in
the world today, despite the fact that the search
for a cure has been pursued since Biblical times.
An LCI. discovery, ‘EtisuP, offers new hope in
the attack on this disease. The great advantage
o f this drug, besides its efficacy, is simplicity of
treatment, which greatly appeals lo the patieot:
it is simply applied to the skin, and from there it
is absorbed into the system. After two or three
months the patient, though not yet fully cured, is
non-infectious, and can mingle once more with
his family.
NEW PASTUSES FOE OLD
Thousands o f acres o f British farmland r o w
nothing bat coarse grasses and weeds that pro­
vide little or no nourishment for cattle or sheep.
These useless, often unploughible, pastures can
now be made productive, through paraquat, the
latest discovery o f I.C.I/s agricultural scientists.
Paraquat, which is being marketed under th«
name of ‘Gramoxone’ W, lhakea it possible to
reseed these pastures without ploughing them up.
It destroys the old. useless sward and, because it
w t w to b t active the moment it touches the
ground, the soil can be reseeded almost at once
with rich, lush grasses. The result is new pas­
tures that will play their full part in producing
meat and milk for the nation. This latest I.C.I.
discovery will have as big an effect on grassland
fanning as did the earlier I.C.I. discovery of IM P E R IA L
'Agrosone', the first o f all selective weedkillers.
WALLPAPERS THAT REALLY WASH
Out of I.C.I. laboratoriea has recently come a
new P.V.C.-coated wallpaper, ‘Vymura’, that
sets a new standard of durability anddeanability
in wall coverings. The material has proved that it
can withstand scrubbing twice weekly for 12.
months, without detriment to its beautiful
designs. Ink stains, beetroot snd tomsto juke,
and cooking fats are completely removed from
‘Vymura’ by soap and water.
is contributing
to progress in many fields
n*99
IN D U S T R IE S
L IM IT E D ,
rpH E Opposition Spokesman on Defence spoke to a record
-*• audience at the Labour Club last Friday might. He chose
as his topic not Defence (It’s an election year) but Foreign
Affairs generally, and then proceeded to expound his theories
as to the major political problems of the next ten years. “ In
politics your aim must be to survive problems, not to solve
them” was the Healey dictum and those naive idealists
amongst us who expected solutions should return to their
study of Hobbes.
*
Two trends were immediately discernable: the problems
surrounding the end of the Cold WaT and the political
instability amongst the impoverished peoples of the World (as
recent events show).
GLIMPSE OF THE MAN
f.C.I.’s far-ranging research
C H E M IC A L
And in Paul EMman's eyes:
LONDON,
S.W .l
Tim e and the deterrent effect of a representative of the
local (T o ry ) press worked against a more profound analysis
of the World but we were offered a tantalisingly brief
glimpse of the man (which the press was not allowed to
record fo r posterity), when he gave us the Healey theorem on
Latin America. Poverty and the inability of present regimes
to cope with it must lead to inevitable revolutionary <hs»nge,
which need not be against U.S. interests in the area.
In thds most important of political years, a vote o f thanks
Is due to the Labour Club fo r bringing Mr. Healey to the
University. If more party leaders find it worthwhile to make
a stop here, election yeac m ight give the political life at
New castle the boost it needs.
4
COUSUFtt TMiJKSOAY, JAN U ARY iiC, 1964
COURIER, THU RSD AY, JA N U A R Y 30, 1964—S
shire monastery — definitely
pre-Surtees. v In spite of the dazzling
array of extraneous material
ranging from beautiful filig r e e
silver spoons to the ugliest of
Victortefta — white porcelain
plaques of the 'Thou C. i
seest me” variety — in spite
of all this, the Surtees House
has not lost i<ts own per­
sonality. The great stone fire­
place still bears the initials
and coats of arms of its first
owners carved in the wooden
mantel. And even if it is dis­
graced by a portable electric
fire, and even though the
small low
doorways are
fringed with very Victorian
bobbles, there is no denying
that the walls are Surtees
walls and the undulati
floorboards have eertaii
never been renewed.
Bessie Surtees’
house
If you follow the steep road
of the side which winds down
to the left between the Cathedral and the Keep, you will
find yourself in the traditional centre o f commerce in
the city. Until the eighteenth
century this area, Sandhill
was a fashionable residential
quarter for merchants. ,,
Here in the midst of offices,
pubs and shops— all having a
distinctly nautical allure—is
a scoop for
all
intrepid
explorers
of
antiquity :
Surtees’ House It was from
this half timbered house that
the fair Bessie Surtees eloped
in 1772 with her neighbour
John Scott, who later became
Lord Eldon, Chancellor of
England in the reign of
George HI. _
.
The upper part of the house
is privately occupied but the
ground and first floors have
been taken over by an antique
dealer and are well worth
visiting. The tiny, musty
entrance hall
and
dark
^
.11 f/ V 'f M
M B fe v fll
* ■ ' W
&
M
%
*
,
f,
.
E M
4 «| fP
y .
J
7#
'■
•
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m
f
Bf
MB'
I ' s|| "-jfi
m
|
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§§
1
I :
\ v,
|| §
V
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B
^^8
^
see that you are
almost entirely overhung by
E izabethan rooftop* — quite
unspoiled and unpretentious.
With Bessie Surtees’ House
on the right and following
the road along the Quayside
we made our way to Arthur’s
their offer to see the loft. We
did; but I don’t know whether
I ’d do it again.
The Olde George
A visit to the Oflde George
— one of the three surviving
coaching inns of Newcastle—
can best be described as a
“ rich
experience.”
The
entrance to the inn is through
the “Olde George Yard’’ ait
the bottom of the Bdgtg
Market, down the street from
Bainhrddigee. The ground floor
and lounge have low raftered
ceilings. A few old prints add
local colour and one of these
shows the inn as it appeared
in 1648.
No one, however, was very
certain of its age. Popular
opinion, towards closing time,
favoured 600 years, but this
Cooperage. It is not a difficult
place to find if you quite
1terally “ follow your nose”,
as the aroma of whisky may
be detected at a hundred
paces by even the leasttrained nostils.
The business, which is one
hundred and ten years old,
occupies a half timbered
house on the river front. The
ground floor is, on weekdays,
a hive of activity and the
whole evolution of a barrel
can be viewed in an instant
as the seven or eight men
work a t their various jobs
with a great deal of clash and
The
casement
clamour. liht whisky itself
which extend the length <>
never sees the . light of
r V*/■
"*l *1 house overlook the old
Arthur’s Cooperage, much to
y G u i l d h a l l and it was fron,
the sorrow of the men, as the
these— the one with
ba reels are sold to a Scottish
single blue pane, aocordii
distillery firm.
tradition— that Bessie el.,
The
reason
for
the
on N ovem b er 16, 1772. 1
fragrance was that Wood from
charm o f visiting this
old whisky barrels is some­
w^as dn its very easy-go
times used in making new
slightly ehaotic atmosph.
ones and it is the steaming
I 'There w ere no particular
process which raises the
’ •’/’J v ; * ' ■ strictions on visit,,; - and :
delightful aroma. The men,
; ' v ’ /r; ' a curious spirit could wander
however,
explained
con­
v -k S H h R I w ill among the rooms of •
temptuously that the old
^ f P l l l R finst- floor
without
fet
wood was perfumed with
■
I
com pelled to wear a "1 mere American stuff, while
*1*j£^acV
flf§ 1 pective customer" exprcs
the Scottish firm would grace
',p
If you should go ask n;c<
their completed barrels with
§fN8£5$|? Jj* - i| K as we did. to be shown
o n ly the very hest Scotch. The
appearance o f two be-note
;; ■ : * 1. hinder regions of the It
You w ill be escorted thro
booked reporters did not
dark disu sed room s int.
altogether
impress
the
■ ■ B H B B
smatltl yard, surrounded on Cooperage
for
as
they
:
f
*
t hr ee sides by house wa
explained: ZWe're
always
(0 0 d , D U lIt 17W1
and on the fourth s id e ‘by a having telly-men and film
hop to bo “the flight o f 6teo>s leads up stars and things.
If you have a strong head
t a d been built j» * £ u ‘l“
for heights and do not mind
pipes and packing cases and climbing treacherous stairs !n
direct your eyes heavenwards
ickness, you might take up
'\ J‘ ' r ' w
t f c
V \
i
^
m
■’£" —.
■HO HAOIfli
—Mid by an
< ;»«
you will
C h ristin e Mtourke
AUAr
ne ®¥er
W
m
lm
m
m
W
m
r n
All on
a page in
THE OBSERVER
every Sunday
WOMANIA
or coming
(or to Observer readers)
• This Circular Tower fortifies the West Wall of
Newcastle. It is to be found on Westgate Road (just
past the Essokto). In the Mine area are the remains
of a Dominican JJrtory, incorporated Into the wall
STUDENTS’ BOOKSHOP
LIMITED
^ L L those who fancy
t h e m s e l v e s as
f e a t u r e writers in
women’s “glossies” are
appealed to in a com­
petition being run by
the “Vogue” magazine.
Here is a chance for those
of you who can be certified as
being under thirty to express
your opinions on matgazines,
men, marriage, food, furni­
ture and Wms, to write you*
autobiography and even to
win £50 into the bargain.
Three leading
women’s
magazines are running a
Talent Contest, the objcot of
which from their point of
view might seem to be to
acquire a vast amount of
original material and adver­
tising gimmicks at the smoflil
cost of £75. It is also an
opportunity for those who
would Hke to spend all their
working Mves
expressing
their
opinions on these
matters to get on the staff o f
one of these magazines, since
thfe is one of the inducements
offered to the firsit and second
prise winners, and those who
get an “honourable mention.”
Who’s trying to be charitable
to whot
Further details from the
Editor.
63-67 PERCY STREET
(Opposite Prudhoe Street)
NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE, 1
Th e Recommended suppliers of
T E X T B O O K S to S TU D E N T8 of th« U N IV E R S ITY
Large stocks of all books Including
M E D IC A L and D E N T A L are always on hand
Orders receive quick attention by a trained staff
Our S T A T IO N E R Y D E P A R T M E N T especially
caters for your requirements
Loose Leaf Books, etc
Refill Paper in various Rulings :: f
• View of the West W alls of the City, betw een
W estgate Rosd end Gsllowgete. The walls were
chiefly built as a defence against Scots attacks, and
are rem arkably well preserved In this area of the
City.
Precision D R A W IN G IN S TR U M E N TS and
S LID E RULES at varying prices
10 P ER CENT DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
ARTISTS’ MATERIALS
L A R G E STOOKS TO CH O O SE FROM
Sleeping
THE PITY OF WAR...’ Prince
Totters
•— C O U R IE R , T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 30, ISM
rp H E “ Victors.” The
word is treated
with mockery in a
powerful, at t i m e s
stunning
film,
ably
directed by Carl Fore­
man.
His approach to the war
theme is from the human
angle, and the story is built
upon the degradation of war
suffered by victor and van­
quished alike. Scenes, early
in the film, serve to empha­
sise this basic similarity.
creates a deep pathos'in the
quick
separation
inflicted
upon the lovers.
An equally poignant scene
is the Christmas-tide execu­
tion of a deserter, and the
effect is increased by the
musical
background — a
Christmas song that befits the
snowy setting but is horribly
out of sympathy with the act
of execution. The theme is
prolonged, wfthuJingle Bells**
accompanying
the
allies’
bitter struggle against the
freezing cold.
On±
Women drift into and out
of the men’s lives as they
H o rro r Off war
make
progress
towards
The opening is violent, giv­ Berlin. Jeanne Moreau plays
ing snatched glimpses of the a convincing part a« & terri­
horror of modern warfare, fied French eiviMan and Kike
Sommer as Helga, bringing
and this provides an effective
backcloth to the subsequent many appreciable talents to
action. The use of newsfllm is bear, piays a Berlin love
scene opposite George Hamil­
a success because it recalls
ton, in the^role of Trower.
familiar
faces — Churchill,
Roosevelt and others — thus
News Aim of Hiroshima
making
the action
more casts further doubt on the
realistic
,
validity of. the term ‘victors.’
Japan’s
capitulation
is
“The Victors” follows a
received . with celebrations
company of American GXs
that
somewhat
pointedly
through Europe as the allies
follow film of the atomic
advance slowly on Berlin.: It
explosion.
shows in vivid terms the
degradation suffered by them
Th i end Of the film is a
—their nomadic existence, the
tremendously
powerful
need
to
subject
human
climax. Trower and a Russian
emotions to expediency, their
soldier (Albert Finney) quar­
moral decline.
*
rel over trivialities, but the
quarrel becomes a fight, and
Deep pathos
in a brilliant closing scene,
both men are stabbed to
The allies sweep on at a
death by the other. It is
relentless
pace and love
final,
entirely
affairs are transitory. The ser­ Foreman's
geant’s love for Maria* play^l successful, bid to illustrate
by
Rosanna SchiafHno, is the futility of war.
ROGER M. S T E A D M A N
such an affair.
Foreman
S W IN G I T M A N
“Tommy Dorsey — Frank
Sinatra—The Pied Pipers”
must bring back a mass of
seething
nostalgia to the
hearts o f many of our older
generation. < Back we were,
bang in the Swing era of the
thirties, and the long gone
days of the American band
show.
For the record, let it be ad­
mitted that thirty years ago
the Dorsey band was one of
the kings of Swing. After the
death of its leader, Warren
Covington reformed the band
QUEEN’S H A LL — How ths
Watt was Won.
It also serves ae a direct
example o f the type of tat­
tered cliche-ridden middle­
brow
souffle
which
has
become anathema to the
contemporary
thinking
audience.
COMIC S TE R IL ITY
Despite these annihilating
stigmas, the play remains an
interesting theatrical curio; a
quaint but sad reminder of
the comic sterility o f the
recent Beet.
But, if you are one o f those
people who inupdate Mr.
Harold Hobson with letters
bewailing the decline of the
theatre of "sheer entertain*
ment” (whatever that may
mean), and if you still enjoy
being moderately amused and
greatly bored; “The Sleeping
Prince” is the play for you
Donahue disinters Dorsey
A
N one of his records Shellev
Shelley Berman, the
/"kN
^
American comedfen, talks aabout
_ . a
„ „game he
has invented, which we can play by ourselves. The
game is called ‘Nostalgics’, ana ail we have to do
is respond to certain words or phrases in a way that
brings back a flood of memories out of the past.
standing.
FLORA BOBBON -
A N evening
of
Terence Rattigan
makes us a little more
optimistic about the
modern theatre’s con­
scious attempt to make
us more intelligent and
artistically receptive. '
George H am ilton (T ro w e r) stars in the Him.
to play the same original
scores in the same original
style. In 1962 Sam Donahue
took over the leadership, and
it is hi* band that confronts
us today. The band includes
a number of former stdemen,
and also a number of relative
newcomers to the scene, of
which one or two are imports
from
the
Stan
Kenton
orchestra that recently visited
our shores.
The concert started with a
few bare of the band's theme
‘Getting Sentimental Over
You’, and quickly led into a
powerful rendering of the
‘Woodchopper’s Ball’. In num­
bers like this and the later
revived ‘Song of India’ the
band showed that it was cap­
able of great dynamics, and
at times could really swing,
With Larry O ’Brian taking
the original Dohsey solos on
trombone.
AFTER Y O U DAD
Following Shavers, another
veteran of the old swing days,
the next ‘turn’ in the band
show was the Pied Piper’s
vocal group
Now here we
really were pushed right back
to the thirties, with synco­
pated harmonies that today
sound tike the BeaUes prob­
ably will thirty years hence!
So on we plodded to the
climax, and the entrance of
-He
Frank Sinatra _ Junior. .-He
showed hie developing ability
swing the old ones in fair
pie. including a sympathetic
Nancy” and an oh so nos­
talgic “ m
Never Smile
Again." But why, why, why,
if he says he is not trying to
imitate hia father, does he
have to sing in the same band
in which Dad began, and sing
the same songs with the same
arrangements that made Dad
the Sinatra he is today? This
above all invites comparison,
which, for the meantime any­
way, is not desirable. But in
spite of all this the audience
loved it.
O L D SO UND
• The Tommy Dorsey Band
Show: this was what we came
for, and thds was what we got,
like a page out of the history
book: even if it was related
by different historians, the
interpretation was the same.
But Bffu&ic must advance and
not stand still if it is to sur­
vive. Sure, let them re-create
the sound of the thirties. But
maybe Mr. Donahue should
also find his band a new
sound for the sixties, and
follow the example of the
Ellingtons and Kentons in the
world of modern American
music.
C L IV E VAN OCR V E L 0 E
&
THIS Yffglf
OOEON —The Thrill of iH flf
ItM L D O — Tho Victor*.
HAYMABKBT— Ben Hur
TATLER— Joumoy to
Flora' Robson
Playhouse
Lovs scenes
WHAT'S
-ON
thU is.*in^fast, very well per­
formed by the Flora Robson
company Who, as usual, mana g e to combine twinkle-in the-eye
amusement
with
effortless slickness; sqeezing
much more humour than the
preponderance of empty lines
is prepared to give.
P O L ITIC A L C H A 0 8
The p lo t'Is comprised of a
Carpathian Regent’s momen­
tary fancy for a zany Grade
Allen-typed American actress
and hfe gradual infatuation
with her, resulting love. This
ie set off to a general political
chaos which thase little semi
mythical principalities are so
adept at precipitating.
The guts of the play, is concerned with Love We are presenied with the, by now,
sickening picture of the wide
eyed, big hearted American
in
Europe, whose
naive
ROYAL—Wish tar Jaauy. .
•T O L L — In ths Franoh Stylo.
NEXT WEEK
OOEON— Father Coen To.
ESSOLOO— Ths Victor*.
HAYMARKET— Bon Mur
TATL4EK— Ashsr Bilk; WorlS
al Wax.
FLBBA ROBSON— Tho Or SOS
Is Orssnar.
QU BEN’S H A LL — Hsw ths
Wsst was W an.
ROYAL— With far Jantsy,
STOLL— Bsat Girl*.
common sense triumphs over
the effete sophistication and
traditional
pride
of
the
Balkan Dumkopf.
/
Elizabeth Richman gives an
admirable portrayal of the
actress. Her declamation of
the virtues o f the American
lets - all-be-big-buddies-withpoppa cult, may once have
been slightly ironical if not
refreshing; n*w it is unfor­
tunately rather nauseating
satire (thank God fob Death
of a Salesman).
DIRTY OLD MAN
Dulcie Bowmans, as th#
Grand Duchess, gave a de­
lightful cameo of the vague,
tolerant Royal scatterbrain,
and Denntfi Holmes, as every­
one’s idea of a dirty middleaged man, had the necessary
princely touch and bewildered
impatience.
Christopher Greatorex a*
Norhbrooke,
the
foreignoffice proto-type and Roy
Herrick as the King of
Carpathia were also note­
worthy.
The Production by Jean
Pierre Voos was intelligent
without
being particularly
swift; It was a pleasant
change to observe that the
decor adamantly refused to
be disconcerted by the con­
tinual opening and closing of
great doors.
B. A. HANSON
THIS HUMAN
L JUMBLE
YOUNG girl is thrown from the comparative
.quiet of the American middle-west into the
Paris jungle. The film is a sketchy study of her
life from virginity to maturity.______ _
t o t h e U .S .A .
10 RAYS ON THE ATLANTIC ON
AN ALL-STODE NT, ONE-CLASS SHIP
FOR £49
Studenfs and Academic Staff
should write to:
NATIONAL UNION OF STUDENTS TRAVEL
DEPARTMENT
3 ENOSLEICH
NAME
m
STREET, LONDON,
W . C l____
. • ... • • « ,.. . • • « • . # * • «
ADDRESS ........... .............. .......A ; ................ ...............
KCl
The films technique,. is
analytic and ~ degenerates
slowly into an insensitive and
pointless documentary. No
moral emerges, except that
o f the expediency of adapt­
ing onetMf to life on the
safest terms.
Coaria reaNeas
*
*i’M
newspaper man with a
of International women gives
hit usual display of rugged
masculinity—like the aide of
a Rhondda coal-face.
The handling e l Christina’s
Two stools
first love affair with a boy
who pretends he is twenty- The film suffers mainly through
falling between two stools.
one when, in fact hsSts six­
The first half dwells with
teen. has a touch of genuine
the problems of two wouldand uncomfortably comic
be-lovers, and was relatively
realism about it: the shame
successful, the dialogue be­
of their unreal relationship
ing fresh and the pace
comes over as perhaps the
quick, but aa. seen as the
best feature o f the Aim.
girl’s father appears to see
Jean Seberg does her very best
now hia daughter is occupy*
with a basically unsympath­
ing her time, the savage ere
etic character and the results
is turned on Paris and the
are well worth the 10S
pugjjoM^of the film becomes
minutes. Her
ability
to
portray lhe deeply frustrated
self-Justiflcation bv which Nejtt-week . the Stoll shows
Beat Girl”
with Adam
Christina spanks along, is
Faith and ‘‘The Curse of
powerful and moving.
Stanley Baker is the possessive
Frankenstein.”— B.M.
TIR ED
H A N D ED
CROUP.*
OF
ROUND
BEINO
TH E
FOR CH R ICTIN A
JAM ES (JEA N SEBERG), IT
IB T H E END OF T H E LINE.
■ a m i.* * im i
n u a z i
ROBINSON’S, Booksellers
GRAINGER MARKET
Newcastle upon Tyoe
WI A M ALWAV* WOBTH VW TW O
Large stocks of new and second-hand books of all kinds ar*
at hand
WE BUY BOOKS -------- WE SELL BOOKS
u r y i R. TH U R SD A Y. M N U A R Y
ItM — 7
v. and Gosforth
RUGBY
Johnson & Cunningham shine
NEWCASTLE LOSE
EARLY ADVANTAGE
CATTERICK CAMP ... 3;
UNIVERSITY ... 3.
oN
Saturday the University 1st XI drew with
Catterick Camp in a very interesting and
fluctuating match. Conditions were heavy, due tot
the sun softening the frozen ground, and conse­
quently the game slowed down towards the end.
H ie University were the
first to attack, and they held
the initiative for the first 20
minutes. In the tenth minute
T. Arica had a hard shot
saved by the opposing goal­
keeper and D. Davies scored
from the rebound. The pres­
sure was held on the Catterack goal following this and
five minutes later K. Molyneux volleyed
what was
meant to be a clearance by a
defender into goal from 18
yards to make the score 2-0.
worked the ball downfleld
and scored through their
centre-forward again, only 80
seconds after Arica’s goal.
The University managed to
make an occasional attack,
but never looked as danger-/
ous as the Catterick forwards,
and inevitably they equalised
in approximately the 80th
minute, R. Johnson making
three saves before the ball
eventually went in.
Fencing
success
R E LE A SE D PRESSURE
Then the University re­
leased the
pressure and
Catterick scored after 30
minutes through their centreforward.
For the last 15
minutes of the half, posses­
sion of the ball was equal but
the University went very
close to scoring on two or
three occasions.
,
R.A.F. MAN CONTAINED
AT
Liverpool, this
week-end, in the
U.A.U. Championships,
A. Griffin won the
Individual Epe$ Cham­
pionship, and achieved
fourth place , in the
Sabre.
The second half was the
complete reverse of the first,
when the Catterick half-backs
and inside-forwards domin­
ated the play in mid-field.
Yet in the 55th minute T.
Arica ran on to a 30-yard
pass, which came from deep
in his own half, and ran
approximately 40 yards to
push the ball past the onrunning goalkeeper and make
the score 3-1.
From the kick-off. Catterick
This is the first time any
metnber of either Durham
Univensity,
of
Newcastle
Fencing Club has won an
individual title.
U.A.U. ATHLETICS
PE R FO R M IN G for U.A.U.
A
in an indoor athletics
match against the R_A.F. at
R.A.F. Cosford on Saturday,
January 25th:—
Terry Povey — Long jump
— Secretary of the Athletics
GUib. Maurice Comissions —
High jump — Fresher. Don
Hoodtless — Mile.
J N spite of Combined Services and Northumber­
land County fly-half Palin playing for them,
R.A.F. Acklington couldn’t cope \vith a revived
Eustace P«rcy team who showed most encourag­
ing form in their first game after the vacation.
Playing among the swirling
mists ot Close House, it
looked like a trouncing for
E.P.H. when the airmen not-,
dhed up an easy try in the
first five minutes. But apart
from two or three breakaways by Acklington, it was
the Hall side that gave an
exhibition of open rugby that
Basketball
bouncy start
CLOSE
CONTEST
ItT E D IC A L S
notched
up an eprly 3-0
lead over the rival King's
Club lost Saturday.
However, King’s captain D.
Simpson managed to rally his
team and won a nartow vic­
tory over the much-experlenced Medic’s captain and
University fencer J. Feggetter.
But it was left to Medic J.
Watkins—fencing in only his
second match for Medio—to
surprise everyone by winning
two of his three bouts. With
this he aided Medics to a
close 5-4 win. This »epresente
one more valuable victory for
the newly-resurgent Medics’
dub.
TEAMS
Medics A : J. Feggetter
(capt). G. A. McLooghlin, J.
S. Watkins
King’s: D. Simpson (capt),
T. Moss. L. Hempsoy-_______
with THE SUNDAY TIMES. Beginning at
the bottom, these days, is for last-ditch romantics only. Realists
take THE SUNDAY TIMES and save themselves a lot o f foot work.
28% more appointmept advertising appears in THE SUNDAY TIMES
than in any other quality Sunday paper. Its columns are often
the exclusive choice of Personnel Managers seeking graduates o f
the right calibre. And the nan\*s o f its advertisers form a checklist o f the most progressive companies in Britain.
s
t a
r t
n
i g
n
e
r
I t is elevating points like these which make THE SUNDAY TIMES
such indispensable reading.
THE SUNDAY TIMES Where the best jobs come — and go.
was a pleasure to watch,
Notable in the 17-11 win
were aill ttie three-quarters
who ran with and handled a
slippery bad! with finesse —
they were well served by the
forwards. Showing this form,
the third team cup is surely
coming to stay at Freeman
Road?___________________ _
International debate
>f the new
Convenor
itnational
rp H IS is how TRAM P found 18-year-old Miss
Annabelle Brown last Sunday afternoon. As
the victim of external pressures rather than
through any personal desire to get ahead, she is a
UTOPIA
C H IV A L R Y
j& ^ leed s
as extensive a social life as
anyone else was obvious.
Although officially a resident
of Ethel Williams, she seems
to spend most o f her time at
Henderson, whose occupants
she described as ^perfectly
After a preliminary round
reasonable.”
The interview
wa« interrupted by the arrival debating the motion “ This
of her boy-friend, who added bouse deplores the decline in
a few words of self-satisfied chivalry,” three English rep­
appreciation,
which,
for resentatives, Walker of Liver­
reasons of delicacy, we re- pool University, Smith of
Sheffield, and Mahony of
frain from printing._________
Britain
Mr Smith developed the
theme of disillusionment, say­
ing that freshers came up
expecting a Utopia, and grad­
uates went down with a
foretaste of
the rat-race,
which was the reality of life.
Mr. Mahony denied this.
The judges, Canon Benndtt,
Mr. Wafltin, and Mr. Hu gives t
surprisingly announced that
they had been unabl& to
decide between, Walker tend
Smith as the final English
representative. Their
otely
suggestion ^as that lots be
drawn. Smith of Sheffield won.
The mOtlon was defeated.
The Finals motion before a
packed house, which included
the Lord Mayor* the Univer­
sity Vice Chancellor, and the
Editor of the ;**Journal* was
'‘that the implementation of
the Bobbins ftpport would
debase
the ' standards of
higher education.’*
*0
,
The judges, impressed by
the - clarity
and force of
Hughes’ argument, declared
ales the winner, and Engid the runner-up,
S
UNION RAVE
Yorick's
macabre-
WITH TJHE HARLEMS
Also THE UNIVERSITY FAVOURITES — THE V .I.P,*
Unite<
ST
Son
their
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tudei
the A
a bod
Attacl
their
The
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