2012-2013 Reading Lists

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2012-2013 Reading Lists
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
9th Grade Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one novel from the 2010-2011 Georgia Peach Teen Nominees list.
2011-2012 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens
-Almost Perfect Brian Katcher
-Beautiful Creatures Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl
-Birthmarked Caragh O’Brien
-Black Hole Sun David McGinnis Gill
-Bruiser Neal Shusterman
-Dirty Little Secrets C. J. Omololu
-Finnikin of the Rock Melina Marchetta
-Five Flavors of Dumb Anthony John
-Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have Allen Zadoff
-The Things a Brother Knows Dana Reinhardt
-Hate List Jennifer Brown
-Jane April Lindner
-The Maze Runner James Dashner
-The Morgue and Me John Ford
-Nightshade Andrea Cremer
-Shift Jennifer Bradbury
-Ship Breaker Paolo Bacigalupi
-Split Swati Avasthi
-God is in the Pancakes Robin Epstein
-Lockdown: Escape from the Furnace
Alexander Gordon Smith
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability
level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the
student in making an appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the
assignment during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your
summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
Honors 9th Grade Literature and Composition
2012 - 2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
All students will read The Miracle Worker by William Gibson,
and
students should select one of the following titles.
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Watership Down-Richard Adams
Pride and Prejudice-Jane Austen
Abarat-Clive Barker
Fahrenheit 451-Ray Bradbury
And Then There Were None- Agatha Christie
Jurassic Park-Michael Crichton
The House of the Scorpion-Nancy Farmer
Lord of the Flies-William Golding
Green Mansions-W. H. Hudson
The Bean Trees-Barbara Kingsolver
The Scarlet Pimpernel-Baroness Orczy
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-Robert Louis Stevenson
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual
interests, ability level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the
selection process and guide the student in making an appropriate decision. Students
should be prepared for an assessment of the assignment during the first two weeks of the
semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
10 Grade World Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select a nonfiction work by an American author. The
text should be at least 100 pages and grade-level appropriate. Possible
choices include biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Other
options might be books about a particular sport, hobby, occupation, or
period of history. Each student should choose his/her summer reading
title carefully based upon individual interests, ability levels, and
personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection
process and guide the student in making an appropriate decision.
Students should be prepared for an assessment of the assignment
during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading
will enrich your summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
10 Grade Honors World Literature and Composition
2012 – 2013
Assignment is due the first week of class.
Mandatory Reading:
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Amazon.com product description: In a future where there is no love, no science, and everyone
is equal and of one entity, one man defies the group to be his own person. That is a serious
offense.
You may pick up a copy before summer begins from Mrs. Stumpf in SR 103 or Mrs. Paulk in SR 102.
The number of books is limited. This book is also available in a public library or a local bookstore.
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ASSIGNMENT – Annotating the Text: Taking notes (annotating) as you read will be
advantageous to you when school begins and you review the novel for our class discussions,
Socratic Seminar, and upcoming objective assessments.
o On the inside front cover of your copy of Anthem write a list of characters with a brief
summary of each.
o Each novel should have a minimum of 20 different annotations throughout the entire
text. The annotations should cover a variety of topics.
 The annotations can include themes, key scenes (especially moments of
character development, etc.), political philosophies, dystopian concepts. The
internet can be used to help you know what to look for; however it should not
be used in lieu of reading the novel.
o Use a variety of annotative methods: highlighting, abbreviations, “sticky” notes,
extensive marginal notes, underlining, bracketing, parentheses, etc.
Recommended Reading:
How to Reading Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster
Amazon.com product description: In this practical and amusing guide to literature, Thomas C.
Foster shows how easy and gratifying it is to unlock those hidden truths, and to discover a world
where a road leads to a quest; a shared meal may signify a communion; and rain, whether
cleansing or destructive, is never just rain. Ranging from major themes to literary models,
narrative devices, and form, How to Read Literature Like a Professor is the perfect companion for
making your reading experience more enriching, satisfying, and fun.
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Read Introduction and Chapters 1, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 22.
o Write in the margins interpretative notes, questions, or remarks that refer to the
meaning of the page.
This text will be used throughout the semester. Many schools require this for summer
reading, so don’t wait too late to get your copy.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
11 Grade American Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Dear Students and Parents,
To prepare for the curriculum in American Literature, students are required to read a novel during the
summer. During the first weeks of the semester, students will take a test based on the novel they chose.
Local booksellers and libraries should have copies of these books.
Student Choice—Select ONE of the following:
Title
Flygirl
Author
Sherri L.
Smith
Description
Ida Mae Jones is a Louisiana girl who longs to be a pilot when America
enters World War II. She is pretty and smart, but she has two huge strikes
against her. She is black AND a woman, but if she can pass as white, she
can at least fly.
Shiver
Maggie
Stiefvater
In all the years she has watched the wolves in the word behind her house, Grace has been
particularly drawn to an unusual yellow-eyed wolf who, in his turn, has been watching
her with increasing intensity.
Beautiful
Creatures
Kami
Garcia
In a small South Carolina town, where it seems little has changed since
the Civil War, sixteen-year-old Ethan is powerfully drawn to Lena, a new
classmate with whom he shares a psychic connection and whose family
hides a dark secret that may be revealed on her sixteenth birthday.
The Maze
Runner
James
Dashner
Ship
Breaker
Paolo
Bacigalupi
Split
Swati
Avasthi
Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a
maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds
himself if he is to escape.
In a futuristic world, teenaged Nailer scavenges copper wiring from
grounded oil tankers for a living, but when he finds a beached clipper ship
with a girl in the wreckage, he has to decide if he should strip the ship for
its wealth or rescue the girl.
A teenage boy thrown out of his house by his abusive father goes to live
with his older brother, who ran away from home years earlier under
similar circumstances.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
11 Grade Honors American Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
The Honors American Literature course is designed to give you a comprehensive examination of literature
that chronicles the development and changes in the United States from the Colonial period writers to
Modern authors.
The writing focus for 11th grade literature course is expository, the analysis of literature. To fully
comprehend and coherently write about literature, you must first be exposed to a variety of genres and
writers. So, in an effort to sustain your reading skills and comprehension, as well as exposing you to the
canon of classic literature, the Honors-level American literature class will be reading two texts this
summer.
REQUIRED
All students will read the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller
 This text is available in the MHS bookroom.
 You will have an objective test on this novel the first day of class.
AND
Students should select one of the following titles:
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The Awakening by Kate Chopin*
The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner*
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain*
*Available in the MHS bookroom for checkout
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It is suggested that you purchase your own copy of any text so that you may annotate.
Annotating the text as you read will be advantageous to you when school begins, and when you
review the novel for writing assignments and tests.
Use a variety of methods: underlining, parentheses, extensive notes in the margins, highlighting,
post-it notes, etc.
You choice of the second text will be used to write an analytical paragraph with primary and
secondary documentation in MLA format and a Works Cited page.
AP Language and American Literature
Mrs. Stumpf’s Summer Reading Assignments
2012-2013
Dear AP Language and Honors American Literature student:
Welcome to your 11th grade AP Language course. This course is a one-year study in American literature, nonfiction,
writing, and research, presented chronologically. A major emphasis for this year will be the evaluation of student
response to literature and nonfiction as demonstrated in classroom discussion, written expression, and oral
presentation. AP Language is a rigorous course offering designed to prepare students for the nationally administered
Advanced Placement exam (Spring, 2013). It is my hope that the summer reading program will begin a rewarding
study of American literature (fiction, nonfiction, biography, and drama) while providing a head start on the work for
the course.
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Please note: While it is not required that you purchase the following texts, I believe it would make reading and
annotating a much easier process. Using a e-books (Kindle, Nook, etc…) is fine, but you must have access to the
text when necessary in the classroom. Amazon.com sells used copies of all of the texts.
Part I: Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle
You must read Upton Sinclair’s novel, The Jungle, taking care to note as you read the author’s emphasis on social
issues such as the following: Immigration, Industrialization, Mass Production, Big City Neighborhoods, Unionization,
Working-Class Neighborhood Changes, Class Relations (ethnic, gender, race, age, education), Corporation versus
Political Influences, and Cultural Institutions.
ASSIGNMENT – Annotating the Text: Taking notes (annotating) as you read will be advantageous to you when
school begins and you review the novel for our class discussions and upcoming objective assessments. It is
recommended that you use a variety of annotative methods: highlighting, abbreviations, “sticky” notes, extensive
marginal notes, underlining, bracketing, parentheses, etc. It may also help you to maintain on the inside front cover of
your copy of The Jungle a list of characters with a brief summary of each as well page references of key scenes
(especially moments of character development, etc.). As you read, I suggest that you write in the margins
interpretative notes, questions, or remarks that refer to the meaning of the page. Plot notes are also helpful – just a few
quick words or phrases which summarize key events as they occur throughout the novel.
Annotated student books will not be turned in as a graded activity; however, your success on future objective
assessments and essay assignments may depend on your ability to refer to comprehensive notes in your text.
When you return to school…
ASSIGNMENT – Significant Quotes: Upon completion of a close reading of the autobiography, list what you
consider to be the ten (10) MOST SIGNIFICANT quotes in the text, and then, in sentence form (a few sentences
each will work fine here) explain why each quote is vital central to the meaning of the work. Please do not choose
random quotes or quotes from any number of “quote web pages” – you will need to cite page numbers from the
version/publication you select (for “e-readers,” please establish a consistent method for citing) . In order to complete
this assignment successfully, you need to dissect the text as a whole and then determine which sections are most
influential and representative of the overall meaning of the work. This assignment must be typed, double spaced /12
pt. font / Times New Roman / 1” margins / MLA format (7th edition).
Part II: Arthur Miller’s The Crucible
You must read Arthur Miller’s drama, The Crucible, taking care to note as you read the author’s emphasis on such
themes as Human Cruelty in the Name of Righteousness, the Individual and the Community, Justice versus Retribution
and Revenge, Godliness versus Worldliness, Ignorance versus Wisdom, the Puritan Myth, and Order versus Individual
Freedom. You might want to familiarize yourself with some historical background that includes knowledge of the
Salem Witch Trials, as well as Joseph R. McCarthy and “McCarthyism.” In addition, you will want to define the term
crucible and determine why Miller chose the word for his title.
In the same way that you annotated The Jungle, you should take notes as you read The Crucible.
*When you return to school…
Assignment: You will be completing a character study on the characters of The Crucible. Pay particular attention to
the following characters: Reverend Samuel Parris, Betty Parris, Abigail Williams, Tituba, Mrs. Ann Putnam, Thomas
Putnam, John Proctor, Elizabeth Proctor, Rebecca Nurse, and Reverend John Hale (10 characters total). Be as
descriptive as possible in a small space.
Part III: Personal Selection
You must read one of the following texts, taking care to note as you read the author’s emphasis on the primary issues
of the work:
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Un-Spun by Brookes Jackson and Kathleen Hall Jamieson
The Thirteen American Arguments: Enduring Debates That Define and Inspire Our Country by Howard Fineman
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
Columbine by Dave Cullen
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas, An American Slave by Frederick Douglas
Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich
Great American Short Stories: Dover Thrift Edition, edited by Paul Negri
ASSIGNMENT – Annotating the Text: (as above) Taking notes (annotating) as you read will be advantageous to
you when school begins and you review the novel for our class discussions and upcoming objective assessments. It is
recommended that you use a variety of annotative methods: highlighting, abbreviations, “sticky” notes, extensive
marginal notes, underlining, bracketing, parentheses, etc. As you read, I suggest that you write in the margins
interpretative notes, questions, or remarks that refer to the meaning of the page.
Annotated student books will not be turned in as a graded activity; however, your success on future objective
assessments and essay assignments may depend on your ability to refer to comprehensive notes in your text.
When you return…
Assignment: You will have an additional in-class assignment to complete upon your return. Please be prepared for a
written or oral assignment.
Additional Reading:
I would highly suggest reading the novel In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. This will be one of the first novels of the
second semester and will be assigned over the winter break.
Please be aware that this is an American Literature AND an AP Language. These two courses culminate into the
EOCT and the AP Language test. Please take into consideration the vast amount of material you will be reading and
assessing during the course of the year. Prepare accordingly.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
12 Grade English Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one novel from the Georgia Peach Teen Nominees list. If none of the novels
appeal to you, you may go to the Georgia Peach Teen website and choose a book from any of their lists.
2011-2012 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens
-Almost Perfect Brian Katcher
-Hate List Jennifer Brown
-Jane April Lindner
-God is in the Pancakes Robin Epstein
-Birthmarked Caragh O’Brien
-The Things a Brother Knows Dana Reinhardt
-Black Hole Sun David McGinnis Gill
-The Morgue and Me John Ford
-Bruiser Neal Shusterman
-Nightshade Andrea Cremer
-Dirty Little Secrets C. J. Omololu
-Shift Jennifer Bradbury
-Finnikin of the Rock Melina Marchetta
-Five Flavors of Dumb Anthony John
-Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have Allen Zadoff
-Lockdown: Escape from the Furnace Alexander Gordon Smith
Previous Peach Award Nominees
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Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher (honor book winner)
Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff
City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (honor book winner)
Deadline by Chris Crutcher
Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (winner)
Oh.My.Gods by Tera Lynn Childs
Ophelia: A Novel by Lisa Klein
Three Little Words: A Memoir by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
Unwind by Neal Shusterman
Wake by Lisa Mann
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability
level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the
student in making an appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the
assignment during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your
summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
12 Grade Multicultural Literature and Composition
2012-2013
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one novel from the Georgia Peach Teen Nominees list. If none of the novels
appeal to you, you may go to the Georgia Peach Teen website and choose a book from any of their lists.
2011-2012 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens
-Almost Perfect Brian Katcher
-Hate List Jennifer Brown
-Jane April Lindner
-God is in the Pancakes Robin Epstein
-Birthmarked Caragh O’Brien
-The Things a Brother Knows Dana Reinhardt
-Black Hole Sun David McGinnis Gill
-The Morgue and Me John Ford
-Bruiser Neal Shusterman
-Nightshade Andrea Cremer
-Dirty Little Secrets C. J. Omololu
-Shift Jennifer Bradbury
-Finnikin of the Rock Melina Marchetta
-Five Flavors of Dumb Anthony John
-Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have Allen Zadoff
-Lockdown: Escape from the Furnace Alexander Gordon Smith
Previous Peach Award Nominees
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




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

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher (honor book winner)
Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff
City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (honor book winner)
Deadline by Chris Crutcher
Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (winner)
Oh.My.Gods by Tera Lynn Childs
Ophelia: A Novel by Lisa Klein
Three Little Words: A Memoir by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
Unwind by Neal Shusterman
Wake by Lisa Mann
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability
level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the
student in making an appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the
assignment during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your
summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
12 Grade Honors British Literature and Composition
2012 – 2013
All rising Honors British Literature students will read two books.
You may find all books in the library or you may purchase them, new or used, from a bookstore. I suggest
purchasing the novels not only because it allows you to annotate directly in the margins, but because you
will need to have the books with you in class. If you use an e –book version, then keep a detailed reader’s
journal for the assignment. Both novels will have summative assessments.
Mandatory Reading: Complete the commentary annotation assignment for this book (see below). The
novel and assignment are due the first week of school.
1984 by George Orwell
Make notations regarding language, irony, theme, characterization, power, warfare,
technology and modernization, manipulation, repression by government, behavioral
conditioning and isolation, utopias and dystopias
Choice: These novels are choices for writing your literary analysis research paper. Complete the
commentary annotation assignment for this book (see below). The novel and assignment are due the third
week of school.
Make notations regarding theme, motif, time period, symbolism, characterization, philosophies,
impact of setting,
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Robinson Crusoe (unabridged) by Daniel Defoe
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
A Passage to India by E.M. Forester
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
Commentary annotation assignment for each book:
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Do a brief internet search to locate analysis of your novel.
Each novel should have a minimum of 30 different examples (commentary annotations) throughout
the entire text.
The examples (commentary annotations) should cover a variety of topics.
For example, do not simply write the word “theme” as a note. You need to address how this theme is
shown. You do not need to write in complete sentences.
If you have purchased your book, write directly in it, but if you borrow the book, you will need to use
sticky / post-it notes.
Suggestions:
The more notations you make, the easier selecting a topic and gathering information for your paper will be.
E-mail questions to
[email protected]
Advanced Placement English: Summer Reading
Class of 2013
“If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.” --Ralph Waldo Emerson
All entering AP English students will complete two readings during the summer in preparation for the
course. Choose one novel or play from each box below, and be prepared to begin work as soon as
school starts in August.
#1: Book Club: High Interest Reading
Due: The first week of the semester
Choose one novel from the list below:
One of the goals of this course is to promote a love of reading by featuring high-interest books that span wide cultural
contexts. These books, ranging from the Edwardian era in England to contemporary American titles, do just that.
Cry the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
A Passage to India by E. M. Forster
Mudbound by Hillary Jordan
The Good Soldier by Ford Maddox Ford
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
#2: Modern Drama
Due: Day 3 of the Semester
Choose one modern play from the list below:
Each of the plays below has appeared repeatedly as choices on the Advanced Placement Free Response Examination.
Equus by Peter Shaffer
Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
#3: Heads-up: Victorian Novel
Due: Within the first six weeks
Choose one Victorian novel from the list below:
These are those works of “recognized literary merit” that are necessary but sometimes difficult. Be sure to
choose a novel you actually can enjoy and work with, since this will be the basis of extensive research and
writing as soon as we begin the semester. If you would like to get a jump on the semester’s reading, you might
go ahead and read one of the selections below.
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

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