June 2016 - MU Extension

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June 2016 - MU Extension
LAKE AREA
Monthly Newsletter
June 2016
Volume 10, Issue 6
2016 Club Officers
Suzanne Albright, President Phone: 573-207-0044
E-mail: [email protected]
Susan Osgood, Vice President Phone: 816-289-4774
E-mail: [email protected]
Nancy Hall, Secretary Phone: 913-221-9007
E-mail: [email protected]
Roni Vollmer, Treasurer Phone: 314-435-8803
E-mail: [email protected]
Past President, Tamara Jorstad: Phone: 573-723-2055
E-mail: [email protected]
Standing Committee Chairs
2016 Garden Walk Gail Conavay, 573-286-5064
[email protected]
Suzanne Albright, 573-207-0044
suzannealbri[email protected]
Club Photographer Glenda Hinrichs, 573-964-5601
[email protected]
Historian
Sally Burke, 573-480-7815
[email protected]
Hospitality
Rita Burks, 573-434-4144
[email protected]
Membership
Tamara Jorstad, 573-723-2055
[email protected]
Year Book
OPEN
MU EXT & MOMA Winnie McKinley, 573-793-6231
[email protected]
Newsletter
Charli Allee, 573-480-1915
[email protected]
Projects
Charmaine E. Guyot, 206-883-0279
[email protected]
Ways & Means
Mildred Webster
573-363-5650 or 573-346-7211
Miller County Extension
P O Box 20
Tuscumbia, MO 65082
Phone/Fax 573.369.2394
Thanks to all the
Lake Area
Master Gardeners
who helped make our
2016
10th Annual Garden Walk
a Great Success!
PAGE 2
L AKE A RE A MA S TE R G A RD ENE R ’S NE W SL ET T ER
June Gardening Tips
Ornamentals
Week 1: Deadhead bulbs and spring flowering perennials as blossoms fade.

Weeks 2-3: When night temper atur es stay above 50 degr ees, br ing houseplants outdoor s for the summer .


Weeks 2-3: Apply a balanced r ose fer tilizer after the fir st show of blooms is past.

Weeks 2-3 Apply or ganic mulches as the soil war ms. These will conser ve moistur e, discour age weeds, and
enrich the soil as they decay.

Weeks 2-3: Apply a second spr ay for bor er contr ol on har dwood tr ees.

Weeks 3-4: Softwood cuttings can be taken fr om tr ees and shr ubs as the spr ing flush of gr owth is beginning
to mature.

Weeks 3-4: Continue spr aying r oses with a fungicide to pr event black spot disease.

Weeks 3-4: Tir ed of the same old foundation plantings? Find fr esh ideas among the ever gr eens planted in
the Dwarf Conifer collection.

Weeks 3-4: Tr ees and shr ubs may still be fer tilized befor e J uly 4th.
Weeks 2-3: Rhizomatous begonias ar e not just for shade. Many var ieties, especially those with br onze
foliage, do well in full sun if given plenty of water and a well-drained site.

Weeks 3-4: Pr uning of spr ing flower ing tr ees and shr ubs should be completed before the month's end.
Lawns

Weeks 1-4: Mow lawns fr equently enough to r emove no mor e than one-third the total height per mowing.
There is no need to remove clippings unless excessive.

Weeks 1-4: Gr adually incr ease the mowing height of zoysia lawns thr oughout the summer . By September ,
the mowing height should be 2 to 2.5 inches.

Weeks 1-4: Mow bluegr ass at 2 to 3.5 inch height. Tur f gr asses gr owing in shaded conditions should be
mowed at the higher recommendations.

Weeks 1-2: Zoysia can be fer tilized now while actively gr owing. Do not exceed 2-3 pounds of actual nitrogen
fertilizer per l000 sq. ft. per year.

Weeks 3-4: When using any gas power ed equipment, be sur e to allow the engine a few minutes to cool befor e
refilling empty fuel tanks.
Vegetables


Weeks 2-4: Soaker hoses and dr ip ir r igation systems make the most efficient use of water dur ing dr y times.

Weeks 2-3: Star t seedlings of br occoli, cabbage and cauliflower . These will pr ovide tr ansplants for the fall
garden.
Weeks 2-4: To minimize diseases, water with over head ir r igation ear ly enough in the day to allow the foliage
to dry before nightfall.
Fruits


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Weeks 2-3: Summer fr uiting r aspber r ies ar e r ipening now.
Weeks 2-3: Spr ay tr unks of peach tr ees and other stone fr uits for peach tr ee bor er s.
Weeks 3-4: Pr une and tr ain young fr uit tr ees to eliminate poor ly positioned br anches and to establish
proper
Gardening Calendar supplied by the staff of the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening located at the
Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, Missouri. (www.GardeningHelp.org)
L A KE A RE A M A S TE R G ARD ENE R ’S NE W SL ET T ER
PAGE 3
Do your yard care practices save water?
Source MU Extension “Yard and Garden Care: How it Affects Your
Health and Environment
The average American uses approximately 200 gallons of water each day. About half of that water may
be used for landscaping and gardening, depending on climate, time of year, and plant species in the
landscape. This is an immense amount of clean water, and only a small portion is actually used by your
plants.
If you convert your landscape plants to ones adapted to your region and climate, you will take the biggest
step in conserving water.
In places with dry climates, there are many native plants that are drought-tolerant. Consider using
drought-resistant turfgrass species like tall fescue, zoysiagrass and buffalograss.
Perennial flowers conserve water because their roots grow deeper than annual plants and require little or
no watering once established. A shallow mulch (about 2 inches deep) of wood or bark chips over bare
soil will reduce storm water runoff and keep water from evaporating.
Watering wisely
Because most plants can tolerate at least short dry periods, watering should be timed to meet the
biological needs of plants. Watering slowly and deeply helps develop deep roots; in the long-run, your
plants will need less frequent watering. The plants that seem to benefit most from shallow watering are
the ones you don't want: weeds.
Soils can absorb only so much water. Over watering wastes water and can injure certain plants. Placing
several containers with 1-inch marks under your sprinkler will help you gauge how much water your
lawn or garden is getting (Figure 5.1).
Another option in some regions is to allow established cool-season lawn grasses to go dormant during
the hot, dry summer rather than irrigating. Drip irrigation systems and soaker hoses deliver water to the
intended plants efficiently. The time of day when you irrigate matters, too: early morning (4 to 8 a.m.) is
best.
Figure 5.1
Placing containers with 1-inch marks under your sprinkler will
help measure how much water you are applying.
PAGE 4
L AKE A RE A MA S TE R G A RD ENE R ’S NE W SL ET T ER
Lake Area Master Gardeners Volunteers
10th Annual Garden Walk …… A Great Success!!
PAGE 5
L A KE A RE A M A S TE R G ARD ENE R ’S NE W SL ET T ER
PAGE 5
Lake Area Master Gardener Events
June 20th
Ginnie Boyle
June 21st
Suzanne Albright
June 24th
Tamara Jorstad
June 26th
Patricia Griffen
June 14th at 6:30 PM at Baba’s Bistro and
Catering—Cost $15.00 per person—126
Illinois Street SW, Camdenton, MO—
Contact Debbie Laemmli for reservation
816-304-9416
July 12, 2016 at 6:30 at Willmore Lodge
Program - Vertical Gardening—by
Lisa Hill, IL Master Gardener
To help new and returning members remember LAMG Club Member Names—Starting 2015—a twenty-five cent
fee will be charge to an member failing to wear his/her LAMG/Maser Gardener name badge at the monthly
meetings. “Fines” are to be collected by the Ways and Means Chair, Mildred Webster, and funds added to the
club’s income.
Items for the monthly newsletter are due to the Newsletter Chair, Charli Allee, by the
26th of each month—Send to [email protected]
A few plants fit into the “flavoring” category. These are plants that have an essential oil that is extracted from it and
used to flavor dishes or beverages. Vanilla is an example of a flavoring derived from the seed pod of V anilla
Our Mission: “Helping Others Learn to Grow” and To Have Fun Along the Way!
Lake Area Master Gardener Club
P O Box 20/ Courthouse Annex
Tuscumbia, MO 65082
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI EXTENSION
LAKE AREA