Music and the Battalion - Mormon Battalion Association

Comments

Transcription

Music and the Battalion - Mormon Battalion Association
MCRHOH BATTALIOH SONG
Thomas Horria
AdraCdbti
fe^Uj^J j|J J ^fe^
F=5=
All hail the toave BattalionI Oie noble, valiant band,
0*er Bany a barren desert Our weary ftet haTe trod
Va settled hare in Utah, Upon a sterila soil,
Vhat tho* the wicked hate xa, and 'gainst our rights cont«nd|
Oar sens are growing tdghty, And they are spreading forth,
^rffi-/
i
^
:t
=f=^=FF
I^A^JU-^-^^^lTPJ:^
5^
Stat went and served oar ooontry Vith willlrg heart anl'hand.
Xo find, where, miaolested, Cie Saints can worship God.
And fay our faith and patience And hard, unflinching toilt
And, thnxigh their vile esgrcssions. Car brotherbood woald rendl
Xo mltiply oar noobera And beentify the earth«
S
L:,,'
I I i:U-'{
1 I J I I M, J' .
i^
Altho* we're called disloyal ?y aany a tongae and pen.
We've built np snuxy cities — We're twdlding temples, toot
And thro' the daily blessings Oar Father, God, bestows.
Hie keys of truth and knowledge. And power to va beleng}
All Bail, the brave BattalionI Ibe noble, valiant band.
is
J I 8!?J-
t
t.
I —r-----1-
m
X
f=F
3:
3:
^
d:
¥^
ͣj^
ffl-i^.:j.4^
Oar nation boasts no soldiers So true as 'Vornon" Don*
Whioit prove to all beholders What 'TloiBon" hands can do.
Ibe once forbidding desert llow blosscns as the rose.
And we'll extend oar borders And make our bulwarks strong.
Ihat went and served our camtir With willing heart and hand.
I
OlOlwa Wun M iniu««
tejjc*
i
I
^
I - I J-
J.
The rank for the above men was Musician; they were not Privates. They were paid $8.00
per month; privates received $7.00 per month.
The identities of the musicians and the role they played for the Battalion was given by Levi
Hancock in his journal entry for July 31,1846. However, he failed to identify the musicians of
Company B.
LEVI HANCOCK: "31 day, at 7 o'clock marched tune Jeffersons Liberty passed through Weston
played the tune over the river to charley the whole town looking at the doors the musition had not
kept so good time before the people looked astonished while Elisha Averet, Allen, Jackson
seemed to receive fi-esh breeses as it were from the mouth of the father of spirits which inspired
them with the most perfect sound on the fife while Sprge Erie and Smith and Day with listning
eares that ketched the sound with hands and fingers clenched tight around the drumstick beat the
accents with most tremendious stroke which were even and were hansomly measured with left
foot down at the beginning of every bar all was silence while five hundred mormons passed and
turned there comers in the hart of town camped one mile out of town"
William B. Pace made some comments as the Battalion passed through St. Joseph, MO.
WILLIAM PACE: July 31,1846. "... On approaching Western Mo. Col. Allen being desirous of
showing ofFhis Mormon boys to the Missourians selected Levi W. Hancock and Elisha Averett as
fifers, and Jesse Earl and myself as drummers at the head of the command, being two of the
smallest boys in the Battalion about 14 Vi years old we were of course very conspicuous.
However, I do not recollect of ever feeling prouder or weighing more in my imagination in life,
than on that occasion.. .The march through the city and suburbs was about three miles of
continuous beating so when we were through we were wet as drowned rats from perspiration yet
it paid in vanity for many callers at Ft. Leavenworth the next day requested introduction to those
two little boys that drummed through the city of Western Mo."
The effectiveness of the drums is evident from comments by Henty Standage on January
30,1847.
HENRY STANDAGE: January 30,1857. "Quite misty and foggy, heard the Drum at some
distance and made tracks for camp. Reach'd camp about 8 AM rested for the rest of the day at
San Diego Mission."
MARCHING TUNES AND OTHERS PLAYED BY THE BATTALION
Several of the tunes the musicians played have been identified by the Battalion journal
writds. Perhaps the best-known is the one mentioned by Henry Bigler in his journal entry of
Tuesday, July 21,1846.
BIGLER: "On the 21" of July at twelve o'clock Captain Allen took up the line of march
for Fort Leavenworth, two hundred miles distant, the men keeping time to the tune of "The Giri 1
/ Left Behind Me." To me this was a solemn time as also to others, though to a casual observer we
may not have shown it. Leaving families, friends, near and dear relatives, not knowing for how
long and perhaps to see them no more in this life, I bid my folks farewell and did not see them
again for nine years."
Levi Hancock and others also made reference to this same tune, played as they marched
through St. Joseph, MO. This tune seems to have been one of the favorite marching tunes.
The tune, *The Giri I Left Behind Me," was a popular fife tune of the 18* century. It is
said to be of Irish origin, or adapted from the popular English song "Brighton Camp." It may
date back to 1758 and was very familiar by 1770. It became popular in the American colonies as
a stage song, as a country dance or square dance tune, and as a song of farewell among pioneers.
Several opinions exist concerning the origin of its popularity. One tradition states that a certain
Irish bandmaster, serving with a British regiment in Southern England, was such a philanderer that
he was perpetually bidding good-bye to some local sweetheart. As a joke, the band formed the
habit of playing "The Girl I Left Behind Me" every time the regiment changed its station. Thus
the tune became the recognized music for all occasions of military departure and is still so
designated. General George Custer ordered it played whenever the 7* Cavalry went out for
action. According to custom, it was played the morning he went out to his death. Today it is part
of the marching medley each June at the graduation ceremonies at West Point.
At least three different sets of lyrics exist for this tune. One set dates back to
Revolutionary War times, one dates from the pioneer times of the general westward movement,
and one is a little more general that was collected by the DUP. Instructions for a country dance
formation are also available.
James V. Williams, a private in Company E, mentioned two tunes in his writings: "JimAlong-Joe" and "Yankee Doodle."
"Yankee Doodle" was probably the most famous popular song in the American Colonies.
Various ori^ns are given, but the most likely source of the tune was an English nursery rhyme,
"Lucy Locket." The song probably came to the colonies during the French and Indian War under
the following circumstances. Richard Shuckburg, a British army physician, was so amused at the
sight of the ragged and disheveled troops under General Braddock that he decided to mock them.
In or about 1755 he improvised a set of nonsense lyrics to an English tune with which he had long
been familiar; he palmed off this concoction on the colonial troops as the latest English army
song. Dr. Shuckburg's nonsense song was "Yankee Doodle." It grew so popular with the British
troops in the colonies that for the next two decades they used it to taunt the colonists, sometimes
singing it loudly outside church during religious services.
With the outbreak of the Revolution, the colonials appropriated "Yankee Doodle." It
became a favorite in every camp and was frequently heard in battle, in defeat and victory It was
played at the final surrender of General Comwallis at Yorktown. It has been used as a basis for a
number of concert pieces.
According to Williams, "Jim Along Joe" was used for sick call. When the men heard the
tune they knew the "Doctor" would see them. The very catchy tune was an early play-party song
that suited action to words. The chorus especially allows for a variety of movements.
Levi W. Hancock, the only musician who wrote a journal, identified several marching
tunes including "California March," "Jefferson's Liberty," "Over the River to Charlie," "Rogue's
March," and "White Cockade."
"White Cockade" was another popular dance/military tune of the 1700's. This dance tune
takes its name from the rosette/cockade or knot worn on the hat by servants of officers in the
army or navy or diplomatic corps. The cockade of the House of Stuart was white. Military tunes
played a prominent part in the hours of fun and relaxation. The melody was published in 1776.
No words were found for the tune, but instructions for the contradance formation are available.
The tune "Over the Water to Chariie," (Hancock says river, not water), dates from the
time Prince Charles attempted to take the crov^m of Britain in 1745. Many of his followers wrote
innumerable songs to gain lus favor. He was a great traveler, a rather democratic soul, and a very
jovial person. He was extremely popular with the people. He had been in exile in France.
Charles had many followers in Scotland who aided him for a time. Eventually they fell to fighting
among themselves. Charles left England for France where he died. Hence, "Over the Water to
Chariie."
"Jefferson's Liberty" that Hancock mentions is probably the song "Jefferson and Liberty,"
a campaign song written for the election of 1800, expressing the thought that Jeffersonian
America would be the best and freest land in the worid and definitely the country of the future.
The author of the words is unknown but they hail JefFerson as a champion of liberty and deride
the Alien and Sedition Acts. It became one of America's eariiest successful campaign songs,
promising the emergence of a new democracy through Jefferson's election. The tune is an Irish
jig-
Military punishment, very strict in the 18* century, was carried out to the tune of
"Rogue's March." Persons convdcted of crimes or breaches of discipline were ceremonially
punished in front of their re^ments or brigades. Lashings, running the gauntlet, and executions
all were performed by or before the assembled troops. Where the crime was sufficiently
serious to warrant dismissal from the service, but not the penalty of death, the culprit was
"drummed from the army." Such offenses included stealing, assault, desertion, cursing the
American army, drinking on duty, aiding the enemy. "Miscreants, their coats turned inside out as
a sign of dishonor and their hands tied behind their backs, were paraded in front of the regimental
formation to the tune of "Rogue's March" and literally kicked out the gate by the youngest
drummer." One member of the Battalion received this punishment.
HANCOCK: "14 day June... this day at 5 oclock poll at retreat the sentence of John Allen was
read and carried into exicution by the order of the general at Montira his head was half shaved and
drumed out of town was under the tune of roges march drove across the rio and ordered not to
return if he did he was to be put in irons and put in the calaboos and cept during the war"
/' ELIJAH ELMER: "June 14,1847 -1 witnessed a scene that is not common among us to see and
that was a man drunmied out of the service, with half of his head shaved for deserting his post and
coming into town and getting drunk. This a pretty sad sight to see a man turned out in an
enemy's country without a cent and no clothes, and then told not to be seen anywhere around
here under pain of imprisonment, during the war, took nine months of his pay from him; enemies
all around him and all know him by the mark. He could not come with us until he was baptised
and so he went forward and was baptised, then he was received into the battalion and come
through with us. He was a very bad tempered man. Therewasnodoubt he got his just dues. He
was a disagreeable man. On the road out here, he lost his gun and got himself lost and was
several days without anything to eat. He said, "the Indians took his gun from him. " The captain
game him another, and he pawned that for liquor, when he deserted his post. His pay was
stopped from September up until now, so that he got only one and a half months pay for the
whole year's work of service.
"He has been served so before, so he says, and it is said by Col. Turner that he killed a
man when he was in the service before; that John Allen is not his name, so he must have altered
his name for some mischief before this time."
HENRY STAND AGE: "14. Work'd on the fort. This afternoon G. [J.] Allen had half his head
shaved and at retreat was drummed out of town, being marched between 4 sentinels in charge of a
Corporal. Drummers and fifers in the rear. He was marched through town at the point of the
bayonet and the musicians playing the Rogue's March. Not allowed to return during the present
war, and liable to be taken up and kept in irons till the close of the war."
In addition to the marching tunes used frequently by the army, Levi Hancock and Azariah
Smith wrote original words to tunes that were already known to the members of the Battalion.
"In These Hard Times" was written by Azariah Smith while the Battalion was quartered at San
Diego. Several verses express the difficulties of their long march and end with the hope of
reuniting mth friends and loved ones.
Levi Hancock wrote several songs, including "Death and the Wolves," "The Desert
Route," and 'The Bull Fight on the San Pedro," sung to the tune of "Old Dan Tucker." At least
two versions of this song exist.
Mormon Battalion Farewell Part>'
There was no sentimental affectation at their leave-taking. The afternoon before was
appropriated to a farewell ball; and a more merry dancing rout I have never seen, though the
company went without refreshments, and their ball-room was of the most primitive. It was the
custom, whenever the larger camps rested for a few days together, to make great arbors, or
boweries, as they called them, of poles, and brush, and wattling, as places of shelter for their
meetings of devotion or conference. In one of these, where the ground had been trodden firm and
hard by the worshipers of the popular Father Taylor's precinct, was gathered now the mirth and
beauty of the Mormon Israel.....
With the rest, attended the Elders of the Church wthin call, including nearly all the chiefs
of the High Council, vwth their wives and children. They, the gravest and most trouble-worn,
seemed the most anxious of any to be the first to throw off the burden of heavy thoughts. Their
leading off the dancing in a great double cotillion, was the signal bade the festi\dty commence. To
the canto of debonair violins, the cheer of horns, the jingle of sleigh bells, and the jovial snoring of
the tambourine, they did dance! None of your minuets or other mortuary processions of gentles
in etiquette, tight shoes, and pinching gloves, but the spirited and scientific displays of our
venerated and merry grandparents, who were not above following the fiddle to the Fox-chase Inn,
or Gardens of Gray's Ferry. French fours, Copenhagen jigs, Virginia reels, and the like forgotten
figures executed with the spirit of people too happy to be slow, or bashful, or constrained. Light
hearts, lithe figures, and li^t feet, had it their own way firom an early hour till after the sun had
dipped behind the sharp sky-line of the Omaha hills. Silence was then called, and a well cultivated
mezzo-soprano voice, belon^ng to a young lady with fmr face and dark eyes, gave with quartette
accompaniment a little song, the notes of which I have been unsuccessful in repeated efforts to
obtain since-a version of the text, touching to all earthly wanderers:
"By the rivers of Babylon we sat down and wept."
"We wept when we remembered Zion."
Taken from A Concise History of the Mormon Battalion in the Mexican War by Daniel Tyler,
p. 80-81.
"N
X
THE BULL FIGHT ON THE SAN PEDRO.
BY
1.FVI
W.
HANCOCK.
THE DOLL Fionr OK THE SAN PEOnO.
With brutal strength and iron will.
Poised on his horns with master skill,
Under command of C!oloncl Cooke,
When passuig down San Pedro's brook,
Where cane-grass, growing rank and liigh,
"Was waving as the breeze pass'd by:
A bull, one mule o'er mule did throw.
Then made the latter's entrails flow.
One bull was shot and when he fell,
A butcher ran his blood to spill,
The bull threw up his horns and caught
There, as we gain'd ascending ground.
Out from the grass, with fearful bound,
A wild, ferocious bull appear'd.
And challeng'd fight, with horns uprear'd.
"Slop, stop!" said one, "just see that brute I"
"Hold!" was responded, "let me shoot."
Ho flashed, but failed to fire the gun—
Both stood their ground, and would not run.
The man exclaimed, "I want some meat,
I think that bull will do to cat;"
And saying thus, again ho shot
And fell'd the creature on the spot:
It soon arose to run away.
And then the guns began to play;
All hands at work—amid the roar.
The bull was dropp'd to rise no more.
But lo! it did not end the fight—
A furious herd rushed into sight.
And then the bulls and men around,
Seemed all resolved to stand their ground.
In nature's pasture, all unfenc'd,
A dreadful battle was commcnc'd;
We knew we must ourselves defend.
And each, to others, aid extend.
The bulls with madden'd fury raged—
The men a skillful warfare waged;
Tho' some, from danger, had to flee
And hide or clamber up a tree.
A bull at one man made a pass.
Who hid himself amid the grass.
And breathless lay until the brute
Pass'd him and took another shoot.
The bulls rushed on like unicorns.
And gored the mules with, piercing liorns,
As if the battle ground to gain,
When men and mules should all be slain.
The butcher's cap, ui)on the spot.
"Give up my cap!" exclaimed the man.
And chased the bull, as on ho ran:
Tho butcher beat, and with his knife
Cut the bull's tliroat and closed his life.
0. Cox, from one bull's horns was thrown
Ten feet in air: when he came down,
A gaping flesh-wound met his eye—
The vicious beast had gored his thigh.
The Colonel and his staff were there,
Mounted, and witnessing tlie war:
A bull, one hundred yards away.
Eyed Colonel Cooke as easy prey.
But Corp'ral Frost stood bravely byj
And watch'd the bull with steady eye;
The brute approach'd near and more near.
But Frost betray'd no sign of fear.
The Colonel ordered him to run—
Unmov'd ho stood with loaded gun;
The bull came up with daring tread,
When near his feet, Frost shot him dead.
AVhatever cause, we did not know,
But something prompted them to go;
Wlien all at once in frantic fright.
The bulls ran bellowing out of sighL
And when the fearful fight was o'er.
And sound of muskets heard no more.
At least a score of bulls were found.
And two mules dead upon the ground.
"i*ii iifMi^wr li't • '-'ii
751
MOR.MONS
WESTERN SONCS AND BALLADS
Come, all pu young men and.uke my advice.
To never play pokerl go to throwing any dice.
For if you do. you'll get too much of rye.
And you'll land in the calaboose to root. hog. or die.
f ON
{•
for*
ay
la
tnm ikara
tKa *pria< •(
do«a
Sn.
IV.
»y-«i».
to
C
MORMONS
On the Road to California (The Buffalo Bull Fight)
lb<Unca..>«U acccatwl J. > 92*
' "
r
' ͣ ..
m^ J 1J
J
n« Ibr-
,ll I
If
tkiac far
ͣ•
Jllj. I '
ma
t*
rMC,h»(..
i
r^
mmm, led. by
J
;—-
C>Ie«
. —1—1
a«l CsoU,
IhiU
''iJ'JJj J^ljlj
•r
4it.
out in the country, commenced to making hay,
iges that I got was a dollar and a half a day.
ippers after night, and there's no use to cry,
s no me of whining, it was root, bog, or die.
vent from there down to Bellew,
vith a stranger who helped to put me through,
in a game of poker and he give the cards a sly.
; soon got my money, then it's root, hog; or die.
^t mad and I begin to swear.
1 down the com juice till I got on a tear.
d of the dty who was standing nearby,
^ ^e to the calaboose to root, hog, or die.
took me out to court next morning just at ten.
ClT>> tal
atrim
mi
tl»m^
iay
t>aa» taiaa.
Just as our mules begun to pull.
Out &om the grass there jumped a bulL
As soon as he appeared In sight.
He raised bis head all ready for a fight.
set the judge and a dozen other men.
ined me twenty dollars, and I found it rather high,
se's no use o£ whining, it was root, hog. or die.
>ng about then I begin to repent,
ined me twenty dollars and I didn't have a cent,
uck would have it. a friend was standing by,
: paid off my fine, saying root, hog; or
r by R. R. Denoon, Springfield. Missoui
7 Robertson,
D. C
WESTERN SONCS AND BALLADS
.'\rchive of American Folk
Record No. 33« Al.
I saw a man as I passed by,
A bull had hooked hira in that side;
Transcrib
'
And from that side tlie blood did pour.
Three inches deep it made a gore.
When this bull battle it \fM o'er
'>>N-?*,V(fe:*?::;*. -^
And sound of muskeu heard no more.
We went next day and there found slain
Four mules, twelve bulls upon the plain.
Echo Canyon
Usderau J » 138
Sttntms
la
tU
of
CM* yoa
Ed>.
o. tkarc'a a
raiU road
-5—
-.C-i-----J=3=
a>
'
b
F
-M
,
^
r
\
-^^
J
J
ͣ
ifjjD^ sonSoif 3X{± :Si 3idNVX3
E:£fi:ij^;^t^:?^^E^i^=E^^^:^^^^^^^^S
^l^i^^^|P^^^^^^^k^^i^^^^>
:5:-ttc;p
SiS*SSSi
i
-*----^
->(--------K-^--------------T
•-——'—r"------1-----«r'—---------r'-----ͣ«-—-r
i-
—
^^tzi=tL
jt=iC
=^
i'tit^i
:<agA'zJ££p?«Syf*gba?fcc.
EicirSafrirrjeigfe
—s—a—"—a—a
<L^
j—a—^"h-----m
v^—v~a—^"s—a"
S
—*—f*-
I m n
:Er=3fe
S
~/r jfil___TT
-V—H—Jt^
t
^3:^
t J^K*
S
^1
» • #'' rru:—ii
-ͣT'-----ar—-r
-<ͣͣ /•#
1
^
I.TU(I
i
'fM
i&rnfi
:^^ *^
i
[ozi-rj
•V>:'
263
Ballads, Folk Songs, and Ditties
EH5
^^
^^
1. O^vor the wa-ter and
2. Char-lie
o -ver the sea,
loves good
cake
i^
O-vor tha wa-ter to
and ale,
%
§^
J'
p'
-
-
y-—«
5^5
xrrs:=a
un-der my arm. And I'll
kiss the girls,_ Sweet
cc
To make a cake for Charlie.
z
?3
0
Jefferson and Liberty
S
i
^
gloom-y
i:
reign of ter-ror
nl^t be-fore
^
tors and spies. Its
i
£
^*-i-*^
^ JJJI I i>J
herds of harpies are no more.
^
^
Ee- joice, Co-lum-bla's sons,
4
us flies,The
now Is ofer;Its gags.in-qui- si-
It
'#
£
1
f U** *
^
E
#
i^
go" o-ver to Char-lie.
as sug - ar can - dy.
Pll have none of your Indian meal,
I'll have none of your barley,
Pll have only the best of white flour,
=K
Char-lie,
Ip' p'
^^^
The_
^
Char-lie loves good bran-dy,
n
I'lltaka ray pet-ti-coat
Char - lie loves to
^H5
X
*^*
£
re-joioej To
r p r pi{J] J jji J'r
^
^-rants ney-er bend the knee. But join with heart and
^ ^^ ^m
^^
JIM-ALONG JOSEY
y Lively
-fCTT
»*
ͣ^-----<»
^
HI
a»
^
Chorus
U" 'U- r
J^ iC__g-f^i-TOj II
(The chorus of above play-party song is the same as
fiddle tune "Run, Nigger, Run." Sec page 37)
THE WHITE COCKADE
For fife and dnuna play melody octave
^
i
»
»
g
»
»
g
m -*
*
s
tflcl 33g
o
/TN
#
W
* a
S
S
m^^
^
#
I
9__^. CZ Z ..jL
-g
g
* g J bI
' ««ͣ
^
»
g
i
d ' m
ti
znnm
^^rVfta-TTft]^^^
'I'HE WHITE COCKADF
For fife and drums play melody octave
S
i^-»
^g^a^
o»
p^
5^
^'*
'
i
^
^^TFrnrrg^
ͣ' N.....'i I I' (^^
lW'T«">.^l I I ,.^' f!irPp , ,»»-^4-l-4—l-cr^tT4J-
MCRHOH BATTALIOH SONG
Thomas Horria
AdraCdbti
fe^Uj^J j|J J ^fe^
F=5=
All hail the toave BattalionI Oie noble, valiant band,
0*er Bany a barren desert Our weary ftet haTe trod
Va settled hare in Utah, Upon a sterila soil,
Vhat tho* the wicked hate xa, and 'gainst our rights cont«nd|
Oar sens are growing tdghty, And they are spreading forth,
^rffi-/
i
^
:t
=f=^=FF
I^A^JU-^-^^^lTPJ:^
5^
Stat went and served oar ooontry Vith willlrg heart anl'hand.
Xo find, where, miaolested, Cie Saints can worship God.
And fay our faith and patience And hard, unflinching toilt
And, thnxigh their vile esgrcssions. Car brotherbood woald rendl
Xo mltiply oar noobera And beentify the earth«
S
L:,,'
I I i:U-'{
1 I J I I M, J' .
i^
Altho* we're called disloyal ?y aany a tongae and pen.
We've built np snuxy cities — We're twdlding temples, toot
And thro' the daily blessings Oar Father, God, bestows.
Hie keys of truth and knowledge. And power to va beleng}
All Bail, the brave BattalionI Ibe noble, valiant band.
is
J I 8!?J-
t
t.
I —r-----1-
m
X
f=F
3:
3:
^
d:
¥^
ͣj^
ffl-i^.:j.4^
Oar nation boasts no soldiers So true as 'Vornon" Don*
Whioit prove to all beholders What 'TloiBon" hands can do.
Ibe once forbidding desert llow blosscns as the rose.
And we'll extend oar borders And make our bulwarks strong.
Ihat went and served our camtir With willing heart and hand.
I
OlOlwa Wun M iniu««
tejjc*
i
I
^
I - I J-
J.

Similar documents