Oct 30 - Cascadia Weekly

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Oct 30 - Cascadia Weekly
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Gruesome Gristle, P.08 * Elk Attack!, P.16 * Haunted House Roundup, P.18
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
*
*
*
WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
{10.23.13}{#43}{V.08}{FREE}
Terrifying Tales
Boo!
Scary stories for adults, p.14
election guide, p.10
Sounds like Halloween, p.22
A tea-rrifying
Spooktacular!
MUSIC
c
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c
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ONSTAGE
A glance at what’s happening this week
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
Community Band Exhibition: 6:45pm, Civic Field
THURSDAY [10.24.13]
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
WEDNESDAY [10.23.13]
Scream Fair: 6:30-9:30pm, NW Washington
Fairgrounds, Lynden
Equus: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU
Little Shop of Horrors: 7:30pm, Anacortes Community Theatre
Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
The Project: 10pm, Upfront Theatre
ART 20
STAGE 18
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
Scream Fair: 6:30-10:30pm, NW Washington
Fairgrounds, Lynden
Nightmare at the Spark Museum: 7pm and 9pm,
Spark Museum of Electrical Invention
Haunted Depot: 7-10pm, Depot Arts Center,
Anacortes
Equus: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU
Dracula: 7:30pm, Firehouse Performing Arts
Center
No Exit: 8pm, iDiOM Theater
Little Shop of Horrors: 8pm, Anacortes Community Theatre
Hellingham: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Zombie 5K: 10am, La Conner Club
Boneshaker Bicycle Festival: 10am, La Conner
Boys & Girls Club
Final Gore and Lore Tour: 5pm, downtown
Bellingham
FOOD
Final Anacortes Farmers Market: 9am-2pm,
Depot Arts Center
Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot
Market Square
Final Ferndale Farmers Market: 10am-3pm,
Centennial Riverwalk Park
VISUAL ARTS
Fiber Arts: 12-4pm, Whatcom Museum’s Old City
Hall
Artpocalypse Closing Reception: 6-8pm, Fourth
Corner Frames
SUNDAY [10.27.13]
DANCE
ONSTAGE
Dracula: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon
Dance Bellingham Dance: 7:45pm, Mount Baker
Theatre
Dracula: 2pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center
Dynamo: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
MUSIC
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
COMMUNITY
GET OUT
ONSTAGE
MUSIC
Run for your lives at the Skagit Valley Zombie
5K happening Oct. 26 in La Conner
DO IT 2
10.23.13
Bill Dietrich: 2pm, Western Washington University Bookstore
Nick James: 4pm, Village Books
Poetry Alive!: 7pm, Firehouse Performing Arts
Center
Tribute Jazz: 7pm, Firehouse Performing Arts
Center
FRIDAY [10.25.13]
#43.08
WORDS
MUSIC
Mt. Baker Film Festival: 7pm, Mount Baker
Theatre
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Reel Competition: 9am-5pm, Whatcom Community College
Scottish Masquerade Ball: 6:30pm, the Majestic
Swing Connection: 7-9pm, the Leopold
Contra Dance: 7-10:30pm, Fairhaven Library
Pumpkin Patch in the Pool: 4:30-6:30pm, Arne
Hanna Aquatic Center
Halloween Carnival: 5-7:30pm, Perch & Play
GET OUT
2
DANCE
Angelo Rondello: 7pm, Whatcom Museum’s Old
City Hall
GET OUT
Gore and Lore Tour: 7pm, historic Fairhaven
COMMUNITY
Punkin’ Run Car Show: 10am-2pm, Hardware
Sales
SATURDAY [10.26.13]
Carve up some
spooky fun at
a Community
Pumpkin Party
happening
Mon., Oct. 28 at
Whatcom County
Fire District #4
Art of Jazz: 4-6:30pm, Bellingham Arts Academy
for Youth
Sound Healing: 6pm, 8 Petals Yoga
Jamie Sieber: 7pm, Mount Baker Theatre
ONSTAGE
Costume and Prop Sale: 11am-3pm, Bellingham
Theatre Guild
Scream Fair: 6:30-10:30pm, NW Washington
Fairgrounds, Lynden
Nightmare at the Spark Museum: 7pm and 9pm,
Spark Museum of Electrical Invention
Haunted Depot: 7-10pm, Depot Arts Center,
Anacortes
Dracula: 7:30pm, Firehouse Performing Arts
Center
The Joy Luck Club: 8pm, Mount Baker Theatre
No Exit: 8pm, iDiOM Theater
Little Shop of Horrors: 8pm, Anacortes Community Theatre
Hellingham: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
MUSIC
Skagit Symphony Gala Concert: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon
GET OUT
Lutherwood, Wouldn’t You?: 9am, Lutherwood
Camp
Breezin’ and Freezin’: 10am, Bloedel Donovan
Park
MONDAY [10.28.13]
WORDS
Open Mic: 7pm, Village Books
Poetrynight: 8pm, Alternative Library
COMMUNITY
Community Pumpkin Party: 6-9pm, Whatcom
County Fire District #4
TUESDAY [10.29.13]
WORDS
Dick Harris: 7pm, Village Books
3
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
FOOD 34
THISWEEK
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
A spirit who was apparently in search of spirits broke into a
liquor store this week in Anniston, Ala. Although the costumed criminal didn’t end up taking away any boozy booty,
he could still be charged with third-degree burglary if apprehended. As of press time, the ghost had not been busted.
VIEWS & NEWS
GET OUT 16
WORDS 16
CURRENTS 10
TOC
Production
Art Director:
Jesse Kinsman
{[email protected]
kinsmancreative.com
12: Last week’s news
13: Police blotter, Index
14: Scary stories
16: Eerie elk
18: Haunts and jaunts
22: Spooktacular!
24: Creepy Clubs
27: Film Shorts from Hell
REAR END
28: Bulletin Board
29: Wellness
30: Crossword
31: Free Will Astrology
32: Slowpoke, Sudoku
33: Advice Goddess, Comix
34: A hare-raising tale
Graphic Artists:
Stefan Hansen
{[email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
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Distribution
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Barb Murdoch
Canada: Kristi Alvaran
10.23.13
Letters
Send letters to [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com.
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Gruesome Gristle, P.08 * Elk Attack!, P.16 * Haunted House Roundup, P.18
c a s c a d i a
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
4
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WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
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VIEWS 8
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ARTS & LIFE
DO IT 2
Contact
{10.23.13}{#43}{V.08}{FREE}
Terrifying Tales
Boo!
Scary stories for adults, p.14
election guide, p.10
Sounds like Halloween, p.22
A tea-rrifying
Spooktacular!
COVER: Art by Sean Delonas
AN OPPORTUNITY THAT
MUST NOT BE LOST
The latest 2013 data according to the National
Low Income Housing Coalition states a family
would need to make $17.35 per hour and work 40
hours per week for an affordable two-bedroom
apartment in Whatcom County. Yet, almost 50
percent of residents don’t have affordable housing. Fully 38 percent of Bellingham School District students qualify for free or reduced-price
meals. Amazingly, 22 percent of Whatcom County
residents receive food stamps.
Certainly, as a community we can do better
than this! First stop leaving economic development to chance. We can start by creating
living-wage jobs now. And there is no better
start than on the Bellingham waterfront. Our
community needs standards to make sure the
jobs created pay a living wage, provide affordable health insurance and hire local workers. A
community benefits agreement needs to be a
requirement included in the port/city agreements and negotiated between the community
and the developers later.
Other communities with community benefits
agreements have assured that large develop-
ments benefit the community and not just the
developers.
—Catherine Chambers, Bellingham
SUPPORT PRODUCT LABELING
Every week I get a slick flyer telling me to vote
against Initiative 522. The flyer claims food prices will soar if we add a few words to food labels
in grocery stores. We heard the same thing when
we voted to ban plastic grocery bags.
Why are giant multi-nationals like Monsanto,
Dupont, and Dow spending more than $17 million
in our state to keep us from knowing what they
put in our food? It’s simple: if they genetically
engineer our food, we have the right to know.
Recent polls say 66 percent of Washington
voters want labels on genetically engineered
food (GMO). However, international food engineering and pesticide conglomerates are outspending 522 supporters 3 to 1. What are they
trying to hide?
Don’t be fooled by their aggressive advertising campaign. You have the right to know how
they’re tampering with our food and what we’re
feeding our kids. No one knows the long-term
effects of genetically engineered food, good or
While our Best of Bellingham issue remains
a well-known yearly tradition, a lesser-known
part of that tradition is our mysteriously dropping out a category, despite our best efforts.
This year, the category was Best Place to See
Live Music and the winner was the Wild Buffalo. Apologies and congratulations to the Wild
Buffalo, and what follows is what should’ve appeared in last week’s issue of Cascadia Weekly.
Best Place to See Live Music: Wild Buffalo
The Wild Buffalo’s reign of supremacy in this category remains intact this year, but they were given a
real run for their money by the Shakedown, and the Green Frog made a strong showing as well. But at
the end of the day, the Wild Buffalo prevailed, and given the sheer number of sold-out shows that happen on the regular at the expansive music venue, they are certainly more than deserving of their many
Best of Bellingham accolades. Where: 208 W. Holly St. More info: www.wildbuffalo.net
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 16
CURRENTS 10
Once again the signs are sprouting up
all over the county telling us it is time
for we the citizens to put on our thinking
caps and go to work for our democracy.
In this country it is our right and duty to
vote. If we choose not to vote we give
up our voice, the only thing we have to
let our government know who we want to
represent us and how we want them to
act in our name.
This is an “off-year election.” In the
last “off year election” in 2011, only 59
percent of registered voters actually cast
ballots. How do these elected officials
Row upon row, they stretch as far as
the eye can see: train cars loaded with
coal at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe depot in central Montana. And
they’re waiting to come here: 18 trains
daily, each a mile and a half long, going
through Bellingham to Cherry Point.
Predatory corporations like SSA Marine are using their wealth and power
to bankrupt our democracy. They want
to build the Gateway Pacific Terminal
to continue enriching themselves while
depleting our resources. These robber
barons have hired Edelman, the world’s
largest public relations firm, to peddle
their propaganda of high-paying jobs and
huge tax revenues.
Those who believe these Wall Street
charlatans’ (Goldman Sachs owns 49 percent of SSA Marine) promise of prosperity
are suffering from Stockholm Syndrome.
Remember the RESources lawsuit, which
exposed SSA Marine’s blatant violation of
the Clean Water Act? An SSA Marine contractor admitted to deliberately hiding
their illegal road building on wetlands.
VIEWS 8
THINK ABOUT DEMOCRACY
A GLOBAL ISSUE WE DECIDE
MAIL 4
—Barbara Hudson, Bellingham
—Linda Schonborn, Ferndale
DO IT 2
Lately I’ve been so disgusted with
what is going on in the other Washington
that I’ve let that spill over into my attitude about local elections. So I forced
myself to attend the League of Women
Voters candidates’ forum to combat my
lethargy—and, boy, was I surprised. Every single one of the candidates who is
running for county council positions was
amazingly articulate and well informed. I
realized how lucky we are to have people
who are willing to put in the time and
energy it takes to make the tough decisions we need for the future of Whatcom
County. I want to thank each and every
one of them for that effort. I came away
feeling so fortunate to live here and reenergized about voting. I learned that
one of the worst results of the fiasco in
Congress would be if we neglect to vote
and let down the local people who are
running for office right here, representing all that is best about a democracy.
Don’t give up yet—take the time to
vote.
10.23.13
LUCKY TO HAVE THESE
CANDIDATES
#43.08
—Ray Kamada, Bellingham
truly represent us when so few of us are
choosing them?
Please find out about the candidates
and what they stand for. Go to forums
and see the candidates and hear about
the issues. Think about what and who
would be best for Whatcom County. We
owe it to ourselves, our families, and our
neighbors to educate ourselves on this
election and to vote.
After doing this research, I have concluded that the right people to put in
these important offices are Rud Browne,
Carl Weimer, Ken Mann, and Barry Buchanan for County Council. For the Port
Commissioner’s positions, Mike McAuley
has done an excellent job for us already
and should continue at his post. Renata
Kowalczyk will be a great addition to the
commission. And a yes vote on I-522 GMO
labeling!
Important decisions for the future of
Whatcom County will be made over the
next few years, be sure you have your say
in those decisions.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
bad. The more we know, the better decisions we can make. The law applies to
products that already require a label.
Adding a few more words won’t increase
your grocery bill.
You’ll receive your ballot in the mail
soon. Please vote YES on Initiative 522
to label genetically engineered foods.
5
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
mail ›› your views
Bob Watters, Senior Vice President of SSA
Marine, lied when he wrote, “We thought
we had the right permits to do the work”
(Bellingham Herald, Aug. 8), while dismissing the lawsuit as a nuisance and the
$1.6 million penalty as chump change.
We are attempting to transition into a
new paradigm of sustainability and environmental stewardship (recycling, water
meters, solar energy, electric cars...), but
at the same time we are living in a corporate state that will lie, cheat and steal
to maintain its wealth and power. While
we still have elections, we must vote for
candidates who oppose the coal terminal,
and leave those coal trains in Montana.
“We will be known forever by the tracks
we leave.” —Native American proverb
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
—Judith A. Laws, Bellingham
6
Many voters in Whatcom County may not
understand that our vote this November is
key to the decision on the fate of whether
this project is approved or denied.
We have all heard many conflicting
pros and cons about the benefits and
burdens of Gateway Pacific Terminal
(GPT). But what we need to understand is
that us citizens do not get to vote on it.
That determination is only made by the
government agencies in charge—the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers, Washington
State Dept. of Ecology, and the Whatcom
County Council. These three agencies can
deny its permit and stop it.
Voters need to be aware of GPT’s impacts, both jobs and health and environmental impacts. Burdens and benefits.
There is a lot at stake. Be informed,
and find out where your candidates stand.
—Nora Weaver, Bellingham
JOBS, AT WHAT COST?
Recently there have been billboards popping up throughout the county that proclaim in large letters, “Want Jobs? Vote
Jobs.” It then pictures and lists an apparent “coalition” of candidates running for
office this year in Whatcom County—Bill
Knutzen, Kathy Kershner, Ben Elenbaas,
Michelle Luke, Dan Robbins, and Ken Bell.
This is obviously the conservative candidates pooling their resources to promote
their propaganda (I call any politically motivated material that has unsubstantiated
claims as “propaganda”) in order to entice
from you your vote this November.
While I consider myself a conservative, there are several positions that
“conservative politicians” hold that I
do not agree with.
One of those that I cannot, in good
conscience, agree with is their position
on jobs. My belief is this billboard would
be much more accurate if it stated,
“Want Minimum Wage Jobs? Vote Minimum Wage Jobs.”
The conservative politicians claim
that, if elected, they will work at providing more jobs. However, they do not
specify what kind of jobs and at what
wages. Nowhere in their “propaganda”
do you find reference to “living-wage”
jobs. Most of these politicians are business owners and/or managers whose main
motivation is to get their labor at the
cheapest possible cost. It is the business
owners they are most concerned about,
not the employees.
There are actually a lot of jobs available in Whatcom County right now. The
problem is very few of these jobs pay
much more than minimum wage (currently, $9.19 per hour in Washington state).
While that wage may seem decent, statistics show that a family of four needs to
make at least $16.50 per hour to make a
halfway decent living in Whatcom County. That is more than $7.30 per hour difference! Where can the family make up
that difference to make ends meet?
What we need in this county are more
“Living-Wage Jobs.” That is not what you
will get if you vote the conservative ticket.
Please think seriously about this when you
see these billboards around the county and
when you cast your vote this November.
—Matthew Lolkema, Ferndale
OLD, HOT GARBAGE
In numerous presentations around
town and recent published interviews,
Ken Bell (running for port commissioner)
has neglected to mention a big part of
his professional life. But many of us remember when he was vice president at
Recomp of Washington, then the county
garbage facility.
For years, Bell and Recomp fought to
prevent testing of the thousands of tons
of garbage they put in digesters, spun
until it was hot, then put in big piles
on their property. Many citizens called
it “old, hot garbage,” but Bell called it
“municipal solid waste compost.” Recomp wanted to spread it on farms that
raise our food and on fields that our
children play on. Recomp hired a highpriced law firm from Seattle to fight
Whatcom County over whether the old,
hot garbage should be tested for contaminants before it was spread. It cost
Whatcom County a lot of money to stand
up to Bell and Recomp’s lawyers. After
the old, hot garbage was tested, the
Health Department found it contained
high levels of heavy metals and other
substances that harm people.
Is this who we want managing the
cleanup of the GP site? Please vote for
Mike McAuley for port commissioner.
—Nancy Keene, Bellingham
APPEARANCE OF FAIRNESS
I was appalled to see that the Democrat-endorsed County Council candidates
are on record for their opposition to the
Gateway Pacific Terminal (GPT), contrary
to quasi-judicial procedure.
At this time the project at Cherry Point
GPT is currently under environmental review. This is an extremely thorough review
process, with several multi-step studies.
Unfortunately, as printed in their campaign literature, the four men representing the Democrat party for Whatcom
County Council already stand in opposition to the project before the review is
even finalized.
The process has been set up by the
Washington Dept. of Ecology and the Army
Corps of Engineers so that the future council will be able to objectively weigh the
“results” to make an educated decision.
So much for an impartial consideration
of a project that could ultimately turn
the economic tide in Whatcom County!
These Democrat candidates are not just
bypassing the process, but are also ignoring that Cherry Point has been zoned
for heavy industrial projects such as the
proposed shipping terminal.
Vote for the four county council candidates: Kershner, Elenbaas, Luke, and
Knutzen, who have pledged to remain
impartial until the review process comes
before them; promising a thorough consideration of facts. After all, isn’t that
the only ethical thing to do?
DEEDS MORE THAN WORDS
Members of the County Council who
are seeking reelection should be talking
about their accomplishments rather than
brandishing their party affiliation in what
is supposed to be a non-partisan race.
Of course, Council member Kathy Kershner would have to acknowledge her failure
to fulfill her oath of office, which requires
that she uphold the laws of Washington
State. Instead, she chooses to defy our
state’s Growth Management Act and vote
to spend our tax dollars on high-priced
Seattle attorneys in a losing effort to support her delusion (and that of other council
members) that Whatcom County’s planning
and development regulations are exempt
from compliance with this state law.
Kershner could be bragging about how
she voted for the creation of the 8,800acre Lake Whatcom Watershed Park, but
most likely she is hoping those affiliated
with her party forget she did that. I think
Kershner’s got things turned around. She
should be embarrassed about ignoring her
oath and defying state law and proud of
her successful support of the conversion
of forestland into the new watershed park.
—Virginia Watson, Bellingham
SAY ‘NO’ TO TEA PARTY
While perusing the voters pamphlet, I
noticed that Ken Mann lists two endorsements: Conservation Voters plus the local Democratic party. Those would be
the Seattle-based environmental group
that is spending hundreds of thousands
of dollars telling everyone that Mann
has pledged to an anti-jobs agenda, and
the group that passed a resolution that
would destroy the companies and the
family-wage jobs now operating at Cherry
Point—their resolution says no new use
of land or water at Cherry Point. That
means that if one of those companies had
to replace a dock, they would not be allowed to do so.
I am voting for Rud Brown, Carl Weimer,
Ken Mann, and Barry Buchanan for Whatcom County Council.
As I watch, our federal representatives
take a vacation after Sen. Ted Cruz and
the House Republicans closed down the
government to get what they wanted, to
repeal “Obamacare.” They voted more than
40 times in the past two years to repeal
this law passed and validated by the U.S.
Supreme Court. At a cost of $1 million per
vote, they knew the Senate would not pass
the bill. Wasting that money was for political theater, not about saving money. So
after wasting millions of dollars, they just
wasted more than 25 billion (GDP spending)
closing our government down. Who won?
I truly believe that now it is more important than ever to vote locally for county council members that will look out for
us, not politics or money. Brown, Buchanan, Weimer, and Mann are men can work
to bring jobs to the county while looking
out for our environment. Farmers, manufacturers, homeowners—everyone needs
clean air and enough water to live. If we
allow big corporations to build businesses
that will risk the amount of clean water we
have and the air we breathe, then who will
really benefit from the couple hundred
jobs? The county can be a model for green
industry, with our wind, water and innovative resources. Vote.
—Karen Brown, Bellingham
—Amy Glasser, Custer
—Greg Brown, Bellingham
EDITOR’S NOTE: RCW 42.36.040, addressing the quasi-judicial process, allows
candidates for elected office to discuss
their views without violating the appearance of fairness doctrine.
POTENTIAL CONFLICT
NOV. 8 8:00 PM
TICKETING
BUY 10 TICKETS OR MORE AND GET $30+ OFF AND
A FREE FILM. CALL 800.523.7117 *offer only available by phone
BEST TICKET PRICE IN TOWN AT REI LOCATIONS
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DISCOUNTS WITH PURCHASE
FROM THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS
REI MEMBERS:
RECEIVE A FREE
WARREN MILLER
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DOWNLOAD WITH
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TICKET HOLDERS
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B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MOUNT BAKER THEATRE
MUSIC 22
BELLINGHAM
ART 20
3URYHQ/HDGHUVKLSLQ&UHDWLQJ
:KDWFRP-REV
Founder of Ryzex (360 jobs, 140
in the County). Whatcom County
Business Person of the Year (2004)
3URYHQ&RPPXQLW\6HUYLFH
Former Brigid Collins Family
Support Center Board, Whatcom
County Ethics Commission, US
Coast Guard Auxiliary Aircrew,
Former Whatcom Community
Foundation Board
3URYHQ9DOXHV:H
:DQWLQ2XU/HDGHUV
Created family wage jobs, in an
awarding winning workplace, while
protecting our environment.
(QGRUVHGE\RYHU
&RPPXQLW\/HDGHUV
STAGE 18
!
NOW
GET OUT 16
ARREN
MI
13 W
20
F O R W H AT C O M C O U N T Y C O U N C I L
FILM TOUR
ER
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RUD BROWNE
FILM TOUR
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TICKSALE
ON
FOOD 34
ARREN
13 W
MI
20
VIEWS 8
SEASON PASSES ON SALE NOW
CURRENTS 10
Paid for by Vote Rud Browne, 1313 East Maple St., Suite 201, MAC 594, Bellingham, WA 98225-5708
WORDS 16
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* See
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
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COAL’S BLACK FINGERPRINTS: Last week the curtain
8
descended on the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures for this election cycle. At
the close of the financial reporting required by the
Washington State Public Disclosure Commission, in
the PDC’s last-minute contribution report 21 days
before the general election, more than $447,000 had
funneled into the races for Whatcom County Council,
easily a record for those positions. A little more than
half of that amount, or $287,000, had been reported
as spent, so we can expect a flood of late, targeted
mass media buys, last-minute claims that cannot be
easily rebutted or refuted, the Dirty Tricks eclipse of
local elections. Beware.
The race for Whatcom County Council and the effect
that outcome may have on coal exports has risen to
prominent national attention, with this election perhaps the most important public referendum ever on
global climate change. This interest has produced an
unusual, unprecedented amount of “outside money”
flowing into our local election. Compounding this has
been a general loosening of campaign finance restrictions for corporate and NGO donors at both the federal
and state level, meaning money can flow more easily
and abundantly into local campaigns. And money is
useful in campaigns.
By the time final reporting is in, more than $1 million in campaign money will have flooded into the
backwater Fourth Corner.
“Outside money” tends to clump around single
prominent issues, and is not particularly concerned
with the minutiae of local governance. But voters
should be. Council will vote not only on this issue,
but scores of others.
“Both sides are doing it,” yes, the rubric goes; but
the manner in which both sides are doing it is markedly different.
Of the $447,000 officially reported so far, easily
three dollars in four have funneled into the campaigns
of progressive council candidates Barry Buchanan,
Ken Mann, Carl Weimer, and Rud Browne. No, let’s call
them moderate candidates, since their pledge is to
follow and apply the law, which seems a de minimis requirement for public office, the least voters might expect from officeholders. A more telling metric are the
numbers of campaign contributions in amounts under
$100, an amount that might be pulled from an average person’s pocketbook. Here, these moderate candidates have received nearly six times the amount of
contributions, hundreds of individual contributions,
compared to those received by their challengers and
competitors for their respective seats on council. The
names of these small donors are known and familiar—
they’re your friends and neighbors and co-workers,
members of your church and PTA.
So recognize that to be even holding their own in
contributions, the challengers of these moderate candidates are especially beholden to large-scale, bigbudget donors with huge cash infusions.
Big donors are finite, and their contributions are
capped by state law. Which means to contribute
above this cap, these donors must circumvent the
law. Generally this is done through cut-outs—a donor gives money to a trusted intermediary, who then
launders the money back into the campaign—and by
glossing or stalling the disclosure of these contributions in order to conceal this coordination. The cut-
OPI N IONS
T H E G R IST L E
BY ALAN RHODES
Signs of the Times
MR. CRANKY’S PRE-ELECTION ELUCIDATIONS
his month I was planning to
endorse candidates for the
upcoming Whatcom County
Council election, but I changed my
mind. Will the outcome hinge on Mr.
Cranky’s opinion? Will the electorate
be swayed by the political views of
a curmudgeonly columnist who wanders around town humming Creedence
Clearwater tunes, pausing occasionally to chat with people and jot down
notes with a stubby pencil? Probably
not. So I have a better idea.
Many Whatcom pundits will be giving endorsements, but who’s going
to tell you about the yard signs of
totally unacceptable candidates? Mr.
Cranky, that’s who.
Let’s start with Ben Elenbaas,
whose yard sign slogan is “Vote Local.” Vote local? This is a local election. It’s held locally. Only local people can vote. Everybody running is
local. So, is this just a really dumbass
slogan, or a subliminal suggestion
that Ben is somehow more local than
his opponent? Maybe Ben’s opponent
flies into Bellingham daily from his
Florida condo. Or maybe Ben needs
a different slogan. How about “Vote
Bogus?”
Council member Bill Knutzen has
impressed many folks as not being
what you would call conspicuously
bright, but when I saw his yard signs
I thought maybe we’ve been misjudging Bill. The signs feature leprechaun
green lettering on a background of
a yellow hue rarely seen anywhere
other than the oversize shoes of circus clowns. Wow, I thought, maybe
Bill is actually a very hip guy with a
campy, ironic sense of humor. Nah.
He’s probably color blind.
Bill’s actual problem in the area of
analytical skills was explained to me
T
one morning while I was sitting in
my office (the corner window table
in the Black Drop Coffeehouse). A
local elected official sat down to
visit while waiting for his caffeine
concoction to be assembled. I asked
him about Bill’s cognitive abilities,
and he explained that “Bill will give
more weight to an anecdote than to
a stack of scientific studies if the anecdote supports what he has already
made up his mind about. You can’t
reason with the guy.”
Call me picky, but not having the
ability to reason doesn’t seem like a
strong selling point for someone who
gets to decide the county’s future.
Kathy Kershner’s yard signs feature a drawing of a heart. I wonder if
this perky little touch is to remind us
of how much Kathy loves spending
bushels of taxpayers’ money fighting
state law. The rest of Washington
has pretty much accepted that the
Growth Management Act, designed
to prevent sprawl and protect rural
areas, is probably a good idea. But
Kathy is having none of that treehugging nonsense.
I’ve gotten relatively skilled at
translating Kershner’s statements so
as to ascertain their true meaning.
A recent Kathy Kershner comment:
“I’m not going to let bureaucrats
in Olympia tell citizens of Whatcom
how their businesses will be (regulated) in Acme.” Mr. Cranky’s translation: “I’m not going to let professionals whose job it is to protect the
VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY
environment and rural areas stop
landholders, speculators and developers from turning Whatcom County
into Bellevue.” That’s a rough translation, but you get the idea.
Michelle Luke is taking a second
shot at getting on the council, after
a transcendently unimpressive run
four years ago. When asked in a forum
what qualified her to be on the council, poor Michelle couldn’t come up
with an answer. Michelle’s yard signs
have no distinguishing touches: no
silly slogans, goofy colors or little
heart icons. There’s nothing worth
noting there, which pretty much describes Michelle’s “thoughts,” which
largely consist of generic job-creation clichés, minus the annoyance
of cumbersome specifics. Whenever I
hear Michelle opining, I’m reminded
of the comment Gertrude Stein made
about the city of Oakland: “There is
no there there.”
It’s worth noting that the above
candidates have been dodging election forums, including the important RESources/Futurewise forum on
growth and the environment. Kathy
Kershner said she had a conflicting
meeting. Have you ever used that
one? I have. Michelle Luke went to a
furniture show. Ben Elenbaas doesn’t
like Futurewise. Well, the progressive candidates who went to the Tea
Party forum probably weren’t crazy
about that outfit, but went anyway. As good as these excuses are,
first prize goes to Bill Knutzen, who
said he had “the right to remain silent because anything can be used
against you.” Uh, Bill, maybe the
voters have a right to hear your ideas
and ask questions so they can make
informed decisions. There’s a word
for it—oh, yeah: democracy.
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
out can also conceal the original source
of the money.
This was how the coal industry was
able to covertly funnel more than
$40,000 into the campaigns of the nonprogressive, non-moderate candidates
back in April. It is also how coal interests were apparently able to flood more
than $154,000 into the coffers of these
candidates over the summer and fall in
a dozen instances of alleged campaign
finance abuse, according to a complaint
filed last week with the state Attorney
General’s office.
According to the complaint, two political committees used the same firm
as campaign treasurer to shuttle money
back and forth between accounts, defeating the requirements for timely
disclosures, including a requirement
to disclose large donors in media buys.
The two committees themselves—Save
Whatcom and Whatcom First—appear
to be mostly shells with minimal records. Both formed in mid-September,
evidently for the purpose of shuttling
money covertly between them.
Among the contributors, according
to the complaint, was SSA Marine, the
project applicant for the Cherry Point
pier, at $12,000. An additional $100,000
arrived from Cloud Peak Energy, a coal
supplier with potential exporting interest in Cherry Point, and Global Coal
Sales of Columbus, a brokerage that
markets coal for export partners. The
latter companies share interlocking
management, according to Bloomberg.
Another $32,000 arrived from donors
in Houston, Texas, with strong ties to
both the coal industry through their
company, Quintana Minerals, and the
tea party. In total, eight dollars in ten
arrived from out of state. Perhaps more
interesting, Save Whatcom was able to
coax this amount of money from these
groups after only a month in existence.
Nearly all of this arrived in a mid-October cash dump, just as the shutter came
down on expenditure reports. We won’t
have a clear picture of where and how
this money is distributed and spent until after the election.
As detailed by the public policy
group Sightline, “Only a small fraction of the pro-coal money comes from
Whatcom County, or anywhere in the
Northwest for that matter. Almost all
of it can be directly linked to firms or
people with a strong financial interest
in Northwest coal exports. And much of
the coal money seems to originate from
sources that tilt heavily toward Republican [and tea party] politics.”
Coal’s black fingerprints are all over
this election.
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9
BELLINGHAM RACES
Bellingham School District
Pos. 4
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N E WS
P OL I T ICS
F U ZZ BU ZZ
STEVEN SMITH
The Weekly loves and
supports John Blethen
ands everything he attempts. And it was very
important that he (and
Hue Beattie) ran for
this position to focus
on the lack of engagement with public goals that has plagued the
school board.
But those problems pre-date Steve Smith,
who ran four years ago to address many of
those issues. Smith has been a voice for
progressive change on the school board. He
fought for a more inclusive mission statement. As an educator and financial expert,
he’s served the school board well and has
brought rigor to their budget. He’s passionate and committed.
John Blethen deserves immense thanks;
but Steve Smith should be reelected.
I N DE X
BY TIM JOHNSON
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2013
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
10
COUNTY RACES
Port of Bellingham, District 1
B
RENATA
KOWALCZYK
allots are pouring into county mailboxes this week, in what may be
the most important local election in 20 years. Voters who have been
following these issues closely will no doubt turn right around and
return their completed ballots. For others, we offer this handy guide of our
thoughts and perceptions about this election.
Vote. Please vote. It is the most important voice you have in your community.
Bellingham City Council, Ward 4
CLAYTON PETREE
Oh, how we wish these two had not been paired against
one another! The hardest choice in this election, two excellent candidates would each make a fine addition to Bellingham City Council. We like the style, energy and intelligence
of Pinky Vargas, her hunger to know and engage with public
policy issues. She’s right-headed on all the important issues
facing the city.
But a council is about more than the quality of individu-
BELLINGHAM RACES
Bellingham City Council, At-Large
ROXANNE MURPHY
Bob Burr has rightly criticized Roxanne Murphy for running a happy-but-vacuous campaign short on specifics. He
notes her lack of experience and engagement on public policy issues in Bellingham. And we support Burr’s views on open
als on it. How they function as a group
is also important—and Bellingham City
Council edges toward groupthink. Clayton Petree would add dimension and
scope to council. Grounded on all the
important issues facing the city, Clayton would strengthen council’s dialogue
with the public by questioning cherished assumptions and introducing new
issues and new ways of looking at old issues.
We don’t agree with Clayton on several of the issues he’s
raised in this campaign. But he’s argued them well. That’s
kind of our point.
government and an engaged citizenry.
He’s been engaged, often at perilous
personal cost
From our conversations with Murphy,
though, we’re convinced she does have
a fire in her belly and would engage the
council both critically and as a team
player. Her presence on the council
would be additive and constructive.
MICHAEL
MCAULEY
MCAULEY
BELLINGHAM RACES
Port of Bellingham, District 2
KOWALCZ YK
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THE WEEKLY’S GUIDE TO FILLING OUT YOUR BALLOT
We like the answers Ken Bell has given
on the future of the Bellingham waterfront
and the role the port must play in economic
development. In a perfect outcome, the port
commission would expand to five members
and Ken Bell would be one of them.
But Michael McAuley is already at work
doing what Bell promises he wants to do
(and, based on the numbers of bad actors
who’ve endorsed Bell, we do have to wonder about the sincerity of those promises).
In the most significant area of job creation in the port’s wheelhouse, Mike was
passionately committed to lowering the
moorage rates for the commercial fishing
fleets and all the ancillary marine trades
jobs that brings, establishing a reputation for Bellingham as a fishing community
from California to Alaska. That’s why the
At-Large
WEIMER
BROWNE
After just witnessing the dysfunction
and nihilism of the tea party at the national level, do we really want to empower their strategies of angry nullification
and bitter paralysis at the local level?
Ben Elenbaas went so far as to host the
Whatcom TEA Party Freedom Rally at his
family farm, which was attended by other candidates endorsed by the tea party.
Want to better understand how the
tea party candidates will approach the
coal pier issue? Look at how they voted
on the slaughterhouse issue. Two candidates from the Whatcom County Planning
Commission supported no controls whatsoever on one of the bloodiest, polluting
and resource-depleting operations that
PROP 2013-1:
APPROVE
A general obligation bond of $160 million, primarily to rebuild the aging and
unsafe Sehome High School, as well as
other school facilities suffering great
need of upgrade and improvement.
Importantly, levies cannot be used to
construct facilities. Bonds can be used
to construct facilities.
We met with members of the citizens’
advisory committee, who were both passionate and clear that many schools constructed together under the assumptions
of their times have aged together, presenting challenges to learning and the
health and safety of schoolchildren across
the district. A task force of parents, staff,
students, alumni and community members
assessed these challenges and recom-
MAINTAIN PROPERTY
TAX LEVY: YES
STATE INITIATIVES AND
MEASURES
I-517: NO
Sponsored by Tim Eyman, this measure
would establish penalties for interfering
with or retaliating against signaturegatherers and petition-signers for public
initiatives and extend time for gathering
initiative petition signatures. This is all
very self-serving to Eyman’s career, but—
more important—is a state that approved
gay marriage by referendum, reformed
marijuana laws by referendum, established open government and tax reform
through referendum, is this still not well
served by the current law that supports
direct legislation? Washington already
has the most robust and energetic public
ADVISORY VOTES
In the push and pull of the legislative
process, some changes are proposed
that require approval by voters. Often
these are housekeeping measures that
modernize fiscal practice and policy, or
streamline the state tax code. As these
arcane and complex measures have already been rigorously debated and negotiated, quarreled over and ultimately
approved by our elected representatives
in Olympia and presented to you, we believe they should be upheld by voters.
SSB 5444:
MAINTAINED
A leasehold excise tax credit for taxpayers who lease publicly owned property.
SB 5627: MAINTAINED
An aircraft excise tax on commuter air
carriers in lieu of property tax.
ESHB 1846:
MAINTAINED
An insurance premium tax to some insurance for pediatric oral services.
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Public assets for health, safety, education and recreation are important and
should be maintained.
Bellingham School District
Northwest Park and
Recreation District 2
GET OUT 16
LOCAL MEASURES
MANN
BUCHANAN
RUD BROWNE
COMMUNITY
CENTER CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS: YES
WORDS 16
CARL WEIMER
Point Roberts park and
Recreation District 1
CURRENTS 10
District 3, Pos. A
EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES: YES
VIEWS 8
KEN MANN
Whatcom County Fire
Protection District 4
MAIL 4
District 2, Pos. A
mended this bond. This is not only about
the future, this is about now and the conditions of schools now.
Bellingham has always supported its
levies. Bellingham needs this bond.
DO IT 2
BARRY
BUCHANAN
might occur on ag land adjacent to rural
residences. Their concern was jobs, declaring phantom jobs on paper. Period.
Full stop. Nothing else mattered.
The full County Council worked a year
to beat that ordinance into better shape,
addressing many concerns in addition to
jobs-on-paper. This is the kind of deliberation and inclusion we need more of on
Whatcom County Council.
Barry Buchanan, Ken Mann, Carl
Weimer, and Rud Browne have pledged to
follow the law as it applies to the big issues facing Whatcom County. Perhaps it
is a sign of our terrible times that something that would be an absolute minimum requirement in normal times (following the law, which elected officials
swear an oath to uphold) is today reduced
to a campaign pledge. Push back against
that! Fight for something better.
These candidates are fair-minded and
each one gifted in public policy matters.
They will make an excellent council.
Elect them.
This measure would require most raw
agricultural commodities, processed
foods, and seeds and seed stocks, if produced using genetic engineering, to be
labeled as genetically engineered when
offered for retail sale.
Foes of this initiative—primarily
Monsanto and other food lobbyists—
have broken state records, raising more
than $17.2 million to defeat this measure and thereby kill efforts at food
labeling nationally. Even some progressives oppose the initiative, saying it is
a poorly constructed law.
But look, what message does it send
to state lawmakers to burn this measure
in flames? Does it make it more likely or
less likely they will ignore the lobbyists
and work to improve information available for the food you and your family eat?
Even an inadequately constructed law
sends a message to lawmakers this issue
is important to the people of Washington;
and we’re not at all convinced this consumer protection effort is inadequately
constructed. It does a job, and puts the
Legislature on notice to do a better job.
You have a right to know what you eat.
Vote yes.
10.23.13
District 1, Pos. A
I-522: YES
#43.08
WHATCOM COUNTY COUNCIL
initiative process in the nation. If it ain’t
broke, don’t fix it.
Vote no.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Commercial Fishermen's Association of
Whatcom County has strongly endorsed
McAuley, and why you should, too.
In his public appearances and responses, Dan Robbins has shown himself to be
the weakest of the four candidates for port
commission, lacking vision and vigor in his
approach to public policy issues. Renata
Kowalczyk, by contrast, has shown herself to be a quick study on port issues and
actively engaged in public discussion of
the issues. She listens carefully and considers thoroughly. She and McAuley will
work together to form a formidable team.
11
The W
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LAST WEEK’S
NEWS
OCT15-22
BY TIM JOHNSON
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
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currents ›› last week’s news
Wa
at s
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Halloween Celebrations Oct 31
12
10.15.13
TUESDAY
NORTHWEST PASSAGES
Tom Foley, former Speaker of the
U.S. House of Representatives, died
Friday at the age of 84 from complications following a stroke. The Spokane
Democrat served 30 years in Congress,
including more than five years in the
speaker's chair. In that job, he was third
in line of succession to the presidency,
making him the highest-ranking public
official in Washington state history. He
is remembered as being genial and effective among leaders from both sides of
the aisle. The Republican capture of the
chamber in the 1994 gave them control for the first time in 40 years
and Foley was their prize victim. He was defeated for re-election in the
GOP wave. He was replaced as speaker by Newt Gingrich (R-GA), ushering in a new era of partisan rancor.
"Dawgfather" Don James, legendary former coach of the University of
Washington football team, died Sunday from the effects of pancreatic
cancer. James, 80, coached the Huskies from 1975-1992 and led team
to a share of the 1991 national championship. James went 153-57-2
with the Huskies and led the school to six Rose Bowl appearances. He
was the winningest football coach in the history of the university.
10.18.13
FRIDAY
A $32-million commercial fishery has inexplicably and completely collapsed this year on the B.C. coast. The Vancouver Sun
reports the sardine seine fleet has gone home after failing to catch
a single fish. The commercial disappearance of the small schooling
fish will have severe repercussions all the way up the food chain to
threatened humpback whales.
A Nooksack tribal member who pleaded guilty in June
to killing a Lummi tribal elder is sentenced to prison.
Levi Eugene Joseph Charles, 63, will serve 23 years in prison
for killing 67-year-old Kenneth Joseph with an axe during a
robbery last year. Charles had sold arts and crafts to Joseph,
and came to his house on the morning of Oct. 23 intending
to steal the items back so he could resell them.
10.17.13
10.22.13
Bellingham Police arrest a fourth person in connection with a
riot that broke out near campus on Oct. 12. The 19-year-old is a student at Western Washington University, the first student arrested
in connection with the confrontation between police and dozens of
people who failed to disperse from a block party and were joined
by other crowd-sourced revelers. Police continue to scour numerous
videos and photographs taken at the riot and searching for distinguishable faces of people suspected of illegal activity. University
officials say they’ll work closely with police as they investigate.
A day before his arrest, the student had sent a The Western Front
apologizing for his actions, vowing only to contribute to the community in positive ways and encouraging others to do the same, the
campus newspaper reported.
Two people are killed in a head-on collision on Grandview Road in north Whatcom County. The Washington State
Patrol reports a 39-year-old man was driving in heavy fog
when he tried to pass a truck. His pick-up collided head-on
with a small car driven westbound by an 18-year-old Blaine
woman. Both died at the scene.
THURSDAY
Northwest lawmakers, including Suzan DelBene and Rick Larsen,
urge federal officials to quickly allow Bering Sea fishermen to start
fishing for Alaskan king crab. The crab season was scheduled to
start on Oct. 15, but due to the government shutdown, the federal
employees at the National Marine Fisheries Services (NMFS) have
been unable to issue permits for the fleet, thereby delaying the
start of the season.
A helicopter makes a "hard landing" in a field north of SedroWoolley, but the man and woman aboard suffered only bruises. The
pilot and his passenger refuse medical attention, the Skagit County
Sheriff’s Office reports.
TUESDAY
At least two people were hurt—one seriously—in a
crash on the Mt. Baker Highway, east of Bellingham. Witnesses said a woman didn't slow down at a stop sign, struck
the back end of a semi hauling a trailer and spun off into the
garage of a home along the highway.
No one is injured when a car and a school bus collide at
the intersection of Bill McDonald Parkway and 21st Street
near WWU campus. The bus sustains minor damage, the
Fairhaven Middle School students are taken home safely on
a second bus.
Greene’s Corner market reopens after a speeding car
crashed through the front entrance Friday and burst into
flames. The driver failed to stop at the intersection of Guide
Meridian and Smith Road and lost control, bursting through
the storefront. Bystanders pulled him from the wreck with
serious burns. This marks the third time a car has smashed
into the popular public market.
On Oct. 17, Bellingham Police spoke to a
23-year-old man after he threw a bottle at the
WTA depot on E. Magnolia Street and nearly
struck a window. Police took him to jail.
On Oct. 19, a pedestrian at Bellis Fair Mall reported nearly being struck by a thrown bottle.
DINE AND DASH
On Oct. 16, Bellingham Police took a report
that a 20-year-old man had started a tab at
a restaurant near Bellis Fair Mall, then ran
out on the bill.
On Oct. 19, Bellingham Police learned the
same 20-year-old had returned and been allowed to open another tab at the restaurant.
He again walked out without paying the bill.
He left behind a room key for a nearby hotel. Police knocked on the hotel door. The
man told police he had no means of paying
for the two meals and drinks he consumed.
Police threw him in jail for theft of services.
On Oct. 19, a teen reported as a runaway
On Oct. 20, a woman told Bellingham Police
her boyfriend had assaulted her while they
were drinking near Lincoln Creek. She was
taken to the hospital and treated for minor
injuries.
On Oct. 22, Bellingham Police learned a couple were quarreling in Birchwood neighborhood. “The couple was contacted and said
they were just playing around, and denied
there was any problem or need for police,”
the responding officer reported. “They were
headed home, nothing further.”
ASSISTED LIVING
On Oct. 21, a drunk was reported swilling
whiskey outside his assisted living facility in
Fairhaven and stripping off his clothes.
CHECK'S IN THE MAIL
On Oct. 16, a man cashed two checks for
someone he did not know very well and gave
him the cash. “The checks have since been
determined to be not valid,” police reported.
“The man is out several hundred dollars.”
On Oct. 15, Bellingham Police received a
report of a man burning mail in a bathroom
at Cornwall Park. Police contacted the man,
a 65-year-old transient, and learned he was
burning his own trash. “He had a warrant for
shoplifting and was arrested,” police reported.
STONED CLONES
Oct. 14, twins, aged 18, were arrested for
smoking marijuana in Whatcom Falls Park.
They were cited.
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
AMOUNT of money that flooded into the Save Whatcom campaign coffers in mid-
81
12
PRECENT of the above figure that
NUMBER of campaign finance
disclosure violations alleged by
Whatcom Democrats in the dispersal
and reporting of the above figure.
arrived from coal interests outside
Washington State.
$160,600
AMOUNT raised, as of Oct. 15, through the Washington Conservation Voters Action
Found in support of Barry Buchanan, Rud Browne, Carl Weimer, and Ken Mann for
Whatcom County Council.
$29
AMOUNT, in billions, that American taxpayers have been bilked by coal companies
who are underpaying for their leases on federal land, according to a probe by the
Department of Interior’s Office of Inspector General.
$20,000,000
INITIATIVE 522, the GMO labeling initiative, has attracted more than $20 million,
most of it from corporate food lobbying interests seeking to defeat the measure.
54,117
GET OUT 16
October from coal interests. The funds are expected to support Whatcom County
Council candidates Kathy Kershner, Bill Knutzen, Michelle Luke, and Ben Elenbass.
WORDS 16
On Oct. 15, a man reported his girlfriend had
been kidnapped. Bellingham Police investigated and located the woman, who reported
she was fine at the moment. “However,” police
reported, “she was uncooperative in explaining to law enforcement what had occurred.”
$154,000
CURRENTS 10
On Oct. 13, a neighbor at a Birchwood apartment complex called police to report a man
with a no contact order had entered the apartment of his ex-girlfriend. He assaulted her,
then locked her in her bedroom. He would not
leave. Bellingham Police arrived and showed
the 24-year-old man the error of his thinking.
VIEWS 8
On Oct. 13, Bellingham Police responded
to a report of a party on N. Garden Street,
where people were reported throwing bottles at passing vehicles. Police spoke two
four people at the residence but could not
locate any damage.
COUPLES WITH ISSUES
MAIL 4
FULL-THROTTLE BOTTLES
On Oct. 15, a person was reported twirling
blazing batons in Red Square on Western
Washington University campus. The person
was gone when campus cops arrived.
DO IT 2
On Oct. 20, a 19-year-old man was reported
“throwing wild punches in all directions” outside the Glow nightclub in downtown Bellingham at closing time. “Upon seeing officers
approach, he sprinted away from the melee
in an attempt to get away,” Bellingham Police
reported. “Officers chased him on foot for several blocks eventually catching up and arresting him.” He was booked on multiple offenses.
MAJORING IN MAJORETTE
10.23.13
On Oct. 17, Bellingham Police announced the
department would join Western Washington
University Police and Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office to increase party patrol efforts in
the city’s residential areas following an Oct.
12 riot near campus. City and university police will provide extra staffing in this previously planned enforcement effort. Bellingham
Police will use the “Party Bus” to respond to
problem parties, police reported. If needed,
the Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office will provide their mobile booking vehicle, along with
corrections officers to assist with processing
the arrested individuals. “Parties that get out
of control are not only a noise or nuisance concern, they are a public safety issue. And we
will not tolerate any outbreaks of violence,”
Bellingham Police Chief Clifford Cook said.
On Oct. 21, two women reported a man
grabbed them and groped them as he ran by
them on the trail around Lake Padden by the
dog park. He kept running.
#43.08
PARTY PATROL
THE GROPER
CASCADIA WEEKLY
FUZZ
BUZZ
index
returned home long enough to gobble down
a meal, then ran away again, Bellingham Police learned.
NUMBER of applications processed for Washington State’s health care exchanges,
as of Oct. 15. Washington State currently leads the nation in numbers of reported
applications filed and processed, according to news reports. Despite software
glitches, approximately half a million applications for health care have been
submitted nationwide.
SOURCES: Washington Public Disclosure Commission; Whatcom Democrats; Institute
for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis; Washingtoon Post
13
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FOOD 34
words
B-BOARD 28
COM M U N I T Y
L E CT U R E S
BOOK S
WOR DS
THURS., OCT. 24
WESTERN READS: Educators and researchers
will discuss the moral and ethical issues facing
humans as we respond to the impact of climate
change at tonight’s “Western Reads” Social
Justice Panel Discussion at 7pm at Village
Books, 1200 1th St.
671-2626
SAT., OCT. 26
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
DIE TRICH TALK: Pulitzer Prize-winning
author and former Huxley environmental
journalism instructor Bill Dietrich gives an
author talk at 2pm at the Western Washington
University bookstore. At the free event, expect
to hear more about global warming, Napoleon
Bonaparte, forest policy and more.
WWW.WWU.EDU
ART 20
SK YSHIP ACADEMY: Bellingham author Nick
James reads from his third Skyship Academy
book, Strikeforce at 7pm at Village Books, 1200
11th.
STAGE 18
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
SUN., OCT. 27
GET OUT 16
FAMILY FIC T ION: “Storytelling and Teen
Communication” will be the focus of a Family
Fiction presentation with author Laura Kelly
Robb at 4pm at Village Books, 1200 11th St.
671-2626
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS
WORDS 16
16
BY AMY KEPFERLE
14
Cryptic Tales
A STORYTELLER’S SCARY SECRETS
few years ago, Doug Banner had a woman come up
to to him after a scary storytelling event and tell
him that, sorry, but the tale he’d just told wasn’t in
the least bit frightening.
When he saw the same woman again the next day, however,
she marched up to Banner and punched him in the arm. The
reason for the assault? She told him she didn’t think she was
scared—until she drove home and then spent a half-hour in
her car frozen with fear while trying to get the courage to go
up to the front porch and enter her darkened house.
Banner, a longtime member of the Bellingham Storytellers
Guild, says he and the professional yarn-spinners he combines his talents with now use the harrowing experience as
a meter to gauge their audience’s fear factor.
“It’s an indicator of how scary your story is by how long
it stays in your head, and if they punch you afterward,” he
says with a laugh.
When asked if it takes most people a while to realize
they’ve been spooked, Banner says plenty of listeners react directly to the stories at hand. Members of the Guild
have witnessed onsite screaming and gasping and people
have also leapt out of their seats, gotten their arms bruised
by terrified girlfriends clutching them hard enough to hurt
and, in one case, a librarian sprung out of her front-row seat
to turn the lights back on.
Banner posits that those who are brave enough to sit
through all the stories without bolting or outwardly reacting are still getting a thrill—or at least elevating their
heart rates.
“Humans get an adrenaline rush when they’re scared,”
he says. “When you go to an event like this, you can be
A
scared, but you’re still safe. There’s
no risk—except for the deep psychological damage. It’s a rush—like
eating chocolate or riding down Alabama hill on a bike.
To set the mood, Banner says he and
his creative cohorts typically dim the
lights, light candles and draw the listeners in through careful connections
with them. As for costumes, Banner
ATTEND
WHAT: Scary
thinks they’re unnecessary.
Storytelling for
“We just really use the art of lanAdults
guage
and word,” he says.” Tone,
WHEN: 8pm Thurs.,
pacing,
volume—it’s all part of our
Oct. 31
performance
art delivery technique.
WHERE: Fairhaven
Library, 1117 12th St.
Telling a vampire story while dressed
COST: Free
up as a vampire isn’t scary.”
INFO: www.
By working with basic fears that a
bellinghamstory
lot
of people have—whether they’re
tellersguild.org
afraid
of spiders, don’t like to spend
---------------------WHAT: “Dark! A
time in the dark or truly believe in
Halloween Spectacle”
ghosts—Bellingham Storytellers Guild
featuring seven
members then build on those suspiperformers telling
cions to craft their tales of horror.
tales from the crypt
Banner won’t divulge what particuWHEN: 8pm Oct. 31
and Nov. 1
lar stories will be told at the annual
WHERE: Conway Muse
Scary Storytelling for Adults gatherCOST: $14
ing happening Halloween night at the
INFO: www.
Fairhaven Library, but he will let it be
conwaymuse.com
known that all of the tales are true (or
at least partially true).
And, when the spook-night stories are over, Banner and
the rest of the Guild members will be watching to see who
heads for the door. If the crowd isn’t’ quick to disperse,
they’ll know they did something right.
“You can tell how well you scared the audience by how long
they hang out after the lights come back on,” Banner says.
“Oftentimes, they really don’t want to go back outside.”
POE TRY ALIVE: Poets Kevin Murphy, Matthew Brouwer, and Jodee Adams-Moore will be
joined by members of the Bellingham Ukulele
Group for “Poetry Alive! A Night of Poetry and
Music” at 7pm at the Firehouse Performing Arts
Center, 1314 Harris Ave. Suggested donation is
$10; proceeds raised will support the Whatcom
Juvenile Justice Creative Writing Project’s
Kickstarter project.
734-2776 OR WWW.KICKSTARTER.COM
MON., OCT. 28
OPEN MIC: Local writer and teacher Laurel
Leigh will emcee the monthly Open Mic at 7pm
at Village Books. Bring scary tales and poems,
or any creative work in progress.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
TUES., OCT. 29
HARRIS POEMS: Dick Harris will read from
his new collection, Selected Poems: Alaska and
Northwest, at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th
St. James Bertolino will introduce the 79-yearold poet.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
THURS., OCT. 31
HALLOWEEN STORIES: Members of the
Bellingham Storytellers Guild will share family
friendly tales from 4-6pm at Village Books,
1200 11th St. At 7pm, they’ll tell extremely
scary stories for adults and “those brave at
heart” at the Fairhaven Library, 1117 12th St.
Both events are free.
WWW.BELLINGHAMSTORYTELLERSGUILD.ORG
COM M U N I T Y
OCT. 23-24
RUMMAGE SALE: Attend a Fall Rummage
Sale from 9am-3pm Wednesday and 9am-3pm
Thursday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2117
Walnut St.
WWW.STPAULSBELLINGHAM.COM
doit
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
Voted #1 Italian Restaurant
Try our New Full Gluten-Free and Vegetarian Menus!
SUN., OCT. 27
PUNK IN’ RUN CAR SHOW: The 28th
annual “Punkin’ Run” Car Show takes place
from 10am-2pm in the parking lot at Hardware Sales, 2034 James St. Cost is $10 to
enter your car, free for spectators.
WWW.FOURTHCORNERELITES.COM
by Evening Magazine & King 5 TV!
95*
15
$
Four Course Sunset Specials
NOW AVAILABLE DURING LUNCH! ‡Ê££>“‡È«“ÊUÊ->ÌÊEÊ-՘ÊΫ“‡È«“
15 Entrees to choose from
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MON., OCT. 28
PUMPK IN PART Y: A Community Pumpkin
Party takes place from 6-9pm at Whatcom
County Fire District #4, 4141 Britton Loop
Rd. Kids and adults can carve pumpkins,
play games and more. Entry is free.
STAGE 18
EO P L E
GP
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GET OUT 16
IN
Now Offering Ravioli, Gnocchi & Veal
/FX%FTTFSU0QUJPOTtCréme Brulee made In-House
*Offer valid 7 days a week (holidays excluded) For additional offers visit www.granaio.com
WWW.WCFD4.JPG
WORDS 15
16
WORDS
H
10
WWW.SLUMDOCTOR.ORG
Hiway 9 – Van Zandt
C
SLUM DOC TOR FUNDRAISER: Help out
the Slum Doctor Programme at a Fundraising Diner from 6-9pm at Bellingham’s First
Congregational Church, 1220 N. Forest St.
Tickets are $20-$35.
360-592-2297
www.everybodys.com
CURRENTS 10
WWW.PERCHANDPLAY.COM
Dinner is Now Being Served
S
HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL: A costume
contest, old-fashioned carnival games, face
painting, food, balloon artists and more will
be part of a Halloween Carnival happening from 5-7:30pm at Perch & Play, 1707 N.
State St. Tickets are $12-$15.
LI
WWW.COB.ORG
GI T P U B
POOL PUMPK IN PATCH: Kids can swim
to their favorite floating orange orb at the
annual “Pumpkin Patch in the Pool” from
4:30-6:30pm at the Arne Hanna Aquatic
Center, 1114 Potter St. Entry is $5.
Bulgarian Tapenades
We Custom Cut Cheese
French Country Olive Mix
Boneless Lamb Roasts
Manitoban Wild Rice
Organic Hubbard Squash
Great Harvest Breads
KA
733-6749
S
FALL FEST IVAL: Items by local artists
and crafters, baked goods, produce, a quilt
raffle, craft activities, a bratwurst dinner, a
marketplace, a live auction and more will be
part of today’s Fall Festival from 10am-8pm
at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church, 1720 Harris Ave. Entry is free.
FOOD 34
SAT., OCT. 26
Dinner hours
3pm–10pm
360.419.0674
WWW.GRANAIO.COM
[email protected]
£ääÊʜ˜Ì}œ“iÀÞ]Ê-ՈÌiÊ££ä]ʜ՘ÌÊ6iÀ˜œ˜
visit our nursery
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
MAIL 4
Lunch hours
11am–3pm
DO IT 2
DOWNTOWN MEE T ING: The Downtown
Bellingham Partnership will host its monthly
community meeting at 6pm at the Leopold
Retirement Residence, 1224 Cornwall Ave.
Candidates for City Council and the Port
will be invited to come listen to downtown
residents, businesses, and patrons about
issues important to downtown.
VIEWS 8
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS
WED., OCT. 30
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
FAIRHAVEN TRICK OR TREAT: From
3-6pm, costumed kids and their keepers can
head to Fairhaven for the annual Trick or
Treat event. Shops will be decorated for the
holiday, and there will be treats at all (look
for the poster at participating locations.
WWW.FAIRHAVEN.COM
#43.08
october sale!
fruit trees
buy 2, get a 3rd free
large balled and
burlapped trees
40% off
fruit, cider, winter
squash and pumpkins
CASCADIA WEEKLY
DOWNTOWN TRICK OR TREAT: More than
100 downtown businesses will open their
doors for kids from 3-6pm as part of the
annual Downtown Trick or Treat throughout
the urban core. From 4-6pm, there will also
be a Halloween Carnival at the Depot Market
Square, 1100 Railroad Ave. Entry to that
event—which features 13 booths, a bouncy
house, face painters, balloon artists and
circus performers—is $3.
10.23.13
THURS., OCT. 31
15
fall hours: wed-sat 10-5, sun 11-4
closed monday and tuesday
6906 goodwin road, everson | (360) 966-5859
www.cloudmountainfarmcenter.org
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FOOD 34
outside
RU N N I NG
C YCL I NG
B-BOARD 28
H I K I NG
THURS., OCT. 24
MT. BAKER FILM FEST IVAL: View a stellar
selection of winter sports clips from international and local filmmakers at the 14th annual
Mt. Baker Film Festival starting at 7pm at the
Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St.
Show up early to peruse the newest goods from
local ski/board shop vendors and play to win
a chance at a 2013-14 Mt. Baker season pass.
Entry is $8-$10; season pass holders get in
free (while tickets are available).
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
Elk Night, Elk Fright
CAUGHT IN THE RUT
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
MAIL 4
BY TRAIL RAT
DO IT 2
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
FRI., OCT. 25
16
’ll never forget all those spectral, unearthly sounds they made. Even now—
10 years later—that primordial cacophony of ritualistic articulations echoes
through my soul.
There were only two of us working along the headwaters of the Missouri River
that fateful, near-indescribable week. We were installing directional signposts
through a vast, maze-like expanse of upland forest meadows known to accommodate some of the most prolific concentrations of migratory megafauna endemic to
the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.
Of course, the ground up there proved fiercely stubborn—chock full of inconveniently situated rocks and all manner of labor-intensive subterranean surprises.
On average, it took us the better part of two hours just to excavate a post
hole. A ridiculous amount of time, really, especially considering autumnal
weather conditions that season were uncharacteristically ideal. We were busting
our balls to the max.
Yet, even so, we could only relish our once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to luxuriate in such an intimate and completely unfettered foray among the stupefyingly
resplendent surroundings of Yellowstone country.
Meanwhile, the deeper we worked our way into the remotest throes of these
isolated park lands, the more conspicuous grew the presence of the local breeding
I
population of Rocky Mountain elk.
Hundreds of freshly made hoof-prints
and telltale pellet droppings crisscrossed the tawny hillsides and draws.
We couldn’t dig down more than a few
feet without crunching our tools into
one interred generation of Cervidae
bones or another.
They were out there, alright—lots
of them. But still, even as late as our
sixth and final night on this project, we
hadn’t seen or heard a single one.
However, just moments after we
crawled into our tents on that moony,
eerily lit evening, we were beguiled to
register the first audible stirrings of
their impending onrush.
What began as the faintest smattering of isolated yelps, squeals and bugling on the forested hill rims above
escalated quickly into a combative chorus of snorting, grunting and vigorous
interlocking of antlers that seemed to
creep closer toward our camp.
“Oh, no!” I soon heard my crew-mate
scream as he hastily unzipped himself
from his tent amid a throng of desperate clattering and heavy thumping.
“Not here! NOT ME!”
Peering pensively out through my
bug screen, I was stunned to see the
type of trouble that had befallen him.
Looming directly behind his tan-colored, half-dome tent stood the largest
8-point bull I’ve ever seen. As its spearsharp rack of antlers gleamed lethally
through the shadows, this extremely
horny, thousand-pound ungulate raised
a definitive front leg forward and began pawing the ground with lusty determination.
“Escape while you still can!” I
screamed. “Bruiser’s got serious eyes
for your tent!”
In a flash, I saw the glow-white,
buck-naked form of my crew-mate
streak through the night, whimpering
profusely as he dragged his sleeping
bag off into a nearby stand of protectively thick, dog hair timber—where
I, too, soon joined him in hiding. It
was a night we’d survive, but never,
ever forget.
WILD THINGS: Kids, adults and adventurers
can join Wild Whatcom Walks for “Wild Things”
excursions from 9:30-11am every Friday in
October at the Stimpson Nature Reserve. Entry
is by donation.
WWW.WILDWHATCOM.ORG
BACK YARD VOLCANO: Geology professor
Doug McKeever leads a multimedia presentation
focusing on “Mt. Baker: The Active Volcano in
Our Backyard” at 6:30pm at Kendall Elementary
School, 7457 Kendall Rd. Entry is free.
305-3600
THE EDGE OF ALASK A: Learn more about the
challenging expeditions and intimate daily life
of adventure trekker and author Erin McKittrick
and her husband, Hig, when she shares tales
from her book Small Feet, Big Land: Adventure,
Home, and Family on the Edge of Alaska at 7pm
at Village Books, 1200 11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
OCT. 25-26
GORE AND LORE TOUR: The Good Time Girls
combine history with a bit of horror at the
final “Gore and Lore” tours of the month at
7pm Friday in Fairhaven (in front of Skylark’s)
and 5pm Saturday in downtown Bellingham
(at the Black Drop Coffee House). Entry is $18
and includes a drink ticket.
WWW.GOODTIMEGIRLSBHAM.COM
SAT., OCT. 26
WALK ING CLUB: Whether you’re looking to
improve or compete, all are welcome at the
weekly Fairhaven Walking Club led by Cindy
Paffumi starting at 8am at various locations in
Fairhaven. All paces are welcome.
676-4955 OR 319-3350
GARDEN CLASS: Debra Olberg of Secret
Garden Designs focuses on “Putting Your Garden to Bed” at a free workshop at 9am at the
Garden Spot Nursery, 900 Alabama St. Please
register in advance.
676-5480
WOOLLE Y CROSS: From 9:30am-3pm, cyclocross fans will want to head to the Northern
State Recreation Area for Cascade Cross’s
“Woolley Cross.” Entry is $15-$30; races are
available for a variety of ages.
WWW.CASCADECROSS.COM
ZOMBIE 5K: Participants can try to avoid
“pushing up daisies” at the Skagit Valley
Zombie 5K starting at 10am at the La Conner
Club, 305 N. Sixth St. Those who take part will
run for their lives as zombies try to steal their
“health flags.” Infected runners and the walking dead are all welcome at Celebration Village
until 1pm. Entry is $50.
WWW.SKAGITVALLEYZOMBIE5K.ORG
BONESHAKER BIKE FEST: Enjoy the Skagit
Walla Walla Vintners
(360) 739-4672
BREEZIN’ AND FREEZIN’: Raise funds and
win prizes in support of Special Olympics Washington by taking part in todays
“Breezin’ and Freezin’ for a Reason” Polar
Plunge and 5K run starting at 10am at
Bloedel Donovan Park, 2214 Electric Ave.
There’s no fee to register; check the website
for fundraising details.
WWW.BREEZINANDFREEZIN2013.KINTERA.ORG
TUES., OCT. 29
CROSS-COUNTRY BASICS: Learn more
about where to go and how to get started
when Sharmon Hill leads a “Cross-Country
Skiing Basics” clinic at 6pm at REI, 400 36th
St. Register in advance for the free course.
647-8955 OR WWW.REI.COM
VOLCANO MONITORING: Scientist John
Ewert focuses on “Volcano Monitoring in
the Cascades” at a 7pm presentation at
Whatcom Museum’s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St. Suggested donation is $3.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
Nick James
SKYSHIP
ACADEMY
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Saturday, Oct. 26th, 7pm
AND
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Join travel expert Rick
Steves—acclaimed for
his bestselling guidebook
series, and public TV
and radio shows—as he
shares the latest in smart
European travel.
Tuesday,
Nov. 19th,
7:00pm
at Bellingham
High School
PATIO is OPEN
appy
H
our
Monday–Friday
3PM
Lester & Hyldahl
DUI/Criminal • Bankruptcy • Personal Injury
Helping Good People in Hard Times
Tom Lester - Doug Hyldahl - Lee Grochmal
Attorneys at Law
WORDS 16
Friday, Oct. 25th, 7pm
the Heart of Fairhaven since 1985
CURRENTS 10
Adventure, Home,
and Family on the
Edge of Alaska
VIEWS 8
BIG LAND
GET OUT 16
60$//)((7
MAIL 4
LUTHERWOOD TRAIL RACE: Get a peek at
old-growth forests, small creeks, meadows
and more at the “Lutherwood, Wouldn’t
You?” 5K beginning at 9am at Lutherwood
Camp, 1185 Roy Rd. Great prizes and a
post-race brunch are included in your $15
entry fee.
STAGE 18
Erin McKittrick
• Enjoy dinner and travel conversation with Rick Steves
Nov. 13-14. See Willows-inn.com
for details and registration information.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
WWW.HAMSTERENDURANCERUNNING.ORG
ART 20
Two Free Events at Village Books
733-4433 OR WWW.MTBAKERBIKECLUB.ORG
RUN WILD WHATCOM: A Hamster Endurance running event, “Run Wild Whatcom,”
begins at 9am at the northwest corner
of Bayview Cemetery (at Alabama and
Electric). The event is described as being
“part race, part scavenger hunt, part routefinding, part Halloween celebration. Once
participants begin, they’ll visit three points
within Whatcom Falls Park, collecting a
token at each. The order and the route you
take is up to you. Entry is $10-$35.
VMZLQHPHUFKDQWVFRP
360.671.2420
DO IT 2
RABBIT RIDE: Join members of the Mt.
Baker Bike Club for the weekly “Rabbit
Ride” starting at 8:30am at Fairhaven Bike
& Ski, 1108 11th St. The 32-mile route
sees riders heading down Chuckanut and
back via Lake Samish.
independent service & repair
10.23.13
SUN., OCT. 27
)ULGD\2FWWK
#43.08
(360) 595-2218 OR WWW.
LAKEWHATCOMRAILWAY.COM
SUBARU
TASTING
MUSIC 22
WWW.BONESHAKERBIKEFEST.COM
AUTUMN TRAIN: Call the number below to
secure a ride on the Lake Whatcom Railway’s
“Autumn Train” leaving at noon from its
Acme locale. Entry is $12.50 for kids and
$24 for adults.
FILM 26
7KXUVGD\2FWWK
B-BOARD 28
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Bakery
now available
every Wednesday
The only
DEDICATED GF
Mount Eden TASTING
bakery in town
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Valley scenery via seven different routes
ranging from 4 to 25 miles—and featuring names such as “Crossing the Abyss,”
“Zombie Loop,” and “Dirty Devil’s Ride”—
as part the annual Boneshaker Bicycle
Festival starting at 10am at the La Conner
Boys & Girls Club. In addition to the selfguided excursions (for which costumes
are encouraged) there’ll be special guest
speakers, live music and entertainment,
bike decorating, bike safety primers, human and bike costume contests, a pancake
breakfast and much more. Entry is $45 per
person, $90 for a four-person family or $75
for tandem riders.
FOOD 34
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Read more! VillageBooks.com
17
Tickets $5 available at Village
Books & BrownPaperTickets.com.
7LFNHWVSURFHHGVWREHQHÀW
%+6376$
$OVR
VILLAGE BOOKS
1200 11th St., Bellingham
360.671.2626
360.733.5774
[email protected]
doit
FOOD 34
staGe
B-BOARD 28
T H E AT E R
DA NCE
PROF I L ES
ONSTAGE
OCT. 23-25
EQUUS: Western Washington University’s
theater arts program presents showings of the
drama Equus at 7:30pm Wednesday through
Friday at the school’s Performing Arts Center.
Tickets are $8-$12.
650-6146 OR WWW.TICKETS.WWU.EDU
THURS., OCT. 24
FILM 26
GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Watch “The Good, the
Bad and the Ugly” at 8pm every Thursday at
the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. At 10pm,
stick around for the “Project.” Entry is $4-$7.
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
MUSIC 22
OCT. 24-26
ART 20
LIT TLE SHOP OF HORRORS: The musical
known as Little Shop of Horrors shows for the
final weekend at 7:30pm Thurs. and 8pm Fri.Sat. at the Anacortes Community Theatre, 918
M Ave. Tickets are $20.
WWW.ACTTHEATRE.COM
STAGE 18
OCT. 25-26
GET OUT 16
NO EXIT: Northwest Passage Theater Collective
presents a newly translated version of Jean-Paul
Sarte’s existential masterpiece, No Exit, starting
this weekend at 8pm shows Friday and Saturday
at iDiOM Theater, 1318 Cornwall Ave. Tickets to
the performance—which was directed by Glenn
Hergenhahn, and features actors he’s been
working with in New York City—are $10.
WWW.IDOMTHEATER.COM
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
HELLINGHAM: Who dunnit? Find out when
the perennially popular “Hellingham” closes
its October run with 8pm and 10pm shows at
the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. Tickets are
$10-$12.
18
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Haunting Jaunts
DEATH BEHIND EVERY DOOR
irst dates can be scary as hell. But if you play your cards right, making
plans to attend one of the many haunted houses happening this week
will likely assure that you get at least a little closer to the object of
your affection. After all, getting rushed by a zombie in a dark hallway is as
good an excuse as any to hold someone a little closer—just make sure they
haven’t morphed into a member of the undead.
I’ve attended the Halloween haunt in Lynden known as the Scream Fair the
last two years, and I’m here to tell you that if you don’t elevate your vocal
cords at some point during the night—whether it’s in the parking lot after a
bloodthirsty flesh eater knocks on your car window or while you’re deep within the confines of the barn where the spooky proceedings take place—there’s
something wrong with you. This year’s theme is “Escape from Dead Block,”
and it promises to be horrifying. “You are trapped inside a maximum-security
prison with the flesh-eating dead,” reads a memo on the group’s website.
“There is no escape!” Sounds fun, right? When: 6:30-9:30pm Thurs., Oct. 24
and Thurs., Oct. 31 and 6:30-10:30pm Oct. 25-26. Where: NW Washington Fairgrounds, Lynden Cost: $13-$24 More info: www.lastchanceproductions.com
Infants and toddlers will want to stay at home when Nightmare at the
Spark Museum brings scary science to the forefront at Bellingham’s Spark Museum of Electrical Invention Oct. 25-31. The Frankenstein-inspired electrical
shows—which are tailored for Halloween week—include, according to a press
release, “shocking sounds, spooky fog, sudden bolts of lightening and bizarre
electrical antics.” Examples include a “schizoid” talking robot named Frank-
F
lin, a singing Tesla Coil named Elvis, and a variety
of mad scientists who will perform last rites for an
evil fellow named Dr. Morbius. Additionally, there
will be visits from Benjamin Franklinstein, and,
for an extra donation, visitors can step inside the
Cage of Death, where they’ll be “swarmed with 4
million volts of raw electricity.” If you’re faint
of heart—or have a pacemaker—you’ll probably
want to sit that part out. When: 7pm and 9pm
Fri.-Sat., Oct. 25-26 and Tues.-Thurs., Oct. 29-31
Where: 1312 Bay St. Cost: $8-$10 More info:
www.sparkmuseum.org
“Bad Things Happen When You’re Waiting for
a Train” is the oh-so-creepy tagline the folks
running the Haunted Depot at the Depot Arts
Center in Anacortes have concocted for your
nocturnal visits. According to their fictitious
lore, it’s the 50th anniversary of the crash of
the Anacortes Red Line Express, and that means
very bad things are about to happen. You see,
the “special cargo” one of the train cars carried
was full of something(s) quite horrifying, and
the frightful beings that have been unleashed
are now ready to meet you. The storyline was
concocted by Brian Hurst—the guy responsible
for the Haunted Hospital in Sedro-Woolley—so
chances are you’ll forget it’s all just an act.
When: 7-10pm Fri.-Sat., Oct. 25-26 (a kid-themed
“Family Haunt” happens from 11am-2pm Sat. Oct.
26) Where: 611 R Ave., Anacortes Cost: $5 More
info: www.anacortesfarmersmarket.org
OCT. 25-27
DRACULA: Free Key Productions presents
showings of Bram Stoker’s Dracula at 7:30pm
Friday and Saturday, and 2pm Sunday at the
Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris
Ave. Tickets are $15.
WWW.FREEKEYPRODUCTIONS.COM
SAT., OCT. 26
COSTUME AND PROP SALE: Attend a
Costume and Prop Sale from 11am-3pm at the
Bellingham Theatre Guild, 1600 H St.
733-1811
THE JOY LUCK CLUB: View a theatrical
version of Amy Tan’s 1989 novel, The Joy Luck
Club, at 8pm at the Mount Baker Theatre, 104
N. Commercial St. Tickets are $20-$42.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
SUN., OCT. 27
DYNAMO: Liven up your Sunday nights at
“Dynamo” shows at 8pm at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. Entry is $5.
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
TUES., OCT. 29
ART IST IN RESIDENC Y: Krissa Woiwod will be
looking into the idea of using several devices to
guide a short piece of theater for her upcoming
“Sketchopedia” show from 6-8pm every Tuesday
in October at Temple Bar, 306 W. Champion St.
Come prepared to write. Donations are welcome.
WWW.TEMPLEBARBELLINGHAM.COM
OCT. 30-31
HAUNTED BEER GARDEN: Boundary Bay and
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FOOD 34
Make.Shift team up for a “Haunted House at
Boundary Bay” from 7-11pm Wednesday and
Thursday at the brewery’s beer garden at
1107 Railroad Ave. Entry is $5.
WWW.BBAYBREWERY.COM
B-BOARD 28
OCT. 31-NOV. 2
FILM 26
ROCKY HORROR: Local actors will act out key
scenes and sing songs at viewings of the classic camp film known as The Rocky Horror Picture Show at 8pm and 11:59pm Oct. 31-Nov. 2
at the Mount Baker Theatre’s Walton Theatre,
104 N. Commercial St. Tickets are $9.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
MUSIC 22
DA NCE
FRI., OCT. 25
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BRD OPEN REHEARSAL: Get a sneak peek
at Bellingham Repertory Dance’s upcoming fall show at an open rehearsal from
11:30am-1:30pm at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave.
WWW.BHAMREP.ORG
SCOT T ISH MASQUERADE BALL: The
Bellingham Scottish Country Dancers host a
“Masquerade Ball: An Evening with Spirits”
starting at 6:30pm at the Majestic, 1027 N.
Forest St. Tickets are $15-$50.
WWW.BELLINGHAMSCD.ORG
SWING CONNEC T ION: Dance and listen to
big band sounds when the Swing Connection
performs from 7-9pm at the Leopold, 1224
Cornwall Ave. Entry is by donation.
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GET OUT 16
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DANCEBELLINGHAMDANCE.COM
REEL COMPE T IT ION: The Clan Heather
Dancers will focus on Scottish Highland
dancing at today’s “Reel Competition” from
9am-5pm at Whatcom Community College,
237 W. Kellogg Rd. Entry is $3-$6.
STAGE 18
7\ISPJ;HSR!6J[YK WT
DANCE BELLINGHAM: Young Life in
Bellingham presents its third annual “Dance
Bellingham Dance” competition and fundraiser at 7:45pm at the Mount Baker Theatre,
104 N. Commercial St. Tickets are $20-$125.
10.23.13
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
ART 20
DRACULA: Northwest Ballet presents its
two-act ballet about the undead, Dracula,
at 7:30pm at Mount Vernon’s McIntyre Hall,
2501 E. College Way. Tickets to the big
event are $24-$35.
WWW.BELLINGHAMCOUNTRYDANCE.ORG
THURS., OCT. 31
THRILLINGHAM: The Bellingham Zombies
team up for the 6th annual “Thrillingham”—
which sees the undead dancing along to
Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”—at 8:30pm at
Maritime Heritage Park.
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THRILLINGHAM
CASCADIA WEEKLY
CONTRA DANCE: JP & the O.K. Rhythm
Boys will provide live music and Seattle’s
Joe Michaels will do the calling at
tonight’s Contra Dance from 7-10:30pm at
the Fairhaven Library, 1117 12th St. No
partner or experience is necessary. Entry
is $6-$10.
#43.08
WWW.SWINGCONNECTION.ORG
19
doit
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
visual
OPEN I NGS
Dead on Arrival
THE CORPSE AS ART
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
MAIL 4
BY AMY KEPFERLE
DO IT 2
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
G A L L ER I ES
20
n Mexico, those who have passed on to another plane of existence—yes, I mean those have died—are rarely forgotten.
Proof of this can be found every year in early November, when
family members and friends celebrate their lives via Dia de los Muertos—otherwise known as Day of the Dead. The events take place November 1 and 2, and often feature those seeking connections with
their dearly departed visiting graves with gifts of their loved ones’
favorite foods and, sometimes, a few of their possessions.
Our southern neighbors aren’t the only ones who use Dia de los
Muertos as a valid excuse to celebrate the dead. Parades featuring
elaborate skull-related costumes are common in many cities across
the United States, and Bellingham itself has hosted a few events over
the years—complete with art, altars, music and even processions.
Although there’s not a parade scheduled for this year, that doesn’t
mean residents don’t have any access to related revelry.
In addition to checking out a month-long Day of the Dead Art
show currently on display at the Lucky Monkey, those who are interested in making their faces resemble lovely skulls can do so during
their various Halloween celebrations. A Day of the Dead Storytell-
I
P ROF I L E S
ing event also takes with the historical hussies
known as the Good Time Girls Nov. 2 at the Redlight—a State Street site that is also the locale
where, in 1905, one of Bellingham’s most gruesome murders took place (the grisly details will
be revealed later that night).
If you can get enough people together, you
might also consider hosting your own party or
procession sometime during the week—either
on Halloween proper or on the Mexican holiday.
When it comes to costumes, you’ll want to keep
a few things in mind.
“The skull is an important
theme, with sugar skulls offered
to the dead and living,” reads a
tutorial on www.squidoo.com .
“The sugar skull has influenced
the face painting and costumes
that can be seen alongside the
ATTEND more traditional skull-shaped
WHAT: 5th
masks in Day of the Dead celeannual “Day of
brations,” the how-to continues.
the Dead” Art
“The makeup is based on the
Show
traditional skull with darkened
WHEN: Through
eye and nose sockets, but also
Nov. 2
WHERE: Lucky
includes intricate and someMonkey, 312 W.
times colorful details on the rest
Champion St.
of the face. These include petCOST: Entry is
als around the eye sockets plus
free
a spiderweb on the forehead and
INFO: 393-4068
-----------------often hearts and flowers.”
WHAT: Dia de los
As marigolds are one of the
Muertos Scary
most
important symbols of Day
Storytime with
of
the
Dead festivities—during
the Good Time
the
holiday,
they are traditionGirls
WHEN: 8pm Sat.,
ally scattered around the floor,
Nov. 2
streets and even graveyards
WHERE:
in Mexico—the bright yellow
Redlight, 1017 N.
flower is also often incorporatState St.
ed into the mix when it comes
COST: $10;
includes a
time to put a costume together.
specialty
Similarly, skulls of many shapes
beverage
and sizes are often sported—
INFO: www.
either via face paint or as a
goodtime
fearsome accessory.
girlsbham.com
For more inspiration, you
may want to head to the Lucky Monkey to get
a closer look at the fifth-annual exhibit, which
will hang through Dia de los Muertos (Nov. 2).
In addition to the pieces created by local artists, there are also unique thematic offerings and
sculptures from both Mexico and Peru to peruse.
While some may use the opportunity to dress up
as an attractive corpse as an excuse to party, try
to keep your departed loved ones in mind as you
prepare for your funereal festivities. They may be
gone, but they’re not forgotten—and they might
be watching.
FRI., OCT. 25
FIG WORK SHOP: “Scary Art” will be the
focus of a kid-centered FIG Art Club workshop
from 2-4pm at the Whatcom Museum’s Family
Interactive Gallery, 250 Flora St. Entry is $5-$7.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
SAT., OCT. 26
FIBER ARTS: Members of the Whatcom
Weavers Guild will be on hand from 12-4pm
at Whatcom Museum’s Old City Hall, 121
Prospect St. Peruse a variety of original fiber
creations, watch demonstrations and try your
hand at weaving. Kids are welcome. Entry is
free with admission.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
ARTPOCALYPSE ENDING: A closing reception for “Artpocalypse: Art Will Never Die”
takes place from 6-8pm at Fourth Corner
Frames, 311 W. Holly St. The exhibit—which
features works by George Jartos, Anita Boyle,
Mary Jo Maute, Vikki Jackson, John McCulloch, and Amy Armitage—is a sideways look at
the future and the art in it.
734-1340
ONGOI NG E X H I BI TS
ALLIED ARTS: Faye Hayes, Brian Simpson,
and Doug Banner will share their natureinspired works at the “Serene Certainty”
exhibit through Oct. 26 at Allied Arts, 1418
Cornwall Ave.
WWW.ALLIEDARTS.ORG
ANCHOR ART: The multi-artist “Dry Ice:
Shaping the Northwest Landscape” exhibit
will be up through Nov. 24 in Anacortes at
Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave.
WWW.ANCHORARTSPACE.OR
ART WOOD: “Lamps & Lights for Fall” shows
through October at Artwood, 1000 Harris Ave.
WWW.ARTWOODGALLERY.COM
CEDARWORK S: Peruse and purchase a variety of Native American art from 10am-6pm
Wed.-Sat. at the CedarWorks Art Gallery, 217
Holly St.
647-6933
CHUCK ANUT BREWERY: Paintings and
prints by Nicole Brauch will be on display
through Nov. 16 at the Chuckanut Brewery,
601 W. Holly St.
WWW.CHUCKANUTBREWERYANDKITCHEN.COM
DEMING LIBRARY: Sheila Oberg’s oil paintings will be on display through Nov. 2 at the
Deming Library, 5044 Mt. Baker Hwy.
305-3600
FISHBOY GALLERY: Check out the contemporary folk art of RR Clark from 1:30-5pm every
Mon.-Fri. at the FishBoy Gallery, 617 Virginia St.
714-0815 OR WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
GOOD EARTH: Coiled cray creations by Anne
Marie Cooper will be highlighted through October when “Sinuosity” shows at Good Earth
Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave.
WWW.GOODEARTHPOTS.COM
HONE Y SALON: Nature-based artist,
designer and teacher Jill Bliss shows “Tiny
Terrains” through October at Honey Salon,
310 W. Holly St.
WWW.JILLBLISS.COM
Studio
FOOD 34
JANSEN ART CENTER: Sign up for classes
and workshops at Lynden’s new Jansen Art
Center, 321 Front St.
WWW.JANSENARTCENTER.ORG
LUCIA DOUGLAS: View new sculptures
by Lummi Island artist Ann Morris and new
paintings by Matthew Waddington and E.V.
Wick through Nov. 9 at Lucia Douglas Gallery,
1415 13th St.
Galactica
OPENS NOVEMBER 3, 2013
WWW.LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
Loves
FILM 26
MAKESHIF T: “Mutants ‘R’ Us,” a multimedia group show featuring reinterpretations
of superheroes and villains, can be seen
through Oct. 26 at Make.Shift Art Space,
306 Flora St.
MUSIC 22
WWW.MAKESHIFTPROJECT.COM
You
ART 20
MONA: Spokane artist Ric Gendron’s “Rattlebone” exhibit can be seen through Jan. 5 at
La Conner’s Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S.
First St. “Geology from the Permanent Collection” is also on display.
B-BOARD 28
doit
WWW.MUSEUMOFNWART.ORG
STAGE 18
ST. JOSEPH’S: “Contemporary Aboriginal
Art: Australian Dreamings” shows through
Jan. 26 at PeaceHealth St. Joseph’s Medical
Center.
WATERWORK S: Painting and sculpture will
be highlighted at Dana Roberts’ and Matthew
Gray Palmer’s “Elemental Senses” exhibit
through Oct. 27 in Friday Harbor at WaterWorks Gallery, 315 Argyle St.
3
VIEWS 8
WWW.SMITHANDVALLEE.COM
Largest selection
of clones in
Bellingham
gs
in
Free Tast
Live Music
Apples, Ap
ples, Apple
s!
WWW.WATERWORKSGALLERY.COM
WWW.WESTERNGALLERY.WWU.EDU
WHATCOM ART MARKE T: From 10am-6pm
every Friday through Sunday, stop by the
Whatcom Art Guild’s Art Market at Fairhaven’s
Waldron Building, 1314 12th St.
WWW.WHATCOMARTGUILD.ORG
WHATCOM MUSEUM: “Treasures from the
Trunk: The Story of J.J. Donovan” and “Romantically Modern: Pacific Northwest Landscapes” can currently be viewed at Whatcom
Museum’s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
First Time Patients
recieve free Edible
and
Refer a patient for
a free pre-roll.
Open 10am-7pm Mon-Sun
360-733-3838
1326 E. Laurel St.
Bellingham, WA 98225
samishwayholistic.com
• Over 6 Hard Ciders on tap, Pumpkin Smash, Hard
Cider Workshops, Guess the Apple Bin Weight
Raffle & Sweepstakes!
• Live Music Daily w/Deception Past,
Warren G. Hardings, Prozac Mountain Boys
& The Gallus Brothers.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
WESTERN GALLERY: “Looking Back:
Photography in the ’70s” shows through Nov.
22 on the Western Washington University
campus at Western Gallery. The show examines new formal and conceptual developments
in photography in the ‘70s. Entry is free and
open to the public.
EXTENDED HOURS
Visit bellewoodacres.com
for more event info and
Like Us on Facebook
for updates.
6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden
360-318-7720 | www.bellewoodfarms.com
MAIL 4
SMITH & VALLEE: View new paintings by
Todd Horton through Oct. 27 at Edison’s
Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave.
New Clone Connection
DO IT 2
WWW.SKAGITOCOUNT Y.NET/MUSEUM
rd Annual CiderFest
Nov. 1-3
10.23.13
SK AGIT HISTORICAL MUSEUM: “Have a
Seat: A History in Chairs” shows through Oct.
25 at La Conner’s Skagit County Historical
Museum, 501 S. 4th St.
CURRENTS 10
www.vanishing-ice.org
WWW.LACONNERQUILTS.COM
#43.08
QUILT MUSEUM: View the Fibre Art
Network’s “Abstracted” exhibit, Elizabeth
Barton’s “Inspired to Design,” and “Best of
the 2013 Quilt & Fiber Arts Festival” at the
La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 702 S.
Second St.
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
WWW.LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
21
Check us out online
for more info!
FOOD 34
music
SHOW PREVIEWS › › RUMOR HAS IT
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MANY OF YOU already know this, but in case you
BY CAREY ROSS
Happy Halloween
IT’S SPOOKTACULAR!
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC
22
MUSIC 22
Rumor Has It
22
CON BRO CHILL
t is true that I haven’t donned a Halloween costume in at least a decade,
probably longer. It is also true that I don’t hand out candy at my house
and generally avoid the downtown tricking and treating action. Further,
I don’t bob for apples, carve pumpkins or ride around on a broomstick.
Given all that, one might be led to believe I am filled with Halloween
humbug. But that is simply not the case.
I love Halloween, the fact that I am not moved to actually participate in
most of its traditions notwithstanding. And I especially love living in a town
that goes a little Halloween crazy every year.
This year, the hallowed holiday falls midweek, on Thursday, which, in many
locales would probably signal more toned-down festivities, but in Bellingham simply means Halloween will be celebrated on Oct. 31 and either the
weekend before or after. Double the Halloween pleasure, double the Halloween fun. Per usual, music is a big part of this mix, and what follows is a
snapshot of just some of the activities at your disposal both before and after
the witching hour strikes.
Boundary Bay Brewery: Holidays and Boundary Bay have become so synonymous in Bellingham that many of us don’t even bother to look elsewhere
when it comes to celebrating such events. This year, they’re looking to outdo
themselves (if such a thing is even possible) by teaming up with Make.Shift
to create the “Nightmare on Railroad Ave.: A Haunted House.” I’ve been to
enough events executed by both Boundary and Make.Shift to know whatever
the two entities have planned for the beer garden will put the “spook” in
“spooktacular.” Plus, since all the proceeds from the haunted house will
I
go to Make.Shift, you can get the
bejesus scared out of you for a good
cause. And you can quell your fears
and slake your thirst with music by
the Legendary Chucklenuts and Luke
Warm & the Moderates, and the release of this season’s first batch of
Cabin Fever. WHERE: 1107 Railroad
Ave. INFO: www.bbaybrewery.com
Cabin Tavern: The Cabin is just
one of many music venues that will
try and appease the Halloween-hungry masses by offering up holidaythemed shows on both Halloween
and the weekend preceding it. So, for
all of you who can only party during
the weekend, feel free to don your
costumes on Sat., Oct. 26 and head
to the wee bar on Holly Street for
a “Day of the Dead” show (yes, we
know Oct. 26 isn’t actually the Day
of the Dead, but it’s not Halloween
either, so feel free to let it slide) featuring King Hush Hush and friends.
don’t, I’ll fill you in: Craigslist Missed Connections
are my life. They are the first thing on the internet
that I check out every day, and an especially good
(or bad, as the case may be) Missed Connection
can make my whole day.
If you’re not a dedicated Craigslister like myself,
it might interest you to know that Missed Connections are essentially the equivalent of the “I Saw
You” ads that can be found in many newspapers
and online. Around these parts, they typically go
something like, “I saw you at Fred Meyer. You were
wearing yoga pants. We glanced at each other a
few times and I thought we had a spark. Coffee?
Write me back and tell me what I had in my grocery basket.” In other words, they tend to be general enough that no one would actually be able to
discern who they’re for and strikingly lacking in
originality.
Every now and
then, however, I
come across a good
one. Such as the one
that appeared a few
days ago titled “Im
Issy You” and was
a simple transcripBY CAREY ROSS
tion of the Zorbatron song of the same name. What is this? A Missed
Connection that features some of my very favorite
local music? Be still my beating heart. Although
the Missed Connection in question was not for me
(they never are), I’d like to commend its author for
his impeccable taste in local music and further express the hope that he gets the girl, whoever she
might be. I’d also like to use this as an example
of the incredible way an album that barely existed
when it was released 10 years ago has lived on and
resonated with people. So, feel free to unleash that
new album you’re reportedly working on, Zorbatron.
I’d say we’re all more than ready for it.
Other than that, I’d like to draw your attention
to a show happening Sat., Oct. 26 at the Redlight
featuring Benjamin Von Wildenhaus. When Wildenhaus isn’t earning his musical keep as one-third
of Federation X (who are playing next door, at
the Green Frog, later the same night as a sort of
delayed album release show), he makes his own
music—and what weird and wonderful music it is.
Most recently, I saw him play at Total Fest in Montana, and, out of all the bands/musicians I sussed
during the festival, it was the seersucker-suited,
one-man-band action of Wildenhaus that was my
hands-down favorite. Get yourself to the Redlight
and get ready to get weird.
Lastly, I’d like to send a shout out to my new
best friends from Jon Durham’s sixth-grade class
at Samish Woods Montessori. I had the opportunity to hang out with a group of them who are
producing the Monsoon, the Samish Woods student
paper (which I can’t wait to read), and it was easily
the highlight of my week. Stay curious, kids. Ask
all the questions. Use your voices wisely. Probably
I should also urge you to clean your rooms and
be nice to your teachers, but I’m pretty sure your
parents already have that advice on lockdown.
COMMUNIT Y BAND EXHIBIT ION: The 5th annual
Community Band Exhibition will feature marching band
field show performances and music from Squalicum,
Sehome, Mount Baker, Meridian, Ferndale, BurlingtonEdison, and Bellingham high schools at 6:45pm at Civic
Field, 1355 Civic Field Way. Entry is by donation.
[email protected]
B-BOARD 28
WED., OCT. 23
FOOD 34
musicevents
FRI., OCT. 25
ANGELO RONDELLO: Pieces by Debussy, Liszt, and
Ravel will be on the musical menu when lauded pianist
Angelo Rondello performs at 7pm at Whatcom Museum’s
Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St. Entry is $5-$15.
MUSIC 22
MUSIC
22
WWW.FIREHOUSEPERFORMINGARTSCENTER.COM
ART 20
TRIBUTE JAZZ: Pianist Miles Black, drummer Julian
MacDonough, and bassist Chuck Kistler will perform
“Tribute Jazz: The Music of Red Garland” at 7pm at the
Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave.
Entry is $10-$15.
FILM 26
THURS., OCT. 24
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
SUN., OCT. 27
ART OF JAZZ: The Anton Schwartz Quintet performs
at the Jazz Project’s monthly “Art of Jazz” concert and
gathering from 4-6:30pm at Bellingham Arts Academy
for Youth, 1059 N. State St. Entry is $10-$16 at the door.
WWW.JAZZPROJECT.ORG
SOUND HEALING: Attend a “Sound Healing” performance with Kristen Rubin at 6pm at 8 Petals Yoga,
1317 Commercial St., #203. Tickets are $15-$20.
GET OUT 16
SK AGIT SYMPHONY: Pianist Angela Kraft Cross will be
the featured soloist when the Skagit Symphony presents
its Gala Concert at 7:30pm at Mount Vernon’s McIntyre
Hall, 2501 E. College Way. Tickets are $20-$40.
WORDS 16
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
CURRENTS 10
YOUTH SYMPHONY: Members of the Fidalgo Youth
Symphony will perform at a Fall Concert at 1pm at
Mount Vernon’s McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way.
Tickets are $10-$15.
VIEWS 8
SAT., OCT. 26
STAGE 18
WWW.ANGELORONDELLO.COM
JAMIE SIEBER: Internationally renowned electric cellist Jami Sieber performs at 7pm in the Encore Room at
the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. Tickets
are $15 general, $24 if you want to attend a pre-show
reception with Sieber.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
WED., OCT. 30
VE TERANS CHOIR: The award-winning New Directions
Veterans Choir performs at 7:30pm at the Mount Baker
Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. Tickets to see the a
cappella ensemble are $20-$39.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKETHEATRE.COM
WWU STUDENTS
PACIFIC BACKPACKS
$29.95 W/SCHOOL ID
Brenthaven Premium Cases for Mobile Technology
› 909 Harris Ave ›
MAIL 4
WWW.WHATCOMYOGA.COM
DO IT 2
31 lineup, it would have to be Voyager,
who will do their very best impression
of Motley Crue—and a spot-on impression it is. But this isn’t the only time
Voyager will take the Shakedown stage
in the name of Halloween. They’ll also
appear Oct. 26 with the appropriately
named Halloqueen, who will do their
very best to channel Freddie Mercury
and Co. WHERE: 1212 N. State St. INFO:
www.shakedownbellingham.com
The Underground: Halloween parties abound in Bellingham, and the
folks at the Underground aren’t ones
to miss out on all that action. They
too will host multiple Halloween parties, the first one happening Oct. 26
after Spaceband finishes up their set
(knowing Spaceband and their vast
repertoire of songs, they very well may
have some holiday-themed tricks up
their collective sleeve). But all that
is just the warm-up for the big day,
and when Halloween rolls around, the
party will be in full swing at the expansive nightclub. Costumes are, of
course, encouraged, so bust out your
best disguise and plan your trip Underground accordingly. WHERE: 211 E.
Chestnut St. INFO: 306-3178
Wild Buffalo: O.K., so maybe the
Sadies show that takes place Oct. 26
and the Con Bro Chill show on Oct.
27 aren’t exactly Halloween-themed
events, but I’m guessing should you
decide to show up for either in full
holiday garb, such behavior will only
be accepted and encouraged by everyone at the Wild Buffalo. But if you’re
saving yourself for Halloween proper,
the Buff has some plans in store for
you as well, in the form of a Daft Funk
Halloween party, that will not feature Daft Punk, but instead the everpopular Acorn Project (you know they
had to show up somewhere on Halloween, and here they are), who will use
the occasion to celebrate the release
of their latest album Shift. Further,
if you’re looking to see what will no
doubt be the most amazing visuals in
town on this big night, Sensebellum
will be working their crazy magic, and
I can’t think of a holiday better suited
to such endeavors. WHERE: 208 W.
Holly St. INFO: www.wildbuffalo.net
10.23.13
Come Halloween proper, you’ll be
partying with local honky-tonk/reggae band Pacific High, so make sure
your costumes are made for dancing.
WHERE: 307 W. Holly St. INFO: www.
facebook.com/cabintavern
Glow Nightclub: For my money, Glow
just might be the best place in town
to do a little Halloween celebrating.
Not because their “Halloweekend Celebration” runs from Oct. 31-Nov. 2,
thus ensuring you can dance like the
dead for days on end. And not because
Glow’s costume contests feature cash
prizes, meaning you can turn the holiday into a money-making opportunity
should you so desire. And not because
the drink specials mean that even if
you don’t win the costume contest,
you’ll still make out O.K. But because
the bar’s vantage point and expansive
windows mean you can suss out all the
crazy whatdoings on the downtown
streets below from the comfort of
Glow’s warm indoor perch in the sky.
WHERE: 202 E. Holly St. INFO: www.
facebook.com/glownightclub
Green Frog: In last week’s Best of
Bellingham issue, we mentioned that
relative newcomers Br’er Rabbit managed to (just barely) snatch a win out
from under Polecat in the Best Band
category. Proving that there’s no hard
feelings between the two (and why
would there be?), the two bands will
team up for an Oct. 31 show at the
Green Frog. Polecat is a huge draw
wherever they play in Bellingham,
making a sellout crowd for this event
all but inevitable. Get your costumes
on and get there early, or instead of
being a naughty nurse for Halloween,
you’ll be a sad nurse left out in the
cold. WHERE: 1015 N. State St. INFO:
www.acoustictavern.com
Honey Moon: Honey Moon would like
you to know that signups are still open
for their Oct. 31 Halloween party, but
there’s just one catch: You have to be a
dead musician to participate. Technically, you don’t have to have departed
this mortal coil, but you do have to
dress and embody one of your favorite
departed musical types to join in the
show. Since last year’s “Dead Musicians
Halloween Party” was a success, the
Honey Moon is making it a tradition.
Of course, all these dead legends will
need an audience, so if your Elvis duds
are at the cleaners, you can still show
up and witness all the undead action.
WHERE: 1053 N. State St. INFO: www.
honeymoonmeads.com
Kulshan Brewing Company: Pickings used to be slim in the Sunnyland
neighborhood when it came to Halloween happenings, but the lovely folks
at the Kulshan Brewing Company are
aiming to change that this year. Along
with a costume contest (or “Kostume
Kontest” in Kulshan vernacular), Matney Cook and the Mudflat Walkers
have been tapped for your entertainment pleasure. And that’s not the only
thing being tapped—Kulshan will
kick off the Oct. 31 event by tapping
their Horseman’s Head Pumpkin Ale.
WHERE: 2238 James St. INFO: www.
kulshanbrewery.com
Rumors: Rumors is not the only place
in town throwing a Halloween party that
features a costume contest with cash
prizes as well as drink specials and related festivities. However, Rumors is indeed
the only place in town where the winner of the costume contest (which takes
place Oct. 26) will be awarded their prize
($500 for first place) by the inimitable
Betty Desire. It’s also the only place
where you can watch the Rocky Horror
Picture Show on Oct. 27 (costumes encouraged, toast and rice provided). And
while the costume-contest prizes aren’t
as lucrative on Halloween itself, Rumors
still has more than enough money on
the line to make dressing up worth your
while. WHERE: 1119 Railroad Ave. INFO:
www.rumorscabaret.com
The Shakedown: With the demise of
Black Eyes and Neckties, Horror Business—with their commitment to devilocks and all things Misfits—has become Bellingham’s de facto Halloween
band, a title they richly deserve. They’ll
be joined by Wild Throne (read: Dog
Shredder) and Jeff Kastelic as Pantera
cover band, Pantera Lives. But given my
Everett origins and the fact that I’m a
child of the hair-metal era, if my heart
belongs to anyone on this stacked Oct.
#43.08
FROM PAGE 22
CASCADIA WEEKLY
HALLOWEEN,
23
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
10.23.13
10.24.13
10.25.13
10.26.13
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Karaoke w/Kristina
Karaoke w/Kristina
Karaoke w/Kristina
Bobby Lee's Pub &
Eatery
Boundary Bay
Brewery
Cabin Tavern
Karaoke
Shady Tones, Mudflat Walkers,
Tear Jerkers
Day of the Dead, King Hush
Hush, more
Haim
Gov't Mule
DJ Mark Falcon, DJ Quest
Randy Norris, Jeff Nicely
Gregory Rawlins
David Rogers
ART 20
DJ Ontic
Conway Muse
Jesse Taylor & The Rainy Day
Devils
Whatever's Clever Variety
Show
DJ Little
Boy Meets Girl
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Jo Elless
BERNHOFT/Oct. 25/
Wild Buffalo
Billy Talent, Mystery
Machine
Bow Diddlers
Boombox
Bellewood Acres 6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden • (360) 318-7720 | Blue Horse Gallery 301 W. Holly St. • 671-2305 | Bobby Lee’s Pub & Eatery 108 W Main St, Everson • 966-8838 | Boundary Bay Brewing Co. 1107
Railroad Ave • 647-5593 | Brown Lantern Ale House 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-2544 | The Business 402 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-9788 | Cabin Tavern 307 W. Holly St. • 733-9685 |
Chuckanut Brewery 601 W Holly St. • 752-3377 | Commodore Ballroom 868 Granville St., Vancouver • (604) 739-4550 | Conway Muse 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) 445-3000
LAST CHANCE
FOR 5 X POINTS!
your Points
y
Increase
the last friday
y
and saturday in
October!
There’s no need to sign up! Just use your Winners Club
Card and get 5 times the Reward Points every Friday and
Saturday! See Winners Club for details.
last chance for Your
Favorite Dining Deal!
Y
Your
last Tuesday in October to enjjoy our full lunch or dinner buffet for
only two dollars! You won’t ¿nd a
o
deal like this anywhere else! Served
d
Tuesday from 11am to 10pm. Must
T
be a Winners Club Member.
b
SEAHAWKS SPECIAL
IN THIRST BAR EVERY
NFL GAME DAY!
Come watch NFL games in Thirst Bar Monday nights, Thursday nights, and on Sundays, and you can enjoy a foot-long Seahawks Dawg with chili-cheese fries and a
glass of Honkers Ale for only $10! Ask your
server for details.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
Edison Inn
Glow Nightclub
SUNDAY
Paul Klein (Taproom)
Open Mic
Commodore Ballroom
10.27.13 10.28.13 10.29.13
Aaron Guest (Taproom)
Brown Lantern Ale
House
STAGE 18
MUSIC
22
MUSIC 22
musicvenues
24
Where the fun and food never ends!
P P P' G H H D L : < D < : L B G H L ' < H F
2 0 . ) G H K M A P H H = K H : = E R G = > G P :
1 0 0' 0 0 0' 2 1 - 0
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Robert Sarazin Blake,
Meghan Yates (early & late)
Chuck Prophet (early), Salvador Dali Llama, Scott Greene
Band (late)
Martha Scanlan (early),
Federation X, Kurly Something,
Nasalrod (late)
Slow Jam, Open Mic (late)
Guffawingham
DJ Yogoman's Terrible
Tuesday Soul Explosion
DJ Ryan I
Gertrude's Herse
David's Drinking Band
Adrianne Gunn
Pretty Little Feet
The Shadies
CHUCK PROPHET/
Oct. 25/Green Frog
Karaoke
One Lane Bridge
Main St. Bar and Grill
Country Karaoke
McKay's Taphouse
Still Kickin
The Devilly Brothers
Halloween Party w/Still Kickin
Boogie Sundays
Brian Hillman Band
Old World Deli
DJ Dgas
GET OUT 16
Prozac Mountain Boys
Paso Del Norte
DJ Dgas
Ben Von Wildenhaus, Federation X Listening Party
Rattletrap Ruckus
WORDS 16
Redlight
Mossman Band
MUSIC 22
MUSIC
22
Kulshan Brewery
Carly Calbero
STAGE 18
Open Mic w/Tad Kroening
Karaoke
Karaoke
Karaoke, DJ
Karaoke, DJ Partyrock
Rumors
Leveled
Throwback Thursdays
DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave
Halloween Bash
Rocky Horror
Karaoke w/Zach
DJ Postal
Heavy Rotation
Sarah in the Wild, Hillary
Susz, Never
Bali Girls, Tacos, Grenades,
Eternal Bad
Voyager, Halloqueen
Eagle Teeth, VR Trainers,
Out on the Streets, The
Shows
Tom Waits Monday
Aireeoke
Silver Reef Hotel
Casino & Spa
Tony and the Tigers (Lounge)
Tony and the Tigers (Lounge),
Haunted Halloween Bash
(Event Center)
Skagit Valley Casino
DJ Clint Westwood (Lounge)
Halloween Ball (Showroom),
Idol Eyez (Lounge)
Chad Petersen
The Sonja Lee Band
The Julianne Thoma Quartet
’90s Night
Spaceband (early), Halloween
Party (late)
ABC Party
Karaoke
Open Mic
Bernhoft, Sivert Hoyem
The Sadies, Girl Trouble
Con Bro Chill, Cherub,
Mansions on the Moon
Mic Night
HAIM/Oct. 24/
Blues Jam
Commodore Ballroom
The Underground
EDM Night
The Village Inn
Wild Buffalo
Wild Out Wednesday w/
Blessed Coast
My Dad Bruce, Triceracorn,
Lokeye
DO IT 2
10.23.13
Skylark's
#43.08
The Shakedown
MAIL 4
Royal
CURRENTS 10
Honey Moon
10.27.13 10.28.13 10.29.13
ART 20
H2O
10.26.13
FOOD 34
WEDNESDAY
Industrial Revelation
10.25.13
FILM 26
10.24.13
VIEWS 8
Green Frog
10.23.13
The Green Frog 1015 N. State St. • www.acoustictavern.com | Edison Inn 5829 Cains Ct., Edison • (360) 766-6266 | Glow 202 E. Holly St. • 734-3305 | Graham’s Restaurant 9989 Mount Baker Hwy., Glacier • (360)
599-3663 | H20, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 755-3956 | Honey Moon 1053 N State St. • 734-0728 | Kulshan Brewery 2238 James St. • 389-5348 | Make.Shift Art Space 306 Flora St. • 389-3569 | Lighthouse
Bar & Grill One Bellwether Way • ( 360) 392-3200 | Main Street Bar & Grill 2004 Main St., Ferndale • ( 360) 384-2982 | McKay’s Taphouse 1118 E. Maple St. • (360) 647-3600 | Nooksack River Casino 5048 Mt. Baker
Hwy., Deming • (360) 354-7428 | Poppe’s 714 Lakeway Dr. • 671-1011 | Paso Del Norte 758 Peace Portal Dr. Blaine • (360) 332-4045 | The Redlight 1017 N State St. • www.redlightwineandcoffee.com | Rockfish Grill
320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 588-1720 | The Royal 208 E. Holly St. • 738-3701 | Rumors Cabaret 1119 Railroad Ave. • 671-1849 | The Shakedown 1212 N. State St. • www.shakedownbellingham.com |
Silver Reef Casino 4876 Haxton Way, Ferndale • (360) 383-0777 | Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow • (360) 724-7777 | Skylark’s Hidden Cafe 1300 11th St. • 715-3642 | Swinomish Casino 12885
Casino Dr., Anacortes • (888) 288-8883 |Temple Bar 306 W. Champion St. • 676-8660 | The Underground 211 E. Chestnut St. • 738-3701 | Underground Coffeehouse Viking Union 3rd Floor, WWU | Village Inn Pub
3020 Northwest Ave. • 734-2490 | Washington Sips 608 1st. St., La Conner • (360)399-1037 | Wild Buffalo 208 W. Holly St. • www.wildbuffalo.net | To get your live music listings included in this esteemed newsprint,
send info to [email protected] Deadlines are always at 5pm Friday.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
B-BOARD 28
musicvenues
25
FOOD 34
film
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
MOVIE REVIEWS › › SHOWTIMES
26
REVIEWED BY STEPHEN DALTON
The Wicker Man
THE FINAL CUT
eturning in a new restoration to mark its 40th anniversary, The Wicker
Man is a cult classic of left-field British horror whose reputation has only
deepened over the decades. The film’s most obvious cheerleaders in contemporary cinema are Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright—who paid indirect homage
in their fanboy genre spoof Hot Fuzz—as well as the acclaimed comedy thriller
director Ben Wheatley, who tapped a similar seam of pagan weirdness in Kill List
and Sightseers. Teasingly dubbed The Final Cut, this latest digitally restored edit
returns to theaters later just in time for Halloween.
Loosely inspired by David Pinner’s novel Ritual, which itself began as a rejected
screenplay for Death Wish director Michael Winner, the script was written by
Sleuth author Anthony Shaffer and directed by young first-timer Robin Hardy. TV
tough guy Edward Woodward, later to find U.S. fame as The Equalizer, plays Howie,
a straitlaced and devoutly Christian policeman investigating the apparent ritual
murder of a young girl on a remote Scottish island, which is run as a kind of giant
free-love hippie commune by the saturnine Lord Summerisle (Christopher Lee).
Thwarted at every turn by the cheerfully unhelpful islanders, whose pagan worship of nudity and sexuality arouses conflicted passions inside him, Howie learns
too late that he has been lured into a terrifying trap.
R
Initially an obscure midnight movie,
The Wicker Man has become more culturally resonant during its 40-year afterlife.
The notion of a spiritually inclined death
cult run by a charismatic guru has since
acquired plenty of real-life parallels, from
Jim Jones to David Koresh to Osama Bin
Laden. The film’s spellbinding score of
haunted folk ballads, composed and arranged by transplanted American songwriter Paul Giovanni, has also earned evergreen cool status among generations of
bearded acoustic hipsters. In some scenes
it feels like a psychedelic hippie musical,
in others a creepy soft-porn thriller.
Watched today, however, some of the
performances look comically hammy. Lee
is the chief offender here, closely followed by Lindsay Kemp—former mentor
and lover of David Bowie—as a camp pub
landlord. While the picturesque Scottish
locations are authentic, the locals speak
a preposterous polyglot gumbo of accents.
The colorful cast of unlikely Celts includes
Swedish starlet Britt Ekland, Australianborn Diane Cilento, and Polish horror-
movie veteran Ingrid Pitt.
A commercial flop on British cinema
screens back in 1973, The Wicker Man began
its slow journey to global cult status in the
United States. Having acquired the film
as part of the ailing studio British Lion,
EMI unceremoniously hacked down Hardy’s
original edit from 102 to 88 minutes for
U.K. release as the B-picture in a double
bill with Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now.
But across the Atlantic, the film received
positive interest from the legendary cult
movie mogul Roger Corman. Warner Bros.
marketed it unsuccessfully to drive-in audiences, then sold the rights to a smaller
connoisseur outfit called Abraxas, who
worked with Hardy to restore the film back
to a near-complete 94-minute cut. Finally
re-released to critical acclaim in 1979, it
was dubbed “the Citizen Kane of horror
movies” by Cinefantastique magazine.
Over the decades, The Wicker Man has
accumulated its own potent mythology,
including oft-repeated claims that the elusive full original negative had been buried
in the concrete foundations of an English
motorway. Hardy insists these nonsensical
rumors originated with EMI as a fanciful
excuse for losing the negative. The film’s
reputation even survived Neil Labute’s disastrous 2006 U.S. remake, starring Nicolas Cage and set on a matriarchal island
commune off the Pacific Northwest coast,
which was fatally low on tension and
bombed at the box office.
In assembling this latest restoration,
the current rights-holders Studiocanal
tracked down a print in the Harvard Film
Archive that once belonged to Corman.
This print became the source of several
long-missing scenes that have now been
reinstalled into the shorter U.K. theatrical
cut, expanding it to 94 minutes. The most
significant revived scene is Howie’s first
sighting of Lord Summerisle, performing
the erotic ballad “Gentle Johnny” under
Ekland’s bedroom window, and reciting
Walt Whitman lines over close-up scenes
of copulating snails. Of the brief early
sequences set on the Scottish mainland,
Howie’s thematically significant church
scene remains, while the superfluous police station section has been dropped with
Hardy’s blessing.
As any serious fan will tell you, none
of the restored footage is new material,
all of it having appeared in previous edits. But Hardy is claiming this latest remix
is as close to definitive as possible, and
concedes his long-lost 102-minute “Director’s Cut” is most likely gone forever. The
cleaned-up picture and sound mix is not
perfect, with some grainy third-generation transfers, but scenes struck from the
original negative look as crisp as if they
were shot yesterday. Most importantly, The
Wicker Man retains its occult power, and
remains as bizarre and bewitching a fable
as when it first appeared four decades ago.
Once seen, never forgotten.
The Counselor: Written by arguably the best author alive, Cormac McCarthy, and starring Brad Pitt,
Michael Fassbender, Javier Bardem, and Penelope
Cruz, who even cares what this movie is about? +++
(R • 1 hr. 51 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Doctober: Doctober rolls on in the form of the story
of the 1985 government bombing of radical black
power group MOVE (Let the Fire Burn), a film that
follows the Seattle Sounders’ exciting 2012 season
(American Football), a study of the ways in which
practices like meditation and yoga can be used to
treat all manner of mental and physical pain (Free the
Mind), a harsh look at the price-gouging practices of
pharmaceutical companies (Fire in the Blood), the tale
of an artistic and marital relationship that spans 40
years (Cutie and the Boxer), the untold story of three
top Nixon aides who were jailed in the aftermath of
the Watergate scandal (Our Nixon), a vibrant portrait
of France’s much more lively equivalent of BBC or NPR
(La Maison De La Radio), and much more.
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
Enzo Av itable Music Life: Jonathan Demme (Oscar-winning director of Silence of the Lambs, among
other movies) is an avowed music nerd. His latest
cinematic project sheds light on world musician Enzo
Avitable, set against the breathtaking backdrop of
Naples. +++++ (Unrated • 1 hr. 19 min.)
Pickford Film Center/PFC’s Limelight: See www.
pickfordfilmcenter.com for showtimes.
Escape Plan: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester
Stallone get together to out-action all other action
movies. Too bad they fall short of the mark. ++ (R
• 1 hr. 56 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
The Fifth Estate: Julian Assange, the subject of this
fictionalized recounting of the WikiLeaks scandal,
has torn this film’s alleged inaccuracies to shreds.
He’s probably laughing at this movie’s poor box office
returns as you read this. + (R • 2 hrs. 4 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Grav ity: Without even seeing what the remainder of
2013 has to offer, I can say this will make my list for
PEP PER
SISTERS
COOKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
Open Nightly Except Monday
1055 N State St
Grown Ups 2: It seems to me that real grownups
would know a sequel to the first installment is a bad
idea. If you persist in acting like a child, Hollywood,
then that’s how we’ll treat you. You’re grounded. Go
to your room. + (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.)
Bellis Fair: 12:00 | 3:00 | 5:15 | 8:00
Inequality for All: Robert Reich, a tiny man with
a giant mind, is going to explain to you exactly why
it’s bad that the richest few in America account for
most of its wealth. +++++ (PG • 1 hr. 29 min.)
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
Insidious: Chapter 2: More insidiouser than ever.
++ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 45 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Instructions Not Included: An Acapulco playboy
finds a baby on his doorstep, and he embraces his
newfound role as a parent while also stumbling into
a new career as a Hollywood stuntman after moving to Los Angeles to search for the girl’s missing
mother. +++ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 55 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa: Johnny
Knoxville dons a latex grandpa suit and sets off on
a journey across America. Antics ensue. While this
isn’t your typical Jackass movie, it follows enough of
the formula for me to know that some gags are wildly
funny while others fall flat. +++ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Machete Kills: Oh, Machete. The only thing you’re
Rush: Given the generally cheesy nature of Ron
Howard’s films, it’s rare that I find myself wanting
to see one of them. However, pretty much from the
moment I laid eyes on the preview for this drama
about the rivalry between two race-car drivers, I
found myself transfixed. Opie may redeem himself
yet. ++++ (R • 2 hrs. 3 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Smur fs 2: This smurfin’ movie is full of smurfin’
smurfs who smurf around like mothersmurfers. + (PG
• 1 hr. 45 min.)
Bellis Fair: 12:45 | 3:45
The Summit: K2 is the second-highest mountain
on Earth. This documentary details an August 2008
incident in which 24 people went up the mountain,
but only half of them made it off alive in the deadliest incident in this unforgiving mountain’s history.
+++++ (R • 1 hr. 35 min.)
PFC’s Limelight See www.pickfordfilmcenter.com for
showtimes.
We’re the Millers: I cannot suspend my disbelief
far enough to ever buy Jason Sudeikis as a pot
dealer, Ed Helms as a drug kingpin or Jennifer Aniston as a stripper. + (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)
Bellis Fair: 1:00 | 4:05 | 6:30 | 9:15
The Wicker Man: See review previous page. ++++
(R • 1 hr. 28 min.)
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
VOTE
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
27
SINCE 1988
B’ham 671-3414
STAGE 18
Runner Runner: Don’t bother don’t bother. ++ (R
• 1 hr. 31 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
GET OUT 16
Enough Said: After years of playing Tony Soprano
on television, James Gandolfini had a whole second
career as a leading man ahead of him when he died
in June. This film, also starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus,
shows just how promising that career would’ve been.
+++++ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 33 min.)
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
the best films of the year. If Alfonso Cuaron is trying
to become my favorite filmmaker, he’s going about it
the right way. +++++ (PG-13 • 91 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
WORDS 16
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2: I was
pretty surprised when this children’s book was
adapted for the big screen. I am no less surprised that
it somehow merits a sequel. ++ (PG • 1 hr. 35 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Don Jon: This movie was written and directed by
Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who also stars in it. I find
him to be a versatile, engaging, smart actor and
will continue to do so despite being ridiculed for my
opinion. ++++ (R • 1 hr. 29 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Riddick: With eyes that shine brighter than any
laser cat, Vin Diesel reprises the role that made him
famous(ish). +++ (R • 1 hr. 59 min.)
Bellis Fair: 5:50 | 8:30
CURRENTS 10
Carr ie: The 1976 horror classic features a pair of
Oscar-nominated performances by Sissy Spacek and
Piper Laurie. I believe its working title was For the
Love of God, I’m Good Enough. Please Resist the Urge
to Remake Me. Forever. Naturally, here’s your remake.
+++ (R • 1 hr. 32 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
THE COUNSELOR
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Captain Phillips: Alert the Academy, Tom Hanks is
in full-on Oscar-baiting mode in this dramatic, basedon-actual-events recounting of a man caught between
guns and more guns when he’s kidnapped at sea by
Somali pirates. ++++ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 13 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Planes: Despite the presence of John Lasseter and
the fact that it’s a spinoff of the Cars franchise, this
is not a Pixar film. +++ (PG • 1 hr. 32 min.)
Bellis Fair: 12:15 | 3:15 | 5:30 | 8:15
VIEWS 8
Perc y Jackson: Sea of Monsters: Another installment in a second-tier film franchise that I’d all
but forgotten about. + (PG • 1 hr. 50 min.)
Bellis Fair: 12:30 | 3:30
Bleedingham: If it’s homegrown horror films you’re
looking for, Bleedingham is the annual event for you.
Come see what scary stuff your neighbors have been
up to. ++++ (Unrated • 1 hr. 30 min.)
Pickford Film Center Oct. 26 @ 9:00
MAIL 4
Monsters University: The prequel to Monsters,
Inc.—if these monsters don’t graduate with a ton of
student-loan debt and no job prospects I’m going to
think this Pixar story isn’t very true to life. ++++
(G • 1 hr. 42 min.)
Bellis Fair: 1:15 | 4:00 | 6:25 | 8:50
2 Guns: Buddy movies can either be entertaining
or totally terrible. This one stars Denzel Washington
and Mark Wahlberg, so even if everything else about
the movie is bad, those two are sure to be pretty
darn good. +++ (R • 1 hr. 49 min.)
Bellis Fair: 6:05 | 9:00
DO IT 2
FILM SHORTS
10.23.13
killing here is Danny Trejo’s movie career. + (R • 1
hr. 48 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
#43.08
BY CAREY ROSS
FOOD 34
film ›› showtimes
claytonpetree.com
3DLGIRUE\&OD\WRQ)RU&RXQFLO
32%R[%HOOLQJKDP:$
bulletinboard
100
MIND & BODY
“Take Control of Your Hormonal Health” with certified
nutritionist Jim Ehmke from
6:30-8:30pm
Wednesday,
Oct. 23 at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. Entry is $5. More info:
www.communityfood.coop
Master Fu Wei Zhong leads
a “Zen Healing and Sudden
Enlightenment”
workshop
from 6:30-8:30pm Thursday,
Oct. 24 at the Community
Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St.
Donations will be accepted at
the class; please register in
advance. More info: 734-8158
or www.communityfood.coop
“Complementary Medicine in Whatcom County”
will be the focus of a United
for National Healthcare presentation from 7-9pm Thursday, Oct. 24 at St. Luke’s
Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum
Pkwy. Complementary medical practitioners will discuss
how they are integrating
their work with mainstream
medicine to promote the
best healthcare for Whatcom
County. Entry is free. More
info: www.unitedforhealthcare.org
Therapist Hal Pullin focuses on couples’ conflict
resolution at a “Jack & Jill
and Happiness Hill” workshop
at 1pm Saturday, Oct. 26 at
Mount Vernon’s Skagit Valley Food Co-op. The class will
center around Pullin’s latest
100
MIND & BODY
book of the same name. Register in advance for the free
workshop. More info: www.
skagitcoop.com
ANNUAL
PARTY
SAVE THE DATE
Friday, Nov. 8
6-9 pm
The Leopold Ballroom
1224 Cornwall Ave.
Everyone Welcome
Free for Members!
Refreshments
Revelry
Gratitude
Family Fun
360-671-5600
www.KulshanCLT.org
FOOD ADDICTS ANONYMOUS MEETING
12 Step Program
dedicated to food addiction
1 hr. Open Meeting, Mondays 7 pm
Christ the King Community Church
4895 Birch Bay-Lynden Rd
www.foodaddictsanonymous.com
100
MIND & BODY
100
MIND & BODY
“The Power of Chant” will
be the focus of a workshop
with Simme Bobrosky at
6:30pm Monday, Oct. 28 at
Mount Vernon’s Skagit Valley
Food Co-op. No experience is
necessary, just a willingness
to use your voice to open your
heart and allow spirit to move
through you. Entry is free;
register in advance. More
info: www.skagitfoodcoop.
com
Hadea Tift of Skagit Community Acupuncture leads a
discussion focusing on the the
idea of an affordable wellness
center being created to offer holistic care options and
classes at 6:30pm Tuesday,
Oct. 29 at Mount Vernon’s
Skagit Valley Food Co-op.
Community members and
practitioners are welcome.
Entry is free. More info: www.
skagitfoodcoop.com
Jeanell Innerarity leads a
presentation focused on “Alchemy of the Womb: How to
Transform ‘That Time of the
Month’ into ‘I LOVE My Cycles’ in the Next Six Months”
at 5:30pm Monday, Oct. 28 at
Village Books, 1200 11th St.
Entry is free and no registration is required. More info:
www.villagebooks.com
Attend a clairvoyant reading demonstration at a
“Reading Hour” from 5:306:03pm Wednesday, Oct. 30
at Simply Spirit Reading and
Healing Center, 1304 Meador
Ave., B-11. No registration is
required, and guests are invited to ask a question of the
reader. Entry is $5. More info:
www.simplyspiritcenter.com
Mystique Grobe, ND, discusses where to draw the line
on the “big bad three” in our
diets at an “Alcohol, Sugar,
Caffeine” discussion from
7-9pm Monday, Oct. 28 at the
Community Food Co-op, 1220
N. Forest St. Entry is $5. More
info: 734-8158
Bellingham Tennis Club
owner and personal trainer and
cycling coach Robin Robertson
leads a “Thinner Next Year:
Your Action Plan” presentation
at 5:30pm Wednesday, Oct. 30
at Village Books, 1200 11th St.
Entry is free. More info: www.
villagebooks.com
ENOUGH SAID (PG-13) 93m
Starring James Gandolfini & Julia-Louis Dreyfus
Fri: (4:20), 6:40, 8:50; Sat: (11:50 AM), 4:20, 6:40
Sun: (12:15), 4:40, 7:00, 9:15; Mon: (4:20), 9:00
Tue - Wed: (4:20), 6:40, 9:00; Thu: (4:20), 6:40
SPOOKY PICKS FOR YOUR HALLOWEEN:
THE WICKER MAN (1973) 88m - 40th Anniversary!
Britt Ekland? Ingrid Pitt? Creepy, ancient fertility rites?
Cult classic, restored.
Fri - Sun: 9:00; Mon: (1:50), 9:00; Tue & Wed: 9:00
Thu: 5:45, 9:00
BLEEDINGHAM FILM FEST 90m
Sat: 9:00 - Local filmmakers get scary!
THE BODY (PG-13) Mon: 6:30 - Costume & Candy Night
HOUSE (Hausu) (1977) (NR) 88m
Thu: 8:00 - Seriously trippy Japanese cult classic
INEQUALITY FOR ALL (PG) 89m
“Robert Reich leads us through a sharp-eyed essay
meditation on the rising trend of income inequality.” EW
Fri: (4:15); Sat: (2:05); Sun: (2:30); Mon: (2:00)
Tue - Thu: (3:45)
ENZO AVITABILE: Music Life (NR) 90m
Fri: 6:50 - Italian wine tasting w/ ticket
FREE THE MIND (NR) 80m Sat: (10:00AM) - Encore
FIRE IN THE BLOOD (NR) 87m
Sat: Noon - Seam Humphrey House Presents
Cerise Noah
CUTIE AND THE BOXER (R) 82m
Sat: (2:10); Sun: 6:45; Mon: (4:15)
REALTOR ®
Professional,
knowledgeable,
fun & friendly
to work with.
THE INSTITUTE (NR) 92m
Sat: 4:15 - Is it a game, or real life?
OUR NIXON (NR) 84m
Sat: 6:30 - Literally, the inside story
HERB & DOROTHY 50x50 (NR) 87m
Sun: Noon - Art collectors hits the road
A.K.A. DOC POMUS (NR) 98m
Sun: (2:15) - Rock & roll’s unlikely icon
Windermere Real Estate Whatcom, Inc.
(360) 393-5826
BIG JOY: The Adventures of James Broughton 82m
Sun: 4:40 - “Follow your own weird”
[email protected]
JFK: A PRESIDENT BETRAYED (NR) 90m
Mon: 6:40 - A story never before told
LA MAISON DE LA RADIO (NR) 99m
Tue: 6:30 - France’s vibrant public radio
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
NOW SHOWING October 25 - 31
28
THE PERVERT’S GUIDE TO IDEOLOGY
Wed: 6:00 - Zizek takes on ideology
“ PICKFORD FILM CENTER: 1318 Bay St. | 360.738.0735 | www.pickfordfilmcenter.org
Box Office is Open 30 Minutes Prior to F irst Showtime
Join us for a drink before your movie! Mary’s Happy Hour: 4-6pm, M-F $2 Beer/$3 Wine
NOW SHOWING October 25 - 31
PFC’s Limelight Cinema | 1416 Cornwall Ave
Parentheses ( ) Denote Bargain Pricing
Age 21+ Only
ENZO AVITABILE: Music Life (NR) 90m
“ (Jonathan) Demme has crafted yet another superb
document of musicians at work, one as much about creation,
and the sources of inspiration—as it is about performance.
A wonderful film, as in, it’s full of wonders.” Village Voice
Sat & Sun: (1:15), 5:40; Mon - Thu: 5:40
THE SUMMIT (R) 95m “A complex and gut-clenching human
drama that has the great advantage of all being true.” LA Times
Fri: (4:10), 6:30, 8:50; Sat - Thu: (3:20), 7:45
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CASCADIAWEEKLY.COM
Across
1 Bed on board
6 Scrooge outburst
9 “Parklife” group
13 Get really lucky,
in old slang
15 Single
16 Relaxed condition
17 1969 Elvis Presley cowboy film
18 Louis Quatorze,
e.g.
19 Crowning point
20 Baseball-loving
sci-fi artist?
23 Scruff of the
neck
24 Blackhawks’ org.
25 Zool., e.g.
28 Directionally proficient author?
33 Sister org. to
24-across
34 Green or MacFarlane of “Family
Guy”
35 “Let’s keep moving!”
36 Vietnam ___
38 Symbol of
mightiness
40 “___ Love Her”
41 Penetrating path
44 Israel’s first
female prime
minister
47 Quick sidestep
48 Basketball player
who’s popular at
breakfast?
51 Albany is its cap.
52 ___ Speedwagon
53 1984 NL MVP
Sandberg
54 Singer/songwriter known for
nightwear?
59 Miso soup
chunks
62 Funny Gasteyer
63 1998 Masters
champion Mark
64 Wilson with a
funny nose
65 Yang’s counterpart
66 Rat out, younger
sibling-style
67 The latest
68 It sells
69 Vacuum cleaner
pioneer Sir James
___
Down
1 “Coffee Cantata”
composer
2 Cavern comeback
3 500-sheet paper
unit
4 Apartment window
sign
5 Good-natured
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
rearEnd ›› ”You’ve Got to Stand for Something”— but not that
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
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cheers
6 Five-time Wimbledon champ with
iconic hair
7 Apply oil to
8 Disney song sung
by six characters (if
you count right)
9 Stock market pessimist
10 Trip around the
track
11 “For Official ___
Only”
12 “Toy Story”
dinosaur
14 Cheap alternative
to Rogaine
21 “That’s pretty
awesome!”
22 Tiger Woods’ ex
25 Poem division
26 Jean-Paul Marat’s
slayer Charlotte ___
27 Sixth of seven on
the visible spectrum
28 Dancer ___
Glover
29 Writer known for
surprise endings
30 Michelob beers
31 SeaWorld star
32 Rap group with
a 2013 Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame
Remember
to Vote.
+ ‡…”‡–•–‘—……‡••ˆ—Ž‹‡•‹–‹‡ˆ‘”–Š‡Š‘Ž‹†ƒ›•Ǥ
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
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A message from the
nomination
37 Kid, sometimes
39 “Pirates of the
Caribbean” actress
Knightley
42 Taj Mahal’s city
43 Record spinners
45 Muscle relaxant
brand
46 Changed a street
sign
49 “Happy Days”
spinoff character
50 No more than
54 The lowest form
of humor, it’s said
55 Cat with no tail
56 Actor Kilmer and
namesakes
Last Week’s Puzzle
57 Switch back?
58 “Life of Pi” author ___ Martel
59 Whole bunch
60 Have to pay back
61 Not a lot of
©2013 Jonesin’
Crosswords
CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Venice is to the
man-made world what the Grand Canyon is to the natural one,” said travel writer Thomas Swick in an article
praising the awe-inciting beauty of the Italian city.
“When I went to Venice,” testified French novelist
Marcel Proust, “my dream became my address.” American author Truman Capote chimed in that “Venice is
like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one
go.” I bring this up, Cancerian, because even if you
don’t make a pilgrimage to Venice, I expect that you
will soon have the chance, metaphorically speaking,
to consume an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one
go. Take your sweet time. Nibble slowly. Assume that
each bite will offer a distinct new epiphany.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do you have any interest
in reworking—even revolutionizing—your relationship with the past? If so, the coming weeks will be an
excellent time to do so. Cosmic forces will be on your
side if you attempt any of the following actions: 1.
Forgive yourself for your former failures and missteps.
2. Make atonement to anyone whom you hurt out of
ignorance. 3. Reinterpret your life story to account for
the ways that more recent events have changed the
meaning of what happened long ago. 4. Resolve old
business as thoroughly as you can. 5. Feel grateful for
everyone who helped make you who you are today.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “As a bee seeks nectar from all kinds of flowers, seek teachings everywhere,” advises the Tibetan Buddhist holy text known
as the Dzogchen Tantra. That’s your assignment, Virgo.
Be a student 24 hours a day, seven days a week—yes,
even while you’re sleeping. (Maybe you could go to
school in your dreams.) Regard every experience as an
opportunity to learn something new and unexpected.
Be ready to rejoice in all the revelations, both subtle
and dramatic, that will nudge you to adjust your theories and change your mind.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Have you
thought about launching a crowdfunding campaign
for your pet project? The coming weeks might be a
good time. Have you fantasized about getting involved in an organization that will help save the
world even as it feeds your dreams to become the
person you want to be? Do it! Would you consider
hatching a benevolent conspiracy that will serve as
an antidote to an evil conspiracy? Now is the time.
You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you
have more power than usual to build alliances. Your
specialties between now and December 1 will be to
mobilize group energy and round up supporters and
translate high ideals into practical actions.
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
Thank you
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THEATRE
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Right now you
have a genius for escaping, for dodging, for eluding. That could be expressed relatively negatively
or relatively positively. So for instance, I don’t recommend that you abscond from boring but crucial
responsibilities. You shouldn’t ignore or stonewall
people whose alliances with you are important to
keep healthy. On the other hand, I encourage you
to fly, fly away from onerous obligations that give
you little in return. I will applaud your decision to
blow off limitations that are enforced by neurotic
habits, and I will celebrate your departure from
energy-draining situations that manipulate your
emotions.
ART 20
GET OUT 16
Japanese Restaurant
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 2008, writer
Andrew Kessler hung out with scientists at NASA’s
mission control as they looked for water on the planet
Mars. Three years later, he published a book about
his experiences, Martian Summer: Robot Arms, Cowboy
Spacemen, and My 90 Days with the Phoenix Mars Mission. To promote sales, he opened a new bookstore
that was filled with copies of just one book: his own.
I suggest that you come up with a comparable plan to
promote your own product, service, brand, or personality. The time is right to summon extra chutzpah as
you expand your scope.
STAGE 18
Blue Fin Sushi
WORDS 16
waiting as mere passivity,” says author Sue Monk Kidd
in her memoir. “When I looked it up in my dictionary,
however, I found that the words ‘passive’ and ‘passion’
come from the same Latin root, pati, which means ‘to
endure.’ Waiting is thus both passive and passionate. It’s
a vibrant, contemplative work...It involves listening to
disinherited voices within, facing the wounded holes in
the soul, the denied and undiscovered, the places one
lives falsely.” This is excellent counsel for you, Gemini.
Are you devoted enough to refrain from leaping into action for now? Are you strong enough to bide your time?
pitch blackness, all you can do is sit tight until your
eyes get used to the dark.” That helpful advice appears in Norwegian Wood, a novel by Haruki Murakami.
Now I’m passing it on to you, just in time for your
cruise through the deepest, darkest phase of your
cycle. When you first arrive, you may feel blind and
dumb. Your surroundings might seem impenetrable
and your next move unfathomable. But don’t worry.
Refrain from drawing any conclusions whatsoever. Cultivate an empty mind and an innocent heart. Sooner
or later, you will be able gather the clues you need to
take wise action.
CURRENTS 10
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I had tended to view
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If you’re in
3DLGIRUE\&OD\WRQ)RU&RXQFLO
32%R[%HOOLQJKDP:$
claytonpetree.com
VIEWS 8
pher Simone Weil described the following scene:
“Two prisoners in adjoining cells communicate with
each other by knocking on the wall. The wall is the
thing which separates them but is also their means
of communication.” This muted type of conversation is a useful metaphor for the current state of
one of your important alliances, Taurus. That which
separates you also connects you. But I’m wondering
if it’s time to create a more direct link. Is it possible
to bore a hole through the barrier between you so
you can create a more intimate exchange?
sessive, brooding, suspicious, demanding, and secretive, right? That’s what traditional astrologers
say, isn’t it? Well, no, actually. I think that’s a
misleading assessment. It’s true that some Scorpios
are dominated by the qualities I named. But my research shows that those types of Scorpios are generally not attracted to reading my horoscopes. My
Scorpios tend instead to be passionately focused,
deeply thoughtful, smartly discerning, intensely
committed to excellence, and devoted to understanding the complex truth. These are all assets
that are especially important to draw on right now.
The world has an extraordinarily urgent need for the
talents of you evolved Scorpios.
VOTE
MAIL 4
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): French philoso-
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpios are ob-
DO IT 2
ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I’m greedy,” says
painter David Hockney, “but I’m not greedy for money—I think that can be a burden—I’m greedy for an
exciting life.” According to my analysis, Aries, the
cosmos is now giving you the go-ahead to cultivate
Hockney’s style of greed. As you head out in quest
of adventure, here’s an important piece of advice
to keep in mind. Make sure you formulate an intention to seek out thrills that educate and inspire you
rather than those that scare you and damage you.
It’s up to you which kind you attract.
10.23.13
ASTROLOGY
#43.08
FREE WILL
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t you wish your
friends and loved ones would just somehow figure
out what you want without you having to actually
say it? Wouldn’t it be great if they were telepathic
or could read your body language so well that they
would surmise your secret thoughts? Here’s a news
bulletin: IT AIN’T GOING TO HAPPEN! EVER! That’s
why I recommend that you refrain from resenting
people for not being mind-readers, and instead
simply tell them point-blank what you’re dreaming
about and yearning for. They may or may not be
able to help you reach fulfillment, but at least they
will be in possession of the precise information
they need to make an informed decision.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
BY ROB BREZSNY
written by PETER SHAFFER
WARNING: Scenes contain nudity.
Please, viewer discretion is advised.
31
Coming soon! 2014 Where the Locals Go! Coupon Book
Choose local businesses taking action for a healthy community.
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 16
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
rearEnd ›› comix
Sudoku
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
HOW TO SUDOKU: Arrange the digits 1-9 in such a way that
each digit occurs only once in each row, only once in each
column, and only once in each box. Try it!
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
10.23.13
DO IT 2
4
9 2
8
Choosing The Leopold
where downsizing means upsizing.
Views of Bellingham Bay
Independent Living
1 3
5 3
Views of Mt. Baker
Assisted Living
1
Scenic Downtown Bellingham
32
Call us today
for a tour.
360-733-3500
2 4
8 9
6 2 1
6
3
9
4
2
7 8 3
5
7
You look deep into a woman’s eyes
and whisper those magical words: “I
want to spend the rest of my month
with you.” Well, long-term relationships aren’t for everyone. Along with
the benefits come the tradeoffs, like
having to give up the suspense and
buzz of the new for the comfortable
old slipper of stability. It’s okay to be
unwilling to make that tradeoff, provided you aren’t just covering for a
bunch of unexplored fears. The problem comes in letting women believe
that you have the potential to be Mr.
Right when you’re most likely Mr. Lite.
Unfortunately, some will see your pattern of succumbing to Restless Boyfriend Syndrome as a challenge to domesticate you. To keep things from
going ugly, you might gently remind
them that you’re looking to be there
for them in good times and good
times—and that someday their prince
will run.
©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171
Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA
90405, or e-mail [email protected]
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 16
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
I’m a 36-year-old guy who’s dated some
great women but ended most of my relationships around the six-month mark. I wasn’t
concerned about this until I was talking about
how cool my girlfriend of two months is and
my married buddy looked at his watch and
said, “Yeah, bummer. Only got four more
months of her.” I had a long relationship in
my 20s, so I don’t think I fear intimacy or
commitment. Do I need therapy? Or is this
one of those things where, if you’re happy,
you ignore the criticism?
—The Transient
MAIL 4
Here’s an ornery guy who’s probably spent much of the past 90 years
convinced that women belong in the
kitchen wearing ruffled aprons, baking
pies and practicing saying, “Yes, dear.”
Yeah, he’ll be changing—the direction
his finger’s pointing when he looks at
his daughter, gestures toward his closet, and says, “Could you go back in,
change into a dress, and come out with
a husband?”
Your girlfriend can tell herself she’ll
no longer be chasing her father’s approval, yet be running as fast as she
can after it on the inside. It’s deepseated stuff, wanting your parents to
approve of you, to appreciate who you
are and love you for it, and it’s tough
stuff knowing they don’t and probably
never will. So as much as she might
wish things were different and vow
they’re going to be, it shouldn’t come
as a surprise that her father still wears
the pants in the family (even if he also
wears the diapers).
It’s probably tempting to go all onewoman gay pride march and picket
the old goat’s bed: “We’re here! We’re
queer! Get used to it!” (Or, later in the
day, “We’re here! We’re queer! We need
a beer!”) And if how your girlfriend
handled the change of clothes—going
sneaky to get her way—is a pattern,
you two have a problem. But maybe
she was just desperate to keep her time
with him from being conflict-filled and
awful and couldn’t bear to do battle
SOUL MITE
DO IT 2
I went to meet my girlfriend’s 90-year-old
father. They have a conflicted relationship.
He doesn’t “agree” with his daughter’s homosexuality, generally looks down on women
and believes they should be helpful, nice,
pretty and married to men. When we got to
his upscale senior living facility a few hours
away, I jokingly asked my girlfriend whether
I should change out of my jean shorts and
into dress pants. She said yes, and I said, “I
don’t have those; are you serious?” She then
pulled out a “nice outfit” she’d brought for
me. I felt angry that she’d sneaked this on
me. I felt even angrier meeting her father,
who barely acknowledged my existence and
didn’t notice this “nice outfit” I ended up
putting on. Should I remind my girlfriend
that she no longer chases her father’s approval? Tell her I certainly will not?
—
Steaming
10.23.13
GOLDEN POND SCUM
#43.08
THE ADVICE
GODDESS
with you right before facing her father’s
disapproving looks because the man of
her dreams is a woman.
Her father is grazing 100 and will be
dead soon; doing what you can to relieve your girlfriend’s stress when she
sees him isn’t exactly the equivalent
of bringing a plate of cookies out to
the Westboro Baptist Church marchers.
Consider telling her that you know how
hard visiting him is for her and, in the
future, she should just tell you what
she needs from you to make things
easier. Hearing this will probably make
her melt into a pool of love for you and
inspire her to extend herself when it
means a lot to you. Sure, it’s unhealthy
to always be in the habit of muzzling
your beliefs, but there are times to
stand up for them and there’s sometimes a time to just crawl into the back
seat and put on those “nice pants”
your girlfriend brought for you.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
BY AMY ALKON
FOOD 34
rearEnd ›› comix
33
doit
FOOD 34
34
FOOD
chow
B-BOARD 28
RECIPES
REVIEWS
WED., OCT. 23
HOMEMADE YOGURT: Learn the basic methods
and equipment used for making yogurt at a
“Homemade Yogurt” class with Katharine Isserlis
from 6:30-8:30pm at Gretchen’s Kitchen, 509 S.
First St., Mount Vernon. Cost is $30.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
PROF I L ES
THURS., OCT. 24
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
At the second slaughter last summer, the entire
crew was back in full force. This time, I stuck
around to get a closer look at the process. And,
while I wasn’t the one breaking the necks of the
rabbits and skinning them, my admiration for
those doing the culling grew exponentially.
“Don’t you want to try it?” one of the crew
asked as they saw me closely watching them.
“No thanks,” I replied, “but I’ll be happy to
make you dinner.”
recipe
WWW.COMMONTHREADSFARM.ORG
MEXICAN K ITCHEN: Ana Jackson helms a
“Mexican Kitchen: Mole” course from 6-9pm
at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. Entry is $39.
383-3200
SAT., OCT. 26
COMMUNIT Y MEAL: All are welcome at the
bimonthly Community Meal from 10am-12pm at
the United Church of Ferndale, 2034 Washington
St. Entry is free.
384-1422
GET OUT 16
ANACORTES MARKE T: Drop by the final
Anacortes Farmers Market of the season from
9am-2pm at the Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave.
WWW.ANACORTESFARMERSMARKET.ORG
BELLINGHAM FARMERS MARKE T: The
Bellingham Farmers Market can be visited from
10am-3pm every Saturday through Dec. 21 at the
Depot Market Square, 1100 Railroad Ave.
WORDS 16
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.23.13
#43.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
34
SCHOOL HARVEST DINNER: Enjoy a
kid-grown, kid-prepared meal at the fourth
annual School Garden Harvest Dinner at 6pm
at Whatcom Middle School, 810 Halleck St. All
are welcome; please RSVP. Suggested minimum
donation is $5.
WWW.BELLINGHAMFARMERS.ORG
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Run, Rabbit, Run
A HARE-RAISING TALE
hen my boyfriend first suggested we raise rabbits for
meat, I had to pause for a few days before agreeing to
the endeavor.
While we’d already been raising egg-laying chickens for a couple of years before adding bunny hutches to the mix, I’d never
chopped off the heads of our hens and stewed their carcasses in a
pot—nor did I want to. The rabbits, on the other hand, would be
purchased with slaughter in mind.
After doing some research and discovering that putting rabbit on
the menu results in a lean meat that serves as a healthful and nutritious alternative to beef and pork, I told my guy he had my blessing
to go ahead with the food project. I also told him I’d help feed the
furry critters and would be happy to prepare the meat, but would
make myself scarce when it came time to end their lives.
It took us a few months before the Flemish meat rabbits we purchased were old enough to sire offspring, but eventually we had a
hutch full of plump young rabbits that were growing at a scary rate.
And, in early December, it was finally time to make them dinner.
After an afternoon of Christmas shopping, I returned home to
find the culling crew—my boyfriend and a few friends who either
had experience slaughtering rabbits or were looking to get it—
eating fresh meat off the grill. One friend had a tear-shaped blood
splatter on her face, and she told me the experience she’d had
that afternoon had changed the way she looked at food forever.
She was elated. Later that night, we all sat around the table eating some of the best stew I’ve ever had in my life.
W
STEWED RABBIT OR
SQUIRREL
—From www.cooks.com
INGREDIENTS
2 or 3 mature rabbits or squirrels (dressed)
6 medium carrots (cut into chunks)
1 large onion (thick sliced)
1 tbsp salt
2 tsp coarse ground black pepper
1 bay leaf
1 tsp thyme
2 quarts boiling water
4 tbsp butter
4 tbsp flour
2 cups stock
RECIPE DIRECTIONS: Cut rabbits or squirrels into
serving pieces and place in stew pot or Dutch oven.
Add carrots, onion, bay leaf, thyme, salt and pepper. Cover with boiling water. Bring back to a boil
and reduce heat. Cover and simmer until meat is
tender. Remove meat and set aside. Drain off two
cups of the stock.
In a skillet or saucepan, melt butter over low
heat. Remove from burner. Stir flour into butter
until thoroughly combined and the consistency of
paste. Stir in the two cups of stock until smooth.
Return to medium-high heat and cook, stirring
constantly to boiling. Continue cooking until thickened (about one minute). Pour over meat.
FERNDALE MARKE T: Attend the final Ferndale
Public Market of the season from 10am-3pm at
the town’s Centennial Riverwalk Park.
WWW.FERNDALEPUBLICMARKET.COM
CHICKEN AND WAFFES: Laura Hartner will
lead a “Chicken and Waffles” brunch class at
9:30am in Mount Vernon at Gretchen’s Kitchen,
501 S. First St. Entry is $20.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
TUES., OCT. 29
ONE POT MEALS: Registered dietician Lisa
Dixon focuses on “Autumn One Pot Meals” from
6:30-9pm at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N.
Forest St. Fees are $35.
383-3200
CROAT IAN CLASSICS: The Croatian Cultural
Center’s Maria Petrish leads a “Croatian Classics”
course from 6:30-8:30pm in Mount Vernon at
Gretchen’s Kitchen, 501 S. First St. Entry is $40.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
WED., OCT. 30
ISLAND SPECIALT IES: Robert Fong and Beach
Store Cafe head chef Jason Brubaker present
an “Ahoy, Lummi Island!” cooking course from
6-8:30pm at the Cordata Community Food Co-op,
315 Westerly Rd. Entry is $49.
383-3200
DIA DE LOS MUERTES: Day of the Dead recipes
will be the focus when Calle’s Carlos Carreon
cooks up menu items associated with the
holiday from 6:30-8:30pm at Gretchen’s Kitchen,
501 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Entry is $40.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
''
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FOOD
FOOD 34
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CURRENTS 10
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.08
Thank You, Bellingham, for Voting
Anthony’s at Squalicum Harbor “Best Place to Impress a Date”
and Anthony’s Hearthfire Grill “Best Happy Hour”
VIEWS 8
Paid for and authorized by IAFF Local #106
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MAIL 4
District 4 EMS Vote YES
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WORDS 16
Port of Bellingham Commissioner
Renata B. Kowalczyk Dist. 1
Mike McAuley
Dist. 2
10.23.13
Bellingham City Council
Gene Knutson
Ward 2
Pinky Vargas
Ward 4
Michael Lilliquist
Ward 6
Roxanne Murphy
Ward At Large
GET OUT 16
Candidates Who Support
Your Local Firefighters
Whatcom County Council
Barry Buchanan
Dist. 1, Pos. A
Ken Mann
Dist. 2, Pos. A
Rud Browne
Pos. At Large
ART 20
MUSIC 22
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