2014-2015 Reading Lists

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2014-2015 Reading Lists
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
9th Grade Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one novel from the 2013-2014 Georgia Peach Teen Nominees list.
2013-2014 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens
-Ashfall by Mike Mullin
-The Hunt by Andrew Xia Fukuda
-Boy 21 by Matthew Quick
-The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
-The Disenchantments by Nina LaCour
-Leverage by Joshua Cohen
-Erebos by Ursula Poznanski
-My Book of Life by Angel by Martine Leavitt
-Every Day by David Levithan
-My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick
-The Fault In Our Stars by John Green
-Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick
-The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson
-Pink by Lili Wilkinson
-The Good Braider by Terry Farish
-Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
-Grave Mercy by R. L. LaFevers
-UnWholly by Neal Shusterman
-Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability
level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the
student in making an appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the
assignment during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your
summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
Honors 9th Grade Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
All students will read The Miracle Worker by William Gibson,
and
students should select one of the following titles.

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Watership Down-Richard Adams
Pride and Prejudice-Jane Austen
Abarat-Clive Barker
Fahrenheit 451-Ray Bradbury
And Then There Were None- Agatha Christie
Jurassic Park-Michael Crichton
The House of the Scorpion-Nancy Farmer
Lord of the Flies-William Golding
The Bean Trees-Barbara Kingsolver
The Scarlet Pimpernel-Baroness Orczy
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-Robert Louis Stevenson
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual
interests, ability level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the
selection process and guide the student in making an appropriate decision. Students
should be prepared for an assessment of the assignment during the first two weeks of the
semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
10 Grade World Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select a nonfiction work by an American author. The
text should be at least 100 pages and grade-level appropriate. Possible
choices include biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Other
options might be books about a particular sport, hobby, occupation, or
period of history. Each student should choose his/her summer reading
title carefully based upon individual interests, ability levels, and
personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection
process and guide the student in making an appropriate decision.
Students should be prepared for an assessment of the assignment
during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading
will enrich your summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
10th Grade Honors World Literature and Composition
2014-2015
Anthem assignment is due the first week of class.
Mandatory Reading:
1. Anthem by Ayn Rand (short novella)
Amazon.com product description: In a future where there is no love, no science, and everyone
is equal and of one entity, one man defies the group to be his own person. That is a serious
offense.
The text of this novella is available online at the following address:
http://www.noblesoul.com/orc/texts/anthem/complete.html This book is also available in a public
library or a local bookstore.

ASSIGNMENT – Annotating the Text: Taking notes (annotating) as you read will be
advantageous to you when school begins and you review the novel for our class discussions,
Socratic Seminar, and upcoming objective assessments.
o On the inside front cover of your copy of Anthem, write a list of characters with a brief
summary of each.
o There should be a minimum of 20 different annotations throughout the entire text.
The annotations should cover a variety of topics.
 The annotations can include themes, key scenes (especially moments of
character development, etc.), political philosophies, dystopian concepts. The
internet can be used to help you know what to look for; however, it should not
be used in lieu of reading the novel.
o Use a variety of annotative methods: highlighting, abbreviations, “sticky” notes,
extensive marginal notes, underlining, bracketing, parentheses, etc.
2. Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (canonical play)
This text will be used throughout the semester.
Amazon.com product description: Roman dictator Julius Caesar returns from a victorious
campaign in Spain, causing his fellow citizens to mistrust the scope of his political ambitions.
Afraid that he will accept the title of kin , a group of conspirators persuade Marcus Brutus to
join their plot against Caesar. William Shakespeare’s play revolves around Marcus Brutus as he
grapples with issues of friendship, honor, and patriotism.
The text of this play is available online at the following address:
http://shakespeare.mit.edu/julius_caesar/full.html This play is also available in a public library or
local bookstore.
To prepare for the curriculum in American Literature, students are
required to read a novel during the summer. During the first weeks of
the semester, students will take a test based on the novel they chose.
The MHS Media Center has limited copies of each novel. Local
booksellers and libraries should have copies of these books.
Student Choice—Select ONE of the following:
11th- grade
American Literature
Summer Reading
2014-2015
Stupid Fast by Geoff Herbach – Just before his sixteenth birthday, Felton Reinstein has a
sudden growth spurt that turns him from a small, jumpy, picked-on boy with the nickname
“Squirrel Nut” to a powerful athlete, leading to new friends, his first love, and the courage to
confront his family’s past and current problems
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline – Imagine a world where most people spend their time
as avatars in a virtual reality. The founder of tis virtual reality leaves his fortune to the first to
win a contest, comprised of puzzles and tasks. Three teens compete to win against an evil
conglomerate.
Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith – Ida Mae Jones is a Louisiana girl who longs to be a pilot when
America enters World War II. She is pretty and smart, but she has two huge strikes against her.
She is black AND a woman, but if she can pass as white, she can at least fly.
Split by Swati Avasthi – A teenage boy thrown out of his house by his abusive father goes to
live with his older brother, who ran away from home years earlier under similar circumstances.
The Maze Runner by James Dashner – Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no
memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he
finds himself if he is to escape.
Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater – In all the years she has watched the wolves in the word
behind her house, Grace has been particularly drawn to an unusual yellow-eyed wolf who, in
his turn, has been watching her with increasing intensity.
ASSIGNMENT:
While reading your selected summer reading text, fill in the graphic organizer on the following topics. List specific pages
where important information/ideas come from to help you remember. (For texts read electronically, use the free app to
correctly note page numbers.) This graphic organizer is NOT a group project; each student’s individual notes are to be
their own work ONLY. (If you have trouble writing within the space provided, you may type using this document or use
paper, but try to keep your notes on each topic limited to the same size—don’t write pages and pages for any topic!) Bring
this with you to class, along with the book, the first week of school: specific date of in-class assessment will be
announced by teacher in class.
1.) Significant Characters
Who are the
protagonist(s)?
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Who are the
antagonist(s)?
Which characters are
dynamic?
Which characters are
static?
How do actions of certain
characters affect events of
the plot/ outcome of the
story?
How does the dialogue of
certain characters
influence our opinion of
them?
What important physical
and non-physical qualities
do key characters
possess?
Do any characters
represent social
stereotypes?
2.) Plot
What happens in the
exposition?
What happens in the rising
action?
What happens in the
climax?
What happens in the
falling action?
What happens in the
resolution?
3.) Point of View
From what point of view is
the story told?
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
How does the point of
view impact the reader’s
understanding /
perception of the story?
4.) Setting
What is the setting and
how does it contribute to
the atmosphere/ mood of
the story?
5.) Conflict
Internal conflict (Man vs.
Self)
External conflict (Man vs.
???)
6.) Themes/ Symbols
What seem to be evident/
dominant themes or ideas
presented by the author in
the book?
What symbols are evident
and what might they
symbolize?
7.) Important Quotations/
Passages
Do any passages stand out
as particularly important
or representative or
specific characters/ ideas
in the book?
What makes them
important?
8.) Author’s Attitude/
Tone
Does the author of the
book have any obvious
feelings on any issues?
What is his/her tone of
voice while writing?
Evidence from the text
Page #
10.) Unknown Vocabulary
What do those words mean in context?
Page #
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
11 Grade Honors American Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
The Honors American Literature course is designed to give you a comprehensive examination of literature
that chronicles the development and changes in the United States from the Colonial period writers to
Modern authors.
The writing focus for 11th grade literature course is expository, the analysis of literature. To fully
comprehend and coherently write about literature, you must first be exposed to a variety of genres and
writers. So, in an effort to sustain your reading skills and comprehension, as well as exposing you to the
canon of classic literature, the Honors-level American literature class will be reading two texts this
summer.
REQUIRED
All students will read the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller
 This text is available in the MHS bookroom.
 You will have an objective test on this novel the first day of class.
AND
Students should select one of the following titles:

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
The Awakening by Kate Chopin*
The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner*
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain*
*Available in the MHS bookroom for checkout

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It is suggested that you purchase your own copy of any text so that you may annotate.
Annotating the text as you read will be advantageous to you when school begins, and when you
review the novel for writing assignments and tests.
Use a variety of methods: underlining, parentheses, extensive notes in the margins, highlighting,
post-it notes, etc.
You choice of the second text will be used to write an analytical paragraph with primary and
secondary documentation in MLA format and a Works Cited page.
ASSIGNMENT:
While reading your selected summer reading text, fill in the graphic organizer on the following topics. List specific
pages where important information/ideas come from to help you remember. (For texts read electronically, use the
free app to correctly note page numbers.) This graphic organizer is NOT a group project; each student’s individual
notes are to be their own work ONLY. (If you have trouble writing within the space provided, you may type using
this document or use paper, but try to keep your notes on each topic limited to the same size—don’t write pages and
pages for any topic!) Bring this with you to class, along with the book, the first week of school: specific date of inclass assessment will be announced by teacher in class.
1.) Significant
Characters
Who are the
protagonist(s)?
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Who are the
antagonist(s)?
Which characters are
dynamic?
Which characters are
static?
How do actions of certain
characters affect events of
the plot/ outcome of the
story?
How does the dialogue of
certain characters
influence our opinion of
them?
What important physical
and non-physical qualities
do key characters
possess?
Do any characters
represent social
stereotypes?
2.) Plot
What happens in the
exposition?
What happens in the
rising action?
What happens in the
climax?
What happens in the
falling action?
What happens in the
resolution?
3.) Point of View
From what point of view
is the story told?
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
Evidence from the text
Page #
How does the point of
view impact the reader’s
understanding /
perception of the story?
4.) Setting
What is the setting and
how does it contribute to
the atmosphere/ mood of
the story?
5.) Conflict
Internal conflict (Man vs.
Self)
External conflict (Man vs.
???)
6.) Themes/ Symbols
What seem to be evident/
dominant themes or ideas
presented by the author in
the book?
What symbols are evident
and what might they
symbolize?
7.) Important
Quotations/ Passages
Do any passages stand out
as particularly important
or representative or
specific characters/ ideas
in the book?
What makes them
important?
8.) Author’s Attitude/
Tone
Does the author of the
book have any obvious
feelings on any issues?
What is his/her tone of
voice while writing?
10.) Unknown
Vocabulary
What do those words mean in context?
Page #
AP Language & Honors American Literature
Mrs. Chandler’s Summer Reading Assignments
2014-2015
Dear AP Language and Honors American Literature student:
Welcome to your 11th grade AP Language course. AP Language is a rigorous course designed to prepare
students for the nationally administered Advanced Placement exam (Spring 2015). This course is a one-year study in
American literature, nonfiction, writing, and research, with our study of American Literature presented
chronologically. A major emphasis for this year will be the evaluation of student response to literature and nonfiction
texts as demonstrated in classroom discussion, written expression, and oral presentation.
It is my hope that these summer reading assignments will begin a rewarding study of language and literature
(fiction, nonfiction, biography, and drama) and provide the beginnings of a solid foundation of literature and analysis
to prepare you for the AP exam.
The first two assignments will be due during the first week of class.
Please note: While it is not required that you purchase the following texts in hard form, I believe it would make
reading and annotating a much easier process.
Using an e-book (Kindle, Nook, etc.) is fine, but you must have access to the text when necessary in the
classroom; in other words, you must be willing to bring those devices to class at your own risk.
Amazon and half.com sell new and used books, as do Goodwill and 2nd & Charles near Town Center Mall.
Part I: Arthur Miller's play The Crucible
1. Before you read this play, write a brief definition or exploration of the following terms:
-crucible
-witch hunt
-Salem Witch Trails
-McCarthyism
2. As you read this play, find at least one strong piece of textual evidence which speaks to each of the following
themes:
-human cruelty in the name of righteousness
-the individual and the community
-justice v. retribution and revenge
-godliness v. worldliness
-ignorance v. wisdom
-the Puritan myth
-order v. individual freedom
You may highlight and annotate the evidence directly in the text if the copy is your own. Otherwise, use post-it
notes or paper.
3. When you return to school, you will be completing a character study on the characters of The Crucible. Pay
particular attention to each of the following 10 characters: Reverend Samuel Parris, Betty Parris, Abigail Williams,
Tituba, Mrs. Ann Putnam, Thomas Putnam, John Proctor, Elizabeth Proctor, Rebecca Nurse, and Reverend John Hale.
A brief description of each of these characters, including significant quotes and/or moments of characterization, will be
helpful for you in your future assignments.
Part II: Personal Selection
Can you smell the freedom? Select one text from the list below.
A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again by David Foster Wallace
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach
Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
1. You will be ceaselessly grateful to yourself for annotating whichever text you pick. Interact with the text as you
read: What strikes you? What's the argument? Why did the author do that thing s/he just did?
2. You will have an additional in-class assignment pertaining to this text to complete upon your return. Prepare
yourself for a written and/or oral assignment by completing the following items (#3 and #4).
3. Top Five Vocabulary Words
Select five examples of interesting diction in the text. For each word:
1. Write the sentence, complete with page number citation in MLA format.
2. Define the word. Some words have multiple definitions. Be sure to write down the definition that
applies to the sentence you have selected.
3. Discuss how the use of this word (in the context of the text) impacts the reader in a specific way. Pay
particular attention to words with a specific connotation.
4. Use this word in your own sentence.
4. Top Five Passages
Select the five most influential passages that illustrate interesting arguments in the text. For each passage:
1. Write the sentence (or sentences), complete with page number citation in MLA format.
2. Discuss the use of this sentence or sentences in the context of the text. Why did you select this
passage? How does a thorough understanding of this passage play an important role in understanding
the author’s purpose with this text?
3. Label the tone of this passage. How does the author use specific strategies to create this tone?
Part Part
III: Preparing
Yourself
Future
Reading
III: Getting
a for
Head
Start
I would highly suggest picking up a copy of the following two texts, which are novels we will study later in the
semester. If you would like to get a head start on the reading, I welcome your enthusiasm!
Into the Wild by Jon Krakaeur
The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother by James McBride
A Final Note
Please be aware that you are taking two courses: Honors American Literature and AP Language. These two courses
culminate with the American Literature EOCT and the AP Language test.
Please take into consideration the vast amount of material you will be reading and assessing during the course of the
year, and prepare yourself accordingly. If it is your intention to skirt the work by reading summaries, watching movies,
and abusing grade-saver websites rather than experiencing each text fully, for yourself, and from your own
perspective, I would reconsider the decision to take an Advanced Placement course.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
12 Grade English Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one novel from the 2012-2013 Georgia Peach Teen Nominees list.
2012-2013 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens

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
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


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This Girl is Different J. J. Johnson
Glow Amy Kathleen Ryan
The Sky is Everywhere Jandy Nelson
Ready Player One Ernest Cline
The Mockingbirds Daisy Whitney
What Can’t Wait Ashley Hope Perez
Stupid Fast Geoff Herbach
Notes From the Blender Trisha Cook & Brendan Halpin
Divergent Veronica Roth
The False Princess Ellis O’Neal
Anna and the French Kiss Stephanie Perkins
What Comes After Steve Watkins
Now is the Time for Running Michael Williams
The Name of the Star Maureen Johnson
Please Ignore Vera Dietz A. S. King
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Rebecca Skloot
The Running Dream Wendelin Van Draanan
Jump Elisa Carbone
Stick Andrew Smith
Previous Peach Award Nominees

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Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher (honor book winner)
Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff
City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (honor book winner)
Deadline by Chris Crutcher
Oh.My.Gods by Tera Lynn Childs
Ophelia: A Novel by Lisa Klein
Three Little Words: A Memoir by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
Unwind by Neal Shusterman
Wake by Lisa Mann
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability level, and
personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the student in making an
appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the assignment during the first two weeks of
the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your summer vacation.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
12th Grade Honors British Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All rising Honors British Literature students will do two summer readings.
You may find all books in the library or you may purchase them, new or used, from a bookstore or on-line.
Furthermore, many of these titles are available in the book room. It is best to purchase the novel you choose: It not only
allows you to annotate extensively in the margins, but also you will need a copy of the “Choice” novel through first
semester, as we will continue to work with it. If you use an e-book version of the novel, you must keep a detailed
reader’s journal for the assignment. Both novels will be assessed in writing at the beginning of the school year.
Mandatory Reading:
1984 by George Orwell
Read and thoroughly annotate this novel. See the guidelines below, “Annotating the Novel,” for detailed instructions.
Choice: Read and thoroughly annotate one novel. See the guidelines below, “Annotating the Novel,” for detailed
instructions. Choose one from the following list:
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
A Room with a View by E. M. Forester
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Annotating the Novel
In order to write a knowledgeable paper, you need to “know” your book. Simply to have read it won’t provide you the
insight necessary for an exemplary paper. This next step requires that you go back and make notations you feel are
important for the actual writing of the paper. If you have purchased your book, write directly in it, but if you borrow the
book, you will need to keep a journal and/or to use post-it notes.
Assignment:

Inside the front cover: Character list with small space for character summary and for page references of
key scenes, moments of character development, etc.

Inside the back cover: Themes, allusions, images, motifs, symbols, key scenes, significant aspects to the
plot line, epiphanies, etc. Use Internet sources to help you initially compile a list, and then add to it as your
read.

Underlining / Bracketing and Post-it notes:
o Flag pages with key aspects of the novel. Write a word or phrase at the top of the Post-it so that you can
quickly reference the passage.
o Underline examples, lines, or passages that you feel are significant in the novel.
o Use brackets for long passages too long to underline.
o Jot a quick summary at the beginning of each chapter.
Grading:
There is no need to write on every page; however, the more notations you make, the easier the gathering of
information will be. Grades will be based on thoroughness, clarity, neatness, and apparent effort. You must
make VERY clear that you have spent time learning this novel.
SUMMER READING LIST
JOHN MCEACHERN HIGH SCHOOL
th
12 Grade Multicultural Literature and Composition
2014-2015
All assignments are due the first week of class.
Students should select one of the works listed below:
Classic Works
The Joy Luck Club
Amy Tan
The House on Mango Street Sandra Cisneros
One Hundred Years of Solitude Gabriel Garcia Marques
Love in the Time of Cholera Gabriel Garcia Marques
One Hundred Sonnets of Love Pablo Neruda
Memoirs of a Geisha Arthur Golden
2013-2014 Georgia Peach Book Awards for Teens
-Ashfall by Mike Mullin
-The Hunt by Andrew Xia Fukuda
-Boy 21 by Matthew Quick
-The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
-The Disenchantments by Nina LaCour
-Leverage by Joshua Cohen
-Erebos by Ursula Poznanski
-My Book of Life by Angel by Martine Leavitt
-Every Day by David Levithan
-My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick
-The Fault In Our Stars by John Green
-Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick
-The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson
-Pink by Lili Wilkinson
-The Good Braider by Terry Farish
-Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
-Grave Mercy by R. L. LaFevers
-UnWholly by Neal Shusterman
-Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick
Previous Peach Award Nominees









Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher (honor book winner)
Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff
City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (honor book winner)
Deadline by Chris Crutcher
Oh.My.Gods by Tera Lynn Childs
Ophelia: A Novel by Lisa Klein
Three Little Words: A Memoir by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
Unwind by Neal Shusterman
Wake by Lisa Mann
Each student should choose his/her summer reading title carefully based upon individual interests, ability
level, and personal values. Parents are encouraged to participate in the selection process and guide the
student in making an appropriate decision. Students should be prepared for an assessment of the
assignment during the first two weeks of the semester. We hope that your reading will enrich your
summer vacation.
E-mail questions to
[email protected] or [email protected]
Advanced Placement English: Summer Reading
Class of 2015
“If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.” --Ralph Waldo Emerson
All entering AP English students will complete two readings during the summer in preparation for the
course. Choose one novel or play from each box below, and be prepared to begin work as soon as
school starts.
#1: Modern Drama:
Due: The end of the first week of the semester
Choose one modern play from the list below:
Each of the plays below has appeared repeatedly as choices on the Advanced Placement Free Response Examination.
They are all accessible and interesting. Most can be read in one or two sittings.
Equus by Peter Shafer
The Piano Lesson by August Wilson
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
This reading will be assessed at the end of the 1st week by an in-class, formative essay
#2: High Interest Reading
Due: The end of the second week of the semester
Choose one novel from the list below:
One of the goals of this course is to promote a love of reading by featuring high-interest books that span wide cultural
contexts. These books, ranging from mid-twentieth century to contemporary American titles, do just that.
All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy
Mudbound by Hillary Jordan
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
The Known World by Edward P. Jones
This will be assessed in the 2nd week in a Harkness Table Discussion
#3: Heads-up: The Female Novelist (Voluntary)
Due: At the end of the first six weeks
If you want to read ahead,
The Female Novelist
Due: Towards the end of the first six weeks
Choose one novel from the list below:
These are the titles you will choose from for a novel study the first six weeks. If you would like to get a jump
on the semester’s reading, you might go ahead and read one of the selections below.
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
This will be the focus of our study of the novel genre. Choose one that you will really like and be able to understand, as
we will so several activities with this one novel choice.

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