Jallikattu, une feria À l`Indienne/Jallikattu, the

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Jallikattu, une feria À l`Indienne/Jallikattu, the
Every year, at the harvest celebration,
over 100,000 Indians in Tamil Nadu
state participate in the Jallikattu, the
Indian version of the corrida. Over 200
bulls are released gradually into a
crowd anxious to prove its manhood.
Apparently, the rules are easy: wins
the one able to stay on the back of the
bull or hang from its horns for more
than 50 meters. In 2006: 5 casualties
and over 300 severely injured
participants.
Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting!
Photos and text ©Petrut Calinescu/Lightmediation
Contact - Thierry Tinacci - Lightmediation Photo Agency +33 (0)6 61 80 57 21 [email protected]
1071-07: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-01: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-02: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-03: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-04: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-11: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-05: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting. A gift for the winner
1071-06: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-07: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-08: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-03: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
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1071-10: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-11: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-12: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-08: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
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1071-14: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
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1071-12: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
1071-01: Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting
Jallikattu, the indian bull fighting!
Every year, at the harvest celebration, over 100,000 Indians in Tamil Nadu
state participate in the Jallikattu, the Indian version of the corrida. Over 200
bulls are released gradually into a crowd anxious to prove its manhood.
Apparently, the rules are easy: wins the one able to stay on the back of the
bull or hang from its horns for more than 50 meters. On top of a bamboo
observation point, an announcer, who is also a referee, comments on any
movement the bull makes in the crowd. The show, that lasts for about 10
hours, builds on intensity as time goes by.
The bulls are released gradually, sometimes more at one time. They are
heavier than the European bulls, their horns are sharpened especially for
this day and have been served some alcohol beforehand, to be more
excited. Unlike at the Spanish corrida, these bulls don't end up dead at the
end and neither too mistreated. As soon as the bull is released, its owner
runs after him, generously slapping the participants who have been violent
with the bull, especially if it is a small animal. Animal protection association
lobby every year to forbid this type of entertainment, but it seems that the
Indians are the ones suffering here: in 2006, there were 5 casualties and
over 300 severely injured participants. At the end of the track, an ambulance
waiting to be stuffed with injured people would leave regularly for nearest
clinic. The bulls chaotic raids in the crowd make most of the victims to be
by-standers. Usually, the participants are bull owners and they know how to
protect themselves.
Even if the awards are just caps, pots or some tin cupboards and the
winners look ecstatic to receive them, it is not just about that. Is a sport to
prove your manhood and bachelors get extra points in their race to
marriage. For a while, they will be looked up as great public figures and their
villages will talk about them for at least a few months after the contest.

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