Autumn Mag-12.indd - Christ Church Lanark

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Autumn Mag-12.indd - Christ Church Lanark
Christ Church Lanark
September - October 2012
Services in Christ Church
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
Sunday 9 September
10.30 Family service/ Noah
18.00 Evening song
Taize day (see extra note)
Sunday 14 October
10.30 Family service/
Thanksgiving/Harvest
18.00 Regional Evening song
Sunday 2 September
10.30 Holy Communion
Sunday 7 October
10.30 Holy Communion
Sunday 16 September
10.30 Holy Communion
and AGM
Sunday 21 October
10.30 Holy Communion
Sunday 28 October
10.30 Holy Communion
Wednesday 19 September
18.00 Bishop / Confirmation
service
Sunday 4 November
10.30 Family service (All Saints)
18.00 Evening song
Sunday 23 September
10.30 Holy Communion
Sunday 30 September
10.30 Holy Communion
Reflection Evenings in the Church
There will be fortnightly “Reflection Evenings” commencing
on Thursday 13 September at 7.30pm. These evenings are for
contemplation and deeper reflection on biblical texts
LUNCH CLUB
Lunch club recommences on Tuesday 4 September and every Tuesday
thereafter at 12.30 in the church hall. (£2.50) All Welcome
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Church News
Church AGM
The AGM of the church will be held after morning service on Sunday 16
September. There will be two vacancies for Vestry as Krystina Korsak and John
Backhouse will be standing down as they have completed three years of service.
The Vestry would like to thank them for all their input. Please consider standing
for Vestry and add your name to the list of nominations at the back of the church.
Special Services
On Wednesday 19 September at 7.30pm, the Bishop will hold a Confirmation
Service in Christ Church.
On Sunday 14 October there will be a Regional Harvest Evensong service at
6.00pm in Christ Church with members from across the region attending.
Craigleith Masonry Conservation will start in late August to repair the masonry
on the north side of the church. This will take approximately 4 weeks and will
cost £20,000.
The Vestry would like to pass on their thanks to Alan Comrie and Peter Glancy
for the painting of corridors in both hall and church vestry.
Next Vestry Meeting: Tuesday 25 September in church at 7.30pm
TAIZE DAY - SINGING, SILENCE, SIMPLICITY and SHARING
Sunday 9 September Led by Rev Jenny Williams
2.00 - 5.00
• Exploring the relevance for us of this ecumenical Christian Community
• Time to learn the songs and play the music
• Time for information and discussion
• Time to experience the worship style and learn how to make that happen.
5.00 - 6.00 Shared simple meal provided
6.00 - 7.00 Service of Worship using format from the Taize Community created by afternoon participants
All welcome to all or part of this event. Donations will be collected on the
day and for catering purposes please let us know if you are coming.
Contact: Rev Dan Gavfert 01555 663065 or Rachel Hill 01555 662190
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The Sixth Day
The emergence of man and woman brings creation to
the fullness. And the birth of humanity contains within
itself the mysteries of all that has been created. Man
and woman includes the masculine and the feminine
of the sun and the moon, the creativeness of the fifth
day, the beauty of the firmament, the creativeness
of nature and the light from the first day. It is the
fullness of creation.
Humanity is created, not out of nothingness, but out of God’s own glory in
the image and likeness of God himself. It is in its essence; of God, not out
of nothing. We are so close to God’s nature that if God should extract from
our life we would cease to exist. We are woven by threads of royal yarn spun
out of God’s nature. At heart we are the love of God, the wisdom of God, the
creativity, the wilderness and imagination of God. God is not present beside
us but as a part of us. We are made of the same substance as God. If we fail to
reflect God’s image in our life we have failed to be truly human.
As we are a part of God’s mystery we are also a mystery. What can not be
known about us is far more than what can be known. The deeper or more we
dig into the human being the more we become aware of our limits in knowledge
about our self. We are a mystery and the heart of what we are always surpasses
our knowledge. No one is to be regarded as an object, for at heart every man
and woman is a holy mystery. As well as seeing God in the terms of a trinity we
can see human beings reflect the same mystery. The essence of our being is the
creator, our universal father and mother.
Man and woman are created in peace and love, in equality and with possibilities
of sharing all Gods gifts together. Somewhere we lost that original blessing. We
lost the innocence of being God’s children. That does not mean that we erased
the holy image of the light within. The divine in us might be hidden or forgotten
but it’s not lost. It might be held in terrible bondage by wrongdoings but at heart
we are the image of God. We may have distorted the image but not lost it.
We have been given the gospel not to tell us about our sinfulness, our flaws and
spots for we are more or less aware about that our self. We have rather, been
given the gospel to tell us more about who we really are.
The garden of God, in which we have been created, has not been destroyed. Nor
has it been abandoned. We may live in a state of exile from it but God forever
dwells in that place and seeks our company.
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He is walking in the garden of our souls and he is searching for us. He is calling
out “Where are you” Gen; 2: 8-9
Take, O take me as I am;
Summon out what I shall be;
Set your seal upon my heart
And live in me.
Dan
Last Sunday Collections
The second quarter collections (April - June) were in aid of the Beniczky
Foundation set up by one of our organists, Dr Susanna Boytha. £500 was
given to Susanna to help her with setting up the foundation. The foundation
is planning to renovate a building in Hungary as a base to promote women’s
education, spiritual and emotional wellbeing and their right to take a place in
society as equals.
Susanna has written to Bobby to thank us for the donation and to tell us that
she is applying to an EU Fund which should cover 95% of the total costs of
renovating the building. She says that our donation came just in time to pay off
the fee for the website (www.beniczkyfoundation.org)
This quarter’s collection will go to Mission Aviation Fellowship which takes
vital medical and humanitarian services to people in remote parts of the world.
Obituary
As many of you know, my dear Mum, Mary Torrance, went to be with the
Lord on 2nd July. I would like to thank all of you in the Christ Church family
for the warm welcome, friendship and fellowship that you gave to her during
the time she became a part of the life of Christ Church. She really loved
going to Church each Sunday, enjoyed visits from Ruth and Dan and felt very
blessed as a member of the congregation. I also feel very loved and supported
by you all as I adjust to my life without her. May God bless you all. With love
on behalf of all my family
Heather Gardiner
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New Babies
Richard and Doreen have a new granddaughter, Erin, who was born on 12 July
to Paula and Scott Brander. A wee sister for Cameron.
Anne and Leonard Grey have a new baby granddaughter, Lauren, who was born
on 13 August to Alisdair and Jenni Grey. A wee sister for Dylan.
Baptisms
Levi Aidan Broadbridge, grandson of Nell
and Nick, and son of Aidan and Anette, was
baptised on 8th July. An American minister,
Rev Kent Gilbert, from Berea, Kentucky
assisted Dan with the baptism.
Jade Rebecca Palmer, granddaughter of Jean and Ken Rance was baptised on
Sunday 12 August
Engagement
Robert Cleary, son of Doreen and Bob, has become engaged to Sarah Jarvis.
Wedding
Hilary and Guthrie’s daughter Fiona was married to Mr Steve Blake at The
Santorini Princess Hotel in Imerovigli on the Greek Island of Santorini on.
Friday 3rd August at 7pm in a beautiful sunset. 30 friends and family attended
the ceremony and a wonderful time was had by all.
Golden Wedding
Congratulations to Anne and John Renwick who will celebrate their Golden
Wedding Anniversary on 15 September.
Graduation
Congratulations to Gugulethu Mathe, daughter of Stanford and Ti who recently
graduated as a doctor.
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Visit to Iona
Columba was from an Irish Royal family but chose the life of a monk. None the
less he managed to quarrel with King Diarmit and left Ireland with 12 companions
and set up a monastery on Iona in 563 from whence he and his missionaries set out
to bring the whole of North Britain into the Christian Church.
“For most monastic centres the visible landscape has altered greatly - with Iona
it is different and we can be sure what we see is much the same as Columba saw”
Written by the Duke of Argyll 1878. Now, despite some extra buildings, this is still
true.
On Saturday 4 August a disparate group of ‘pilgrims’ from Christ Church set off at
the crack of dawn taking two buses and two ferries to reach Iona. We found a warm
welcome at the Bishop’s House, the episcopalian base on the island.
We came together in the services at
the Abbey which was only a short
walk across the fields from Bishop’s
House. We also had daily morning
eucharist and evening compline
services in the beautiful little chapel
in Bishop’s House. There were also
daily meditation sessions led by
John and Krystina, a first for many
in the group.
The Abbey
Bishop’s House
There was plenty of free time to for people to do what they wished, roaming around
the island, on the beaches or climbing the hills. The north beach, the White Strand
of the Monks, is composed of the powdered shells of innumerable sea creatures. We
sat looking out to sea and marvelling at the colours of the sand, sea, and multitudes
of wild flowers on the machair. Some of our group also tried out the island’s golf
course where a major hazard is cow pats on the greens!
The White Strand
Dining in Bishop’s House
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The Golf Course
Monday was the day of the pilgrimage round the island and those of us who were
able set off in great form after breakfast with our packed lunches in our rucksacks.
First stop was Martys’ Bay where a visit from Dan’s ancestors, the Norsemen,
resulted in the sacking of the monastery and the slaughter of fifty monks. We went
over road and track with Dan stopping every so often to recount the historical
happenings, sing a hymn or make a point with regards to life and pilgrimage.
Setting off
The walk was quite
tricky in places
Lunch time saw us at the ‘Bay of the
Coracle’ where Columba first landed.
The shore was a mass of multicoloured
sea polished stones. We each chose two one to cast in the sea with our doubts and
transgressions and the other to take away
in remembrance of our Iona visit and its
meaning. While sitting eating our lunch
on the beach a golden eagle swooped
over our heads calling to us - a magical
moment.
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Those left behind at Bishop’s House
After lunch we walked the stone labyrinth built by other pilgrims. Then it was
time to turn towards the ‘Hill of the Angels’ where Columba was seen to speak
with angels at its peak. Back homewards via a different route to the village and the
ruined Nunnery established in the 13th century and now a flower garden echoing
with past prayers. Then to the Chapel of Oran and the burial place of kings, men
of renown and crofters and finally back to Bishop’s House where a welcome cup
of tea awaited us.
The Nunnery
On Tuesday, nine of the group took a boat trip to Staffa. We were again blessed
with good weather and we saw seals, basking sharks and many types of sea
birds. Staffa is best known for its magnificent basalt columns. Their effect is
overwhelming at An Uamh Binn (Fingals Cave) where some of us entered deep
inside and sang our hearts out to test the fantastic accoustics.
Staffa
and
Fingal’s
Cave
“The peace of Iona whispers to many. Iona has been described as a ‘thin place’
only a tissue paper separating the material from the spiritual. Iona is a Hebridean
jewel in the Atlantic - the changing colours of the sea, the whiteness of the sands
and the quietnes”. Ron Ferguson
Too soon it was time to head back to Lanark. We
had enjoyed wonderful weather and great peace. The
Iona experience is something we will never forget.
Leslie Jenkins
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In 1988 I toured Yugoslavia. In April 1992 the civil war broke out and the country
ceased to exist. In June this year I returned for the first time in 24 years to what
is now known as the independent state of Bosnia Herzegovina. To understand the
words ‘ethnic cleansing’ you have to see the actual reality. Even today villages
have been left totally destroyed, individual houses, church’s and mosques burnt
to the ground and left derelict. The population particularly in rural areas is divided
along religious lines.
In Srebrenica in excess of 8000 Muslim men were murdered because they were
living in an enclave within a Christian Orthodox area. The Republic of Srpska is
now a predominately Christian state within a state.
The city of Mostar suffered substantial
damage. Prior to the war the city was an
example of a modern day ethnically diverse
society. Due to the war the city divided
along ethnic lines with the destruction of
all the bridges across the Neretva River,
including the ‘Stari Most ’bridge which had
been standing for 427 years. The warring
factions commenced the systematic
destruction of various religious symbols,
like the centuries old Christian Orthodox
church on the south side of the city. At this time with the aid of EU funds the
church is being rebuilt and is near completion... The seven bridges crossing the
river have also been rebuilt. A grand ceremony was held for the opening of the
reconstructed ‘Stari Most’ bridge, a very symbolic gesture to the world. A city with
its people united once again, with a new beginning.
Sarajevo like Mostar suffered division
and destruction on a similar scale. In
addition so many people were killed in the city
that space to bury them became acute leading
to people being buried in the city centre park.
Today the graves are still in place as testament
to the suffering the city endured.
Today Mostar and Sarajevo project a
cosmopolitan atmosphere. There is a multi
cultural population striving to put the past to
rest. However it is still sad to reflect on the
deaths, destruction and division that occurred on
the premise of religious beliefs, intolerance and
ignorance.
Elizabeth Baxter
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We Haven’t heard from the Rector of St James the least for a few months so I
thought you might all appreciate his latest epistle!
On how to save electricity in church
The Rectory, St. James the Least
My dear Nephew Darren
Your church certainly seems to have taken to the idea of green electricity with a
vengeance. To have covered the whole of your roof with solar panels was a brave
move, and makes quite a sight – especially when the sun catches them, dazzling
motorists on the by-pass and causing multiple pile-ups. I pity the local pigeons,
who try to land on it and then do a gentle glissade into the gutters.
I know there have been objections to your proposal to erect a wind turbine in your
car park – although no one could claim that it spoils the aesthetic appearance of
your church. Nothing, my dear Darren, could do that.
May I humbly offer you some further suggestions for reducing your electricity
consumption. If you cut your sermons by half, then everyone could go home 20
minutes earlier. Similarly, if you only sang each chorus once instead of your
customary 17 times, that should cut your service times in half. And why have
lighting so good that everyone can see everyone else? That is the last thing our
own congregation ever want to do.
I raised the issue at our last church council meeting, but having only recently gone
on to electricity, there seemed little enthusiasm for yet more change. Major Hastings
still fondly remembers our old acetylene plant in the churchyard, destroyed during
one Mattins when the verger was unaware of the gas leak and lit up a cigarette. We
still occasionally find pieces of his cassock when mowing the grass.
Mr Prentice, with a slightly malicious gleam, suggested building a treadmill, to
be worked by the Young Farmers – which would also keep them out of the pub
while Evensong was taking place. I couldn’t help feeling that our Ladies Group
would have far more determination to keep the thing rotating – probably providing
enough energy to light the entire County. I was tempted to suggest we invite the
vicar from our adjoining parish, St. Agatha’s, to preach every Sunday, as that
would fill our church with more than enough hot air.
I finally stopped all further discussion on the subject when a solar panel consultant
arrived at the Rectory and began his sales pitch with the phrase: “I’ve come to
convert you”.
Your loving uncle,
Eustace
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Hilary Rankin
Tel: 663307
A. Comrie
R. Marshall
R. McIntosh
H. Rankin
J. Rance
K. Rance
J. Rance
K. Rance
Jean Rance
Tel: 662461
R. Marshall
N. Broadbridge
M. Gibson
J. Patrick
D. Evans
N. Mathe
M. Caddell
A. Renwick
E. McAuslane
L. Rickards
Rosemary Marshall
Tel: 663774
S. Russell
D. Evans
L. Jenkins
N. Broadbridge
R. Marshall
S. Russell
E. McAuslane
R. McIntosh
D. Evans
L. Jenkins
2012
2 Sept
9 Sept
16 Sept
23 Sept
30 Sept
CHURCH
CLEANING
TEA/COFFEE
SIDESPERSONS
DATE
12
25 Sept
Hilary & Doreen E.
D. Dixon
R. Burgon
A. Brown
R. Evans
11 Sept
Sandra & Ruby
18 Sept
Irene & Ruth
G. Rankin
COMMUNION
CUP
(Soup)
4 Sept
Jamie & Janet
Doreen Dixon
Tel: 750295
LUNCH CLUB
Hilary Rankin
Tel: 663307
N. Broadbridge
M. Gibson
J. Patrick
A. Comrie
R. Marshall
R. McIntosh
H. Rankin
J. Rance
K. Rance
Jean Rance
Tel: 662461
J. Rance
K. Rance
L. Jenkins
N. Broadbridge
R. Marshall
J. Cox
M. Gibson
J. Patrick
D. Evans
N. Mathe
M. Caddell
A. Renwick
Rosemary Marshall
Tel: 663774
N. Broadbridge
R. Marshall
R. McIntosh
S. Russell
L. Jenkins
E. McAuslane
D. Evans
R. Marshall
R. McIntosh
N. Broadbridge
L. Jenkins
S. Russell
2012
7 Oct
14 Oct
21 Oct
28 Oct
4 Nov
11 Nov
CHURCH
CLEANING
TEA/COFFEE
SIDESPERSONS
DATE
13
D. Dixon
30 Oct
Hilary & Doreen E.
R. Evans
R. Burgon
23 Oct
Connie & Doreen D.
6 Nov
Janet & Jamie
A. Brown
G. Rankin
R. McIntosh
COMMUNION
CUP
16 Oct
Ethel & Ruth
9 Oct
Ruby & .....
(Soup)
2 Oct
Jamie & Janet
Doreen Dixon
Tel: 750295
LUNCH CLUB
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R. Evans
D. Dixon
J. Hill
L. Rickards
P. Glancy
K. Korsak
Trinity XVI
Trinity XVII
23 Sept
30 Sept
----------
J. Rance
S. Cardwell
READERS
Trinity XV
Trinity XIV
Trinity XIII
DIARY
16 Sept
9 Sept
2 Sept
2012
DATE
---------James
3 : 1 - 12
James
3 : 13 - 4:3
7 - 8A
James
5 : 13 - 20
Isaiah
50 : 4 - 9A
Jeremiah
11 : 18 - 20
Numbers
11 : 4-6; 10-16;
24-29
James
1 : 17 - 24
EPISTLE
Genesis
Chapter 7
Deuteronomy
4 : 1 - 2; 6 - 9
O.T.
Mark
9 : 38 - 50
Mark
9 : 30 - 37
Mark
8 : 27 - 38
--------
Mark
7:1-8
GOSPEL
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Trinity XX
Trinity XXII
Family Service
All Saints
21 Oct
28 Oct
4 Nov
11 Nov
Family Service
Harvest
14 Oct
REMEMBRANCE
3 Before Advent
Trinity XVIII
DIARY
7 Oct
2012
DATE
K. Rance
---------
Revelation
21 : 1 - 6A
--------
Hebrews
7 : 23 - 28
Jeremiah
31 : 7 - 9
R. Burgon
R. Marshall
---------
Hebrews
5 : 1 - 10
Isaiah
53 : 4 - 12
R. Evans
J. Backhouse
---------
---------
---------
--------
EPISTLE
Hebrews
1:1-4
2 : 5 - 12
O.T.
Genesis
2 : 18 - 24
M. Symonds
R. Cleary
READERS
John
11 32 - 44
Matthew
5 : 3 - 11
Mark
10 : 46 - 52
Mark
10 : 35 - 45
John
10 : 22 - 29
Mark
10 : 13 - 16
GOSPEL
Christ Church Lanark
Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway
Bishop: The Very Rev Dr Gregor Duncan
Rector: Rev Dan Gafvert
Church Office: 01555 663065
Lay Readers: Robert (Bobby) Burgon, Richard Evans
Pastoral Care Co-ordinator: Ruth McIntosh
Adult & Child Protection Officer, Connie Johnstone 01899 308764
Vestry:
Jamie Hill - Rector’s Warden
01555 662190
Jean Rance - People’s Warden
01555 662461
Richard Evans - Lay Representative
01555 664236
John Backhouse
01555 664610
Nell Broadbridge
01555 662212
Heather Gardiner
01899 308331
Krystyna Korsak
01555 664610
Lesley Jenkins
01555 664692
Sylvia Russell
01555 662676
Hon Secretary - Anne Glen
7 Andrew Place, Carluke, ML18 5UD
01555 772720
Hon Treasurer - Robert Burgon
141 Hyndford Road, Lanark, ML11 8BG
01555 662986
Please remember Christ Church in your will as an act of thanksgiving
for the Church.
For confidential advice please speak to the Treasurer
Web site: www.christchurchlanark.com
Magazine and Website Editor: Sylvia Russell: 01555 662676
E-Mail: [email protected]
Registered Scottish Charity: No SCO 14937
Magazine cost: £1 (£10 pa) / by post £15 pa.
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