English - Foro Secundaria SEP

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English - Foro Secundaria SEP
English
Secundaria 1
English
Jean Denise Salazar Wolfe
Eliseo Gustavo Ramírez Toledo
1
1
English
Jean Denise Salazar Wolfe
Eliseo Gustavo Ramírez Toledo
1
English 1
El libro
es una obra colectiva, creada
y diseñada en el Departamento de Investigaciones
Educativas de Editorial Santillana,
con la dirección de Clemente Merodio López.
1
El libro
English 1 fue elaborado en Editorial Santillana por el siguiente equipo:
Edición: Margarita Javiedes Romero y Nelly Pérez Islas
Asistente editorial: Rosalinda Bazán Hernández
Coordinación editorial: Roxana Martín-Lunas Rodríguez
Revisión técnica: Eduardo Benitez Sánchez
Corrección de estilo: Eduardo Benitez Sánchez y Nelly Pérez Islas
Diseño de portada: José Francisco Ibarra Meza
Ilustraciones de personajes de portada: Carlos Velez, Tania Juárez
Diseño de interiores: Alicia Prado Juárez y Eliete Martín del Campo Treviño
Diagramación: Alicia Prado Juárez
Coordinación de Iconografía: Germán Gómez López
Iconografía: Eliete Martín del Campo Treviño y Miguel Bucio
Ilustraciones: Luis Sopelana, Judith Meléndez, Alejandro Zárate, Carlos Vélez, Tania Juárez, Israel Ramírez, Humberto García
Fotografía: Rocío Echávarri Rentería, Archivo Santillana, Jupiter Images
Fotografías páginas 160: Gregg Newton. (C) Reuters 1998
Gerencia de Internet y Multimedia: Arturo Mercenario Pérez Negrón
Estudio de grabación: Sonica Audio
Jean Denise Salazar Wolfe
Eliseo Gustavo Ramírez Toledo
Editora en Jefe de Secundaria: Roxana Martín-Lunas Rodríguez
Gerencia de Investigación y Desarrollo: Armando Sánchez Martínez
Gerencia de Procesos Editoriales: Laura Milena Valencia Escobar
Gerencia de Diseño: Mauricio Gómez Morin Fuentes
Coordinación de Arte y Diseño: José Francisco Ibarra Meza
Coordinación de Iconografía: Germán Gómez López
Coordinación de servicios electrónicos: Víctor Vallejo Paquini
Digitalización de imágenes: José Perales Neria, Gerardo Hernández Ortiz y María, Eugenia Guevara Sánchez
Fotomecánica electrónica: Gabriel Miranda Barrón, Benito Sayago Luna y Manuel Zea Atenco
La presentación y disposición en conjunto de cada página de English 1 son propiedad del editor. Queda estrictamente prohibida la reproducción parcial o total de
esta obra por cualquier sistema o método electrónico, incluso el fotocopiado, sin autorización escrita del editor.
D. R. © 2006 por EDITORIAL SANTILLANA, S. A. DE C. V.
Av. Universidad 767
03100, México, D. F.
ISBN: 978-970-29-1636-9
Primera edición: julio, 2006
Primera reimpresión: mayo, 2007
Segunda reimpresión corregida: abril, 2007
Tercera reimpresión: septiembre, 2007
Cuarta reimpresión: marzo, 2008
Miembro de la Cámara Nacional de la
Industria Editorial Mexicana. Reg. Núm. 802
Impreso en México
2
> Presentation
To the teacher
The way we teach foreign languages, particularly English, has changed radically over the last thirty years. Today, classroom
dynamics are enriched with a host of innovative technical and methodological considerations.
English 1, is student-centered as well as teacher-friendly. It follows the methodology established in the official program and
offers the five thematic units plus an Introductory unit to be covered during the 1st grade in Secondary school. The units
have been designed in modules of three lessons each; the number of lessons agree with the amount of teaching sessions that
conform a school year. A lesson can be covered in a 45-50 minute-class period, nevertheless the timing devoted in each unit
is flexible and will depend on the needs of every group.
The units in English 1 offer the following:
Unit
Modules
Lessons
Introductory
2
6
1
6
18
2
8
24
3
7
21
4
10
30
5
7
21
The modules, which shape the programmatic basis of this textbook, follow three stages:
• Connecting: introduces students to the topic, the specific notions of language and the communicative functions to be
developed throughout the unit.
• Chatting: engages students to practice what they’ve learned while transferring language concepts to their own reality.
• Downloading: promotes critical thinking skills development and increases accuracy and fluency through oral and written
activities.
A more detailed description of what each stage offers is included in the following section Meet Your Book! (page 4)
English 1 also offers you the following supplementary material:
• Audio CD: aimed to help you engage your students to practice pronunciation and to develop listening strategies. Includes
all listening activities such as dialogs, chants and readings.
• Teacher’s Edition: aimed to help you plan and optimize your teaching strategies. It offers a front matter that reviews
the methodology to be followed; a detailed lesson plan for each week in the school year; ten term exams -two different
evaluations per bimester (A and B); all Student book pages with overwritten answers and teaching suggestions, a
Grammar Reference and the audio scripts.
We are sure that English 1 will be a highly successful tool for you and your students throughout the school year.
To the student
Welcome to English 1, designed to be your companion during your first course in English in Secondary school. This book
is aimed to help you enjoy the learning process of the new language while developing useful strategies to start understanding
and communicating in English.
English 1 is organized in modules of three lessons each that offer a variety of activities that will help you acquire basic
vocabulary and fixed expressions in order to communicate in English with your classmates and teacher during your foreign
language class and to start understanding the language in magazines, songs, TV programs, movies, Internet, games, etc., in
things and activities of your interest. Throughout the book, you will also become familiar with different kinds of texts and
use them for personal and limited purposes.
A very important issue about learning a foreign language is to acquire confidence in using a limited range of structures and
vocabulary so as to speak or write about yourself and/or others. Therefore, English 1 helps you to develop self-confidence and
some basic strategies at learning the language. You will find different activities in the book that engage you to understand,
think, produce and reflect on how to use the language properly in familiar situations. You will also have lots of practice
and fun while working and developing the four skills you need to start managing the new language: speaking, reading,
writing and listening. To help you develop this last skill in an easier way, an audio CD is included in your book. A detailed
description of the way to approach a unit, what each lesson offers and what you will find in the last sections in your book is
included in the section: Meet Your Book!
Finally, we invite you to enjoy every moment of your English course and every page in this book; and we wish you the best of
luck throughout this school year!
Denise and Gustavo
3
> meet your book!
APPROACHING A UNIT
Let’s all Plug in and start reading about what each unit in this book offers for you to
approach English with enthusiasm and succeed at learning and using the language
in daily life situations. Each unit offers three main components: Unit Presentation,
Unit Modules and Unit Review.
[email protected]+
[email protected](
I take a shower and
brush my teeth every
day at 6:30 am.
We get ready for bed
every night around
9:00 p.m.
Unit Presentation: It’s a two-page spread where you will find the following:
◗
On the left-hand-page:
• Pictionary: illustrates in a context, the main vocabulary to learn in the unit.
On the right-hand-page:
• Unit title: establishes the theme and context of the social practices.
• Purpose and Social Practices: a clear overview of what language concepts
you will learn throughout the unit and how to use them to interact in
communicative situations.
• My Personal Predictions and a Pre-Unit Investigation: an invitation to browse
through the unit to find relevant information about the social practices and
functions you will learn in the unit.
My sister and I are twins.
My father takes us to school
everyday at 7:00 a.m.
My sister and I come to
school on weekdays. I take
classes from 8:00 a.m to
2:00 p.m.
I take extra math
classes in the
afternoons.
My mom picks
us up at school
at 2:00 p.m.
&(+
;[email protected]@=<
Gligfj\
The purpose of this unit is to enable
students to describe actions that happen
daily or periodically in their life or in
the life of people and animals they are
interested in.
Gi\$Le`[email protected]\jk`^Xk`fe
“It’s a quarter past seven.” is in:
Lesson
page
The expression: “What’s the time?” is in:
Lesson
page
A chart of Óscar’s daily routine is in:
JfZ`XcGiXZk`Z\j
›
Giving and obtaining factual information
of a personal and non-personal kind.
Lesson
page
A reading: “Laika the astronaut” is in:
Lesson
page
My Personal English File is in:
4.1. Asking and telling the time.
Lesson
4.2. Asking for and giving information
about everyday activities.
My Personal Weekly Time Table is in:
Lesson
page
page
The Time Line using: sometimes,
Unit Modules: According to the number of sessions in each bimestrial term, you
◗
will find a different amount of modules per unit. However, each module always
includes the following three lessons aimed to enable you to connect, learn and
apply English to your interest and needs:
DpG\ijfeXcGi\[`Zk`fej
› CffbXkk_\g`Zkli\fek_`jgX^\
Xe[Z_ffj\k_\Y\jkfgk`fe%
1. I think that this unit is about:
a. Leisure activities.
usually, never, always, and often is in:
Lesson
page
Belem Guerrero’s biography is in:
Lesson
page
“The Western Gorilla” is in:
Lesson
page
b. Classroom activities.
c. Daily activities and routines at
home and at school.
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› Gi\j\ekj`dgc\
› =i\hl\eZpX[m\iYj
› Gi\gfj`k`fejf]k`d\
&(,
N<C:FD<KF<E>[email protected]?:C8JJ
:FEE<:[email protected]>
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› Nfib`egX`ij%C`jk\eX^X`eXe[giXZk`Z\n`k_XZcXjjdXk\%
• Connecting: Introduces you to the main topic of the module through an
illustrated dialogue or short text to engage meaningful comprehension of
language and functions. Practice on reading, listening, speaking and writing
for you to produce some performance evidence follows along and finally, you
finish the lesson focusing on developing strategic competences and reflecting
on how you can apply language. This lesson always includes:
a. Words and Expressions: where you learn, reinforce and apply the main
vocabulary in the lesson.
b. Your Turn!: where reflection, application and transferring of knowledge is
performed in your own personal context.
• Chatting: It encourages you to practice and extend language in a different
context Through this lesson your performance evidence will be stronger and
will engage you to consolidate communication in the foreign language. This
lesson includes:
a. Focus!: a task aimed to help you understand and consolidate grammatical
structures being learned in the lesson through practice activities that are
correlated to the Grammar Reference found at the end of the book.
• Downloading: it is the third and last lesson in each module. Here, you will
find new contexts that will enable you to apply your knowledge to daily and
familiar life situations while producing performance evidence, developing
different strategic competences and reflecting on how to use the language
accurately. This lesson always concludes with a Your Turn! activity.
ERICK: Hi, Óscar. How are you?
ÓSCAR: Good morning, Erick, I’m fine thanks, and you?
ERICK: I’m fine too, thanks.
SULLY:
Good morning, Mr. Taylor.
MR. TAYLOR: Good morning, Sully.
May I come in?
SULLY:
MR. TAYLOR: Yes, of course!
MR. TAYLOR: Good afternoon, Mr. Suárez. How do you do?
MR. SUÁREZ: I’m fine, thank you, Mr. Taylor. And you?
MR. TAYLOR: I’m fine, thank you, sir.
) CffbXkk_\g`Zkli\jXe[Zfdgc\k\k_\Zfem\ijXk`fejn`k_k_\Zfii\Zkfgk`fe%
a
ERICK: Hi, Sully.
you?
a. How are
b. Who are
a. Good morning
b. Good afternoon
SULLY:
Erick. I’m fine thanks, and you?
ERICK:
fine too, thanks.
a. I’m
b. You are
JG<[email protected]>
ÓSCAR:
a. Good morning
Mr. Taylor. How do you do?
b. Good night
MR. TAYLOR::[email protected]>
Fine thanks, Óscar, and
?
a. I
b. you
( Nfi[jXe[<ogi\jj`fej
› CffbXe[c`jk\ekfpflik\XZ_\iZXi\]lccp%I\X[Xe[`[\ek`]p%
ÓSCAR: I’m fine
too, sir,
.
a. thanks
SCHOOL
b. hi
:c\a^h]
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&
>cigdYjXidgnJc^i:cXjjiffdCXe^lX^\
blackboard
book
chalk
classroom
desk (student)
door
window
eraser
janitor
marker
notebook
principal
principal’s
office
students
teacher
pen
pencil
pencil case
ruler
schoolbag
school
pencil sharpener
student
desk (teacher)
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Xcg_XY\kXe[jkXe[lgn_\epfliklieZfd\j%JXppflic\kk\iXcfl[%
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
› N_Xkc\kk\ij`ek_\JgXe`j_Xcg_XY\kXi\efkgXikf]k_\<e^c`j_Xcg_XY\k%
=fZlj
›
&'
Read the instructions for activities 1 and 2. Underline the action word (verb) in each sentence and rewrite
them on the lines below. Follow the example.
.
.
1. Look and
.
and
.
and stand up.
2.
. These
Answer the question: What are these sentences for? They give you an order or an
sentences are imperatives. (Look up the Grammar Reference section-page 230 for more information)
;FNECF8;@E>
O$KI<D<JGFIKJ
XZ b
*.
ki
›
>cigdYjXidgnJc^i:cXjjiffdCXe^lX^\
( CffbXkk_\g`Zkli\j#c`jk\eXe[i\X[%
ERICK: Look at these ads, Óscar! Do you like
X-treme sports?
ÓSCAR: They’re fantastic! I love mountain biking a
lot, and you?
ERICK: Well, I don’t like mountain biking but I like
hiking a lot with my family.
ÓSCAR: Hiking? No, I don’t like hiking, I prefer
water sports, I love kayaking!
ERICK: Kayaking? What about exploring?
ÓSCAR: Yes! I love exploring, too.
) C`jk\ekfk_\[`Xcf^l\X^X`eXe[XZk`kflk`egX`ij%
* Nfib`egX`ij%I\X[k_\[`Xcf^l\X^X`eXe[jlYjk`klk\k_\le[\ic`e\[
nfi[jn`k_fk_\infi[jpflbefn%Ni`k\k_\e\n[`Xcf^l\fek_\
c`e\jY\cfn%=fccfnk_\\oXdgc\%
You:
Look at the ads (name of a friend)! Do you like X-treme sports?
Friend: T hey’re horrible! I hate hiking, and you?
+J_Xi\pflie\n[`Xcf^l\n`k_pfli^iflg%
&%)
4
Jc^i(?fYY`\j#C\`jli\Xe[Jgfik
Throughout each module, you will also find the following activities flagged
with specific icons that tell you what the final purpose of the task is:
D
* :fdgc\k\k_\j\ek\eZ\jn`k_XfiXe%=fccfnk_\\oXdgc\%
1. Marcos is
a
2. Eduardo is
janitor and Martha is
a
teacher. They work in
doctor and Silvia is
3. Carlos is
artist and Rosy is
4. My father is
accountant and my mother is
•
Portfolio: for these activities, we suggest using a notebook and dividing it
into three sections: a) Dossier: in this section, you save the activities where you
produce new texts: dialogues, descriptions, chants, e-mails, and all the Print Out
lesson activities such as: posters, invitations, brochures, etc. b) Language: where
you can include the language entry activities described below and that will help you
consolidate understanding of new words; and c) Personal section, for you to write the
information that interested you the most from the unit (friend’s information, your own
experiences, etc). These activities are only suggestions of what can be kept as Portfolio
activities and are aimed for reviewing and reinforcing purposes. However, you and your
teacher are free to choose the activities you may want to use for a Portfolio purpose.
•
Language: stands for every dictionary entry in the book. Each entry is correlated
with the colored word printed in the body of the lesson to facilitate comprehension
and use of vocabulary. An example using the word in a sentence is included in each
language entry. We invite you to look up the word in your dictionary to find more
definitions. Finally, there’s an activity for you to consolidate the use of he word in a
written way. You can do this activity as part of your portfolio work and keep it in the
Language section for further reference and practice.
•
Blog: where you will find tips to help you develop strategies to use and apply the
language in an easier way, as well as to raise awareness of the differences or similarities
between English and Spanish.
school.
dentist. They work in
secretary. They work in
hospital.
museum.
housewife.
AVc\jV\Z
ki
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cXe^lX^\R"lœ NgwIdZTe›Xjpjk\df]nfi[jg\fgc\lj\kf
Zfddle`ZXk\k_\`i`[\Xj#\%^%Dpdfk_\iËjcXe^lX^\`je}_lXkc%
!Ni`k\Xe\nj\ek\eZ\lj`e^k_\nfi[`ek_\cXe^lX^\\ekip%
+C`jk\eXe[i\X[%
There are 15 countries in Latin America where Spanish is the official language: México, Guatemala,
El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panamá, Colombia, Perú, Ecuador, Chile, Argentina,
Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. People in Latin American countries learn English, too.
› C`jk\eXe[i\X[k_\i_pd\%Le[\ic`e\k_\Zfleki`\jXe[Z`iZc\k_\eXk`feXc`k`\j%
› C`jk\eX^X`e#ZcXgXe[Z_XekXcfe^%
WHERE ARE YOU FROM?
I’m from Guatemala, open the door and see El Salvador.
Listen everybody:
Peruvians, Argentinians, Chileans and Colombians.
People from Costa Rica all the way to Panama.
Come visit my country and have some fun!
Where am I from?
México, of course!
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k_\Zfii\jgfe[`e^Zfclde`ek_\Z_XikY\cfn%:_ffj\fe\Zflekip`epflic`jk[`]]\i\ek
kfD\o`ZfXe[kXcbXYflkk_`jZflekip%=`e[flk`e]fidXk`feXYflkk_`jgcXZ\`eYffbj#
dX^Xq`e\j#n\Yj`k\j#\eZpZcfg\[`Xj#e\njgXg\ij#\kZ%Ni`k\pfli`e]fidXk`fe`epfli[fjj`\i
Xe[Yi`e^`kk_\]fccfn`e^ZcXjjkfj_Xi\n`k_k_\i\jkf]pfli^iflgXe[pflik\XZ_\i%
EXk`feXc`k`\j
:fleki`\j
Colombian
Colombia
D
PfliKlie
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N_\i\8i\Pfl=ifd6AZhhdc*
From:
To:
Jenny Harper
Dear
,
((
, and I live in
My name’s
Write u later,
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=fccfnk_\]fidXk`eXZk`m`kp+#Ylki\d\dY\ikflj\Xgifg\iZcfj`e^j\ek\eZ\%
D
From:
To:
Mr Taylor
Dear
My name’s
,
, and I live in
When writing to a friend, you close letters,
e-mails, postcards with informal but
friendly sentences: Bye, bye for now, write u
later, etc. When writing formal letters or
e-mails, you use closing sentences such as:
Yours sincerely / Best regards / Regards.
8:XeX[`Xe=i`\e[AZhhdc&'
◗
Unit Review:
&+&
NiXgg`e^Lg
NiXgg`e^Lg
Each unit ends with six lessons which are intended for reviewing and
consolidation purposes of what you learned in the unit.
• Wrapping Up! aimed to review and consolidate the language
introduced in the unit.
• Print out: offers you the opportunity to work in small groups, to have fun
creating a hands-on-activity and to produce written samples of work based
on the different topics included in the unit. This activity is time-flexible,
depending on the needs of the group and on your teacher’s instructions. You
[email protected]<=FI:LCKLI<8E;=LE
can start at school, finish it at home and bring it in the next class to share and
comment with the rest of your group and with your teacher.
• Time for Culture and Fun: fun way for using language! This lesson [email protected]< :LCKLI<8E;
=FI
=LE
includes a game where comprehension and application of the language is done
in an interactive way.
• Tuning Up! where focusing on pronunciation is the purpose. You will always
find a chant specifically written for each unit.
• The Cool Teens Magazine: this section includes reading texts using a magazine
format to introduce general cultural facts in a teen-appealing way.
• My Personal English File: where you register everyday useful words and
expressions; interesting facts from the unit and to keep a record of your
personal outcome. This section also asks for the use of a monolingual
dictionary to increase your vocabulary and offers an activity correlated to the
previous magazine page.
Finally, at the end of your book, you will find four very useful sections:
Grammar Reference: correlated to the Focus! activities and it’s aimed to help you to
review and reinforce English.
Reflections about My First Year of English: you can write your personal opinion
about your English course and share it with your teacher and your classmates.
Bibliography: this section provides information about books and Websites that
may be consulted. Some references are for you and some others for your teacher.
Audio Scripts: where you will find the text of every listening activity not printed
in the body of each unit. And for you to practice pronunciation and enjoy
working at developing listening strategies, an audio CD which includes all
listening activities –dialogs, reading texts and chants, is offered with this book.
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Partner:
Seems
Actually
Neighborhood
See you later!
Watch out!
Drugstore
Till you hit (street)
Self-Access Center
You:
Partner:
You:
Partner:
You:
Partner:
Gi`ekFlk
=Xi\n\[email protected]`kXk`fe
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`epflijkXk\%=fi\oXdgc\18i\k_\i\XepXdlj\d\ekgXibj#Y\XZ_\j#Xe[dlj\ldj`epflijkXk\6
› General information on the place (name, address, phone number).
› Party schedule.
My state is:
In this state there are
› Party goods you have to take to the place.
› A very well designed and interesting map to locate the place. Include nearby places and mark them on the map.
› A list of people to contact for this event.
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X^\eZp%
1. Locate the places on a map.
2. What is there to see and do in these places?
3. How can you get to these places?
4. Are these traditional or modern places to visit?
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How many boys @jk_\i\XgcXZ\pflnflc[c`b\kfj\\6
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ki
1
How many
students are there
in the classroom
now?
16
15
14
13
2
How many
sandwiches are
there in the
picture?
3
are there in the
picture?
are playing this
game now?
Are
5
How many
teachers are
there in their
classrooms now?
6
How many cats
are there in the
picture?
some friends that you want to meet?
Vacation time is coming soon, and there
lots of things to do.AZhhdc&.
sites
There are many
For you to visit
enjoy
your
to come along
!
And don’t forget to have some
Where
? How can you get there?
these
How many girls
Take
a plane behind the clouds.
are wearing
a the bus, ride a bike, get
sweater right now?
7
How many clocks
are at five o’clock
in the picture?
8
How many girls
''*
How many dogs
are chasing cats
in the picture?
How many clocks
are there in the
picture?
Between the waves
Just surf the ocean and
on a boat,
you go!
, is here to stay
, we meet again.
yourself and don’t forget
!
School’s a place where English is
How many
students are
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are there in the
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classroom now?
wearing glasses
k\okfek_\c`e\jY\cfn#lj`e^Xccf]k_\d%PflZXelj\k_\nfi[jdfi\k_XefeZ\#Ylk[feËkfd`k
right now?
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Introductory Unit: Classroom language
The Imperative
12
11
The Imperative is an obligation to do something. It
has no subject.
Open the book.
Close the door.
Raise your hands.
10
9 How many books
How
many
We use
imperatives to give instructions to do or
The negative is formed
with the auxiliary don’t +
* C`jk\eX^X`eXe[Z_XekXcfe^%
How many people
to make something.
the infinitive form. and notebooks
classrooms
and
Stand up.
Don’t circle that word.
live in your house?
arenotebooks.
you carrying
labs are
therethein
Underline
correct answer.
Don’t open your
+come
Nfib`egX`ij%K_`ebXYflkk_\gcXZ\pflnXekkfm`j`k[li`e^mXZXk`feXe[ni`k\XZ_XekXYflk`k%
Name them. Don’t
to the teacher.
in.
today?
our Listen
school?
;feËk]fi^\kkf`eZcl[\k_\eXd\Xe[Z_XiXZk\i`jk`Zj%Ni`k\pflie\nZ_Xekfek_\c`e\j
How many soccer
balls in backpacks
are there in the
picture?
Y\cfn%K_\e#kXb\kliejkfj_Xi\pflinfibn`k_k_\i\jkf]k_\^iflg%@em`k\k_\dkfZ_Xek
Unit 1: Personal Identification
This and These
Use this with a singular countable or uncountable noun and these with plural
''+
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nouns. Use this/these when you are near the object.
This is a classroom. These are pens.
This is a pilot and these are architects.
This is a teacher and these are janitors.
The indefinite article a / an.
Use a before a noun beginning with a consonant sound.
Use an before a noun beginning with a vowel sound.
Mr. Rogers is an accountant.
Luis Miguel is a pop singer.
This is an orange.
That is a desk.
That and Those
Xcfe^n`k_pflXe[¿_Xm\]lePflZXeb\\gXZfgpf]pflie\nZ_Xek`epfli;fjj`\i%
Use that with a singular countable or uncountable noun and those with
plural nouns. Use that/those when you are distant from the object.
That is an actor. Those are students.
That is a girl and those are doctors.
That is a pencil and those are markers.
5I<=C<:[email protected][email protected]<8IF=<E>[email protected]?
Verb : To Be (am, is, are)
Question Form
Short Answer Form
Affirmative
Contracted form -use an apostrophe ( ’ )
to form the contraction-
Am I a student?
Are you a teacher?
Is he a doctor?
Is she a nurse?
Is it a dog?
Are we students?
Are you engineers?
Are they janitors?
Yes, I am.
Yes, you are.
Yes, he is.
Yes, she is.
Yes, it is.
Yes, we are.
Yes, you are.
Yes, they are.
I’m
you’re
he’s
she’s
it’s
we’re
you’re
they’re
Negative
› :fdgc\k\k_\j\j\ek\eZ\j`e<e^c`j_%
No, I’m not.
No, you aren’t.
No, he isn’t.
◗
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1. WhatNo,I she
likeisn’t.
a lot about my English book:
No, it isn’t.
No, we aren’t.
No you aren’t.
No they aren’t.
Linking devices:
These refer to words that help us join ideas to convey clear meaning. Some linking devices that indicate addition are: 2.
andWhat
and using
a , (comma)
My blouse
I like
a lot about
my
and my shoes are black. My dad, my mom, my brother and my sister are my family.
◗
D
The definite article the.
Use the when referring to something specific.
Mr. Smith is the doctor and Mrs. Jones is the nurse of that hospital.
Mr. Taylor is the teacher of English in my school.
Mary Thomas is the new student, she is from England.
English teacher:
Unit 2: Actions in progress
The present continuous indicates actions that are in progress at the moment of speaking.
Complete Form
I am reading now.
You are reading now.
He is reading now.
She is reading now.
It is eating now.
We are walking now.
You are walking now.
They are walking now.
NOTE:
Contracted Form
I’m reading now.
You’re reading now.
He’s reading now.
She’s reading now
It’s eating now.
We’re walking now.
You’re walking now.
They’re walking now.
Question form
Am I reading now?
Are you reading now?
Is he reading now?
Is she reading now?
Is it eating now?
Are we walking now?
Are you walking now?
Are they walking now?
Affirmative Answer
3.
Yes, I am.
Yes, you are.
Yes, he is.
Yes, she is.
Yes, it is.
Yes, we are.
Yes, you are.
Yes, they are.
Verbs ending with e: ommit the e and add ing:
Take – taking
love – loving
erase – erasing
change – changing
Verbs ending with a vowel + a single consonant: double the consonant and add ing:
Jog – jogging
shop – shopping run – running
rob – robbing
Indicating possession
We use an apostrophe followed by s to indicate possession.
This is Tom’s sweater.
That is Pedro’s backpack.
Negative Answer
WhatNo,
I think
I’m not.about the rhyming chants in my book:
No, you aren’t.
No, he isn’t.
No, she isn’t.
No, it isn’t.
No, we aren’t.
No, you aren’t.
No, they aren’t.
4. My favorite game in the book:
5. When I don’t understand a word I
Unit 3: Hobbies, Leisure and Sport
◗
Likes and dislikes
Always use a direct object –nouns, gerunds or infinitives, immediately after the verbs like, love, dislike and hate.
I like ice cream and I hate strawberries.
6. It is very difficult for me to
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7. It is very easy for me to
8. I often use English
◗
9. I use my dictionary
10. My favorite character in this book is
'('
5
> table of Contents
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
Purpose
Social Practices
• Establishing and maintaining social contacts.
To provide students with basic
1. Greeting people and responding
classroom language that will enable
to greetings.
them to communicate in English at all
2.
Communicating in the classroom.
times during their foreing language
3. Mantaining communication in or out of
lessons.
Reflection on Language
the classroom.
• Imperative form
Module
Lesson
Picture dictionary
Unit entry
1
2
Page
8
9
1. Welcome to English Class
2. Spelling
3. Let’s Sing
10
12
14
4. What’s Today’s Date?
5. My Birthday
6. Wrapping Up!
16
18
20
Unit 1 Personal Identification
Purpose
Module
To enable students to introduce themselves
and others, and to exchange personal details.
Lesson
Pictionary
Unit entry
Social Practices
• Establishing and maintaining
social contacts.
1.1 Introducing oneself and
other people.
1.2 Asking for and giving personal details.
Reflection on Language
• Demonstrative pronouns
• Indefinite articles.
• Linking devices
Page
Module
Lesson
Page
22
23
1
1. Personal Identification
2. It’s a Pretty City
3. They Are My Friends
24
26
28
4
10. Erick’s ID
11. Where Is My ID?
12. A Famous Person
42
44
46
2
4. My Father Is a Teacher
5. Where Are You from?
6. World Languages
30
32
34
5
13. Wrapping Up!
14. Print Out
15. Time for Culture and Fun
48
49
50
3
7. Claudia Is Italian
8. Let’s Chat
9. What’s Your e-mail Address?
36
38
40
6
16. Tuning Up!
17. The Cool Teens Magazine
18. My Personal English File
51
52
53
Page
Module
Unit 2 Actions in Progress
Purpose
To enable students to give and obtain
information about possessions and
describe actions that are in progress at
the moment of speaking.
Social Practices
• Giving and obtaining factual information of
a personal and non-personal kind.
2.1 Asking and answering questions about
personal possessions.
2.2Describing what people are wearing
and/or doing at the moment of
speaking.
Reflection on Language
• Demonstrative pronouns
• Present continuous
• Prepositions of location
6
Module
Lesson
Pictionary
Unit entry
Lesson
Page
54
55
1
1. Look at This Mess!
2. What’s Going on?
3. This Is Sully’s Sweater
56
58
60
2
4. What is She Wearing?
5. Where’s My Cell Phone?
6. These Are My Personal Belongings
62
64
66
3
7. Are These Your Things?
8. A Secret Location
9. The Word Chain
68
70
72
4
10. I’m Catching a Cold
11. What Is She Doing?
12. Working Out!
74
76
78
5
13. Hot Dogs and Sodas
14. Taking Pictures!
15. They aren’t Eating Ice Cream
80
82
84
6
16. What are You Doing Now?
17. They’re Wearing Sweats
18. Chatting on The Net
86
88
90
7
19. Wrapping Up!
20. Print Out
21. Time for Culture and Fun
92
93
94
8
22. Tuning Up!
23. The Cool Teens Magazine
24. My Personal English File
95
96
97
Unit 3 Hobbies, Leisure and Sport
Purpose
Module
To enable students to express their
personal interests around the topic of
hobbies, leisure and sport, and to make
/ respond to invitations to events /
places related to the topic.
Social Practices
• Establishing and maintaining social
contacts.
3.1 Expressing preferences, likes and
dislikes.
3.2Inviting and responding to invitations.
Reflection on Language
• Verbs to express likes/dislikes
• Auxiliary verb Do in questions
• “s” for plurals vs “s” for third person
Lesson
Page
Picture dictionary
Unit entry
98
99
1
1. I Like Basketball!
2. I Hate Swimming
3. X-treme Sports
100
102
104
2
4. Scrapping
5. Movies and Music
6. Remembering Good Moments
Module
Lesson
Page
5
13. Let’s Go to the Mountains
14. Planning an Excursion
15. Let’s Go to the Movies
124
126
128
106
108
110
6
16. Wrapping Up!
17. Print Out
18. Time for Culture and Fun
130
131
132
3
7. Does She Like Teddy Bears?
8. Leisure Activities and Sports
9. The Opera Singer
112
114
116
7
19. Tuning Up!
20. The Cool Teens Magazine
21. My Personal English File
133
134
135
4
10. Inviting Your Friends
11. A Music Show
12. Do You Like Opera?
118
120
122
Unit 4 Daily life
Purpose
To enable students to describe
actions that happen daily or
periodically in their life or in the
life of people and animals they
are interested in.
Social Practices
• Giving and obtaining factual
information of a personal and nonpersonal kind.
4.1 Giving simple infromation
about places.
4.2Asking the way and giving
directions.
Reflection on Language
• Present simple
• Frequency adverbs
• Prepositions of time
Module
Lesson
Page
Picture dictionary
Unit entry
1
2
3
4
5
Module
Lesson
Page
136
137
1. What time Is It?
2. World Friends, World Times
3. What Time Is The Band Playing?
138
140
142
4. With My Friends
5. She Usually Brushes Her Hair at Night
6. What Do You Do on Weekends?
144
146
148
7. My New Pet
8. A Tiny, Little Dog!
9. A Really Big Dog
150
152
154
10. A Biography on Wheels
11. A Daily Routine
12. A Canadian Friend
156
158
160
13. A Busy Timetable
14. Daily Activities
15. Weekend Fun!
162
164
166
6
7
8
9
10
16. Personal Schedules
17. At What Time Do You Wake Up?
18. What a Life!
168
170
172
19. An Interview
20. Cool Magazines!
21. What Sport Do You Like?
174
176
178
22. How Often Do You Visit Your Friends?
23. Sunday Schedule
24. Do Gorillas Like Bananas?
180
182
184
25. Wrapping Up!
26. Print Out
27. Time for Culture and Fun
186
187
188
28. Tuning Up!
29. The Cool Teens Magazine
30. My Personal English File
189
190
191
Unit 5 Places and buildings
Purpose
To enable students to describe
the place where they or other
people live, and to ask the way/
give directions.
Social Practices
• Giving and obtaining factual
information of a personal and nonpersonal kind.
5.1 Giving simple infromation
about places.
5.2Asking the way and giving
directions.
Reflection on Language
• Definite/indefinite articles
• Prepositions of location
• Imperative form to give directions
Module
Lesson
Picture dictionary
Unit entry
Page
Module
Lesson
Page
192
193
1
1. My Hometown
2. Where’s The Restaurant?
3. My Neighborhood
194
196
198
5
13. I Like Huts
14. What a Cool Poster!
15. There’s a House in a tree
218
220
222
2
4. Is The Subway Station Near?
5. How Can I Get to …?
6. Watch Out for Signs!
200
202
204
6
16. Wrapping Up!
17. Print Out
18. Time for Culture and Fun
224
225
226
3
7. Where Can I Find a Bank?
8. Where Is Your House?
9. Self-access Center
206
208
210
7
19. Tuning Up!
20. The Cool Teens Magazine
21. My Personal English file
227
228
229
4
10. Beautiful Clocks
11. What a Beautiful Place!
12. My Favorite Brochure
212
214
216
• Grammar Reference
• Reflections About My First Year of English
• Scripts
• Bibliography
230
232
233
238
7
>Unit 1
>Introductory
UNIT
bulletin
blackboard
globe
bulletin board
bookcase
chalk
chair
eraser
teacher
schoolbag
role list
book
books
desk
floor
shoes
watch
platform
eraser
pen
student
pencil
case
notebook
table
schoolbag
wheelchair
pencil
8
portfolio
CLASSROOM LANGUAGE
Purpose
Pre-Unit Investigation
The purpose of this unit is to provide
students with basic classroom language
that will enable them to communicate
in English at all times during their
foreing language lessons.
Good morning; hello; how are you? ; are in:
Lesson
page
Numbers 1-12, 20 and 30 are in:
Lesson
page
January, February, March, etc., and
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, are in:
Social Practices
• Establishing and maintaining
social contacts.
1.Greeting people and responding to
greetings.
2.Communicating in the classroom.
3.Maintaining communication in or
out of the classroom.
Reflection on Language
• Imperative form
Lesson
page
The alphabet is in:
Lesson
page
Numbers 14,15,100, etc., are in:
Lesson
page
Nationalities are in:
Lesson
page
My Personal Predictions
• Circle the best option.
1.Vocabulary in this unit is related to:
a. restaurants
b.schools
c. cars
2.Dialogues in this unit refer to:
a. communication in the classroom
b.physical exercise
c. introducing people
9
Welcome to english class
CONNECTING
tr
ac k
1
1 Look at the pictures and listen to the conversations.
• Work in pairs. Listen again and practice with a classmate.
Erick: Hi, Óscar. How are you?
Óscar: Good morning, Erick, I’m fine thanks, and you?
Erick: I’m fine too, thanks.
Sully:
Good morning, Mr. Taylor.
Mr. Taylor: Good morning, Sully.
Sully: May I come in?
Mr. Taylor: Yes, of course!
Mr. Taylor: Good afternoon, Mr. Suárez. How do you do?
Mr. Suárez: I’m fine, thank you, Mr. Taylor. And you?
Mr. Taylor: I’m fine, thank you, sir.
2 Look at the pictures and complete the conversations with the correct option.
a
Erick: Hi, Sully.
a. How are
you?
b. Who are
Sully:
Erick. I’m fine thanks, and you?
a. Good morning
Erick:
b. Good afternoon
fine too, thanks.
a. I’m
Óscar:
b. You are
Mr. Taylor. How do you do?
a. Good morning
b. Good night
Mr. Taylor: Fine thanks, Óscar, and
a. I
Óscar: I’m fine too, sir,
a. thanks
10
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
?
b. you
.
b. hi
Mr. Suárez: Hello, Mariana, how are you?
Mariana: Fine thanks, sir.
?
a. How are you?
b. How do you do?
Mr. Suárez: I’m
thank you, and how are you today, Sully?
a. fines
Sully: I’m fine too,
b. fine
. Thank you.
a. sir
b. I
3 Practice the dialogues in activity 2 with three friends. Write the names of your friends on the lines below.
Names
1.
2.
3.
tr
ac k
2
4Words and Expressions!
• Look at the picture. Listen and complete the conversation with a word from the box.
Practice in groups of five and check ( ✓ ) the place where this is happening.
recess
absent
here
present
raise
c Cinema c Classroom c Restaurant
Teacher: Good morning everyone.
your hand,
when I call your name… Erick Gallegos.
Erick:
!
Teacher: Mariana Íñiguez.
Mariana:
!
Teacher: Óscar Robles.
Óscar: Present!
Teacher: Sully Yiang… Sully Yiang?
Óscar:
.
Sully:
Sorry! May I come in?
Teacher: Mmm… O.K. Sully, come in, but please
be on time for class.
Sully:
Yes, sir. Promise!
Teacher: Please close the door, Sully.
Óscar: Time for
!
Your Turn!
• Answer the questions.
1. In the dialogue, who asks permission to enter the classroom? 2. What is the expression we use to ask for permission? • Work in pairs and underline the correct options. You ask for permission, when you:
a. enter a place
b. exit a place
c. go to the bathroom
Welcome to English Class Lesson 1
11
spelling
CHATTING
1 Words and Expressions!
• Look and listen to your teacher carefully. Read and identify.
SCHOOL
:c\a^h]
:c\a^h]
HZXjcYVg^V&
&
&
blackboard
book
chalk
classroom
desk (student)
desk (teacher)
door
window
eraser
janitor
marker
notebook
pen
pencil
pencil case
principal
principal’s
office
ruler
schoolbag
school
students
teacher
pencil sharpener
student
2 Listen to your teacher carefully. Read the letters in the alphabet and follow. Choose a letter in the
alphabet and stand up when your turn comes. Say your letter aloud.
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
• What letters in the Spanish alphabet are not part of the English alphabet.
Focus
•
•
12
Read the instructions for activities 1 and 2. Underline the action word (verb) in each sentence and rewrite
them on the lines below. Follow the example.
1. Look and
.
.
2.
.
and
.
and stand up.
Answer the question: What are these sentences for? They give you an order or an
. These
sentences are imperatives. (Look up the Grammar Reference section-page 230 for more information)
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
3 Look at the pictures and underline the correct word. Follow the example.
Maestro
student teacher
schoolbag notebook
pencil pen
notebook book
janitor desk
pencil
sharpener
blackboard
pen
eraser
pencil
sharpener
pencil
sharpener
To spell a word is to
name each letter on a
word. Read the example
and listen. SCHOOL =
S–C–H–O–O–L
student students
pencil pen
eraser ruler
• Work in pairs. Practice with a classmate and spell the underlined words in activity 3. Follow the example.
How do you spell teacher?
Teacher = T-e-a-c-h-e-r
• Listen to the words again and this time, SPELL the words.
• Now, work in pairs and spell other words from activity 3 or from the Pictionary (page 8).
4Work in teams of four. Look at what your classmates have in their schoolbags or desks and check (✓)
the chart below. Then, share the information with your teacher and classmates. Follow the example:
Emilio has a pencil sharpener, a pencil, a pen, and an English book in his schoolbag.
Materials
Student’s
Name
pencil sharpener
pencil
pen
Emilio
✓
✓
✓
notebook
English book
eraser
✓
Spelling Lesson 2
13
Let’s sing
DOWNLOADING
1Look at the pictures and read.
My mom is forty years old.
Thirty days have September, April, June and November.
My grandparents are celebrating fifty years of marriage.
tr
ac k
3
Wow! This person is a hundred years old.
2Work in teams of ten and choose a number. Listen to
the rhyme and act out your number.
5
4
14
6
10
One, two, open your book.
Three and four, sit on the floor.
Five and six, get together and mix
Seven and eight, stand up straight
97 3
1
2
Nine and ten, take a pen!
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
8
3 Match the correct number of objects with the corresponding word. Follow the example.
Fifty
Fourteen
Twenty
One hundred
Thirty
Twelve
Forty
Eleven
Thirteen
Fifteen
Your Turn!
4Work in pairs and write the number of objects there are of each in your classroom.
Follow the example.
• Compare your answers with another pair of students.
OBJECTS IN
YOUR CLASSROOM
windows
NUMBER OF OBJECTS
4
Four
sharpeners
rulers
English books
erasers
pencils
Let’s Sing Lesson 3
15
What’s today’s date?
CONNECTING
1 Listen to your teacher and read.
The months of the year are:
January, February, March, April, May,
June, July, August, September, October,
November, December.
The days of the week are:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and
Sunday.
• Underline the month of your birthday and circle your favorite day of the week.
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2Look at the calendar. Read and listen to the months of the year. Use the months in the
box to complete the calendar.
February
April
May
June
July
September
October
December
Flag’s Day
• Check your answers with a partner and your teacher.
3 Words and Expressions!
• Write Mexico’s celebrations in their corresponding month.
Follow the example.
• Mother’s Day
• México Independence Day
• México Revolution Day
• New Year’s Eve
• Flag’s Day
16
• First day of Spring
• Children’s Day
• Christmas
• Beginning of summer
• Father’s Day
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
When listening and reading at
the same time, focus attention
on how you pronounce and write
the words. Example: August.
• End of national vacation season
• Columbus Day
• My birthday
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4Look at the days of the week. School is on weekdays and fun activities on weekends.
Listen to the days of the week and complete the chart below with the words from the box. Pay
attention to the spelling and pronunciation of the different days of the week.
Monday
Wednesday
Thursday
Sunday
WEEKDAYS
WEEKEND
Tuesday
(school)
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6
(school)
(school)
(school)
Friday
Saturday
(school)
(fun activities)
(fun activities)
5 Look at the differences in the numbers and listen to the pronunciation. Repeat the numbers.
1 - One
2 - Two
3 - Three
4 - Four
5 - Five
6 - Six
7 - Seven
8 - Eight
9 - Nine
10 - Ten
CARDINAL NUMBERS
11 - Eleven
12 - Twelve
13 - Thirteen
14 - Fourteen
15 - Fifteen
20 - Twenty
30 - Thirty
40 - Forty
50 - Fifty
100 - One hundred
1st. - First
2nd. - Second
3rd. - Third
4th. - Fourth
5th- - Fifth
6th. - Sixth
7th. - Seventh
8th. - Eighth
9th. - Ninth
10th. - Tenth
6Read the numbers. Underline the ordinal numbers and
ORDINAL NUMBERS
11th. - Eleventh
12th. - Twelfth
13th. - Thirteenth
14th. - Fourteenth
15th. - Fifteenth
20th. - Twentieth
30th. - Thirtieth
40th. - Fortieth
50th. - Fiftieth
100th. - One hundredth
circle the cardinal numbers.
Follow the example.
3
1st
13
100
20th
4th
20
5
15th
6
7th
50
8
18
7
30
19
1
Your Turn!
7What’s today’s date? Look at the example and answer the question with true information.
Example: Today’s date is Monday, September 4th 2006. Reality: Today’s date is
• Complete this information:
My English class is on
,
, and
.
My birthday is in .
My best friend’s birthday is in .
What’s Today’s Date? Lesson 4
17
My birthday
CHATTING
1 Look at the picture. Listen to your teacher and complete the dialogue with true information.
Teacher: Good Morning
boys and girls. Today is
Monday, September 5th.
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7
Teacher: What day is today, group?
Group: Today is
(month of the year)
,
(number of day)
2 Look at the calendars and listen to the information. Who celebrates a birthday today? Write the name
of the person under the corresponding birthday calendar.
¡Happy birthday!
3 Write the name of the missing number on the left. Follow the example.
• Practice your pronunciation. Listen to the rhyme and put the sentences in order. Write the number in
the parenthesis. Then, listen again, check and repeat the rhyme.
One -
- four Six – seven –
- ten
Three, four, five, everybody’s fine
(
)
Nine, ten. Let’s sing again!
(
)
One, two, happy birthday to you.
(
)
Six, seven, eight, now cut the cake
(
)
4Walk around the classroom and find out who celebrates a birthday in September. Write the name, the
day and the age under the corresponding column in the chart. Follow the example.
18
NAME OF
STUDENT
SEPTEMBER
AGE
Lalo
11 - Eleventh
12
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
NAME OF
STUDENT
SEPTEMBER
AGE
4Work in pairs. Look at the chart and fill in the blanks with the correct number.
One year
=
12 months
One month
=
weeks
One week
=
days
One day
=
One hour
=
minutes
One minute
=
seconds
Language
birthday ["b‰Ü∏deI] n • the date on
which someone was born; a date
of birth, e. g. My birthday is
February 2nd.
*Write a new sentence using the
word in the language entry in the
language section in your Portfolio.
24 hours
DOWNLOADING
5 Work in groups of five. Tell your friends about yourself and answer these questions.
1. When’s your birthday? My birthday is September 11th.
2. How old are you? I’m 11 years old.
• Fill in the chart with the correct information. Follow the example.
NAME
BIRTHDAY
AGE
Mariana
September 11th
11 (eleven)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
• Is there someone in your class with your
some birthday?
• Share your information with the rest of the
group and with your teacher.
When we say the date in English, we mention
the day of the week, the month, the number of
day using ordinal numbers and finally, the year,
e.g., Tuesday, September 6th, 2008. Is it the
same in Spanish?
My Birthday Lesson 5
19
Wrapping Up!
Up!
Wrapping
1 Words and Expressions!
• Match each word or expression with the corresponding picture. Follow the example.
a
b
d
c
Work in pairs
( g )
Open your book
( )
Answer the roll
( )
May I come in?
( )
How do you do?
( )
Hi, how are you?
( )
Work in groups of three
( )
Sit down
( )
e
f
h
g
2 Unscramble the words and complete the expressions below. Follow the example.
20
ETONBOKO
Open your
notebook
ODRO
.
Close the
Introductory Unit Classroom Language
LOEHL
.
, how are you?
3 Work in pairs and complete the dialogues. Go back to page 10, and follow activity 1 as an example.
Dialogue 1
Dialogue 2
A: How are you?
A: Hello Mr. Figueroa. B: B: I’m fine, thank you. A: I’m fine, too.
A: ?
?
4Answer the questions:
When is your birthday? When is your teacher’s birthday? 5 Work in pairs. Find the following pictures in page 12. Use your dictionary
and write the meaning for each word. The first person to finish is the winner.
WORD
MEANING
School
A place where you
take classes.
6Play a memory game.
• Look at your picture dictionary for one minute. Close your book. Look around the classroom and find
as many objects as you can from the picture dictionary.
• In your portfolio - language section, write a list of these words. You only have two minutes. The person
who writes more words with no spelling mistakes…wins!
Lesson 6
21
lamp
>Unit 1
>unit
ceiling
clock
restrooms
window
refrigerator
cell phone
helmet
clerk
bottles
coat
janitor
telephone
faucet
engineer
doctor
shirt
sodas
construction
plan
schoolbag
counter
computer
screen
computer
watch
hair
boy
mouse
girl
shoes
t-shirt
lemonade
jeans
e-mail
salt
napkins
mouse
pad
boots
pants
sneakers
woman
keyboard
chair
glasses
bracelet
22
personal I.D.
PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION
Purpose
The purpose of this unit is to enable
students to introduce themselves and
others, and to exchange personal details.
Pre-Unit Investigation
Brazilian, Mexican, Guatemalan are in:
Lesson
I, you, he, she, it, etc., are in:
Lesson
Social Practices
• Establishing and maintaining social
contacts.
1.1Introducing oneself and other people.
1.2Asking for and giving personal
details.
page
page
An engineer, a doctor, are in:
Lesson
page
Telephone numbers are in:
Lesson
page
The rhyme “Where are you from?” is in:
Lesson
page
An e-mail from Fiorella Gazzara is in:
Lesson
My Personal Predictions
page
Rodolfo Neri Vela is in:
Lesson
page
• Choose the best option.
1. Vocabulary in Unit 1 is about:
a. occupations
b. people’s names
c. trade marks
2.To tell your age and nationality is a
good way of:
Reflection on Language
• Demonstrative pronouns
• Indefinite articles.
• Linking devices
a. studying math
b. identifying yourself
c. watching T.V.
23
Personal identification
CONNECTING
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9
1 Look at the computer screen below. What’s the information in the format for?
• Listen to the conversation and fill in the blanks with the information you hear.
Create Your E-mail ID
* First name:
* Last name:
* Nationality:
* Male
Female
ID may consist of a-z and 0-9.
* ID:
@englishone.com
Six characters or more. No capital letters.
* Password:
* Re-type password:
• Work in pairs. Create a password for Erick’s e-mail. Ask your partner to guess the password.
2 Work in pairs. With the information on Erick’s e-mail id,
write a description about him on the lines below.
When listening, and
not understanding
ask people to repeat
the ideas. Focus
on the information
you need, not on
everything.
24
Unit 1 Personal Identification
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3 Words and Expressions!
• Listen and identify. Match the people
and their nationalities on the world
map. Follow the example.
English
Italian
Russian
Brazilian
Japanese
Panamanian
Greek
Jamaican
Peruvian
Canadian
Indian
French
• Work in groups of five. Take out your geography book. Choose a country on the map and write 5
characteristics about it in your dossier. When not knowing a word, consult a dictionary, ask your
partners or your teacher.
• Share your information with the rest of your group and your teacher. Explain the reasons for
choosing that country.
4Complete the idea below with nationalities from the map.
Most nationalities end in
as Mexican, and
. These are regular endings. But there are
some other endings such as
and ish. These are regular endings. But there are some other
,
endings such as
like in Japanese,
in nationalities like Indian,
,
,
Canadian,
and
as in English. These are irregular endings.
. And the ending
Some exceptions: Arab, Dutch, French, Greek, Iraki, Icelandic and Thai. • Think about another nationality
for each ending and complete the following sentences. Follow the example:
Xavier is argentinian.
a. (an).
b. (ian)
c. (ese)
d. (ish)
Your Turn!
5 Work in pairs. Where do you think these teens are from? Look at the flag and their name. Write a
short sentence on the line. Follow the example.
I’m James. I’m from Ireland and I’m Irish
I’m Yumiko
.
.
I’m Melina Teodorakis. I’m from
and I’m
.
• Walk around the classroom, check your answers and find out: Is someone in your group not
Mexican?
who?
Personal Identification Lesson 1
25
it’s a pretty city
CHATTING
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1 Listen to the dialogue and read. Then, answer the question aside each picture.
Mariana:
Óscar:
Mariana:
Erick:
Mariana:
Erick:
Óscar:
Erick:
Óscar:
Erick:
Óscar:
Mariana:
Who is from Guatemala?
Hi, Óscar.
Hi again, Mariana. This is Erick. He’s
is from Guatemala.
anew student in our group.
Hi, Erick. Nice meeting you. Where are
you from?
I am from Guatemala City. It’s the capital
of Guatemala.
Guatemala? Cool! I’m from Mérida. It’s a
pretty city in Yucatán, México.
What about you, Óscar? Where are
you from?
I’m Mexican, too. I am from Veracruz.
Who is from Mérida?
Wow! Look at those girls! They are cute.
is
Who are they?
Oh, oh! They are my cousins.
.
Oops!
Hurry up guys! Now, we have to run.
Classes are about to start!
• Then, answer the question under each picture.
Who is from Veracruz?
.
2 Words and Expressions!
• Work in groups of three. Look at the underlined words in the dialogue.
• They are expressions. Use the correct expression to complete the dialogue below.
Dulce: Look Silvia. That’s the new boy in school and he’s good looking.
Silvia: Mm! he’s very
.
Pedro: Hello girls. What are you doing this afternoon?
Dulce: Nothing really.
Pedro: I’m going to the movies.
Dulce: That’s
.
Silvia: Hey, let’s hurry up. Math class is
26
Unit 1 Personal Identification
.
Focus
•
In conversational English we commonly to be. Help Óscar complete his ideas using the correct pronoun
and the contracted form of the verb to be.
my
from
Veracruz.
friends.
my
grandfather.
my
teacher.
(Look up the Grammar Reference
section-page 230 for more information)
3 Work in groups of five. Find out some personal information about your friends and fill in the chart
below. Follow the examples.
— Hi, what’s your name?
— Arturo
— What’s your last name?
— It’s Suárez. S-U-Á-R-E-Z.
— Where are you from?
— I’m from Tepic.
— Hi, what’s your name?
— Nelly
— What’s your last name?
— It’s Millán. M-I-L-L-Á-N.
— Where are you from?
— I’m from Mexico City.
Name
Last Name
The student is from
Arturo
Su rez
Tepic
Nelly
Mill n
Mexico City
• Exchange your information with another group and answer the question:
Is everyone in your group from your hometown? .
It’s a Pretty City Lesson 2
27
THEY ARE MY FRIENDS
DOWNLOADING
1 Use the correct word or phrase from the box to complete the sentences and fill out
the crossword below. Follow the example.
teacher
student
about to start
Brazilian
cool
school
classmate
DOWN
1.A friend in your class is your
classmate
2.Your favorite music is
.
.
3.A person from Brazil is
.
4.Your classroom is a room where you take classes in your
.
ACROSS
5.When the school bell rings, classes are
.
6.Mr. Taylor teaches English. He’s an English
7.In school, I’m a
1
.
C
L
5
.
2
3
A
S
S
M
A
6
4
T
Language
E
7
2Check your answers with a partner.
28
Unit 1 Personal Identification
partner [ "pAÜtn´r] n • a person who
shares the ownership of a bussiness,
or a place, with one or more people.
2. someone that you do a particular
activity with, e.g. My father and my
uncle are partners.
*Write a new sentence using the word
in the language entry in the language
section in your Dossier.
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3 Work in pairs. Look at the picture and complete the text with the verb to be and
the expressions in lesson 2.
• Listen and check your answers.
Hi again. My name
friends. Erick
Mariana and I’m from Yucatán. Erick and Óscar
my
Guatemalan and Óscar is from Veracruz. We are in our English class now.
Mr. Taylor is the English
and he is fantastic. English class is
! What about you?
Your Turn!
4Write a short description about you, your friends and your school. Follow activity 3
as an example. Save it in your Personal Dossier.
Hi, my name is
. I’m in
D
my English class now.
My friends
They Are My Friends Lesson 3
29
my father is a teacher
CONNECTING
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1 Listen and read the following telephone conversation between Mariana and Lillian.
The underlined words are expressions.
Lilian: Hi, Is that 5280-7649?
Mariana:Yes, it is. Who’s speaking?
Lilian: Hi, Mariana. This is Lilian.
Mariana:Oh, hi, Lillian. What’s up?
Lilian:I have visitors from the U.S. Tom and
his family.
Mariana:Tom and his family?
Lilian:Yes. Tom is 12 and very cute. His father
is a pilot and his mom is an actress.
Mariana:An actress? Cool!
Lilian:Listen, I have a problem. They speak
English.
Mariana:Good! Practice your English.
Lilian:Hey, I have an idea. Come over and
meet Tom and his family. You can
practice your English!
Mariana:Great idea! I’m on my way.
• Now, express your opinion. Lillian is
nervous. She has a problem. What’s the
problem? Use the words in the box to
help express yourself and share your
opinion with your classmates.
• Now, practice the dialogue with a partner.
Lilian is afraid to practice English.
Lilian is not friendly.
Lilian wants to practice English, but needs vocabulary.
Lilian wants to practice English with Mariana.
2 Listen again and correct the following sentences. Look at the example.
1. Tom is 14 years old and he’s from France.
Tom is 12 years old and he’s from the U.S.
2. Tom is 12 years old. His father is a doctor and his mom is an engineer.
Language
3. Tom and his family speak Spanish.
conversation [kÅnv´"seIS´n] n. when
two or more persons talk about the
same subject. Discussion. Chat, e.g. The
phone conversation is interesting.
*Write a new sentence using the word
in the language entry in the language
section in your Dossier.
4. The visitors are from México.
5. Lillian and Mariana practice French with Tom.
30
Unit 1 Personal Identification
3 Words and Expressions!
• Look at the people in the pictures. They have different professions. Read the words and repeat.
Then fill in the blanks as in the examples.
This is Mr. Brown.
He’s an engineer.
That’s Carol.
She’s an actress.
1.
T hat
2.
T his is
This is Mr. Jones
He’s a doctor.
That’s Judy Smith.
She’s an accountant.
This is George Scott.
He’s a pilot.
is an accountant.
my classroom.
3.
is my computer.
4.
is an English book.
5.
is Carol. She is an excellent actress!
6.
is my father. He’s an engineer.
• Write the correct option to complete the idea.
• We use this to indicate
, and we use that
(proximity/distance) to indicate
. This/that are singular demonstrative pronouns.
(proximity/distance)
Your Turn!
Language
4Walk around the class and find out the following information
about three people in your class. Look at the different
professions on the next page to help yourself with vocabulary.
Follow the example.
• What occupation or profession sounds interesting to you? .
accountant [´"kAunt´nt] n. someone
who is responsible for maintaining
financial records or accounts, e.g. My
aunt is an accountant.
*Write a new sentence using the word
in the language entry in the language
section in your Dossier.
My Father Is a Teacher Lesson 4
31
where are you from?
CHATTING
1 Look at the people in the pictures. They have different professions. Choose the profession from the
box and write it under the corresponding picture. Follow the example.
doctor
She likes to work in
a theater. She is an
actress
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14
actress
He loves to build
houses. He is an
.
accountant
engineer
She works with numbers
and bills. She
an
.
He works in a hospital.
a
.
2 Look at the pictures. Listen and read. Number the pictures as you listen.
A carpenter ( )
An actress ( )
A driver ( )
An electrician ( )
A teacher ( )
An engineer ( )
An artist ( )
An accountant ( )
An astronaut ( )
A plumber ( )
Focus
Singular nouns use an indefinite article. Singular nouns
that start with a vowel sound (a, e, i, o, u) use the article
, e.g.: engineer. Singular nouns that start with
a consonant use the indefinite article
, e.g.:
. Look at these exceptions when using “a” or “an”:
a university, an honest man, a hungry boy, etcetera. What’s the
reason for these exceptions? Simple! Read the exceptions aloud
and notice the difference. It’s all in the pronunciation.
(Look up the Grammar Reference section-page 230 for more information)
32
Unit 1 Personal Identification
A nurse ( )
A doctor (0 )
3 Complete the sentences with a or an. Follow the example.
1.Marcos is
a
2.Eduardo is
janitor and Martha is
a
teacher. They work in
doctor and Silvia is
3.Carlos is
artist and Rosy is
4.My father is
school.
dentist. They work in
secretary. They work in
accountant and my mother is
hospital.
museum.
housewife.
Language
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15
language ["lœ NgwIdZ] n • a system of words people use to
communicate their ideas, e.g. My mother’s language is náhuatl.
*Write a new sentence using the word in the language entry.
4Listen and read.
There are 15 countries in Latin America where Spanish is the official language: México, Guatemala,
El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panamá, Colombia, Perú, Ecuador, Chile, Argentina,
Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. People in Latin American countries learn English, too.
• Listen and read the rhyme. Underline the countries and circle the nationalities.
• Listen again, clap and chant along.
WHERE ARE YOU FROM?
I’m from Guatemala, open the door and see El Salvador.
Listen everybody:
Peruvians, Argentinians, Chileans and Colombians.
People from Costa Rica all the way to Panama.
Come visit my country and have some fun!
Where am I from?
México, of course!
5 Work in groups of three. Write some countries and nationalities from the chant under
the corresponding column in the chart below. Choose one country in your list different
to Mexico and talk about this country. Find out information about this place in books,
magazines, web sites, encyclopedias, newspapers, etc. Write your information in your dossier
and bring it the following class to share with the rest of your group and your teacher.
Nationalities
Countries
Colombian
Colombia
Where Are You From? Lesson 5
D
33
world languages
DOWNLOADING
1 Remember the list of countries in activity 5, page 33? Tell your classmates and your teacher what you
know about one of the countries in the list.
• Read this information. Underline the countries and circle the languages people speak in the
different countries. Follow the example.
P
eople in the world speak different
languages. Chinese is language number one
in the world. People in Taiwan, China and other
countries speak Chinese. 1300 million people
speak Chinese.
The official language in Germany, Austria,
Belgium, and Switzerland is German and it’s
language number 10 in the world. People in Egypt,
Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Saudi Arabia and 18 other
countries, speak Arabic.
This language is the number five in the world.
What about Spanish? Spanish is language number
four in the world. 300 million people speak
Spanish. People in México, Costa Rica, Nicaragua,
Colombia, Perú and 16 other countries, speak
Spanish.
English is language number two in the world.
People from United States, England, Canada,
Australia, and 53 other countries speak English.
2 Work in groups of three and fill in the information for each country. Follow the example.
Then, check your answers with your teacher and classmates.
Country
Language people speak
Nationality
Germany
German
German
Taiwan
Taiwanese
Australia
Suadi Arabia
Arab
China
Switzerland
Swiss
Mexico
United States
Colombia
Egypt
34
Unit 1 Personal Identification
Egyptian
3 Read the following e-mail from Fiorella Gazzara.
[email protected]
[email protected]
Hello from Italy
Hello friends,
My name is Fiorella Gazzara and I’m Italian. Italy is a pretty country and I live and go to
school in Rome. Italian people are cool! We eat pizzas, ice cream and spaghetti.
I love to write e-mails to people in different countries. My e-mail address is:
[email protected]
What about you? What’s your name? Where are you from? What’s your e-mail address?
What’s your favorite color?
Write me and tell me about your country and city.
Your friend,
Fiorella Gazzara
804 Piagianni Av.
Rome, Italy
Phone number: 804-439258
Your Turn!
4Respond to Fiorella’s e-mail in the space below. Tell Fiorella your name, where you are from, your
D
favorite color and add any ideas that you have. Check your e-mail with other classmates.
Hello Fiorella,
My name is
and I’m from
World Languages Lesson 6
35
claudia is italian
CONNECTING
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1 Words and Expressions!
• Look at the pictures. Where are these people from? What’s their language? Listen and complete the
sentences below. Follow the example.
Example: I’m Bob. I’m from the U.S. I speak English and I’m 11 years old.
• Look at the number in the parenthesis in each picture. That’s the age of every kid.
(13) Sandra
(13) Iván
(12) Nidia
(11) Sully
2 Draw a line from each kid to the
corresponding country on the map.
Check your answers with a partner.
(11) Bob
(12) Monique
(14) Claudia
(12) Zaid
1. Hi, I’m Sandra. I am Mexican and I speak
2. Hello, I’m Monique. I’m
. I’m
years old. I speak
4. Hi, I’m Zaid. I’m Egyptian. I’m
5. I’m Iván. I speak Russian. I’m from
8. I’m Alex. I’m German. I’m
years old. I speak Italian.
. I’m
6. Hello, I’m Sully. I’m Chinese. I’m
7. Hi! I’m Nidia. I’m
years old.
. I’m
. I’m from France.
years old. I speak
3. I’m Claudia. I’m
(11) Alex
.
years old.
years old. I speak
.
years old. I speak Spanish. I’m from
years old. I speak
.
.
3 Answer with true information about you.
a. Where are you from? (specific information: city and state) b. What’s your native language? • Take turns to say where you are from to your group and your teacher.
36
Unit 1 Personal Identification
.
.
2 Find four famous people in a magazine or newspaper. Where are these famous people from? Write
the nationality, language and country for each celebrity on the corresponding line. Follow the
example and check your answers with a friend.
Name
Rodolfo
Neri Vela
Country
M xico
Nationality
Mexican
Language
Spanish
In English we don´t have accents, but when writing proper
names in Spanish such as México, Andrés, Colón, and others,
we can write the accent. Mexico City is an exemption.
Your Turn!
3 Who is the favorite celebrity in your group? Vote on each celebrity from activity 2
and write the information in the chart.
• With the help of your teacher, reproduce this chart on the board and complete it.
Name of celebrity
Votes
• Write the information about the winner.
Name:
Country:
Nationality:
Language:
Claudia is Italian Lesson 7
37
English
Secundaria 1
English
Jean Denise Salazar Wolfe
Eliseo Gustavo Ramírez Toledo
1
1

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