The Railway Hotels of Vancouver

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The Railway Hotels of Vancouver
week. It became an integral part of the way of life in the
were equipped with the very best sterling silver cutlery,
remote communities. To the young boys, the trains and
linen table cloths and cut glass crystal. A wide choice of
engines were the ultimate of engineering and power.
food prepared by master chefs and served by specially
To the adults, many of whom were employed by the
trained waiters made dining a truly pleasant experience.
company, the term “Sleepy R” was the name that they
All of the hotels had ballrooms, meeting rooms and
gave to the powerful corporation that played such an
commercial sample rooms available for businessmen
eminent role in their lives The Canadian Pacific Railway
and commercial travelers. A staff of porters looked after
Company was the first company willing to make the
the delivery of suitcases to the rooms. Transportation
venture into what they knew would be a very difficult
from the train or steamship was always provided –
and forbidding territory. They faced a huge challenge
originally by horse drawn coaches and later by motor
in building a railroad through terrain that included
bus. In addition, the CPR acquired a fleet of deep sea
the Kicking Horse Pass with the steep and dangerous
passenger liners that they named their “Empress Fleet.”
“Big Hill” and the Rogers Pass that had massive annual
The vessels were designed specifically for Trans Pacific
snowfalls. Avalanche hazards were a constant problem
travel to Asia. The CPR then constructed their own
during construction and in the operation of the railway
berthing dock for their ships. Pier BC, the CPR dock
when it opened. Their surveyors were aware of a safer
was located on the Vancouver waterfront at the north
and easier pass through the Rocky Mountains but
foot of Burrard Street. The CPR rail line was completed
it was located many miles to the north and they were
and opened for business in 1885 when they had reached
unable to use it because the federal government of
their goal of the Pacific Ocean at Port Moody, B.C. They
Canada had insisted that they build their line along the
had achieved their goal but there was considerable
more difficult southern route to assist in maintaining
difficulty with the sailing ships of the day navigating
Canadian sovereignty. At the time, there was a threat
through the long fjord of Burrard Inlet from English
from the United States referred to as “54/40 or fight”
Bay to Port Moody so management elected to extend
for the Canadian territory that was located between the
the line to Vancouver. This was done and the first train
United States and Alaska. The Northwest Mounted
traveled over the new line to Vancouver in May of 1887.
by Arthur (Bud) R. Ryckman
Police had established posts adjacent to the 49th parallel
businessman
and were ordered to provide police protection to the
The first CPR Hotel Vancouver was built from plans
The first C.P.R. Hotel, located on the southwest corner of Georgia
and Granville Streets, opened on 16 May 1888.
The Railway Hotels of Vancouver
The
settlement
and
subsequent
development
of
Western
Canada occurred when the railways were built into territory
that had previously been remote wilderness. Many of the small
communities that came into existence because of the railway relied
on the company for transportation, communication, mail service,
delivery of merchandise and very often employment. The railway
companies provided the people living in those communities with
virtually everything needed that they didn’t produce for themselves.
The only form of transportation other than the railroad was horse
and buggy so the train became their lifeline. Every man woman
and child was familiar with the huffing and chuffing of the huge,
powerful coal fired steam engines that hauled the trains. The
sound that was created went on for 24 hours a day and 7 days of the
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Vancouver Exposed: A History in Photographs
crews working on the construction of the railway. To
make the project worth while for the CPR, the Federal
government agreed to make very substantial grants
of crown land along the right of way as construction
proceeded.
Superintendent Samuel Benfield Steele
of the NWMP was put in charge of security and
construction proceeded. Because they were planning to
take passengers into an area where there was no food or
hotel services of any kind, the CPR had to provide hotel,
restaurant and local ground transportation for their
clients. This fact and the desire that they had to be the
very best resulted in the development and construction
of a line of excellent quality hotels that became known
as the “Chateaus.” The grand dining rooms of the hotels
designed by Thomas Sorby on the recommendation of
Cornelius Van Horne, the General Manager of the CPR.
The design was a five story brick building. Construction
began on July 22, 1886 and was completed with the
hotel opening May 16, 1888 a year after the arrival of
the first train. It was closed permanently when the new
Vancouver Hotel opened in 1916. By 1900 the directors
of the CPR concluded that the first Hotel Vancouver
was too small and needed to be replaced with a larger
and more elegant structure. Property was chosen at the
intersections of Georgia and Granville Street extending
to the southeast corner of Georgia and Howe Street.
The corner was considered to be ideal for a number
of reasons; firstly it had the highest elevation of any
The Railroaders
125
This photograph was taken from the top floor or possibly even the roof top of the first
Hotel Vancouver to the northwest with the intersection of Georgia & Howe Streets
in the foreground. Situated in the distance are the First Nation's Villages of Squtsahs
(Deadman's Island) and Paapeeak (Brockton Point) in Stanley Park, circa 1890.
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Vancouver Exposed: A History in Photographs
The Railroaders
127
property located in the downtown section of Vancouver. From the
center for Vancouver socialites from the time that it opened for
site every direction was downhill so they knew that the view from the
business. Local citizens as well as travelers were delighted to attend
hotel windows of the north Shore Mountains and the ocean would
functions at the dining rooms and ballrooms of the very desirable
be outstanding. Secondly, the location was within convenient horse
Vancouver Hotel.
and coach transport from pier BC where the Empress ships berthed,
The second railroad was the brainchild of railroad baron Charles
and the adjacent CPR Rail Terminal on Cordova Street. Thirdly, the
new hotel would be located in the heart of the rapidly developing
Vancouver and West Coast business section of Vancouver.
Melville Hays. It was named The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. From
Winnipeg the route chosen was northern via Saskatoon, Edmonton,
and Jasper and then through the Yellowhead pass to Prince George
Francis M. Rattenbury, the renowned architect who had designed
with a terminal planned for Prince Rupert. Work commenced in
the Parliament Buildings and Empress Hotel in Victoria (a CPR
1905. The services of architect Francis M. Rattenbury were retained
Hotel) and the Vancouver Courthouse was retained to prepare plans
to design high quality deluxe hotels along the route that would
for an entirely new deluxe Italian Renaissance Hotel on the location.
He submitted the plans to the CPR who commenced work on the
The second C.P.R. Hotel located at the corner of Georgia & Granville Streets.
project but stopped with very little work having been accomplished.
Work had been halted because the management of CPR had been
unable to obtain permission to build their new hotel to the desired
height of 228 feet. At the time, a Vancouver City ordinance allowed a
Risk takers pose for a photograph
150 feet above ground during the
construction of the second C.P.R. Hotel.
maximum building height of only 120 feet so the clever Rattenbury
made the plans so they could be altered if the ordinance were to be
changed. Construction remained dormant until 1912 when the City
of Vancouver finally granted permission to the CPR to build their
hotel to the height of 228 feet. Francis W. Swales, an architect with
Painter & Swales Architects (a New York Company) who was born
in Canada but practiced his profession in the USA was engaged to
re-work Rattenbury’s plans and include the necessary modifications
to utilize the space that had been allowed by the amended city
ordinance. Work commenced again in 1913 and was completed in
1916. The hotel was intended to provide first class accommodation
to businessmen and wealthy tourists, some of whom would be
continuing their travel on the Empress Liners. The new Vancouver
hotel was absolutely magnificent in every way. It was a very deluxe
building with beautifully carved mahogany and oak paneling in the
many conference rooms and ballrooms. In addition to the many
wonderful rooms within the hotel, the CPR built and incorporated
the Vancouver Opera House as part of the structure. The Oak Room
at Christmas with its beautiful crystal chandeliers, vaulted ceilings
more than 20 feet high and artistic wood paneling on the walls
was prepared each year for family entertainment with and a huge
Christmas tree fully decorated and Santa in his red suit and beard
passing out favors to the children. The hotel remained as an elegant
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Vancouver Exposed: A History in Photographs
The Railroaders
129
The third Hotel Vancouver, located at
Hornby and Georgia Streets, nears
completion in time for the official
opening by King George VI
and Queen Elizabeth [the
Queen Mother of Queen
Elizabeth 11 and
Princess Margaret]
on 29 May 1939
be as good as or better than the already
established CPR chain of hotels.
Hays
claimed that the route chosen would be
greatly beneficial to trade with Asia because
the Port of Prince Rupert was an excellent
deep water port with none of the problems
for navigation like the narrows with their
rip tides entering the Vancouver harbor. It
was miles closer to Asia than Vancouver
where the CPR had their terminal. The
grade through the Yellowhead pass was
much gentler and thereby more economical
and safer in operation and maintenance
than the route chosen by the CPR. Hays
believed that Prince Rupert would become
a larger metropolitan city than Vancouver,
Victoria or New Westminster because of
the proximity to Asia and the vast market
potential there for Canadian exports – in
particular the export of grain, the best
of which was grown in the area served by
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. He assured
his shareholders that the company would
build, own and operate its own telegraph
line, handle the express, freight, passenger and mail business and
provide the very best of hotels and restaurants. Negotiations were
commenced to purchase a fleet of ocean liners to sail the Pacific
Ocean to Asia and the South Pacific. He asked Francis Rattenbury
to design a Chateau style grand hotel to be linked to the deep water
steamship docks and form the central focal point of a great city.
The hotel would be called The Hotel Prince Rupert and would be
equipped to provide the very best of dining, entertaining, and hotel
services for the passengers of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and
the citizens of Prince Rupert. As the CPR had done in Vancouver,
they built their own wharf and terminals in the Port of Prince
Rupert. A dry dock was completed in 1913 and Francis Rattenbury
His Royal Highness King George VI's
official portrait taken in 1939 is proudly
displayed in the Bessborough Armory.
The King and Queen had visited
Canada on a Domionion tour the
previous summer. With the abdication
of his older brother, King Edward
VIII, the shy and modest 'Bertie' was
crowned just as his country faced the
onslaught of World War II. In 1947 he
visited India and gave them back their
independence.King George VI died from
cancer in 1952 and upon his death his
daughter, Elizabeth became Queen.
completed the drawings for the hotel. Hays wanted the buildings
to be impressive enough to shine as the western terminus of his
Railway. The B.C. Government constructed a hospital, fire hall and
high school. Prince Rupert was now ready for the last spike to be
driven at Fraser Lake that was expected sometime in 1914. Then
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Vancouver Exposed: A History in Photographs
The Railroaders
131
The above car bumper ornament,
made by Henry Birks Jewellers,
was one of hundreds of different
1939 royal visit souvenirs.
RCMP Constable Crystal Shostak poses
beside a 1939 Royal Tour McLaughlinBuick, serial #1, outside the Canadian
National Roundhouse facility at the
West Coast Railway Heritage Museum
at Squamish. The 3-ton royal maroon
automobile was one of two built by
General Motors of Canada for use by
King George V1 and Queen Elizabeth
[Queen Mother of Queen Elizabeth 11
and Princess Margaret] during their
Dominion tour of Canada in May and
June 1939. The Duke of Kent, a younger
brother of the king, visited Canada and
drove the car in 1941. Prince Charles
and Princess Diana rode in the car into
BC Place Stadium to open Expo 86.
Finally, Queen Elizabeth and Prince
Philip rode in the car for the opening
of the Commonwealth Games in 1994
and their son Prince Edward rode in
the car to close the games. This car
has carried more British royalty than
any other car in the world and has
been in service for over 70 years.
two things happened that shattered the dream. Charles Melville
hotel was almost finished when the stock market crash
Vancouver Hotel. The old Vancouver Hotel remained
Hays had been in London finalizing the funding required for the
of 1929 occurred. All work was halted and remained that
standing. When the world war broke out later in 1939
completion of the railroad and its chain of hotels. He cabled his
way until 1937 when it was announced that the King and
the CNR donated the use of the hotel to the Canadian
attorney Lewis Patmore, advising that all was well and complete
Queen of England were planning a visit to Vancouver.
Armed Forces. It was used by the military until the
and he had booked passage on the safest and most elegant liner
As a result a rather strange troika of businessmen and
war ended, was then torn down and the property was
in the world, the Titanic. When the Titanic sank Hays perished.
politicians was created. Management of the CPR, the
sold to the T.Eaton Company who ran it as a parking
Shortly after the tragedy of the Titanic, world war broke out and the
CNR and the mayor and council of the City of Vancouver
lot until the Pacific Center was developed. The T. Eaton
financiers in London rapidly lost interest in a railroad located in a
got together to resolve the problem. It was the bottom of
Company then sold a section to the Toronto Dominion
far distant colony of the British Empire. The railroad was completed
the worst depression in the history of the world so any
Bank and built a modern department store on the
and opened for business April 7th 1914 but by 1919 it was apparent
expenditure of money had to be taken very seriously.
remainder of the property that is now occupied by the
that it was not capable of generating sufficient revenue to stay in
The city council was adamant in their position that two
Sears Department Store.
business. A number of other Canadian railroads were encountering
major hotels in Vancouver would be a disaster for both
the same problems caused by the war and other pressures affecting
with the economy the way it was. Collectively, the troika
In the years following, the CPR bought the entire hotel
the economy of Canada. The Canadian Federal Government decided
decided that the best option was to finish the new hotel
to salvage the railways that were suffering from lack of funds and
that belonged to the CNR as the Vancouver Hotel, close
create a national railway system to be called The Canadian National
the existing Vancouver Hotel that belonged to the CPR
Railways. The Grand Trunk Pacific was taken over as well as a
and open the new hotel as a joint venture of the CNR
competitive railway, The Canadian Northern Railway, a company
and CPR. It is an interesting aside that the CPR ceded
with its terminal and head office located on the false creek flats in
title to their Vancouver Hotel to gain equity in the new
Vancouver. They had built their line from the False Creek Flats
of hotel property in Canada. They then ventured into
the United States hotel market. The CPR eventually
purchased the Fairmont chain of hotels and then put the
majority of their Canadian hotels under the Fairmont
name. The Vancouver Hotel is now The Fairmont
Vancouver Hotel.
along the Grandview Cut and then up the Fraser Canyon to Red
Pass Junction where it intersected the Grand Trunk Pacific line. By
this time the roaring twenties were under way, the stock markets
were booming, businesses were expanding in every direction and
all cautions were out the window. The management of the newly
created CNR decided that it would be for more sensible to route
their main line of trains from Red Pass Junction to Vancouver and
use the Grandview Cut and the terminal of the Canadian Northern
Railway. When this occurred, progress and development in Prince
Rupert ground to a halt. The line west from Red Pass junction
became a secondary spur line serving the small communities from
Prince George Prince Rupert. The majority of the CNR traffic went
to Vancouver. It was the roaring twenties and the economy was
booming. The CNR had constructed a new terminal in Vancouver
and were anxious to build the grand hotel that Francis Rattenbury
had created for Prince Rupert. They acquired property at the corner
of Burrard and Georgia Streets, retained the services of architects
John S. Archibald and John Schofield and commenced construction.
It isn’t known if Archibald and Schofield created an entirely new
design or if they modified the existing plans that had been created
for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway by Francis Rattenbury.
132
chain owned by the CNR and became the largest holder
Vancouver Exposed: A History in Photographs
The
The Railroaders
133
John Hendry Park encircles Trout Lake,
the source of water for the Hastings
Saw Mill. Also visible in this photograph
is the Grandview Cut, a joint venture
between the Great Northern and the
Canadian Northern Railways in 1904.
When the Canadian National Railway
was created, it took over the Canadian
Northern and the Grandview Cut
was shared by the Canadian National
Railway and the Great Northern Railway.
When the Canadian National Railway
built their new terminal it was located
beside the Great Northern Terminal on
Station Street in the False Creek Flats.
The earth that was removed from
the cut was used to fill in the eastern
portion of False Creek to be used
as rail yards for the railway. The
topsoil for Thornton Park adjacent to
Pacific Central Station was brought
in by rail car from Chilliwack.
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Fax
(250) 352-2425
# 27 - newton
13537 - 72ND AVENUE
SURREY, B C V3W 2N9
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 543-2811
Fax
(604) 543-6542
# 80 - nortH kAMloops
SUITE #1 724 SYDNEY AVE
KAMLOOPS, B C V2B 1M9
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 376-8200
Fax
(250) 376-8231
# 24 - nortH vAncouver
1500 FELL AVENUE
NORTH VANCOUVER, B C V7P 3E7
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 984-0277
Fax
(604) 984-9694
# 61 - oliver
34274 - 97TH STREET
OLIVER, B C V0H 1T0
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 498-0600
Fax
(250) 498-0601
# 77 - osoyoos
10 EAGLE COURT
OSOYOOS, B C V0H 1V2
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 495-0445
Fax
(250) 495-0446
# 67 - pArksville
505 EAST ISLAND HIGHWAY
PARKSVILLE, B C V9P 2G9
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 248-5718
Fax
(250) 248-5777
# 48 - penticton
150 PARKWAY PLACE
PENTICTON, B C V2A 8G8
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 490-8880
Fax
(250) 490-4161
# 15 - pitt MeAdows
19150 LOUGHEED HIGHWAY, UNIT 118
PITT MEADOWS, B C V3Y 2H6
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 465-7200
Fax
(604) 465-0681
# 91 - port Alberni
#502 - 3555 JOHNSTON RD
PORT ALBERNI, BC V9Y8K2
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 723-4200
Fax
(250) 723-4203
# 95 - port coquitlAM nortH
3377 Coast Meridian Road, Unit #101
Port Coquitlam, BC, V3B 3N6
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 942-3994
Fax
(604) 942-5063
# 36 - port kells
19875 - 96TH AVENUE, UNIT 3
LANGLEY, B C V1M 3C7
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 513-2288
Fax
(604) 513-2210
# 41 - prince george
3463 - 22ND AVENUE
PRINCE GEORGE, B C V2N 1B4
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 612-0223
Fax
(250) 612-3718
# 78 - princeton
161 BRIDGE STREET, UNIT 157
PRINCETON, B C V0X 1W0
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 295-3880
Fax
(250) 295-3021
# 79 - quesnel
2281 CEDAR AVENUE
QUESNEL, B C V2J 3Y1
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 992-6880
Fax
(250) 992-6825
# 64 - revelstoke
555 VICTORIA DRIVE, UNIT 1
REVELSTOKE, B C V0E 2S0
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 814-0116
Fax
(250) 814-0117
# 21 - ricHMond
5355 NO. 3 ROAD
RICHMOND, B C V6X 2V7
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 276-1866
Fax
(604) 276-1867
# 50 - sAlMon ArM
51 LAKESHORE DRIVE
SALMON ARM, B C V1E 4N3
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 832-7030
Fax
(250) 832-6982
# 47 - sidney
2353 BEVAN AVENUE, UNIT 7
SIDNEY, B C V8L 4M9
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 655-9311
Fax
(250) 655-6693
# 26 - squAMisH
38239 CLEVELAND AVENUE BOX 1899
SQUAMISH, B C V8B 0B3
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 892-5988
Fax
(604) 892-9039
# 56 - steveston
3740 CHATHAM STREET, UNITS 1 & 2
RICHMOND, B C V7E 2Z3
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 272-7870
Fax
(604) 272-8749
# 58 - suMMerlAnd
9527 MAIN STREET
SUMMERLAND, B C V0H 1Z0
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 404-0139
Fax
(250) 404-0137
# 17 - trAil
845 VICTORIA STREET
TRAIL, B C V1R 3E3
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 368-9116
Fax
(250) 364-0311
# 28 - tsAwwAssen
1302 - 56TH ST
TSAWWASSEN, B C V4L 2A6
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 943-1599
Fax
(604) 943-1710
# 33 - vAncouver - eAst 2nd
338 EAST 2ND AVE.
VANCOUVER, B C V5T 1C1
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 879-9391
Fax
(604) 879-9341
# 66 - vAncouver - s.w. MArine drive
210 MARINE DRIVE S.W.
VANCOUVER, B C V5X 2R5
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 324-8000
Fax
(604) 324-8005
# 40 - vernon
2801 - 35TH AVENUE
VERNON, B C V1T 2S7
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 503-2238
Fax
(250) 503-0658
# 37 - victoriA
483 BURNSIDE ROAD E.
VICTORIA, B C V8T 2X4
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 380-2088
Fax
(250) 380-2265
# 39 - westbAnk
2484 MAIN STREET, UNIT 1
WESTBANK, B C V4T 2G2
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 707-0106
Fax
(250) 707-0130
# 13 - wHAlley
10352 - 134A STREET
SURREY, B C V3T 4B8
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 581-1177
Fax
(604) 930-8480
# 43 - wHistler
1200 ALPHA LAKE ROAD, UNIT 5
WHISTLER, B C V0N 1B1
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 932-0900
Fax
(604) 905-0303
# 14 - wHite rock
2546D KING GEORGE HWY
SURREY, B C V4P 1H5
[email protected]
Counter
(604) 531-8877
Fax
(604) 531-3184
# 42 - winfield
10051 HIGHWAY 97, UNIT 2
WINFIELD, B C V4V 1P6
[email protected]
Counter
(250) 766-4457
Fax
(250) 766-4590

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