open space master plan, university of toronto, st. george campus

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open space master plan, university of toronto, st. george campus
open space master plan,
university of toronto, st. george campus
toronto, ontario
completed 1999
siamak hariri, partner-in-charge
joint venture with urban strategies, inc.
As part of a team, Siamak Hariri consulted with the University community,
and examined the spaces around and between buildings; the central
green spaces, gateways and pathways; and the 20 intersections
where the campus meets the city. The resulting Open Space Master
Plan recommended specific and detailed revitalization actions, to be
carried out within a coherent, unifying framework. The Plan balanced
the pedestrian and architectural elements of the campus, and gave
recommendations to reduce the volume of automobile traffic. Street
design, based on an understanding of the differing character and roles
of the various campus corridors, established a distinctive University of
Toronto presence. Siamak’s work on this award-winning Plan was the
foundation of his exploration of the relationship between academic
buildings and their surrounding landscape, informing his later work on
projects such as the Richard Ivey Building at Western University.
awards
2001 - American Society of Landscape Architects Awards
Merit Award
2001 - Canadian Society of Landscape Architects, Professional
Awards of Excellence—National Merit
Founded in 1828, the University of Toronto’s St. George campus was
originally a distinct place apart from the city, with large, interconnected,
densely treed open spaces. Over the decades, trees were removed,
roads were widened, and large parking lots were added, so that by the
1990s, busy streets and narrow sidewalks made pedestrian movement
difficult, and campus spaces were incoherent and unattractive. Realizing
the important relationships between the physical, social, and academic
environments, the University initiated a consultation and planning process
that culminated in a targeted action plan to improve the campus landscape.
2001 - Toronto Architecture & Urban Design Awards
Award Of Excellence—Visions And Master Plans

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