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to - The Rossford Record Journal
Rossford
Record
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VOLUME 74, NUMBER 47 – NOVEMBER 21, 2013
We Honor
WWW.ROSSFORD.COM
©WELCH PUBLISHING CO.
ROSSFORD, WOOD COUNTY, OHIO
Remembering
that fateful day
in U.S. history
It was a Friday and I was
working at Bonner’s Shell
station, in Walbridge. We
had just finished installing a
rebuilt motor in a 1958 Edsel
and it worked well. Don
Bonner said that we did such
a good job, he would buy
lunch for us.
I washed up and went to
Frisch’s on Woodville Road
and got Big Boy sandwiches.
On the return trip, on the
curve on Droulliard Road, I
had the radio tuned to
WOHO, when the news of
the shooting came through
my speaker.
To this day, I don’t
remember how I got from
that spot to the gas station.
All I remember is staggering
in to the cash register area
and blurting out that
“Kennedy has just been
shot.”
The sandwich got eaten,
but I don't remember tasting
it. And every time I see an
Edsel, I cannot help but
think about November 22,
1963.
Roger Bovee
Rossford Eagles
I teach Introduction to
Psychology at BGSU and
one of the concepts we talk
about is “flash bulb memory,” which is an extremely
rich memory that happens
when an unexpected event
occurs. People with flashbulb memories can remember many intricate details of
what happened–as if a flashbulb went off and the camera
captured much richer details
than the typical memory.
I was born in 1969 but
before teaching that concept
for the first time, I asked my
now-deceased mother to tell
me where she was when she
heard about the Kennedy
assassination.
She was able to tell me in
great detail that she was
working as a bank teller in a
drive-through
window
(remote from the main bank
office) and a man in a large
black sedan drove up to the
window crying. He didn’t
have any transactions to
make but just muttered that
the President had been shot
and then drove on.
My mother was confused
and called the main branch
and they verified that
President Kennedy had been
shot. If I remember, the bank
was closed for the rest of the
day.
After discussing this with
my mother and then sharing
with my students, my mother kept remembering more
details, calling me for the
next week to tell me the
name of the other woman
who was working in the
drive up window, what the
weather was like that day in
Peoria, Illinois.
Sadly, I will never be able
to recover those memories
any more, but it was a powerful experience to have had
that conversation with my
mother.
One thing that my mother
never told me was whether
she voted for Kennedy as
President. She believed the
ballot box was secret and
didn’t even tell her spouse
how she voted.
Mike Zickar
Wood County
Democratic Party Chair
On November 22, 1963, I
was at my first job since
graduating from high school.
I worked in the credit department at the Gas Company. It
was a typical Friday afternoon and the girls were talking about what we were
going to do over the weekend.
I was stuffing envelopes
with bills to mail to customers when I received a
call from my boyfriend that
the President was shot.
When he told me, I didn’t
believe him and immediately
asked the people in our
office if anyone else had
heard the news. No one had.
People were asking
employees in other departments if anyone had heard.
At that time, we had no TVs
or computers in our offices.
We weren’t even allowed
radios.
No one could believe it.
Our supervisor then received
a call and confirmed that the
President had indeed been
shot. It was chaotic.
Everyone was in shock and
disbelief. No one seemed to
know what to say or what to
do. We just stood around,
75¢ SINGLE COPY
City pursuing two foreclosed parcels
50th anniversary of
the JFK assassination
This week marks the 50th
anniversary of the assassination of U.S. President
John F. Kennedy.
Just as younger generations recall where they were
when the Challenger space
shuttle blew up or the terrorists attacked on September
11, 2001, an earlier generation has distinct memories of
a tragic November day 50
years ago.
The Record thanks area
residents for sharing their
recollections.
Please Recycle This Newspaper
Our Service
People
The front page of the Rossford Record on November 29, 1963–just a week after the President was killed. Along with
the devastating news, there also were stories about the RHS basketball team winning its opening game, VFW and
Rossford Eagles activities, a wedding announcement and a cheese ball recipe.
waiting for more news. It
was a long and sad afternoon.
Annette Plikerd
Friday, November 22,
1963 was my husband
Norb’s and my fifth wedding
anniversary. Since we are
Catholic and Fridays were
meatless back then, we
decided to wait until
Saturday to have our steak
dinner celebration.
I was at home making
pierogi when my mother
called. She told me that
President Kennedy had been
shot. I called Norb at work to
tell him. There were only
three networks on TV, and I
put on CBS.
I think somehow I did
finish making the pierogi. It
seemed as though everything
stopped that day. TV was
kept on constantly.
We felt so helpless. We
prayed for the President and
his family. The whole country mourned. We never did
celebrate our wedding
anniversary that year.
Judy Heban
On November 22, 1963, I
was an eighth grader at St.
Mary Magdalene grade
school in the days before TV
or computers in the classroom.
I remember Father coming to the door in the back of
the classroom and asking
Sister Catherine to step outside.
When she returned, she
asked all of us to go to our
knees beside our desks and
we would pray for President
Kennedy who had just been
shot.
Shortly after, Father
returned and Sister told us
that the President had died
and we should all go home.
As the first Catholic elected
President, this was a very
upsetting event for all of us.
Bob Watrol
The
day
President
Kennedy was assassinated, I
was a senior at RHS in Fern
Kimmel’s typing class,
which was separated by a
door to Rudy Federici’s
civics class that was
equipped with a portable TV
to be used for “current
events.”
At approximately 2 p.m.,
Mr. Andrews, our principal,
announced over the PA system that there were reports
of a shooting in Dallas,
Texas, involving possible
injuries to our Vice President
Lyndon Johnson, Texas
Governor John Connolly and
the media wasn’t sure of the
condition of President
Kennedy, as the reports were
still sketchy.
Bewildered and concerned, everyone was on the
edge of their seats.
Those in Civics class
turned on the TV and our
class listened through the
doorway. Soon it was
learned that indeed the
President was shot and the
situation was grave.
Many students were visibly upset and crying. Shortly
thereafter, Walter Cronkite
announced on the TV that
the President was dead. Mr.
Andrews made an announcement as well over the PA,
and school was dismissed.
While walking to my
after-school job at Myers
Rexall Pharmacy, I remember talking with friends and
customers and sharing with
them the empty feeling and
the total disbelief of what
just happened? I wondered
aloud who did this and why?
And what our future was
going to to be. My life took a
jolt that day; it was surreal
and a day we all grew up. I
believe the assassination of
President John F. Kennedy
still has had an effect on me
and our country 50 years
later.
Dave Weaks
November 22, 1963 was
a Friday, and a vivid day in
my memory. I was in my
sixth period shorthand class
that day as a junior at
Rossford High School.
The principal, Edgar
Andrews, came on the public
address system to say the
President
had
been
shot/wounded while in a
motorcade in Dallas, Texas.
Everyone in class let out a
gasp and concentrating was
difficult; we continued with
our lesson in a very subdued
manner.
Mr. Andrews came back
on the PA system to say the
President was dead. We were
all dismissed early from
school; the hallways were
eerily quiet and somber.
Since it was a cold, late
autumn day, I remember
going to my locker for my
coat and books; my eyes
were filled with tears.
On the long walk home as
school buses passed by me
on Dixie Highway, I was
wondering what had all just
transpired and what happened that our President was
dead?
Were we being attacked
by the Russians? What,
what, what? I could hardly
wait to get to the safety net
of my home. As soon as I
arrived home, my mom and I
embraced and cried. We
could hardly wait until my
dad returned home from his
afternoon shift at L-O-F.
Our lone TV in the house
was on continuously the
whole weekend; our family
was transfixed with sporadic
bouts of tears, disbelief and
overall sadness in what we
were witnessing–and even
fear, as we watched the subsequent unfolding of events
in Dallas, Texas and
Washington, D.C.
The smooth transition of
the Presidential office, the
dignity of Mrs. Kennedy and
her children, the National
Journal readers are everywhere
From there to here, from here to there, Rossford Record Journal readers are everywhere.
This group of Rossford friends recently enjoyed a trip to Chicago and
are pictured at Navy Pier. From left are Amy Austin, Doug Austin, Jeff
DuShane, Kelly Haas, Chris Haas, Camille MacKinnon, Angi Maxwell,
Marty Kralik, Cindy Johnson, Andrea Steer and Scott Maxwell.
The Record Journal invites all readers to submit photos of themselves
with family and friends, and even celebrities, reading the paper wherever
they are–whether that is the Windy City or the City of the Angels.
Try to include a familiar background or unique scenery.
Photos may be submitted by e-mail to [email protected], or sent by
mail to Rossford Record Journal, 117 East Second Street, Perrysburg,
Ohio 43551.
Please note the names of the people in the photo and their hometowns,
businesses or schools, as well as any other details about the trip and a
daytime telephone number.
Day of Mourning, as well
the respect/reaction from
countries around the world
helped waylay some of our
fears, but our hearts were
broken.
Judy Weaks
Friday, November 22,
1963 will be a day that I’ll
never forget. I was home
from school recovering from
an illness, watching some
game show on Channel 11
when the program was interrupted by an announcement
that the President had been
shot.
Shortly Walter Cronkite
came on struggling to keep
his composure as he
announced the President had
been declared dead at 1 p.m.
E.S.T. That evening our family was very somber as we
watched TV trying to absorb
what
had
happened.
Immense sadness, shock and
uncertainty filled our home.
My wife was attending a
high school of nearly 2,000
students when the announcement was made during her
home economics class. As
the bell rang, she recalled,
“you could have heard a pin
drop. No one talked.” They
had an early dismissal and
when the bus dropped her
off, all the mothers in the
neighborhood were standing
by the curb to meet their
children–an event she had
never seen before, or since.
At our time in life, the
three events we remember as
though they occured yesterday are 9/11, an astronaut
walking on the moon and the
day JFK was shot.
Ken and Barb Szczesniak
I was in fourth grade at
Arlington School in Toledo
when the President was shot.
Our teacher, Mrs. Linda
Fessler, rushed into the room
and told us the news.
We had a television in our
room that we used for our
daily French lesson–in those
days it was black and white.
But we also got local channels, so she turned it on.
We all sat on the floor in
front of the TV watching. It
was sad and unbelievable.
In retrospect, it was the
beginning of many sad
events in the years to come.
My generation witnessed the
world, as we knew it, change
forever. I was in eighth
grade–we were following
the primary elections in history class–when Bobby
Kennedy was shot.
Sandy Komisarek
I wasn’t born yet, but as a
little child, growing up in the
60s and 70s, I remember
hearing a lot about JFK
along with a lot of protesting
over Vietnam and racial
riots. Being afraid of a war
with Russia was always a
fear as well. Children today
don’t even know what a fallout shelter is, but there were
signs on every major public
building back then.
I was born three months
after John Kennedy was
assassinated. But just last
month, my son Oliver and I
went to Dallas to Dealey
Please turn to page 3➧
By Beth Church
Rossford city officials are
pursuing the purchase of
another two foreclosed
parcels, hoping to find new
owners who will maintain the
properties and pay their taxes.
At a November 12
Rossford City Council meeting, Law Director Kevin
Heban said the parcels at 224
and 230 Osborn Street–both
vacant
lots–have
been
through two sheriff’s sales
and not sold.
Each property is appraised
at $14,000, and they are buildable lots, he added.
He noted that neighbors
have been maintaining the
properties, and they are
always mowed.
Mayor Neil MacKinnon
III agreed with the purchase,
adding, “It would be my recommendation to get the real
estate in good hands.”
If the city or school district
does not purchase the property, the state will seize the
property and likely will not
maintain it, Mr. Heban said.
However, the Ohio attorney general’s office issued an
opinion that cities or school
districts may be liable for
delinquent taxes on properties
they accept.
Mr. Heban said he is
unsure if that ruling will apply
in this case, but if it does the
total tax due is $4,000.
Council took similar
action in 2011, pursuing foreclosed land at 223 Bacon
Street that later was sold to
Habitat for Humanity, which
constructed a house.
“We’ve been seeing more
and more of these circumstances coming in,” City
Administrator Ed Ciecka said.
“We need to figure out
what do with them,” he said.
“Market them? We need to
have a strategy.”
2104 Budget
Council heard the first
reading of an ordinance establishing the 2014 municipal
budget.
“We started with the 2013
figures and asked department
heads for additional things
they’d like,” Finance Director
Karen Freeman said.
The proposed budget
includes funding for a new
full-time public works position and a new full-time
police officer, a public works
truck replacement and a used
bucket truck.
It also includes $1 million
for road improvements,
Dan Wagner, left, is sworn in as a new Rossford City
Council member by Mayor Neil MacKinnon III. Mr. Wagner,
who was elected by voters in the November 5 race, is
beginning his term early, filling the council seat left
vacant in August by Mike Scott. “I’d like to thank the community for putting their support behind me,” Councilman
Wagner said.
“although the projects are not
all identified,” she added.
Marina Committee
The Rossford marina saw
its highest number of rentals
this past summer, but it may
be time to raise marina fees,
Councilman Chuck Duricek
said.
The facilities, parks and
marina committee recently
discussed marina usage, and
the need to start a marina capital improvement fund, he
explained.
The new finger docks,
implemented several years
ago, have been popular, Mr.
Duricek added.
The committee discussed
the possibility of converting A
dock into finger docks, but
“the cost is prohibitive,” he
said. “I don’t think we’ll get
there.”
Other Business
In other business, council:
•Heard from Councilman
Greg Marquette that the zoning regulations and technology committee is recommending that parking on Helen
Drive should be limited to the
west side of the street only.
“Although we expect a lot
of complaints, we strongly
believe it will make for a safer
environment for the people
who reside there,” he added.
Council has discussed the
parking situation for more
than a year, after concerns
arose that fire trucks cannot fit
down the street with vehicles
parked on both sides.
•Heard a concern from
Councilman Jerry Staczek
about the upcoming 13.2 percent water rate increase from
the City of Toledo.
“We should start thinking
what it takes to get our own
water treatment plant,” he
said. “We have the assets, the
land, the river. I’d like to get
the discussion moving.”
•Approved a service
agreement between the city
and Siren Rossford LLC,
developers of the new
Camping World site.
Mayor MacKinnon said
the company is asking for
$75,000 of tax incremental
financing (TIF) funds to pay
for infrastructure, including
storm and sanitary sewer and
water lines in the Crossroads
area.
“That’s what it [the TIF
fund] is for,” the mayor
explained. “Over a period of
time, we’ll get that back–and
then some.”
•Authorized pay raises for
non-union city employees–
city administrator, $71,552;
public works superintendent,
$58,448; finance director,
$61,880; fire chief, $63,960;
police chief, $63,960; assistant fire chief, $18.50 per
hour; parks and recreation
director, $49,504; parks and
recreation assistant director,
$36,712, and clerk of council,
$4,800.
All raises are retroactive to
July 8, except the parks and
recreation assistant director,
which will go into effect
January 5, 2014.
Mayor MacKinnon said
the pay increases “are in line
with our neighbors of the
same size.”
Please turn to page 3➧
‘Blue bag’ delivery may be regulated
The plastic bags of unsolicited newspapers that frequently pile up on lawns,
curbs and gutters around
Rossford may soon disappear.
At a November 12 meeting, Rossford City Council
heard the first reading of an
ordinance that would restrict
delivery of the “blue bags.”
Law Director Kevin
Heban said the ordinance is
based on a Kentucky ordinance that has withstood a
challenge in federal court.
“It doesn’t regulate the
content of the bags, but their
distribution,” he added.
City officials frequently
receive complaints about
bags being delivered on
driveways, sidewalks and at
the curbs.
The ordinance stems from
a concern “about the proliferation of litter and debris in the
community, which in turn
leads to the creation of nuisance conditions that decrease
property values in the area
and cause other social decay.”
The ordinance would
require all “unsolicited written materials”–such as newspapers and advertisements–
to be placed:
•in a distribution box
located on or adjacent to the
premises,
•on a porch nearest the
front door of the premises,
•securely attached to the
front door,
•through a mail slot on the
front door as permitted by the
U.S. Postal Service,
•between the exterior front
door, if unlocked, and interior
front door,
•personally to the owner
or occupant of the premises.
The ordinance does not
apply to newspapers received
through subscriptions nor to
the Post Office, Mr. Heban
said.
Placement of the materials
in any other areas than stated
would be a minor misdemeanor violation.
Council member Caroline
Zuchowski Eckel said the
ordinance would improve the
city’s problems with clogged
storm sewers, as they pile up
in the gutters and are pushed
by snowplows into the sewer
drains.
Councilman Dan Wagner
said he supports the ordinance
after witnessing, as a Toledo
police officer, how burglars
often target homes where the
bags are piled up.
Social Security planning
is focus of RBA meeting
The Rossford Business Association will gather
Wednesday, November 27, at noon, for a monthly luncheon
meeting. New members are welcome.
The meeting will feature a presentation by Stephen
Younker of the Miller Younker Group on “Social Security:
What you need to know for you, your parents and your
family.”
The meeting will take place at NECA/IBEW Electrical
Workers Hall, 727 Lime City Road, Rossford.
The lunch will be sponsored by Miller Younker Group.
All area business people interested in joining the RBA
are invited to attend the meeting.
Reservations are required. To make a reservation for
lunch, visit the RBA’s Web site www.rossfordba.com.
City tree lighting ceremony to be Nov. 25
Area residents are invited to kick off the
holiday season at 5:30 p.m., Monday,
November 25, at Rossford’s annual tree lighting ceremony.
The traditional Christmas season event
will take place on the front lawn of the municipal building, 133 Osborn Street.
Mayor Neil MacKinnon III, his wife
Camille, and children Neil IV and Nadia will
throw the switch for the lights on the ever-
green tree and the lights in the display on the
lawn.
Pastor Bob Ball of Rossford United
Methodist Church will give a blessing of the
tree.
The Rossford High School choir and band
will perform a medley of holiday music.
Cookies and hot chocolate will be served
after the ceremony in the lobby of the municipal building, before the city council meeting.
Page 2 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
Rossford man
arrested on
drug charges,
thefts solved
Tornado strikes Oregon Rd., Route 795 area
A severe thunderstorm–with high winds reminiscent of the Lake Township tornado several years ago–ripped through the area Sunday evening,
damaging numerous homes and businesses.
The National Weather Service confirmed Monday that the storm included a EF2 tornado, with winds reaching up to 125 miles per hour.
Clean-up began in earnest Monday morning, especially in the area of
State Route 795 and Oregon Road where the storm was most violent.
The roof over the gas pumps at the Circle K collapsed, and a halfdozen businesses in the Cedar Business Park were severely damaged.
Perrysburg Township Deputy Police Chief Mike Gilmore noted, “Cedar
Business Park was hit pretty hard,” adding that he would be surprised if it
isn’t determined to be the result of a tornado. “It looks like a war zone at
this point.”
There were no serious injuries and the deputy chief expressed relief
that the storm just missed the Friendly Village mobile home complex. “It’s
kind of a miracle.”
Above is the gas station seen from Oregon Road with the fallen roof
laying in the background.
In the foreground is aluminum sheathing from the commercial buildings that was strewn for more than a mile, crumpled into ditches, hanging
off roofs and twisted around trees and power lines.
Yellow insulation was scattered like snow across roads and yards, and
debris from the Cedar Park buildings was carried by high winds up to several miles away.
Buildings on Ponderosa Road suffered the brunt of the tornado-like
winds, including Video Products Distributors, pictured middle right and
bottom left, and Precision Strip Inc., middle left.
Across Route 795, in the Starbright housing subdivision, there were
roofs, siding and decks torn from houses, as pictured bottom right. Power
lines and trees were down and debris was scattered in the streets.
South of the city of Perrysburg along State Route 199, the high winds
felled power lines, cutting power to thousands of area residents into early
this week.
Rossford and Perrysburg Schools were closed Monday, as well.
A Rossford man arrested
on drug charges also has
confessed to committing
several burglaries in his
neighborhood.
Joshua R. Curtis, 19,
Helen Drive, was arrested
for abusing harmful intoxicants and receiving stolen
property, after a search
warrant was executed at his
home by the Rossford
Police Department.
Detective Sergeant Todd
Kitzler said Mr. Curtis
admitted to committing two
burglaries in his neighborhood.
Much of the stolen
items–including TVs, video
games and paintball equipment–has been recovered
from Toledo and Perrysburg pawnshops and second-hand stores, Detective
Kitzler said.
In Perrysburg Municipal
Court on November 8, Mr.
Curtis was sentenced to
180 days jail with credit for
time served and 169 days
suspended to serve in a
treatment program. He also
must pay $190 in restitution to the victim.
Apartment fire causes major damage
The Rossford Fire
Department was called at 11
p.m., November 16, to an
apartment fire at 331 Superior Street.
Fire Chief Jim Verbosky
said firefighters found a
large basement fire in the
rear apartments of the building that had spread to the
first and second floor apart-
ments, as well as the attic.
“The balloon type construction caused the fire to
rapidly extend throughout
the structure,” he explained.
The basement and both
apartments were heavily
damaged by the blaze, the
chief said.
All occupants were evacuated without injury, and no
Announcements
firefighters were injured, he
added.
The cause of the fire is
under investigation, according to the chief.
He did not provide an
estimated value of damages.
Perrysburg Township,
Northwood and Toledo fire
departments assisted at the
scene.
The Journal welcomes announcements from readers of births, engagements,
weddings and anniversaries. There is a $15 fee to include a photo.
The Journal reserves the right to edit content to conform to the newspaper’s
style.
Submissions are due with payment by 10 a.m. Monday for each week’s edition.
Civil Service
sets meeting
for Nov. 22
The Rossford Civil Service Commission will meet
Friday, November 22, at 11
a.m., in council chambers of
the municipal building, 133
Osborn Street. The meeting
is open to the public.
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ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL — November 21, 2013 — Page 3
Rossford
Record
Remembering that fateful day in U.S. history
U.S.P.S. #417-620
Published every Thursday
Periodicals Postage Paid at Perrysburg, Ohio 43552
WELCH PUBLISHING CO.
Matthew H. Welch, Publisher
Beth Church, Editor
Matthew H. Welch, Advertising Manager
117 East Second Street, P.O. Box 267
Perrysburg, Ohio 43552
ÁContinued from page 1
Plaza and took a tour
through the Book Depository building where Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly positioned himself to aim his
rifle at the President and
governor of Texas.
It’s quite an overwhelming, somber experience to
travel back in time in the
museum which is now
owned by Dallas County.
Glenn Goss
Rossford Chief of Police
Web Address: rossford.com
Subscription Rates:
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Liability for errors and/or omissions in publication of any advertisement by
the ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL, whether due to negligence or otherwise, is limited to rerunning without charge that portion of the advertisement published incorrectly. In case of error or omission, the publisher will,
upon request, furnish the advertiser with a letter stating that such error or
omission occurred. The ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL will not be
responsible for errors or omissions in any advertising beyond the first
insertion or for errors in electronically submitted ads. Other than as stated
above. The ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL assumes no responsibility
or liability for any monetary loss or damages resulting from any error or
omission. All copy is subject to the approval of the publisher, who reserves
the right to reject or cancel any submission at any time. The opinions
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Area blood drive scheduled
The American Red
Cross will hold a blood
drive on Friday, November
29, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
at All Saints Catholic
School, 630 Lime City
Road, Rossford.
To
schedule
an
appointment, call 1-800733-2767 or visit redcrossblood.org for more
information.
To be eligible to donate
blood, an individual must
be at least 17 years of age,
or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of
110 pounds based on
height, and be in good general health. All donors need
to present valid identification.
The Western Lake Erie
Region serves 11 counties,
and needs to collect about
300 units of blood a day to
meet patient need in 24 hospitals.
I can’t believe it has been
50 years since that fateful
day in November of 1963.
And just thinking about it
now still brings tears to my
eyes and a piercing pain
through my heart. Our President had been assassinated.
What do you mean? We
knew that the great Abraham
Lincoln had been assassinated almost 100 years ago; we
learned that tragic story in
our history classes.
Here we were, eighthgraders at the newly opened
Rossford Junior High
School sitting in Mrs.
Rudolph’s English class on
the second floor, when a
solemn voice came over the
PA system announcing that
President John Fitzgerald
Kennedy had been shot.
We never knew anyone
that had been shot let alone
our beloved President. Mrs.
Rudolph didn’t speak; she
stopped teaching and just sat
slowly down at her desk.
Stunned, like all of us in the
room.
We were 13 years old.
What did we really know of
Some of the several new books available at the Rossford Public Library that were released to commemorate the 50th
anniversary of the Kennedy assassination.
politics? Not much, and at
13, did we really care about
politicians? But our President had been shot, fatally
wounded. We did not know
what to do. We all just sat
quietly at our desks. Even
some of the boisterous boys
who always had a quick
comeback to make us laugh
sat staring at the board.
I can’t even tell you what
our lesson was that day, as I
turned to stare out the classroom window. Everything
down on Superior Street in
Rossford looked the same.
A few people walking and a
few cars going by. Nothing
looked different. Everything
Letters to the Editor
The Ohio EPA will hold
an outreach session on
Thursday, November 21,
from 1 to 5 p.m., at the
W.W. Knight Nature Center,
Hankison Great Room,
29530 White Road, Perrysburg. This is one of five sessions being held throughout
the state to explain changes
being considered to the Voluntary Action Program
(VAP) rules.
The Ohio EPA is
required to review rules
every five years. The VAP
rules affect entities who are
seeking a covenant not to
419.353.2277
See our complete menu at www.sambs.com
Hometown
Va l u e s
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Ohio EPA to hold outreach session
on Voluntary Action Program rules
The weekly deadline for Letters to the Editor is noon on Monday. Letters should be
limited to 300 words. Letters from the same writer will be accepted no more frequently
than every 30 days. The newspaper reserves the right to accept or reject letters, and to edit
them for clarity and length. Letters should be submitted with the author’s name, signature
and daytime telephone number.
WHOLE
was a blur.
At home with my mother, we watched the news on
our black and white TV.
The whole nation was in a
daze.
My cousin Karen St.
Julian was supposed to get
married that Saturday to
Gilbert McGee, and that was
a big decision. Should they
have the wedding and reception after our President was
just assassinated? Yes, they
did decide to marry that day.
Life continued on, but was
never the same again.
Beverly Zuchowski
9
2
.
3
$
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sue from Ohio EPA to protect them from legal action
following a property
cleanup.
Under VAP, cleanup
actions are required to be
performed by certified professionals to assure properties meet cleanup standards
as defined in VAP rules.
Following the meetings,
Ohio EPA plans to develop
draft rules and hold a public
comment period before formally proposing the rules in
2014.
The meetings are open to
the public.
was anticipating preparing
an after-school snack for my
four elementary school children when the incredible
announcement came over
the radio claiming that our
President had been shot.
My first thought was that
it just had to be some kind
of sick joke the radio staff
was playing. But I then
turned on the TV and saw
Walter Cronkite in tears and
knew it truly was bad news.
Since the report was that
President Kennedy was shot
but not dead, I turned to
prayer for him and his wife
and our country. What a
completely unexpected
shock to hear later that our
nation had lost its young,
dynamic leader.
I then had to find a way
to explain the terrible event
to my kids age 5 to 11. Not
an easy task.
Doris Dubilzig
ÁContinued from page 1
“I think they do a great
job, and our financial house is
in order,” he added.
•Approved an expense of
an additional $2,800 for the
fire department to purchase a
new roof ladder and 250 feet
of hose, which were damaged
in a recent fire.
Mrs. Freeman said the
expense will be submitted to
the insurance company, but
the city has a $1,000
deductible.
•Authorized a contract
without bidding for $20,720
with Ground Level Inc., for
demolition of the structure at
416 Glenwood Road, recently
damaged by fire.
•Heard a concern from a
resident about Senate Bill 58
and House Bill 302, which
would raise electric rates.
“To the point where we’re
paying for what we’re not
even using,” said Brenda
Bright Hagman of Windsor
Drive.
Mr. Ciecka recently attended a state briefing on the issue,
noting that Senator Randy
Gardner believes amendments
will be proposed to the bills.
The electric companies are
seeking reimbursement–
through increased rates–for
the rebates they offered to
consumers using high-efficiency appliances, he
explained.
“We’re monitoring this situation,” Mr. Ciecka said.
•Heard a concern from a
Glenwood Road resident
about speeding traffic on his
street, as well as numerous
dump trucks.
“It’s a brand new road and
they’re going to beat it up
quickly,” he said.
Council member Caroline
Zuchowski Eckel said the
newly-paved portion of Glenwood should be posted as a
“no haul” area, and the public
works committee will discuss
the problem.
Council’s next meeting
will be at 7 p.m., Monday,
November 25, at the municipal building, 133 Osborn
Street, and is open to the public.
City pursuing two
foreclosed parcels
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Library offers
computer
classes in Nov.
The Rossford Public
Library is offering the following computer classes. The
schedule follows:
•Thursday, November 21,
Microsoft Word Open Forum.
•Tuesday, November 26,
Cloud Storage.
All classes are free and
open to the public. They will
be held in the library’s community room starting at 6
p.m. To register, call 419-6660924.
The Ohio Senate recently
approved an amendment
sponsored by Senator Randy
Gardner that strives to end
open lake dumping of
dredged materials in Lake
Erie.
The Gardner amendment
reappropriates approximately
$1.6 million of existing state
funds toward conservation
practices in the counties of
the Western Lake Erie Basin
and specifically provides for
transferring money to the
Healthy Lake Erie Fund to
address open lake dumping.
“Lake Erie is one of
Ohio’s most important natural assets,” said Senator
Gardner in sponsoring the
amendment. “Open lake
dumping of dredge materials
is one of several factors we
believe contributing to algae
problems in Lake Erie. We
must be more aggressive in
our efforts to clean up the
lake.”
Senator Gardner’s amendment received the support of
agriculture groups, environmental organizations and
charter boat captains who
testified in the Senate Agriculture
and
Natural
Resources Committee on
Wednesday. He worked with
the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the Ohio
Environmental Council and
received support from the
Ohio Farm Bureau for his
amendment.
“We must do all we can to
build bipartisan coalitions in
support of Lake Erie,” said
Mr. Gardner. “This effort
against Lake Erie dumping is
another important step.”
The Ohio Environmental
Council agrees.
“Senator
Gardner ’s
amendment offers a practical
bridge between the need to
dredge the Toledo harbor
with the need to protect Lake
Erie from harmful dredge
material,” said Kristy Meyer,
managing director of agricultural, health and clean water
programs with the Ohio
Environmental Council. “All
lawmakers should support
it.”
Senator Gardner said it
was important to note that
the challenges in supporting
a healthier Lake Erie became
even greater this year with
the reported second-worst
algal bloom season on
record.
“I appreciate Senator
Gardner sponsoring this
amendment and Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman
Hite and the committee for
supporting it,” ODNR Director Jim Zehringer said. “This
will be an important first step
in addressing a possible
alternative to the open lake
disposal of dredge material
and the associated nutrients
that can impact Lake Erie.”
Senator Gardner’s amendment is included in legislation scheduled for a final
committee and Senate floor
vote. The bill and amendment will then be considered
by the House of Representatives in December.
Rossford Eagles
and Auxiliary
By Richard Staffan
On Tuesday, November
26, our club will have wing
night, from 5 to 9 p.m. This
is open to the public.
The auxiliary also will
meet at 7:30 p.m., on
November 26.
The Rossford Eagles will
be closed on Thanksgiving
day, November 28.
On Saturday, November
30, the club will have the
Ohio State vs. Michigan
game on all six TVs, so
everyone can see and party.
Tuesday, December 3,
the club will have a burger
basket special, from 5 to 9
p.m. This also is open to the
public.
The Aerie will meet on
Thursday, December 5, at 8
p.m.
Saturday, December 7,
the club will have karaoke
with Karaoke Steve, and
also a feather party for its
members. This will run from
7:30 until 11:30 p.m.
In sports news, the scores
for the Ma and Pa Bowling
League, are: actual - men,
first and second games, Bob
Parisi, 267 and 235; third
game, Eric Pawlowski, 256;
women, first and third
games, Tootie Steffen, 167
and 179; second game, Sue
Sunquist, 180; over average
- men, first game, Bob
Parisi, +66; second game,
Rum Destatte, +36; third
game, Wendell Meek, +64;
women, first game, Carolyn
Beason, +235; second game,
Sue Sunquist, +22; third
game, Sharon Bohner, +43.
Mystery score winners were:
first game, Terry Snyder,
199, and second game, Barb
Staffan, 130.
The Eagle quote of the
week is, “No one is eager to
gain new experience as he
who doesn’t know how to
make sure of the old ones.”
See you at the club.
“Restoring your teeth can restore
your health and appearance for a
lifetime.”
Perrysburg
Family
Dentistry
419-872-9191
• General
Dentistry
Jon B. Dove, D.D.S.,
is accepting new patients.
New address: 601 W. Boundary
Evening hours available
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Happy Thanksgiving!
from
Smithers Insurance Agency
Nationwide Insurance
Jerry & Amy Smithers, owners
229 Superior St., Rossford • 419-666-5703
As we pause to share
the happiness of this
Thanksgiving, we truly
appreciate your loyalty
throughout this year.
Page 4 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
PUBLIC RECORD
Rossford Police Reports
It’s on the
October 26: 100 block
Helen Drive, drug paraphernalia.
October 28: 100 block
Helen Drive, burglary.
Island View Avenue, forgery.
900 block Jennison, arrested Patricia A. Garcia, 49,
Yondota Street, Toledo, dog
running at large, disorderly
conduct.
October 29: 100 block
Helen Drive, burglary.
Unit block Rossway,
telecommunications harassment.
900 block Carol Circle,
suspicious vehicle.
October 30: 10000 block
Olde U.S. 20, arrested Linda
D. Staifer, 44, Fremont Pike,
Perrysburg, theft.
300 block Hillside Drive,
suspicious activity.
800 block Lime City
Road, criminal damaging to
vehicle.
October 31: 600 block
Glenwood Road, aggravated
menacing.
10000 block Olde U.S. 20,
criminal mischief.
November 8 to 14, 2013
Friday, November 8
Accident, Thompson
Road at Fremont Pike; rescue runs, 10000 block
Roachton Road, (2) 28000
block Starbright Boulevard;
fire calls, 9000 block
Dowling Road, unit block
Dr. McAuley Court; disorderly conduct, 27000 block
Tracy Road; K-9 utilized, I75 south at milemark 190.
Saturday, November 9
Accidents, 10000 block
Fremont Pike, Glenwood at
Latcha roads; rescue run,
28000 block Starbright
Boulevard; fire call, Glenwood at Latcha roads;
assist outside agency,
Warrant arrest, failure to
appear, Joe L. Thomas, 25,
Lake Street, Toledo.
November 1: 800 block
Lime City Road, theft.
10000 block Bass Pro
Boulevard, theft from vehicle,
criminal damaging.
9800 block Olde U.S. 20,
theft from three vehicles and
criminal damaging.
November 2: Unit block
Dixie Highway, arrested
Andrew J. Wilk, 24, Bond
Street, Toledo, operating a
vehicle under the influence.
700 block Dixie Highway,
found property, debit card,
owner contacted.
10000 block Olde U.S. 20,
arrested Trina C. Knowinski,
48, Tracy Road, Perrysburg,
theft.
800 block Dixie Highway,
arson, cardboard bail set on
fire.
November 3: 800 block
Lime City Road, arrested
Jami M. Peterson, 36, Glenwood Road, Perrysburg, operating a vehicle under the
influence.
Unit block Rossway,
telecommunications harassment.
November 4: 700 block
Superior Street, unruly juvenile.
200 block Elm Street, runaway, unruly juvenile.
600 block Marilyn Drive,
assault.
1200 block Grassy Lane,
telecommunications harassment.
1100 block Buck Road,
domestic dispute.
November 5: 700 block
Creekside, found property,
credit cards.
9600 block Olde U.S. 20,
arrested Kylie G. Riggio, 19,
Salisbury Road, Monclova,
theft.
November 6: 600 block
Marilyn Drive, arrested Justin
C. Mortemore, 28, Hill
Avenue, Toledo, and Xavier
L. Carlisle, 21, Noble Street,
Toledo, possession of prescription drugs, fifth-degree
felony, and possession of
drug abuse instruments.
November 7: 100 block
Walnut Street, lost rear
license plate.
12000 block Jefferson
Street.
Sunday, November 10
Rescue run, 20000 block
Oregon Road; criminal mischief and petty theft, 26000
block Oak Meadows Drive
West.
Monday, November 11
Accidents, Oregon at
Avenue roads, Thompson
Road at Fremont Pike,
Avenue at Glenwood roads;
rescue run, 20000 block
Oregon Road; alarm, 28000
block Starbright Boulevard;
fraud, 12000 block Roachton Road; suspicious incident, 10000 block Fremont
Pike.
Tuesday, November 12
Accident, Dixie Highway at Five Point road; rescue runs, 10000 block
South Bramblewood Road,
20000 block Starbright
Boulevard, 30000 block
Oregon Road, 20000 block
Tracy Road; fire call,
26000 block Emerald
Lakes; unlawful restraint
and domestic violence,
12000 block Jefferson
Street; K-9 utilized, I-75
north at milemark 196;
incident report, 12000
block Roosevelt Boulevard.
Wednesday, November 13
Rescue runs, 30000
block Oregon Road, 7000
block Ayers Road; incident
reports, 29000 block White
Township Police Report
Wood County grand jury indicts
two in township break-ins
On November 6, a
Wood County grand jury
indicted two Toledo residents for allegedly breaking into several Perrysburg
Township businesses and
taking thousands of dollars
in tools.
Christopher Crapsey,
46, of Peak Street, faces
four counts of breaking and
entering, one count of theft
and one count of vandalism, all fifth-degree
felonies; two counts of
grand theft, felonies of the
fourth degree and one
count of engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, a
second-degree felony.
Joseph Crapsey III, 53,
of 117th Street, is charged
with one count of engaging
in a pattern of corrupt
activity, a felony of the
second degree.
The indictments are the
result of an investigation
conducted by Perrysburg
Township Police, who in
2012 looked into a number
of thefts from area businesses including T. Gray
Automotive,
Seagate
Transportation,
Tech
Dynamic, Pit Stop Collision and Precision Strip.
According to township
police, the Crapseys
allegedly tried to sell the
tools on Craigslist, at the
Toledo Flea Market and at
a home in Toledo.
If convicted on all nine
counts, Mr. Crapsey faces a
prison sentence of up to 17
years and fines of $35,000.
Mr. Crapsey II could be
sentenced to up to eight
years in prison and fines of
up to $15,000 if convicted.
Both cases will be heard
by Wood County Common
Pleas Judge Reeve Kelsey.
Rewards are offered by Wood County Crime Stoppers for information leading to the arrest of criminals.
Perrysburg and Rossford citizens may provide information anonymously by calling 1-800-542-7463.
Real Estate
Transfers
Real estate transfers
from November 1 to 13,
2013 for the area encompassing Rossford School
District.
Henrietta L. and Carl H.
Desko, trustees to Robert A.
Roach and Andrea Dorey
Gleason, 1220 Grassy Lane,
$183,700.
Ryan M. and Courtney A.
Bloom to Bobbie J. Gorsuch,
150 Hannum Road, $83,000.
James L. and Zachary G.
Cook, 117 Windsor Drive,
$76,500.
William A. Wright and
Kelly S. Osborn-Wright to
Joel N. and Rhonda Kryder,
9500 block Five Point Road,
Perrysburg
Township
$170,500.
George Isaac Properties,
Ltd. to Gallant Hospitality
LLC, 0 Clark Street,
$745,001.
Road, 27000 block Oakmead Drive; menacing,
26000 block Glenwood
Road.
Thursday, November 14
Accidents, 8000 block
Avenue Road, East River at
Somerset
roads; rescue
runs, 8000 block Chrysler
Drive, 7000 block Ponderosa Road; K-9 utilized,
(2) I-75 south at milemark
188, Fremont Pike at Burger King, I-75 at Buck Road,
I-75 south at milemark 190;
telecommunications harassment, 28000 block Oregon
Road, 28000 block Cedar
Park Boulevard; forgery,
28000 block Starbright
Boulevard.
Municipal Court Reports
The following cases were
finalized in Perrysburg
Municipal Court October 1426, 2013.
An additional $78 in
court costs was sentenced for
each case, unless otherwise
noted.
Brett A. Dilucia, Glenwood Road, aggravated trespassing, no fine, $73 court
costs, 180 days jail, 120 suspended with credit for time
served; assault, no fine, $73
court costs, 180 days jail, 120
suspended, concurrent with
other charge, electronic monitoring.
Tara L. Osberger, Ross-
way Avenue, speed, $55 fine.
Douglas L. Crill, Lime
City Road, operating a vehicle under the influence, $375
fine, 93 days jail, 90 suspended, six month license
suspension.
Jessica C. Tuttle, Creekside Drive, receiving stolen
property, no fine, $73 court
costs, 180 days jail, 180 suspended, restitution of $1,013
to victim.
Donald H. Mincey, Glenwood Road, speed, $67 fine.
Daniel S. Earl, Hillsdale
Avenue, parking/storage,
$150 fine, $150 suspended,
$53 court costs.
Donations sought for annual
Cops and Kids program
The Wood County Fraternal Order of Police is
again hosting its annual
Cops and Kids shopping
event. This is an event
where police officers are
paired up with a child from
the area and given $100 to
spend on clothing and toys.
This is more than just about
shopping, it is about building relationships between
the children and police officers.
Richard DeVaul Tax Service
419 Superior St.
Rossford
419-661-0583
At this special time of year,
wed like to thank our
customers and friends for
their loyalty and support.
We wish you and yours a
very happy and healthy
Thanksgiving!
This year Meijer in
Rossford will again host
Cops and Kids in Wood
County on Saturday,
December 7. More than 100
children are expected to
participate. The number of
participants depends on the
amount of money raised.
Area police officers are
selling $5 raffle tickets. The
winner will receive a $500
gift card from Meijer, an I
Pad Mini, and a Kindle
Fire.
The majority of the
financial support comes
from the community, local
businesses and local organizations.
Police officers from each
jurisdiction in Wood County participate in Cops and
Kids.
Children who are
invited to participate are
referred by local schools
and the officers.
On the day of the event,
each officer is paired up
with a child from his or her
jurisdiction and given a
cart, and a gift card to shop.
They must first buy a coat
and boots. The remaining
money can be spent on
toys.
Anyone who is interested in sponsoring a child,
buying a raffle ticket, or
make any type of donation,
can call 419-353-9728 or
mail to: Wood County
FOP, P.O. Box 122 Bowling
Green, Ohio 43402.
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419-666-4974
417 N. Main St., Walbridge
ODOT prepares for winter from new facility
By Sean Maiolo
Like most area drivers,
ODOT workers are not
eagerly awaiting the freezing rain, snow, wind and
ice that plague area roads
every winter, But they are
confident that they can
better handle this year’s
frigid season from their
new home on Technology
Drive in Monclova Township.
Along with a host of
amenities and technologies, the new facility
places them only minutes
from the junction of two
main arteries–I-475 and
U.S. Route 24–something
transportation administrator Jeff O’Neal said is crucial this year given how
far the old Detroit Avenue
facility was from major
roads.
“This allows us to get
to our primary critical
routes faster than we did
before,” he said. “And
obviously Route 24 is new,
so there’s all that extra that
has been recently added
over the past couple years
with that new construction
that’s doubled the size of
that route for us.”
While their ability to
reach main roads faster
and more efficiently will
likely please drivers the
most, Mr. O’Neal and his
crew are equally happy
about new technology and
the benefits that come with
a new facility.
One of those is a much
larger salt dome. The old
salt shed’s maximum
capacity was less than
3,000 tons. The new one
more than doubles that at
7,500 tons and is fully
stocked.
The Ohio Department
of Transportation upgraded
facilities for the 32 trucks
in the Lucas County fleet.
All trucks housed at the
Monclova facility have
ample garage space and
are stored inside when
not in use–something that
should significantly extend
the lives of the vehicles.
Many trucks also are
retrofitted with stainless
steel beds which, Mr.
O’Neal said, “will last
longer than the trucks
themselves.”
Perhaps the most noteworthy change is the
statewide implementation
of a color scheme on the
rear of the vehicles along
with a green flashing light
to pair with the standard
orange and white lights.
“About 90 percent of
the district fleet has been
outfitted with the green
lights,” he said, adding
that the lights make the
trucks more visible to
motorists in bad weather.
ODOT is the first in the
country to utilize the
Perrysburg Township
and Perrysburg Christians
United are collecting items
for the 36th annual Operation Breadbasket.
Children’s toys and winter coats are needed. Donations of clean and usable
clothing in all sizes, blankets, gloves, hats, scarves,
shoes and boots also are
being accepted.
In addition to new and
slightly used toys and
clothing, the organization
is seeking cash donations,
non-perishable food items,
books and hygiene essentials.
Annie
HermanAlrabaya, co-organizer,
reminds residents that
donations to Operation
Breadbasket/Perrysburg Christians United stay
in the community.
“Your donations help
our local neighbors in
need,” she said, adding that
for monetary donations,
make checks payable to
Operation Breadbasket.
Items may be taken to
the township police and
fire departments on Lime
City Road through Monday, December 16. Donations also can be dropped
off at the Perrysburg Messenger Journal office, 117
East Second Street; Huntington Bank, State Route
795 and Oregon Road,
Walgreens, U.S. Route 20
and Thompson Road,
O’Deer
Diner,
416
Louisiana
Avenue;
Frisch’s, 10705 Fremont
Pike; Salon Soto, 580
Craig Drive; Ken’s Florist,
140 West South Boundary
Street, and all Perrysburg
area churches.
Businesses interested in
serving as a drop-off location are asked to call 419872-8861 or 419-872-8859.
Baskets, toys and cloth-
ODOT stocks rock salt in a storage shed at its Monclova Township facility.
bright green and yellow
pattern on the rear of
trucks.
In addition to the large
salt dome and large vehicle storage bay, the facility
features a new wash bay
with spray washers that
clean the undercarriage of
the vehicles.
Mr. O’Neal believes the
washing facility is efficient and safe. The water
from the wash is drained
on site to keep it out of the
sewer system. That same
water is then reused
to help create brine
to pretreat roadways,
Perrysburg Twp., PCU are collecting
items for 36th Operation Breadbasket
Auditor announces changes
in Homestead Exemption
The Wood County Auditor urges residents who are
currently eligible to receive
the Homestead Exemption
real estate tax reduction, and
have not yet applied, to do so
immediately.
The state’s budget bill for
2014 will require that any
future applicants have an
annual income of less than
$30,500 per year. Anyone
who is currently age 65, will
turn 65 in 2013, or is permanently disabled, has until
June 2, 2014, to apply for the
Homestead Exemption with
no income requirement. Anyone who fails to do so by that
date or turns 65 after December 31, 2013, will be subject
to the new rules.
An applicant must own
and occupy his or her home
as their principal place of
residence as of January 1,
2013. A person has only one
principal place of residence,
therefore, the law allows for
only one exemption per
owner.
This will not affect residents currently receiving the
Homestead Exemption.
They will continue to receive
the savings as they have in
the past and need not reapply. The program exempts
the first $25,000 of market
value from taxation, yielding
an expected savings of $300$400 per year.
ing will be picked up by
families on Saturday,
December 21, between 9
a.m. and noon, at the township hall, 26609 Lime City
Road.
Prior to distribution volunteers will sort and bag
items at the township hall,
and additional volunteers
are always needed. Anyone
interested in helping is
asked to call 419-8728861.
Operation Breadbasket/
Perrysburg Christians United will provide items for
more than 100 families in
Perrysburg and Perrysburg
Township.
Ms. Herman-Alrabaya
said applications from families in need are being
accepted and may be
picked up at the township
offices.
She reminds families
that filling out an application does not guarantee
placement on the list.
Families will be notified
by mail of their acceptance,
she added.
he explained.
Brine production is
more efficient at the modernized facility. The transportation administrator
said crews can produce
three
times
more
brine–approximately 3,000
gallons per hour–than they
could at Detroit Avenue.
The new system, which
is automated, makes brine
production far more precise, he said.
Springfield and Monclova townships, which
have contracts with
ODOT, also benefit from
the new system. The townships’ vehicles can quickly
and accurately load brine
and pretreat their roads.
“It’s definitely a good
tool that we’ve come up
with over the years
[because] when you use
brine, you use less salt so
it’s a cost savings,” said
Mr. O’Neal. “We make it,
based on the salt price, and
water and everything. It’s
roughly less than 5 cents a
gallon [to produce].”
He noted that increasing the use of wetter and
heavier brine salt helps
prevent “bounce scatter,”
something that happens
when lighter regular salt
does not all stay on the
road.
“The roads get treated
faster and better, and that
increases the melt time so
that the snow starts melting as soon as it hits,” he
said.
This winter, ODOT
District Two will have
more than 1,700 plow
trucks and 3,000 trained
drivers clearing ice and
snow from state roads
throughout its eight- county area, which includes
Lucas and Wood counties.
Statewide ODOT maintains nearly 43,000 lane
miles of state highway.
Those roads carry about
two-thirds of the state’s
daily traffic.
Need
a pair
for glare?
Come visit our office
and check out
our sunglass collection.
Dr. Angela K. Jackson, O.D.
Dr. Tracy Needham, O.D.
647 Lime City Rd. • Rossford • 416-666-0700
www.qualityfamilyeyecare.net
Kris S. Kelley, D.D.S.
Michael J. Thebes, D.D.S.
Gentle Family Dentistry
13003 Roachton Road
Perrysburg, OH 43551
Phone: 419-874-7071
Also located at:
735 Haskins Road,
Bowling Green, OH
419-353-1412
Evening & Saturday appointments available.
NEW PATIENTS & EMERGENCIES WELCOME
AREA BUSINESS GUIDE
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(Minimum 13 weeks)
Call 419-874-2528 today!
Thursdays, Doors open at 5 p.m.
Lightning Games start at 6 p.m.
McAlear Center
All Saints Church, Rossford, OH
Did you hear?
COLOR PRINTING
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WINNER
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32 years in business
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Licensed, Bonded & Insured
419-837-6100
Call us today for a quote on 4 color printing!
117 E. Second St. • Perrysburg
419-874-2528
• Flyers
• Posters (up to 12”x18”)
• Postcards
• Competitive Pricing
• Business Cards
• Brochures
• QUICK TURN-A-ROUND
4 COLOR
Obituaries
•JOHN CALLAND
John Beau Calland, 37.
of Virgina Beach, Virginia,
and formerly of Perrysburg,
died unexpectedly on October 24, 2013. He was born
on June 4, 1976, to John and
Mary Calland.
He is survived by his
wife, Danielle Hertlein;
mother, Mary Calland; stepfather, Thomas Moore Sr.;
brothers,
James
and
Michael Shumay, and
nephew, Jonathan Shumay.
He was preceded in death
by his father, John Calland,
in 1997.
A Memorial Mass was
held on Tuesday, November
19, at All Saints Catholic
Church, Rossford. Interment will be private.
Arrangements were made
by the Sujkowski Funeral
Home of Rossford.
gh
Obituary
Policy
Many newspapers now
charge for obituaries. As a
service to the community,
the Rossford Record Journal provides free obituaries. These obituaries,
however, should conform
to our style.
Limited details about
the deceased person’s personal life are allowed;
please state them objectively.
•SOPHIA LAWNICZAK
Sophia F. Lawniczak, 93,
of Perrysburg, and formerly
of Toledo, died Thursday,
November 14, 2013, at
Kingston of Perrysburg. She
was born on July 1, 1920, in
Toledo, to Stanley and Mary
(Geremski) Rudnicki. She
married Florian Lawniczak
in 1939. She had worked as
an assembler for Craftmaster in the mid 1970s.
She is survived by her
daughters, Joanne (Stephen)
Vedra and Kathy (John) McClure;
grandchildren,
Stephen (Lorri) Vedra, Tim
Vedra, Greg (Cindy) Vedra,
Amy (Robert) Hayes and
Robin (Kurt) Bruderly;
great-grandchildren, Kevin,
Kyle, Emily, Camryn and
Jordyn, and great-great
granddaughter, Izzabela.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 64 years,
Florian, in 2003, and by her
siblings, Stella Noworyta,
Jennie Ostrowski, Lillian
Wayton and Chester Rudnicki.
A Mass of Christian Burial was held Monday, November 18, at All Saints
Catholic Church, Rossford.
Interment was in Calvary
Cemetery. Arrangements
were made by the Sujkowski Funeral Home of
Rossford.
The family suggests that
memorial contributions be
made to Hospice of Northwest Ohio, Kingston of Perrysburg or to the charity of
the donor’s choice.
gh
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Tickets on sale for All Saints concert
The 12th annual Toledo
Symphony Christmas concert
at All Saints Catholic Church
in Rossford will be held on
Sunday, December 22.
The performance will be
filled with a collection of holiday and classical favorites
from the symphony’s repertoire led by conductor Jeffrey
Pollock.
It will feature soloists
Katherine Calcamuggio and
Jesse Donner.
Ms. Calcamuggio is an
award-winning mezzo-soprano. She holds a master of
music degree from Northwestern University, a bachelor of music degree from
Bowling Green State University and currently is pursuing
her doctorate at the University of Michigan.
She has received top
prizes in the Palm Beach
Opera, Bel Canto and Shreveport Singer of the Year competitions, and awards from
the Chicago Women’s Musician’s Club and the Anna
Sosenko Trust.
She is a former participant
in young artists’ programs at
Florida Grand Opera, Glimmerglass Opera, Chicago
Opera Theater, Opera Theatre
Katherine Calcamuggio
of St. Louis, as well as the
Aspen and Brevard Music
Festivals.
In the 2013 and 2014 season, Ms. Calcamuggio is debuting the roles of the
Komponist in Strauss’ “Ariadne auf Naxos” at UM as
well as the mezzo-soprano
soloist in Verdi’s “Requiem”
with Chicago Community
Chorus.
As a winner of the coveted
concerto competition at UM
in the fall, Ms. Calcamuggio
will make her Hill Auditorium debut with the university orchestra singing John
Corigliano’s “Mr. Tambourine Man.”
In January, she will return
Jesse Donner
to Opera on the James to
make a role debut of Julia
Child in Hoiby’s “Bon Appétit” as well as returning
with the Toledo Symphony in
April for the mezzo-soprano
soloist in Beethoven’s “Ninth
Symphony.”
As a voice major, Mr.
Donner received a bachelor
of music degree from Iowa
State University and completed his master of music degree at UM, where he is
pursuing a specialist degree.
He recently appeared in
the role of Bacchus in the
UM production of “Ariadne
auf Naxos.” He has received
Encouragement Awards from
the MET Council auditions in
the last two years and was the
winner of the 2012 Michigan
Friends of Opera competition.
This summer he premiered with Opera in the
Ozarks singing the part of
Pinkerton
in
Puccini’s
“Madame Butterfly.”
Next year, Mr. Donner
will make his debut with the
Lyric Opera of Chicago as a
Ryan Center young artist for
the 2014-15 season.
The Christmas concert begins at 4 p.m., and doors open
at 3:30 p.m.
A reception with champagne and cookies will follow the concert.
The church is handicapaccessible.
A coat check will be provided by the church youth
group with tips supporting
their summer service project.
Tickets are $15 and may
be obtained at the parish office, 628 Lime City Road or
by calling the church, 419666-1393. Tickets, if available, will be $20 on the
evening night of the show.
Tickets also will be on
sale each weekend after
Masses beginning the weekend of November 30.
ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL — November 21, 2013 — Page 5
IN THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE
ROSSFORD UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
270 Dixie Highway
Rossford, Ohio 43460
Phone 419-666-5323
Pastor: Rev. Robert Ball
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
Nursery Available
Sunday Services:
Holy Eucharist, 8 A.M.
Holy Family Eucharist, 10 A.M.
Sunday School 10 A.M.
871 East Boundary
Perrysburg, Ohio 43551
419-874-5704
www.saint-timothy.net
ST. JOHN’S
LUTHERAN CHURCH
U.S. 20 and Route 163
Stony Ridge, Ohio
Phone: (419) 837-5115
Daniel G. Beaudoin, Pastor
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. Contemporary
Worship
9:45 a.m. Sunday School
10:45 a.m. Traditional Worship
ROSSFORD FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
157 Bergin Street
Rossford, Ohio 43460
Phone 419-666-9447
Rev. Alexander Sheares
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. Sunday School
10:45 a.m. Worship Service
WEDNESDAY
6:00 p.m. Prayer Service,
Testifying and Bible Study
Rossford Senior Center
MAKE YOUR LIFE
The Wood County Committee on Aging
400 Dixie Highway • 419-666-8494
24250 Dixie Highway
(Highway 25)
Perrysburg, Ohio 43551
(located just south
of Five Point Road)
Phone: (419) 874-6502
Masses: Saturday, 5:00
p.m.; Sunday, 8:00, 9:45 and
11:30 a.m.
www.blessedjohn.org
PERRYSBURG
ALLIANCE CHURCH
10401 Avenue Road
Corner 795 and White Road
Perrysburg, Ohio 43551
Phone: 419-874-1961
www.perrysburgalliance.org
Rev. Thomas George,
Senior Pastor
SUNDAY
8:15 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 a.m. Sunday School for
All Ages
10:45 a.m. Worship Service
6:00 p.m. Discipling Groups
WEDNESDAY
7:00 p.m. Senior High SNAC
7:00 p.m. Middle School JVD
7:00 p.m. FW Friends
(age 3 - grade 5)
7:00 p.m. Adult Prayer Meeting
“Join Us In Worship”
Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Programs and lunches for all area residents
at least 60 years of age.
ACTIVITIES AND
LUNCH MENUS
Lunch is served Monday
through Friday, at noon. No
reservations are necessary.
Menus are subject to change,
and nutritional values and ingredient information are
available upon request.
The suggested donation is
$2, age 60+, and $5, for those
under age 60. Hot, nutritious
meals are available MondayFriday for home-bound seniors in Wood County who are
unable to prepare meals for
themselves.
Frozen meals are available
for the weekend. If eligible,
the cost is on a donation
basis. For more information,
call Social Services at 1-800367-4935. To register for
weekly activities, call the
Senior Center.
Monday, November 25
Noon menu–Goulash or
Almond Fish, corn, citrus
slaw, peaches, pudding.
•9:30 a.m.–Body Recall
•12:30
p.m.–Program:
“Why Do We Say That?”
with Ed Tucholski. Have you
ever wondered where certain
phrases come from? Attend
this session to learn where
they originated and why we
say them.
Tuesday, November 26
Noon menu–Stuffed Green
Pepper Soup or Chicken Noodle Soup, marinated carrot
salad, apple, blueberrypineapple cobbler.
•November
26,
at
noon–Rossford Senior Club.
Wednesday, November 27
Noon
menu–Baked
Chicken or Bratwurst, sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, tropical fruit, brownie.
•9:30 a.m.–Body Recall
•10 a.m. to noon–Blood
Pressure clinic. There is no
charge for blood pressure
screenings. A self-monitoring
device will be available.
Thursday,
November 28
All senior centers closed for
Thanksgiving. Lunch will be
served at 1 p.m. at the Wood
County Senior Center by reservation only. Call 419-353-5661
for reservations.
Friday, November 29
All senior centers closed for
the Thanksgiving holiday.
You only have so long to make a difference.
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
5:15 7 9 10:45 12:30
PM
PM
AM
AM
PM
ALL SAINTS CATHOLIC
CHURCH
628 Lime City Road
Rossford, Ohio 43460
419-666-1393
www.allsaintsrossford.org
Masses: Saturday at 4:30 p.m.
Sunday at 8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
ALL SAINTS
CATHOLIC SCHOOL
(Preschool through Grade 8)
Where we study the world,
teach the heart,
and live the gospel.
PERRYSBURG
SOUTH TOLEDO
iCAMPUS
29129 Lime City Rd
2150 South Byrne Rd
Watch Live Online
WEST TOLEDO
WHITEHOUSE
2600 West Sylvania Ave
6950 Whitehouse Sq Blvd
Attend the Church
of Your Choice
ISOH/IMPACT seeks help for victims of typhoon Lucas County Retired Teachers to meet Dec. 12
In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, hundreds of
thousands of displaced
Philippine residents are
struggling to find food,
medical care and other essential basic necessities.
ISOH/IMPACT provided
a shipment to the Philippines that cleared customs
and was headed inland before the typhoon struck. It
also recently sent two 53’
semi trailers of relief supplies from the Waterville
Distribution Center and
with the help of area residents, will continue to provide aid for as long as
assistance is needed.
Cash donations are
needed immediately to help
purchase medications and
other critical supplies, and
to assist with airfare,
freight, shipping supplies
and fuel.
Holiday
food drive
organized by
Nrgie salon
On Sunday, November
24, Nrgie Salon and Spa will
kick off a holiday food drive.
The event will take place
from noon to 2 p.m. at the
salon, 690 Dixie Highway.
Rossford city officials
will attend a ribbon-cutting to
begin the event, and Santa
also will make an appearance.
The public is invited to attend, and refreshments will
be offered.
The salon has a goal of
collecting 1,000 meals for the
Toledo Food Bank.
If the goal is reached,
Mayor Neil MacKinnon III
has agreed to serve for one
day as a receptionist in the
salon.
Canned goods and nonperishable food items may be
dropped off at Nrgie from
November 24 to December
24.
For every 10 items or $10
donated, an entry will be
placed in a raffle for free
services at the salon.
Area residents also can
help by donating items to
the Bucket Brigade, including cleaning supplies, personal care items, first aid
supplies, baby care products, canned and non-perishable food items, small
tents, duffle bags, solar battery powered generators,
chloride tablets, mosquito
netting, handy wipes, ace
bandages, band aids, gauze,
children’s vitamins, overthe-counter medications,
paper towels, bathroom tissue, tissues and laundry detergent.
Glass items, bottled
water, clothing and expired
products will not be ac-
cepted.
Donations
can
be
dropped off at any area
Tireman Auto Service Center, at Toledo Walleye
home games at the Huntington Center or at
ISOH/IMPACT’s distribution center located at 905
Farnsworth Road in Waterville.
Cash and credit card donations can be made online
at www.isohimpact .org or
sent
directly
to
the
ISOH/IMPACT offices at
25182 West River Road,
Perrysburg, Ohio 43551.
For more information,
visit the Web site at
www.isohimpact.org.
The Lucas County Retired Teachers Association
will hold its monthly luncheon at noon on Thursday, De-
Perrysburg
Commons
hosts
Veterans Day
breakfast
cember 12, at Inverness
Country Club, 4601 Dorr
Street. Valet service will be
available.
A program of holiday
music will be presented by
Swanton High School.
Attendees are asked to
bring a stuffed animal which
will be given to Lucas
County Children Services.
Lunch menu choices are
sauteed chicken breast, London broil or spinach/mushroom quiche. The cost is
$18.75.
For reservations, indicate
menu choice and send payment to Robert Fetter, 7803
Shaftesbury, Sylvania, Ohio
43560 by Friday, December
6. Checks can be made
payable to LCRTA.
Perrysburg Commons Retirement Center hosted a
breakfast to honor veterans
on Monday, November 11.
More than 50 veterans and
their families attend the event
from the Perrysburg community.
“We wanted to make sure
the veterans got the honor
and recognition they deserve
for their time of service in
keeping our country free and
safe,” said Kelly Ebersbach,
the Commons executive director.
The culinary department
served a breakfast of eggs,
bacon and French toast.
The Schaller American
Legion from Perrysburg conducted a flag ceremony after
the breakfast, and presented
Perrysburg Commons with an
American flag.
Toledo Bikes to hold drive
CONGRATULATIONS
GRADUATES
Toledo Bikes! is collect- hands of others; and promotcycling
awareness
ing bikes to recycle into the ing
hands of students and inner through community outcity residents without cars reach, education and maintewho need a bicycle for pri- nance programs, and cycling
events.
mary transportation.
Bikes will be collected in
Toledo Bikes! will put old
bikes through a multistep re- November 18-21, from 10
furbishing process to insure a.m. to 5 p.m., at Spoke Life
the future owner’s safety and Cycles, 26597 Dixie Highprovide reliable transporta- way, Perrysburg.
Residents also can drop
tion. Defective or inferior
parts such as brake pads, ca- off their bicycles at the
bles, tubes and tires will be Toledo Bikes! building, 1114
replaced. Wheels will be Washington Street, Toledo. If
This
year,
evaluate whether
can benefit
thefrom:
bike off is not
trued,
if necessary.
All pivot-youdropping
possible,
call
419-386-6090
ing
parts
are
lubricated
and
1. Tax-advantaged investments. If appropriate, consider
for a special pickup. All
each
bike is test ridden.
tax-free municipal bonds to provide federally tax-free
Toledo Bikes! is a non- makes and models of bicyincome.*
profit corporation dedicated cles will be accepted. Donors
2.
retirement
Consider
who wish
a receipt for tax
toTax-advantaged
the recovery of used
bikes, accounts.
contributing those
to a traditional
Retirement
purposes
may attach a note
recycling
bikes Individual
Accountour
(IRA)
or 401(k)and
to helptolower
yourand
taxable
the bike
a receipt will
through
volunteer
income.
educational
efforts into the be mailed to them.
Feeling like you
paid too much in
taxes this year?
“The future belongs to those who believe in
Markets
the beauty ofChange.
their dreams.” Eleanor Roosevelt
3. Tax-advantaged college savings accounts. Contribute
or gift to a college savings plan for your children or
www.edwardjones.com
grandchildren.
Are You Prepared?
*May be subject to state and local taxes and the alternative
minimum tax (AMT).
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors are not estate
planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult
with a qualified tax specialist or legal advisor for professional
advice on your situation.
When
stopfinancial
and look
at today
what’s
markets,
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or visit
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to help you decide if you should make changes to your investments
and
whether
you’re
on track to reach your goals.
success
and
prosperity.
Financial Advisor
849 Dixie Highway
Rossford, OH 43460
419-666-1910
www.edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Member SIPC
Thanksgiving Mass
Thursday, November 28, at 9 a.m.
We welcome at the Mass any donations
(food or monetary) for the All Saints Food Pantry.
628 Lime City Road, Rossford
www.allsaintsrossford.com
Stop by or call today to schedule your free review.
Justin R. Knierim, AAMS®
All Saints Catholic Church and School
is grateful for God’s Blessings
as we serve the Rossford,
Perrysburg Township, Northwood
and surrounding communities.
Masses: Saturday at 4:30 p.m., Sunday at 8:30 & 11 a.m.
Member SIPC
Page 6 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
Retiring Judge S. Dwight Osterud to be grand marshal
DPI to present ‘Home for the Holidays’ Parade on December 1
sition no later than 3:45 p.m.
There is no fee for parade
entries. No “Santa Claus”
persons will be permitted in
the parade with the exception
of the DPI invited “special
guest.”
DPI will provide free hot
chocolate and candy canes.
At the conclusion of the
parade, the annual city tree
lighting ceremony will take
place at approximately 5
p.m. at Hood Park. There
will be entertainment, community caroling and lighting
of the tree.
Parade registration forms
can be obtained at the Perrysburg Messenger Journal, 117
East Second Street, or
through an e-mail request to
Mr. Thielen at downtown
[email protected]
In collaboration with
Commodore Way and ODeer Diner, DPI again this
year, is assisting Perrysburg
Christians United (PCU) to
collect non-perishable food
items, toys and monetary donations to help families in
need this holiday season.
Members from PCU will be
in the parade collecting
canned goods and toys from
generous spectators.
Jim Delph, owner of
Commodore Way, has teamed
up with O’Deer Diner to
house Santa every Saturday
from 1 to 2 p.m. during December until Christmas. Children
will
have
the
opportunity to bring a toy
and/or non-perishable food
item and in turn, have their
picture taken with Santa and
an ice cream cone from
O’Deer Diner.
Downtown Perrysburg,
Inc. is a community based,
non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization whose mission is to
offer and promote community-wide events that are held
in Perrysburg’s downtown
historic district.
For additional information
or how to become a DPI
member, visit the Web site at
www.downtownperrysburg
.org or call Mr. Thielen at
419-872-6246.
Portrait of the late U.S. Congressman Paul Gillmor
unveiled in Senate room at Statehouse in Columbus
Nick Atkin and Mallori Pickard
united in marriage
Mallori Pickard and Nick Atkin were united in marriage
on May 11, 2013, in the gazebo at Sunrise Park and Banquet Hall, Millbury, Ohio. The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. Ann Marshall.
The bride is the daughter of Rick and Kelly Pickard of
Perrysburg. The bridegroom is the son of David and Marilyn Atkin of Pemberville.
Escorted down the aisle by her father, the bride wore a
lace champagne gown with a champagne veil.
Maid of Honor was Lexi Marshall of Columbus, Ohio,
sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Sherri Johns of Millbury, Beth Becker of Perrysburg, Emily Kohring of Pemberville and Megan Knauss of Bowling Green. Paige Bock,
cousin of the bride, served as flower girl. The attendants
wore royal blue knee-length dresses with cowboy boots.
Best Man was Matt Atkin of Pemberville, brother of the
bridegroom. Groomsmen were Randy Johns of Millbury,
Bert Buchman of Bowling Green, Chad Green of Portage,
and Ben Marshall of Columbus, brother-in-law of the
bridegroom. Noah and Gabe Bock, cousins of the bride,
were junior groomsmen.
A reception was held immediately following the ceremony at Sunrise Park and Banquet Hall with music furnished by Doug Michaelis.
The couple took a honeymoon trip to the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee.
The bride graduated from Perrysburg High School in
2005 and Bowling Green State University in 2009. She is
employed as a sixth grade teacher at Indian Hills in Rossford.
The bridegroom graduated from Eastwood High School
and Penta Career Center in 2002. He is employed as a
maintenance millwright at American Steel Treating in Perrysburg.
Owens holiday band concert
to benefit St. Paul’s center
The Owens Community
College Concert Band will
present a holiday concert at
2:30 p.m., on Sunday, December 8, in the Fine &
Performing Arts Center
Theater on the Owens campus.
The concert is free. Donations will be accepted to benefit St. Paul’s Community
Center of Toledo.
A variety of holiday
music will be performed including Leroy Anderson’s
“Sleigh Ride,” “Hanukkah, A
Festival of Lights,” music
from the movie “The Polar
Express,” “The Toy Trumpet” and more.
“’Twas the Night Before
Christmas” will be narrated
by Ragtime Rick, who also
will perform on the piano.
Refreshments will be
served in the lobby following
the performance.
The theater is handicapped accessible, and free
parking is available.
For more information, call
567-661-7081.
Have a news tip?
Do you have an idea for a good story in the
Rossford community?
Call the Journal at 419-874-4491 or send an
e-mail with your news to [email protected]
rossford.com.
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The Home for the Holidays Parade will be held Sunday, December 1, from 4 to 6 p.m., in
downtown Perrysburg beginning at Toth Elementary School.
Downtown Perrysburg,
Inc. (DPI) will present retiring Perrysburg Municipal
Court Judge S. Dwight Osterud as this year’s Grand
Marshal for the “Home for
the Holidays” Parade on Sunday, December 1, from 4 to 6
p.m.
On December 31, Judge
Osterud will retire after 24
years of presiding over the
Perrysburg Municipal Court.
Having first been first elected
in 1990, after serving four,
six-year terms on the bench
of the “people’s court,”
Judge Osterud and his
wife Judy, humbly accepted
only if they were permitted to
walk rather than ride and be
accompanied by the Perrysburg Court Law and Government Explorers Post student
mock trial teams that have
been such an important part
of the judge’s tenure.
“We are so excited to have
Judge Osterud and his wife
Judy as our Grand Marshal
this year. What a fitting
recognition to an amazing ca-
Community
Calendar
Rossford
To include your organization’s activities, mail or drop
off the details to the Rossford Record Journal, 117 East
Second Street, PO Box 267, Perrysburg, Ohio 43552. Or
send an e-mail, with the date, time and location, to [email protected] The deadline is Friday at noon.
Friday, November 22
9:30 a.m. St. Tim’s Clothesline, free clothing offered
at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871
East Boundary. Open until 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, November 23
11:00 a.m. AlAnon women’s support group, “The
Saturday Good Morning Group,” at All
Saints Church, 628 Lime City Road. Call
Maryann 419-824-0129 for details.
8:00 p.m. AlAnon and Alcoholics Anonymous at First
United Methodist Church, 200 West
Second Street.
Sunday, November 24
6:30 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous at Schaller
Memorial Building, 130 West Indiana
Avenue.
Monday, November 25
7:00 p.m. Depression and bipolar support group at
Providence Lutheran Church, 8131 Airport
Highway. Call 419-867-9422 or 517-2818042 for information.
7:00 p.m. Rossford City Council at the municipal
building, 133 Osborn Street.
7:00 p.m. Northern Wood County Republican Club at
the Holiday Inn Express, 10621 Fremont
Pike. Doors open at 7 p.m., with meeting
and presentation at 7:30 p.m. For more
information visit the Web site, nwc.wood
countyrepublicanparty.com.
7:30 p.m. There is a Solution AA Group, closed meeting, at Lutheran Church of the Master,
28744 Simmons Road, Perrysburg.
Tuesday, November 26
9:15 a.m. Wood County Commissioners on the fifth
floor of the Wood County Office Building,
One Courthouse Square, Bowling Green.
12:00 p.m. AlAnon at CedarCreek Church, 29129
Lime City Road. Free baby-sitting.
Wednesday, November 27
6:00 p.m. Families Anonymous at Blessed John XXII
Catholic Community, 24250 Dixie
Highway. Call 419-931-4005 for details.
6:00 p.m. Toastmasters Club at Zenobia Shrine, 8048
Broadstone Boulevard, Perrysburg.
7:00 p.m. Racing for Recovery, drug and alcohol support group meeting, until 8 p.m. at St.
Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 871 East
Boundary, Perrysburg.
7:00 p.m. AlAnon at First Presbyterian Church, 200
East Second Street.
Thursday, November 28-Happy Thanksgiving
THE PINK PANTHER & ®1964-2009 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
All Right Reserved. ®2009 Owens Corning. Pub. No. 61220-A
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419-410-0619
Macke Roofing
STORM DAMAGE?
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•Remodeling
•Barns
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From siding to roofing
damage, we can help you!
We will work with your
insurance company!
Every FRIDAY Night
5:00 - 7:30 p.m.
reer and a great opportunity
for the community to once
again say thank you for 24
years of community service,”
said Rick Thielen, DPI executive director.
DPI is busy preparing for
the annual “Home for the
Holidays” parade in downtown Perrysburg.
The parade will begin at 4
p.m., at Toth Elementary on
East Seventh Street. The route
continues to Louisiana Avenue and Front Street. There
will be marching bands, horse
drawn carriages, dancers,
Clydesdales, floats, twirling
performers, clowns, big and
small balloons, little cars and
big trucks, candy and of
course, Santa Claus.
Area individuals, organizations, teams, scouts, students and businesses are
invited to participate in the
parade. Participants may
enter the staging area at Toth
Elementary no earlier than
2:30 p.m. and must be in po-
An official portrait of the late U.S. Congressman and former Ohio Senate President Paul Gillmor was unveiled recently
in Columbus. “I had the honor of working for Mr. Gillmor for eight years as his district representative in his Wood County
Office,” said State Representative Tim Brown, adding, “Mr. Gillmor’s years of public service were honored by Governor John Kasich and many elected officials from around the state.”
The portrait of the late congressman will hang in the Senate Majority Caucus Room at the Statehouse in Columbus
where it can be viewed by the public. At the unveiling ceremony were, from left, former staff members of the congressman Nancy Lehman and Barb Barker, with Rep. Brown.
TA R TA . C O M
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Pollock and Tilapia, Fried
Clams, Popcorn Shrimp,
Soup, Cole Slaw, Vegetables,
Baked Potatoes, and Rolls.
9802 Dowling Road,
Perrysburg, Ohio • 419-833-1725
19%
FEDERAL
ASSISTANCE
FEDER
AL ASSIST
AANCE
18%
PROPERTY
PROPER
T Y TTAX
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61%
STATE
ASSISTANCE
ST
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1%
REVENUE
VENUE
OOTHER
THER RE
1%
100%
EXPENSES
LLABOR
ABOR & FRINGES
55%
MATERIAL
M
ATERIAL & SUPPLIES
13%
FUEL
10%
SERVICES
2%
UTILITIES,, TTAXES,
INSURANCE,
CLAIMS
ANCE, CL
UTILITIES
AXES, INSUR
AIMS
4%
DEPRECIATION
DEPRECIA
ATION
16%
100%
TTARTA
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of TTrustees
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August 30
through November 22
$9.95 - Includes: Alaskan
TANGLEWOOD GOLF CLUB
PPASSENGER
ASSENGER INC
INCOME
OME
1127 W. Central Ave., Toledo, OH 43610 | 419-243-RIDE (7433)
(President)
(P
resident)
FFrancis
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Frey
Steven Pecsenye
Pecsenye
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Tom Ramsdell
Ramsdell
Tom
(Vice
( Vice P
President)
resident)
Barbara Sperr
Sperr
Barbara
Deb
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Troy Stevenson
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Brian
Br
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Anthony Szilagye
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Dee Talmage
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Jack Mur
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William Thomas
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Clifford Wright
Perrysburg Musical Theatre
to present ‘The Best of Broadway’
The Perrysburg Musical
Theatre Company is set to
present “The Best of Broadway” on February 7 and 8, at
the Commodore Auditorium
in Perrysburg. Auditions for
the concert will be held on
December 7 and 14, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m., at Next Stage
Studios.
“The Best of Broadway”
will feature memorable hit
theatre songs from shows
like “The Phantom of the
Opera,” “Les Miserables,”
“Rent,” “West Side Story,”
“Mamma Mia,” “Wicked”
and more. The concert is
PMT’s fund-raiser for its
summer musical “The Music
Man.”
PMT is looking for any
musical acts including vocalists, dancers, instrumentalists
and any other special talents.
Audition packets are avail-
Penta students serve ‘Taste of the States’
able online at www.perrys
bu rg m u s i c a l t h e a t r e . o rg .
Adults age 12 and older
should prepare 90 seconds of
any Broadway song for the
audition. Children age 11
and under should print out
the music in the audition
packet on the PMT Web site
and learn either of the songs
in the packet.
Participants can attend
the auditions on either Saturday at any time between
10 a.m. and 1 p.m. but need
not attend both. Registration is not necessary, and
there will no callbacks. Auditions will be held at Next
Stage Studios, 25581 Fort
Meigs Road, Suite D in Perrysburg.
For more information,
visit the Web site or send an
e-mail
to
perrysburg
[email protected]
Wood County NAMI offers
‘Mental Health 101’ seminar
The Wood County National Alliance on Mental Illness will offer a seminar
entitled “Mental Health 101”
program on Friday, December 13, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
at Bowling Green State University’s Levis Commons
site.
The program will be on
“co-occurring disorders,” the
term that describes individuals who are alcohol abusers
or drug abusers with at least
one serious mental illness.
Individuals with this dual diagnosis are less likely to use
their prescribed medication
and more susceptible to
homelessness or incarceration. Co-occurring disorders
make life difficult not only
for those diagnosed but also
for their families and communities.
Local mental health clinicians, health care professionals, and academics will
present information that will
expand attendees’ knowledge
of:
•Assessing dual diagnosis
•Treating dual diagnosis
•The DSM-V’s (Diagnos-
ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL — November 21, 2013 — Page 7
tic and Statistical Manual for
psychiatrists) definition of
dual diagnosis
•Dual diagnosis of adolescents
Presenters include Harold
Rosenberg, Ph.D., clinical
psychologist and professor of
psychology at Bowling
Green State University;
Francesca Leass, MSSA,
LISW-S program coordinator
at The Children’s Resource
Center; Connie Cameron,
RN, MSN, CNS, advanced
practice psychiatric nurse at
Family Services of Northwest Ohio; Dr. Jay Stewart,
vocational specialist at Stress
Care Behavioral Health;
Laura Feeney, LISW, Adult
and Adolescent Clinician at
Behavioral Connections of
Wood County, and D. Scott
Acus, MA, MSW, LISW-S
LICDC-CS, Manager of Outpatient Services at Behavioral Connections of Wood
County.
Continuing
education
units will be available to attendees.
To register or for more information, call NAMI Wood
County at 419-352-0626.
Towne Club to meet Dec. 5
Towne Club of Toledo, a women’s social and philanthropic
club, will meet Thursday, December 5, at Carranor Hunt and
Polo Club in Perrysburg.
Cards will begin at 10 a.m., followed by a social hour at
11:30 a.m. and luncheon at noon. The meeting will feature
Maumee Select Singers from Maumee High School, under the
direction of Amy Gorman.
Hostesses for the meeting are Jan Comer, Cynthia Hoyt and
Greta Ullman.
New club members are welcome. Reservations are required
one week in advance. For more information, call 419-4911631.
All Saints Quiz Bowl team wins first match of the season
All Saints Catholic School’s Quiz Bowl team got off to a great start, winning both games in the first match of the season, held at Kateri Catholic Academy.
Members of this year’s All Saints Quiz Bowl team are: Maddy Mosiniak, captain, Jacob Darr, co-captain, Ben Arnold,
Jack Eberly, Grace Hittler, Frances Kraus, Alycia Murphy, Sabra Szavuly, Collin Yost, Vinny Costanzo, Jonah Kale, Joey
Tokar and Liam Walsh. Middle school teacher Carol Gutierrez is the coach.
Rossford High School second quarter honor roll
Rossford High School
congratulates the following
students for their academic
achievement. The students
listed below have obtained a
grade point average of 3.0 or
better for the first quarter of
the 2013-14 school year.
Special Honor Roll
4.0 and above GPA
Seniors: Elise Brown, My
Hiep Doan, Matthew Mazur,
Trent Morelock, Maalaea
Newell, Chanetel Parks,
Emily Price, Laura Reitz,
Alexander Smith, Ian Stolar,
Gillian Zywiczynski.
Juniors: Mikhala Dunne,
Mekenze Healey, Sarah Hufford, Maggie Leahy, Taylor
Moore, Hannah Peterson,
John Pupik, Garrett Shafer,
Claire Verbosky, Autumn
Wheaton-Rodriguez.
Sophomores: Kathleen
Hermes, Savannah McIntosh,
Bethany
Price,
Taylor
Spencer.
Freshmen: Benjamin
Duwve, Garrett Hughes,
Grant Hughes, Mayson
Koliba, Jaime Reitzel, Chloe
Roberts, Haley Zywiczynski.
With Honors
3.50-3.99
Seniors: Noah Asmus,
Elizabeth Bergstrom, Briana
Brooks, Annalecia Blair,
Brian Burks, Anthony Carlen,
Tyler Cassavore, Karissa
Clark, Ronald Demko,
Your Trash Can Be Someone Else’s Treasure
Listed below are options for those items that did not sell at your garage sale.
1658, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Books—
• Rossford Public Library — 720 Dixie Highway.
Home Pick-up Service—
Also accepts CDs, DVDs, books on CD and
• Salvation Army – call 419-241-8231 for pickup
books on tape.
of furniture, clothing and household items.
• 577 Foundation — 577 East Front Street, PerHousehold Items and Furniture—
rysburg. Call first at 419-872-0305
• Easter Seals Donation Center — drop off items at
• Bowling Green Recycling Center —1040 North
5929 W. Sylvania Avenue, Toledo, or any Savers
College Drive, Bowling Green, open 24/7
store in the area.
Computers—
• Goodwill — drop off items at 307 Superior Street,
• Goodwill Donation Station, 307 Superior Street,
downtown Rossford.
downtown Rossford, accepts working and non- Small Appliances—
working computers and associated peripherals. • Best Buy accepts small appliances (3 per day
Delete ALL information as security is not guaranper family) free of charge. They accept items
teed. This recycling service is FREE.
such as microwaves, blenders, radios, land line
• Best Buy offers a secure computer recycling opphones, stereo equipment, DVD, CD and VHS
tion. The Geek Squad will remove your hard drive
players.
for a fee to ensure data security.
Television Recycling—
Habitat for Humanity—
• Best Buy accepts televisions (tube TV’s — 32”
• Call for pickup of cabinets, doors, flooring, hardor smaller, flat panel TV’s — 60” or smaller) free
ware, plumbing fixtures and tools at 419-382of charge.
This information provided by the City of Rossford • 419-666-0210
Tyler Fargo, Brandon Goldsmith, Christian Goldsmith,
Karl Hermes, Stephanie
Hiner, Makynzie Horvath,
John Hotz, Julie Hotz, Emily
Houchins, Margo Jackson,
Todd Kitzler, Taylor Kolb,
Joshua Ladd, Christian Lau,
Phoenix Leganik, Mandi
Longeway, Kaitlyn Maxwell,
Melissa Meek, Eldon Miller,
Charles Moore, Matthew
Myers, Katlynn Napolski,
Shaelynn Newman, Michelle
Okapal, Jessica Pietrasz,
Ryan Reed, Zachery Samson,
Christopher Schaffer, Courtney Sizemore-Morris, Taylor
Smale, Ian Stolar, Samantha
Troxell, Kelsie Tucholski,
Alek Wood.
Juniors: Evan Austin,
Debra Beilstein, Nicole
Beyer, Kennedy Brouillard,
James Christoff, Jenna Crippen, Kaiden Day, Terry
Desmond, Karly Durco,
Keaton Eppink, Zach Heath,
Cody Igo, Lance Izsak, Devin
Jurski,
Derek
Krieger,
Christopher Lewis, Martin
Linthicum, Danielle Meller,
Kathryn Nawrocki, Ryan
Niese,
Katherine
Paff,
Geneieve
Parks,
Brian
Perkins, Caitlin Pruss, Andrew Russell, Erica Sifuentes,
Nicholas Skiba, Allyson
Tayler, Austin Taylor, Jocelyn
Tijerina.
Sophomores: Collin Bohland, Samuel Beale, Shayla
Cajka, Kyleigh Dehart, Allison Dunne, Hannah Franks,
Haley Gozdowski, Justin
Groom, Nash Gyori, Alexandria Hope, Isabell Hutchins,
Kayla Kirkman, Jordan
Krause, Alexander Laplante,
Tanya Lark, Trent McHugh,
Matthew McIntire, Jordan
Miller, Mathew Myers, Lauren
Nissen,
Brennan
Reynolds, Taylor Rodriguez,
Andrew Sabovik, Benjamin
Sauter, Heather Schaller,
Travis Szczublewski, Felicia
Tyson, Alec Valencic, Elizabeth White, Rachel Zabick.
Freshmen:
Alexandra
Birdsell, Natalie Campbell,
Bryce Cherko, Regan Clay,
Hey Rossford!
We Are Your Ford Connection!
Kira Cuellar, Alyssa Edmond,
Mara Enderbury, Amanda
Jakubec, Madalyn Jones, Natalie Jones, Gerli Kask, Faith
Kemper, Hope Kemper,
Joseph Korzec, Kyle Krieger,
Zachary Lewis, Briar McMillan, Caroline Meek, Kyle
Mikonowicz,
Gregory
Nawrocki, Dawson Newman,
Sabrina Niedbalski, Israyl
Ohms, Alexis Rakovan, Summer Rodriguez, Alexis
Schultz, Drew Siewert, Christian Tanicala, Jacinda Thielen, Emily Williams, Andrew
Yim.
Above Average
Achievement
3.00-3.49
Seniors: Christopher Ball,
Ronald Birchall, Kayla Bisalski, Christopher Blade, Jacob
Bloomer, Jordan Boyer, Tyler
Bussell, Thomas Carter, Mercedes Cowell, Danielle Farquharson, Kaylee Fryman,
Kyle Holliday, Andrew
Huang, Emily Jahns, Dallas
Johnson, McKenna Keaton,
Kathryn Kirkman, Austin LaPointe, Morgan LaRock,
Aaron
Long,
Dylan
Losiewicz, Derek Mack,
Kaitlyn Maxwell, Katelyn
Mierzwiak, Cassady Palmer,
Kaitlyn Randolph, Shelbi
Redway, Joshua Reitzel, Neil
Savage, Makayla Scott,
Kelsey Shaver-Schneider,
Michael Skaggs, Lyndsey
Skala, Angel Symington,
Joshua Tajblik, Ryan Turco,
Aiden Wagner, Madelyn
York.
Juniors: Hector Aguirre,
Molly Allen, Brandon Birr,
Daniel Bobosky, Lance
Byrd-Hawkins,
Angelo
Campos, Nathan Childress,
Timothy Cieply, Ashley
Cope, Logan Fairbanks,
Christopher
Filipovich,
Michael Gallagher, Hannah
Gauthier, Levan Gubeladze,
Owens to host
baseball camp
Owens Community College is hosting a six-week
baseball camp starting January 12. Owens head coach
Del Young will direct the program in conjunction with U.S.
Baseball Academy.
Classes are available for
players in grades 1-12 and are
limited to six players per
coach.
Sessions are offered in advanced hitting, pitching,
catching, fielding and base
running.
Proceeds from the program benefit amateur baseball
in Toledo.
Space is limited. Registration is now under way. For
more information, visit
www.USBaseballAcademy
.com, or call toll-free 866622-4487.
Brooklyn Jacops, Kaylah
Johnson, Kirsten Keller,
Spencer Kobylak, Brittany
Kralik, Jessica Kulczak,
Tabitha Lewis, Patrick Maas,
Christian McManus, Cassidy
Moritz, Evlyn Ohms, Sarah
Ohms, Katherine Paff, Megan
Rombach, Rebecca Rombach, Mason Robinson,
Joshua Rymers, Bailee Self,
Bryce Sours, Wyatt Soviar,
Jacob Stallbaum, Haley
Stutts,
Emily
Thammavongsa, Austin Torres,
Alexander Vidra, Kylee
Walker.
Sophomores: Cheyenne
Davis, Erik Davis, Amber
Everhardt, Daniel Fox,
Sophia Handley, LaCharnina
Johnson, Tiffany King, Marie
Kuron, Kallen Laugerman,
Ariel Pauken, Brittney Reed,
Julie Rombach, Tayler Royal,
David Schaffer, Caitlyn
Schwiefert, Mellany Scott,
Kyle Sherman, Larisa Sloan,
Taylor Stolar, Nicholas Stowers, Alexis Waclawski,
William Zeller.
Freshmen:
Shaelyn
Agocs, Hailey Beyer, Joseph
Burlage, Jenna Demko,
Kennedy Durco, Jordan
Feltis, Matthew Fuerst,
Logan Gauthier, Abigail
Haynes, Elizabeth Hornyak,
Peityn Horton Theobalds,
Elizabeth Horvath, Reed
Jackson, Allison Juergens,
Camille Karavas, Abby Kuhlenbeck, Madison Lang,
Hope Long, Megan Mahaffey, Brian Maxwell, Jackson
Murphree, Monique Newsome, Kelly Odneal, Cody
Orr, Jacob Perry, Andrew
Rardin, Abbey Roe, Riley
Royster, Adam Sauter, Jacob
Schimming, Cota Sinclair,
Aaron Stallbaum, Morgan
Tayler, Noah Tegtmeier,
Samantha Thomasson, Benjamin Verbosky, Noah Vidra,
Nolan York.
SOS Club
holding
holiday card
collection
The Rossford High School
SOS Club is holding a holiday card collection.
Signed Christmas and holidays cards are being collected to send to servicemen
and women who are serving
overseas.
Donations of boxes of
Christmas cards also are
being accepted for students to
send.
Cards must be dropped off
at the high school by Monday,
December 2, so they can be
delivered in time for the holidays.
Two things to keep in mind
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Why travel to Louisiana
for cajun cooking or to New
England for lobster when
both can be found close to
home?
In celebration of the cuisine that makes each region
of the country so delectable,
students in Penta Career
Center’s culinary arts program prepared meals from
nine states.
Patrons enjoyed samplesize servings from California, Hawaii, Louisiana,
Maryland, Massachusetts,
Mississippi, New York, Ohio
and Texas.
Among the foods offered
were California–ahi tuna
taco, cobb salad and a
Shirley
Temple;
Hawaii–roast pork saimin,
pineapple shaved ice with
candied macadamias and
mahi lau lau with coconut
rice; Louisiana– shrimp
gumbo, chicken and andoille
jambalaya and beignets;
Maryland–crab-cakes, Smith
Island cake and black eyed
Susan; Massachusetts–lobster roll, clam chowder and
English black tea; Mississippi–barbecue ribs with collard greens, banana pudding
and boiled peanuts; New
York–pizza, black and white
cookies and pastrami sandwiches; Ohio– popcorn,
apple pie and roast venison
with whipped potatoes, and
Texas–chili, chicken fried
steak and chocolate pecan
fudge.
Chef Janea Makowski
said the students created
Taste of the Nations last year
and wanted to expand on the
idea with a Taste of the States
this year.
“The kids picked the
states and researched the
recipes,” she said, adding
that they also had to determine how much they would
Christian Lau of Rossford Schools, a senior in the culinary
program, offers crab cakes at his Maryland station.
need to feed visitors to the
school restaurant for three
days.
The chef said the ingredients were readily available.
“I was worried about the
venison, but it was pretty
easy to get,” and she noted
that they even purchased live
lobsters. “It was nice to get
fresh seafood in.”
Students worked in
groups of three or four carefully crafting their recipes,
which were served at lunch
time November 13 to 15.
Patrons were able to purchase tickets for 50 cents
apiece and peruse the buffet
tables, selecting foods from
the various states
Christian Lau of Rossford
Schools, a senior in the culinary program worked on
food from Maryland.
“I got some of the ideas
from the Food Network,” he
said.
Logan Maenle, a senior in
culinary from Perrysburg
Schools prepared New York
style pizza, though he admitted that the crust did not
quite come out as soft as he
had hoped.
Patrons didn’t seem to
mind as they gobbled up the
entreé with its fresh mozzarella and basil.
Daisha Tisdale of Springfield Schools worked on
dishes from Mississippi.
“My original plan was
Georgia, but I got Mississippi, and I’m pretty glad. It
turned out well,” she said of
the ribs, pudding and
peanuts.
Funds raised from the
event will be used toward
student competitions.
–Jane Maiolo
Girl Scouts to carol for canned goods
The Rambling River Service Unit of Girl Scouts of
Western Ohio is sponsoring a
Caroling for Cans food drive
to help stock the shelves of
food pantries in Perrysburg
and Rossford.
Girl Scouts in these communities
are
walking
throughout their neighborhoods singing holiday songs
and stopping at homes to collect nonperishable food items
during their caroling. They
also will collect pet food
items for the Humane Ohio
pet food bank.
Girls will be caroling and
collecting between December
1 and 14.
By participating in this
food drive, Girl Scouts in the
Perrysburg and Rossford
areas are taking part in a service learning opportunity
where they are actively helping their communities, while
further developing their own
civic responsibility and lead-
ership skills.
All food collected will be
divided between the Perrysburg Christians United and
the All Saints food pantries.
Any pet food will be donated to the Humane Ohio pet
food pantry in Toledo.
For more information or
to donate to the service unit,
call Vicki Blanco at 419-8729249 or send an e-mail to
VBlanco.Rambling
[email protected]
Christmas Tree Sale
at FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
CHRISTMAS TREE SALE
All profits used for Mission Work
The tradition continues! For more than 25 years,
Christmas trees will once again be sold at First
Presbyterian Church, 200 E. Second and Elm Streets.
Sale begins Saturday, November 30, and will continue
through Sunday, December 22.
Hours are Monday through Friday, 4 to 8 p.m.,
Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., & Sunday noon to 5 p.m.
A variety of trees will be available including:
White Pine, Douglas Fir, Frazer Fir and Balsam Fir
Suzette L. Huenefeld, M.D.
PERRYSBURG FORT MEIGS
FAMILY PRACTICE
“Join our family! Our practice goes the
extra mile for our patients”
• Specializing in female healthcare, pediatrics & dermatology
• Accepting new patients, same day appointments available
• Call for a FREE get to know you visit
27511 Holiday Lane, Ste. 101, Perrysburg • 419-872-0242
Suzette L. Huenefeld, M.D.
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FAMILY PRACTICE
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Thank you to all our friends
and customers!
Remember the holidays are a great time
to take your family bowling!
Page 8 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
‘I have been very fortunate–I have loved this job every day’
Municipal Court Judge S. Dwight Osterud guest speaker at Exchange Club
On December 31, Judge S.
Dwight Osterud will retire
after 24 years of presiding
over the Perrysburg Municipal
Court.
He was first elected in
1990 and re-elected in 1996,
2002 and 2008–serving four,
six-year terms.
Speaking at a recent dinner
meeting of the Perrysburg Ex-
Governor’s Award for Community Service in 1990 and
the Community Appreciation
Award from the Wood County
Council of Alcoholism and
Drug Abuse in 1992.
Judge Osterud is a member
of the Perrysburg Exchange
Club and served as president
in 1990. He is a member of
the Perrysburg Rotary Club, a
was at his new office at
Reynolds Corners.
“I brought in a desk, small
electric typewriter that I used
throughout my college career
and I had a phone installed,”
he said. “And I even had a
chair to sit on–that was it. At
10:30 a.m. that morning my
first call came–very exciting.
It was a wrong number. True
Municipal Court Judge S. Dwight Osterud will retire from the bench after 24 years
of service. Recently he spoke to members of the Perrysburg Exchange Club on his
experiences as a municipal court judge.
Pictured from left are: Brent Swartzmiller, Exchange Club president; Judge Osterud, and Roger Shoffner, Exchange Club vice president.
change Club, Judge Osterud
said he has seen “almost
everything” during his 24
years as municipal judge.
“Municipal court is sometimes called the ‘people’s
court,’” he told Exchange
members. “It is a limited jurisdiction and covers everything
from dog bites to preliminary
hearings for murder and
everything in between.”
The judge is a graduate of
Libbey High School and holds
a bachelor degree in education
and a Juris Doctor from the
University of Toledo. He practiced private law from 1974 to
1989 and served as an acting
judge for the court from 1982
to 1989 prior to seeking
elected office.
He is a member of the Municipal and County Judges of
Ohio, Inc. and the Toledo,
Lucas County, Wood County
and Ohio State bar associations.
The judge received the
board member of Prevention
Partners, Perrysburg Schools
Foundation and Historic Perrysburg, Inc. The judge also is
an advisor and institution representative for Law and Government Explorer Post 2306.
“A little side story for you.
You heard that I went to the
University of Toledo Law
School. I actually went to
night school and worked fulltime during the day at what is
now Lucas County Job and
Family Services,” the judge
told Exchange members. “It
was there that I met my wife
Judy. We got married September 1974 which was a major
leap of faith for her since she
married me without knowing
if I passed the bar exam or not.
I did pass and quit my job and
decided to practice law, which
did not set so well with Judy.”
The new attorney was
sworn in the Friday before the
Ohio State/Michigan game,
and on Monday morning he
Attention All Veterans
Looking for new proud members to join our
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be glad to discuss eligibility.
Contact VFW Post 6409—Rossford Post
Commander Gilles Frankart—419-874-4984
Cell—419-205-0818
Quartermaster Darrell Maxwell—419-450-1771
Post - ph. 419-666-9563
story. But things went up from
there.”
In 1982, the lawyer became an acting judge for the
Perrysburg Municipal Court.
“I started out with small
claims and convictions and
gradually started handling
other cases,” he continued.
“And as I did this, I realized I
preferred being an independent finder of fact and decision
maker rather than an advocate.
In 1989, opportunity knocked
and Judge Judson Spore decided not to run again, so I
threw my hat in the ring. And
with a lot of help from Judy,
we were able to win that election.”
The judge confessed to Exchange members that when he
was a first year law student, he
did not know the difference
between a municipal court and
a common pleas court.
“And I certainly suspect
there are a lot of people who
don’t know the difference. But
I certainly found out,” he
added.
When speaking to various
groups of people, the judge
said he is invariably asked,
“What has been your funniest
case?”
“And I have to tell them,
court is not funny, court is sad.
We deal with people who
don’t want to be there,” he
said.
“People who are cited for
some minor infraction–stop
sign, speeding ticket. If you
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drive, sometime in your life
you are going to get a ticket. I
have gotten a ticket–of course,
that was before I was a judge.”
The municipal court handles mostly traffic cases, criminal misdemeanors and civil
cases, the judge said.
“Criminal misdemeanors
are serious and include domestic violence and drunk
driving cases,” he said.
“Those are real heart breakers.”
The judge added that over
the years, the social agencies
in the county and state have
developed treatment programs.
“In the 24 years that I have
been on the bench, there has
never been a conviction by a
jury for domestic violence,”
Judge Osterud said. “That
may seem astounding and in
fact it is, but the jury for whatever reason finds it very difficult to convict a person for
domestic violence. And those
jurors at the end of the day,
many of them are crying–it is
such an emotional situation.
“So what we have done is
develop, with the help of social service agencies, a treatment program for both men
and women. Yes, there are
women who commit domestic
violence. These programs
have worked. And the incentive to go through these programs is if you do it
successfully, the case is dismissed and you will not have
a record. If you are convicted
of domestic violence, that
does not go away, cannot be
expunged. And if you are
charged again, it is going to be
a felony.”
The judge also stated that
this is the same case for possession of marijuana–a minor
misdemeanor with driving
privileges suspended for six
months.
“The reason we do this is if
a young person has two convictions, they are cut out of
any kind of federal loan for
educational purposes,” he explained. “One of the first
questions on an application
for a loan for school is, ‘have
you ever been convicted of a
drug offense?’ So this is an out
for those who are in that fix.”
Another duty of a municipal court judge is performing
marriage ceremonies. And
over the 24 years, Judge Osterud has performed between
1,500 and 2,000 wedding ceremonies.
“I have done so many that
although I have a script, I
don’t look at it,” he said. “I
have had some really interesting wedding. Several years
ago, I did a wedding in French
and English. And at one ceremony when I asked the
groom, ‘do you take this
woman as your wife,’ there
was silence. He finally said, ‘I
don’t think so.’ That was a
first for me.”
Judge Osterud said the
most heart wrenching cases,
and he has had a half-dozen in
24 years, is vehicular homicide.
“That is where there is no
alcohol involved–there is an
accident and there is a death,”
he explained. “And that person who caused the accident is
charged. Usually they go be-
fore the grand jury and if they
reject it as a felony, then I will
get it. It is so difficult because
that is the kind of case where
the victims can make an impact statement and there is
nothing more heart wrenching
than listening to that sadness.”
The judge gives credit to
his staff for the success of the
municipal court.
“If I have been successful
as a judge, it has not been entirely my doing,” he said. “I
have surrounded myself with
the best people I can get. I
have probably the best, in my
opinion, the best court staff
around. And I say that because
I get feedback from our
lawyers and visiting judges
who come into our courtroom.
They will always compliment
my staff. They are very
knowledgeable, and they have
a difficult job. They are dealing with people who do not
want to be there–some have a
chip on their shoulder and
some of them are very confused. They deal with them
very successfully.”
Judge Osterud’s retirement
plans include becoming a visiting judge, some travel and
continuing with his Explorer
Post and mock trial teams.
“I will continue with mock
trial–I am not going to walk
away from that,” he said.
“That takes up about six
months of the year–a lot of
time, but it is such a great program. We have the most students we have ever had–40
students with four teams.”
The judge explained that
the program is funded by an
annual seminar that he offers
to lawyers.
The judge also told the
club that once he retires he can
no longer be called “judge.”
“By the way, you can call
me judge now, but according
to an opinion issued by the
Board of Commissioners on
Grievances and Discipline issued in June once I leave the
office I cannot be referred to
as a former judge, a retired
judge or the honorable,” he
said. “You can call me ‘hey
you,’ but according to this
opinion to use the term judge
is unethical. Only if I am a visiting judge in the courtroom
can you call me judge.”
The judge said he has been
very fortunate to have been an
elected official for 24 years.
“I have loved this job
every day–it is different each
day,” he said in closing. “You
can imagine, you don’t know
what is going to happen. Yes,
you have cases docketed, and
yes these people are charged
with various offenses and the
law is what it is for each offense. But they are all different people, different set of
circumstances and they react
differently. And in a lot of instances, I believe we have
been able to make a positive
impact.”
Judge Osterud has certainly made a positive impact
not only for the people in the
courtroom but also for the
people in the community.
Thank you for your years of
service.
You will be missed on the
bench, said Exchange Club
members.
-Deb Buker
Pet food donations sought
Mobile Meals of Toledo is
holding its annual Season of
Suppers campaign.
Now in its seventh year,
the goal is to feed pets of
homebound seniors and
clients who receive meals
from the meal program. The
program calls attention to the
importance of pets to the wellbeing of homebound seniors.
Helping keep these companion pets well fed, healthy and
part of the family for as long
as possible became the motivating factor behind the campaign.
Donations off pet food and
monetary donations to purchase food will be accepted at
Graber’s Animal Hospital,
3311 West Laskey Road,
Toledo. Drop-off hours are
Monday through Friday, from
8 a.m. to noon, and from 1:30
to 6 p.m., and Saturday, from
8 a.m. to noon. Checks can be
made payable to Mobile
Meals of Toledo.
“We know that many of
our clients are compromising
their own nutrition by sharing
their meals with their pets,
often their best friend and
companion. The more service
Mobile Meals can provide for
pets leads to better health and
a longer life for both the meal
client and their pet,” said Carolyn Fox, associate executive
director of Mobile Meals.
For more information on
the program or how to get involved, call the Mobile
Meals’ office at 419-2557806.
Attorneys At Law
Leatherman & Witzler
Todd Hamilton Noll • Kay Leatherman Howard
Paul A. Skaff • Heather L. Pentycofe
353 Elm Street
Perrysburg, Ohio 43551
419-874-3536
Practice Areas Include:
Wills/Trusts/Estates/Probate
Tree lighting ceremony to kick off holiday
season at Levis Commons November 23
The Town Center at Levis
Commons invites the community to the ninth annual Tree
Lighting Ceremony on Saturday, November 23, from 6 to 8
p.m.
The evening will get under
way with the arrival of Santa
at 6 p.m.
Following his grand entrance on a horse-drawn carriage ride escorted by the
Twirling Sophisticates, Santa
will be available for visits
until 9 p.m. in his house on the
boulevard. Families can bring
a camera to take their own pictures with Santa.
•Horse-drawn
carriage
rides will return for the season. Rides are available from
6 to 9 p.m., and pick up is located on Chappel Drive near
Schakolad Chocolate Factory.
The cost is $5 per person or
$10 per family.
Guests of the tree lighting
will have the first opportunity
to purchase the 2013 Make-AWish benefit CD, “Holiday
Wishes 3.” The CD is a compilation of 40 tracks produced
by northwest Ohio musicians
and media celebrities. The
CDs will be sold for $10 each
and all of the proceeds benefit
Make-A-Wish. Everyone who
purchases a CD at the tree
lighting ceremony will receive
a raffle ticket for a $200 Levis
Commons prize package to be
given away that night.
Once Santa has arrived and
the carriage rides have begun,
the performances on the main
stage will begin. At 6:30 p.m.
dancers from Julie’s Dance
Studio will take the stage to
perform scenes from the “Nutcracker All Jazzed Up.”
The entertainment continues from 7 to 8 p.m., with performances
by
several
musicians featured on the
Make-A-Wish
“Holiday
Wishes 3” CD. TJ Thomas,
Kerry Patrick Clark, Two
Guys, Ear Candy and Jeff
Stewart will perform their cuts
from the CD as well as other
holiday favorites. Dance Factory will keep the evening
Visit with Santa–Bring a wish list and camera for a visit with Santa in his house on the
boulevard on the following dates:
•November 29 through December 15–Fridays, from 4 to 8 p.m.; Saturdays, from noon to
8 p.m., and Sundays, from 1 to 5 p.m.
•December 16 through 20, daily from 3 to 7 p.m.
•December 21, from noon to 8 p.m.
•December 22, from 1 to 5 p.m.
•December 23, from noon to 8 p.m.
Letters to Santa–Drop off letters to Santa through December 24, in the mailbox near his
house. It will be specially delivered to the North Pole. All letters that include a return address
will receive a response from Santa.
Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides–For a magical holiday experience, hop on a horse-drawn
carriage ride on Saturdays, November 23 though December 28, from 5 to 8 p.m. The cost is
$5 per person or $10 per family. Pick-up is located on Chappel Drive near Schakolad Chocolate Factory.
Drop and Shop with Imagination Station–Parents will have an opportunity to tackle holiday errands without the kids in tow. Enjoy the convenience of dropping the little ones off at
Levis Commons where they will make gingerbread houses and fake snow while you cross
items off your shopping list. A fee applies, and children must be registered in advance. The
program will be located next to AT&T and is offered on Saturday, December 7, from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m., and Saturday, December 21, from 1 to 4 p.m.
Holiday Blood Drive–Support the American Red Cross by giving the gift of life on Friday, December 20, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., at the Hilton Garden Inn. There will be raffles,
snacks, refreshments and door prizes for donors.
Holiday Hours–for the month of December, stores will be open Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sundays, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., with the following exceptions:
•Christmas Eve, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
•Christmas Day, closed
•New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Cinema, restaurant and some store hours may vary.
desire to participate in historic commemorations of
important battlefields and
sites in Michigan and across
the United States.
Mr. Washburn is a graduate of Lawrence Tech and
works as a Powertrain Engineer at GM.
The program is sponsored by the Anderton Bentley Fund in memory of
Christopher Perky, who
served at Fort Meigs during
the War of 1812.
For more information
about the event or Fort
Meigs, visit the Web site at
www.fortmeigs.org or call
1-800-283-8916.
577 Foundation classes
The 577 Foundation, located at 577 East Front Street,
Perrysburg, is offering the following classes. Pre-registration is required. For more
information or to make reservations, call 419-874-4174 or
visit the Web site at
www.577foundation.org.
Adult Programs
Bob Ross Landscape
This scene is part fall and
winter. The snow blankets the
ground; the trees are still
wearing fall colors. There is an
old, weathered, dying tree and
a broken down fence. Participants should bring an 18”x24”
canvas. All other supplies and
a snack will be provided. An
hour lunch break will be on
your own. Leader Pat Gstalder
offers this class on Saturday,
November 23, from 8:45 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. The fee is $50.
The Right to Bear Arms
The Second Amendment is
a controversial aspect of the
Constitution’s Bill of Rights.
Do citizens have the “individual right” to have guns or not?
Learn what this amendment
meant to the people of early
America, how Supreme Court
decisions like District of Columbia v. Heller seek to alter
it and what it means for the
people of America today.
Read the Heller decision before class. Notes will be provided. Ken Matesz leads this
program on Sunday, November 24, from 2 to 4 p.m. The
fee is $20.
Other locations:
Cleveland, OH
Plymouth, MI
Chicago, IL
Washington, DC
1915 North 12th Street, Toledo, OH 43604 • 419-324-2222
Environmental
Consulting
Geotechnical
Engineering
An Ohio EDGE
Firm and
Service Disabled
Veteran Owned
Small Business
Materials
Testing &
Inspection
May the good things in life be yours
in abundance, not only at Thanksgiving
but throughout the coming year.
www.ttlassoc.com
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ride down the boulevard with
Santa as he arrives, help light
the tree, enjoy free dinner at
Biaggi’s and stay overnight at
the Hilton Garden Inn.
The Levis Commons Tree
Lighting Ceremony is a night
for family and friends to
gather and make special holiday memories.
For a complete list of all
the activities at Levis Commons this season visit shople
viscommons.com.
Holiday events at Levis Commons …
‘The Battle of Fort Stephenson’
to be topic of lecture at Ft. Meigs
Mike Waskul and Dave
Washburn, independent researchers and historians,
will present “The Battle of
Fort Stephenson” on Thursday, November 21, at 7:30
p.m., at the Fort Meigs visitor center in Perrysburg.
The presentation is free
and open to the public.
Doors open at 7 p.m.
After the Second Siege
of Fort Meigs, British general Henry Proctor withdrew
his forces, but instead of retreating back to Canada he
marched to present-day Fremont, Ohio, to attack Fort
Stephenson.
In the first two days of
August of 1813, British and
Native American forces attacked Fort Stephenson.
U.S. troops, under the command of Major George
Croghan, withstood the attack and inflicted enough
casualties on the attacking
forces to cause their withdrawal.
The battle had been a
victory for the Americans.
George Croghan emerged
from the battle as a hero,
and in the following months,
the Americans won decisive
victories at the battles of
Lake Erie and the Thames.
Join Mr. Waskul and Mr.
Washburn as they explore
the events of this decisive
battle.
Mr. Waskul is a long time
student, researcher and lecturer on the War of 1812.
For the past nine years he
has teamed with Mr. Washburn and together they have
made numerous presentations on subjects related to
the War of 1812.
Mr. Washburn has had a
lifelong interest in studying
military history and collecting 19th century militaria.
These interests led to a
moving with spirited dance
routines between musical performances.
At 8 p.m., a special guest
will help lead the crowd in a
countdown to bring more than
150,000 lights to life on the
50-foot tree. Fans of Levis
Commons can be a part of all
the excitement by entering to
win the First Family of Levis
contest.
One lucky family will win
a night to remember as they
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Wayne M. Leatherman
1921-2013
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ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL — November 21, 2013 — Page 9
NOTICE TO CONSUMERS
In answering advertisements, whether in publications, or
television, be aware that 1-900 numbers have a charge that
will be billed to your telephone number. 1-800 numbers that
switch you to a 1-900 number are also billed to you.
Government job information or sales can be obtained
free from appropriate government agencies.
Long distance calls to brokers may only be solicitations
for schools or instruction books, for which there is a charge.
BUSINESS SERVICES
MOVING/ESTATE
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SALE
ADVERTISING
MUST BE PREPAID, BY
CASH, CREDIT CARD OR
CHECK, BY NOON ON
MONDAY BEFORE PUBLICATION OR THE AD
WILL NOT RUN.
STEVE’S DRYWALL, spray
ceilings, texture walls, all
patchwork.
Call
Steve,
419-873-8025.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
SERVE EVERYONE
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING—first 10 words $5.50, 30 cents per word thereafter. Display classified section, $12.75 per
column inch. All garage/estate sales must be prepaid, by cash, check or credit card. DEADLINE IS EACH MONDAY
AT NOON. Classified ads mailed in should be accompanied by payment; ads phoned in should be paid promptly to avoid
a $2.00 billing charge. Send ads to P.O. Box 267, Perrysburg, Ohio 43552. Perrysburg Messenger Journal office hours are
Monday, 8:30 to 4:30; Tuesday-Friday, 9 to 4; closed Saturday and Sunday, or visit our Web site at www.perrysburg.com.
CALL 419-874-2528 or 419-874-4491
BDRY BASEMENT Waterproofing. Life of structure
warranty.
419-891-0856.
419-787-6020. www.bdrynwohio.com
BLIND CLEANING and repair. Mini blinds, wood blinds,
fabric shades, vertical blinds.
Pick up, deliver, take down,
re-hang, next day turn around.
Perrysburg Clean Blinds Plus.
419-874-9199.
FALL CLEAN up, snow removal, estimates. Call/text
Justin 419-309-2002.
FIRST TIME ADVERTISERS, WITHOUT A CREDIT HISTORY
MUST PAY FOR ADVERTISING WHEN SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION.
Submit your classified advertisement via e-mail. Just visit www.perrysburg.com or www.rossford.com
CONCRETE WORK. Driveways, patios, sidewalks. Cement mason since 1985.
Call Paul 419-327-0883.
BUSINESS SERVICES
HANDYMAN.
EXPERIENCED, references, reasonable. No job too small. Dave
419-823-8033.
PER RYSBU RG
ELECTRIC
MICHAEL’S
EXCAVATING. Sand, stone, topsoil, excavating. Free estimates. Insured. 419-344-1872.
SINCE 1987
MASTER ELECTRICIANS
Lic. # 22360
RESIDENTIAL Ƈ COMMERCIAL Ƈ INDUSTRIAL
SERVICE UPGRADES & REPAIRS
NEW CONSTRUCTION
SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEMS
UNIFORMED ELECTRICIANS
LICENSED Ƈ BONDED Ƈ INSURED
419-666-5211
Lake Erie
SPORTFISHING CHARTERS
Excursions for up to 10 persons
(419) 666-5952 (Day)
(419) 662-8347 (Night)
www.lakeeriefishing.com
Texturing & Painting
Complete Basement Remodeling
20 years experience, insured. Free Estimates.
B il l 4 19 -2 9 7- 78 2 6
Mackiewicz Siding,
Roofing and Windows LLC
#1 in Quality, #1 in Price, #1 in Service
“Where Quality Matters” Since 1991
Call Today 419-392-1335
Email: [email protected]
419-874-2734
Local Family Owned
Service Most Makes & Models
Parts 15% Off w/this Ad
www.rapidapplianceservice.com
FALL CLEAN-UP, SNOW PLOWING,
TREE STORM DAMAGE CLEAN-UP,
GUTTER & DOWNSPOUT
CLEANING
Office, 419-874-5006
Matthew, 419-283-0756
Mark, 419-392-3669
Morgan’s
Cleaning Service
Over 20 Years Experience.
Residential, Commercial
& Office Cleaning. Insured.
419-304-6226
WB Farrell
cabinets • refaces,
tile • flooring,
carpentry • painting
40+ years experience
father & son
free estimates
419-351-3010
METZGER PAINTING
& Wallpapering
•Powerwashing •Decks
•Plaster/Drywall Repair
Tree Trimming, Stump and Tree Removal
Firewood: Indoor & Outdoor Burner & Campfire Wood
Call Today: 419-874-0484 Fully Insured
SPS Lawns: Mowing, Mulching, Spring & Fall Clean-up
Bush Trimming & Snow Removal. 419-704-1597
419-874-2251
Senior Discount
Mancillas Sharpening
Giving your business
the sharpest edge
Saturday, Nov. 23
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Hancock Fabrics, next
to Giant Eagle, SR 20,
Perrysburg. Sharpening
fabric, pinker, beauty,
dog grooming scissors.
Every 4th Saturday
of the month
THE ADDED TOUCH
in
Painting & Wallpapering
(419) 874-6779
(419)874-6779
(419)874
-6779
-
LAWN • LANDSCAPE • IRRIGATION • TREE REMOVAL • SNOW REMOVAL
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License
License #17312
#17312
419-862-9042
419-862-9042
Good Work–Fair Prices
25 Years Local Experience
PH. 419-874-1258
Tom’s
PEST
CONTROL
in Holland
(419) 868-8700
Ants, Mice,
Bedbugs, Bees/Wasps,
Box Elder and Stink Bugs
www.citytermiteandpest.com
Service Snowblowers
& Mowers
Window & Screen Repair
Mini-Engine Repair
217 W. Third St. • 419-874-3139
www.mini-engine.com
GUTTER CLEANING, quality service for a fair price.
Michael Rantanen, owner.
419-874-2482.
BRICK REPAIR and roofing, O’Shannons. Specializing in solving masonry
problems.
Chimneys,
porches, foundations, tuckpointing, cement work. Fully
licensed and insured. License
number
BTR05128HRC.
419-270-3782.
UPHOLSTERY, YOUR fabric or mine. Reasonable.
419-874-5747.
PAINTING AND Wallpapering. Professional, quality work.
Removal, wall repair. Brian,
419-297-9686.
AFFORDABLE FALL leaf
clean-up, gutter cleaning. Tom,
419-343-4624.
EXPERIENCED CARPENTER specializing in finish
work, custom furniture, quality
woodworking, home repairs.
Jeff Hoile, 419-265-2999 or
419-874-1819.
BASEMENT
WATERPROOFING, wall repair.
Reasonable rates. 30 years experience. Many Perrysburg references. Licensed and insured.
Call anytime, 419-874-2802.
ELECTRICIAN, 30 years experience. Residential and commercial. 419-704-7201.
HURLEY’S INTERIOR/exterior painting. Reasonable
prices. 20 years experience.
Free
estimates.
Call
419-882-6753.
CONCRETE/MASONRY
repairs. Specializing in small
jobs, brick restoration/basement water proofing/wall
straightening/porches. Reasonable rates. Insured/BBB
A+, 40 years experience.
419-729-2067.
WINDOW CLEANING. Perrysburg Window and Gutter
Cleaning, professional service
for a fair price. Call Michael
Rantanen,
owner
419-874-2482.
For
this
month’s coupon visit:
www.pburgwindowclng.com
FALL CLEAN-UP leaf removal.
Yard
clean-ups.
Bushes and shrubs trimmed.
Perennials cut back. Quality
work. Insured. Reasonable
prices.
Call
Don
419-708-3855.
STORM DAMAGE clean
up. Tree removals and trimming. Stump grinding.Winter discounts available. Firewood delivered. Harris Landscaping, 419-276-1267.
SCHALLER TRUCKING.
Delivering stone, sand and topsoil for life’s little projects.
419-666-7642, 419-392-7642.
BOOKKEEPING? WAIT,
more than just bookkeeping:
Cash flow statements, A/R,
A/P, etc. Text or call
419-902-6954.
PAINTING,
ELECTRIC
ELECTRIC
& HEATING
& HEATING
SERVICE
SERVICE INTERIOR
neat, experienced. References.
Free
estimates.
Donna,
johnnieselectric.com
johnnieselectric.com 419-476-1173, 419-250-4504.
MOTORCYCLE
STORAGE, heated indoor. Safe,
secure. Now until April 30.
$225. 419-661-9249.
A-1 GUTTER CLEANING.
Debris taken away; tower removal. Insured. 419-865-1941.
HEALTH SERVICES
ARE YOU stuggling caring
for a loved one? Please call
me. I am a State Tested Nursing Assistant with CPR/First
Aid certificate. Honest and reliable in home care for your aging loved ones. Tracy,
419-931-4134
(Perrysburg
area).
RN CERTIFIED in foot care
will bring this service to your
home. Dee Jones, 419297-2005.
FOR SALE
FILING
CABINET,
4
drawer, great shape. $50.
419-874-7763.
MOVING SALE
26487 Oak Meadow
West
Corner Eckel Junction
Thurs/Fri 9-2
Moving Sale
Everything Must Go!
Downsizing
5,000 sq ft to 1,200 sq ft
7020 Jeffers Road
Whitehouse
Saturday, November 23
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, November 24
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday, November 25
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
GARAGE SALES
3678 COUNTY Road 106,
Lindsey. 10 miles east of
Woodville on State Route 20,
4 miles north County Road
106. November 22-24, 9-5.
Antique/large barn sale. Doctors office sign, old music
stand, iron bed, childs wicker
sleigh, old wood tool boxes,
lots of assorted furniture, fireplace screen, wicker plant
stand, many collectibles and
nice miscellaneous. Great
Christmas gifts.
FLEA MARKET at Byrne
Road near Hill Avenue at
American Legion Post, Sundays, 7 a.m. to noon. Closed
November 24. Dealers wanted.
Call 419-389-1095.
ALL GARAGE SALE ADVERTISING MUST BE
PREPAID,
BY
CASH,
CHECK OR CREDIT CARD
BY MONDAY NOON ON
WEEK OF PUBLICATION
OR THE AD WILL NOT
RUN. CALL 419-874-4491
TO PLACE YOUR AD AND
PAY VIA CREDIT CARD.
2004 BMW Z4, excellent condition, navigation, manual,
premium sound, sports package. $15,985 Call, 419-3432530.
FIREWOOD, SEASONED
hardwood, 4x8, $85. 4x4, $45.
Call 419-704-1409.
1994 CHEVY S-10, V6,
red, 153,600 miles. $1,800
OBO. 419-344-5337.
FIREWOOD, SEASONED,
4’ high x 8’ long stack, $80.
419-409-0252
or
419-409-0250.
1996 CHEVY Beretta, $1,350.
419-297-9709. Bring ad, receive $100 off.
LIKE NEW king bed, complete, including box springs
and frame. $400 OBO.
419-873-5169.
SOFA/LOVESEAT,
LEATHER sectional, entertainment center, Hammond
organ, king bed, lamps,
dresser, twin heads, kitchen
table, etc. 419-704-1409.
WANTED TO BUY
LOOKING FOR great things
to buy or consign. Collections
or estates. Jones & Jones
LTD Antiques. 114 W. Indiana. 419-874-2867.
WANTED GUNS, any age,
any condition. Also WWII
and earlier military items. Indian
artifacts.
Rob,
419-340-5808, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
BUYING MOST items from
garages. Vehicles, motorcycles, tools, mowers, etc.
419-870-0163.
A MECHANIC buys vehicles; looks, pays accordingly,
anything
with
wheels.
419-870-0163.
ROLEX WRISTWATCHES
wanted by Perrysburg collector.
Call
Tom,
419-360-8920.
ASSISTANT TREASURER, ACCOUNTANT
Rossford Schools is seeking a qualified individual for
the position of Assistant Treasurer, Accountant. School
experience is required. Candidate should have knowledge of USAS/USPS and Microsoft Office and possess
or be able to obtain a State of Ohio Treasurer’s License.
Send resume or application, cover letter and salary requirements to: James Rossler, Jr., Treasurer, Rossford
Schools, 601 Superior St., Rossford OH 43460, by November 29, 2013.
Rossford Schools is an equal opportunity employer
American Steel Treating, a growing industrial
company, is seeking several immediate full time
positions in the following fields:
•Supervisor/Managers
•Maintenance Technicians
•Electrical/Electronic Technicians
Offering excellence in all benefit areas.
Apply in person, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at:
American Steel Treating
Attn: Human Resource Mgr.
525 West Sixth Street
Perrysburg, OH 43551
Drivers
2 Flatbed
col by 2”=Truck
$51/week
Perrysburg/Rossford
Needed
to
relay
mid-sized,
empty & refurbished, inTo run 11/20/13
dustrial propane tanks to Drivers (drop and swap)
regionally. Driver will be responsible for safely securing tanks—(empty & refurbished) on Dropdeck
Flatbed trailers. Training provided. Drivers’ Gross
Pay is between $800 and $1200 per week, depending on runs—with the opportunity to increase your
pay if you want to learn to safely operate the ‘boom
crane’ to make deliveries. Drivers leave out Sunday
afternoon, are back on Tuesday, then out again after
their break until Friday (3-4 sleeper births per week)
and always home on weekends. 1 full year of recent
Class A Driving experience (including 6 months of
FB exp), a good MVR and employment history required. Please either call to inquire (440) 777-3160,
fill out an application @ www.prodrivers.com (to our
Cleveland branch), or email your resume to
[email protected]
Part time help at upscale
local antique store. Responsible well organized
individual with computer
knowledge, sales and
people skills. 24-30 hours
per week. $10.00 per
hour. Apply with resume
at 2646 W. Central from
10:00- 4:00.
USED CARS
FIREWOOD, FREE delivery, 4’ x 8’ row, $85. Seasoned hardwood. Alternative
Tree Service, 419-475-3111.
HARDWOOD FLOORING
truck load sale. 2 1/4”
pre-finished oak, $2.49 sf., 3
1/4” pre-finished oak, $3.09,
5 1/4” #1 common red oak
unfinished,
$3.15.
M.T.
Hardwoods
Osseo,
MI.
800-523-8878.
www.mthardwoods.com
HELP WANTED
2000 TOYOTA RODEO,
4x4, 1 owner, $1,500.
419-297-9709. Bring ad, receive $100 off.
2004 MERCURY Mountaineer, AWD, like new, $4,450.
419-297-9709. Bring ad, receive $100 off.
2001 PONTIAC Montana
van, $1,350. 419-297-9709.
Bring ad, receive $100 off.
1996 FORD Crown Vic,
126K, $1,000. 419-297-9709.
Bring ad, receive $100 off.
LOOKING FOR cars/trucks.
Call before selling or trading.
419-297-9709.
MOBILE HOMES
LIKE NEW 2 bedroom, 2
bath with shed and new deck.
Only $16,900 at Village
Green. 20% down, financing
available. 6 years at $536 includes
lot
rent.
419-248-2372.
* * * NOTICE * * *
Investigate before you invest. Call the Ohio Division
of Securities BEFORE purchasing an investment. Call
the Division’s Investor Protection Hotline at 800-7881194 to learn if the
investment is properly registered and if the seller is
properly licensed. Please be
advised that many work at
home advertisements do not
yield what is promised. It is
best to investigate the company before applying for any
work at home position.
(This notice is a public service of
the Welch Publishing Co.)
PETS
Humane Ohio
Pet Photos with Santa!
Saturday, November 23rd & December 7th
10 am – 2 pm at Lambertville Hardware
(8100 Secor Rd. three miles north of the state line)
$10 & $20 packages, $25 holiday cards
tXXXIVNBOFPIJPPSH
XXXGBDFCPPLDPNIVNBOFPIJP
TRAINCO
TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL
Day • Eves • Weekend Class
Job Placement
Company Paid Training
Call 419-837-5730
Train Locally-Save Hassle
PERRYSBURG CAMPUS
www.traincoinc.com
Individual
Instructor
Individual Instructor
for
Children
for Children
with
Autism
with Autism
Qualifications:
• Spotless FBI and OBCI
background check
• Available from 9 am to
2 pm M-F all year
• Please send three (3)
professional references
and a professional resume to [email protected]
gmail.com
CHURCH
MUSICIAN.
Seeking a musician for Sunday
morning Church services
which includes Liturgy &
Hymns. Steinway Grand Piano
and Rodgers Organ. Organ has
recording capabilities. Pre-recorded music available. Martin, Ohio area. 419-836-8903.
SITUATIONS WANTED
AJS IN Home Cleaning,
weekly, biweekly. Serving
customers in Perrysburg and
surronding. 22 years experience, bonded, references upon
request. Free estimates. Call
April at 419-691-2041. Check
me out on Angie’s List.
CHILDCARE PROVIDED
in our Perrysburg home.
Small group, infant through
school age. Call Susan,
419-283-2312.
CLEANING DONE at reasonable rates. 25 years experience. 419-666-7435.
EXPERIENCED
SEAMSTRESS. Over 30 years experience. Dressmaking, wedding
gowns, bridesmaids, alterations and veil design.
419-874-5390.
GOOD OLD fashioned house
cleaning, holiday parties and
decorating. Honest. Ellie,
419-308-9188.
HOUSE CLEANING. Residential and commercial. Experienced. Reasonable rates.
Call Susan, 419-283-2312.
CLASSES OFFERED
G FORCES Learning Center.
Tutoring for all ages,
ACT/SAT and GED test prep
and creative writing assistance.
Expert resume service and professional job search assistance.
Help with term papers and letters of application. Located at
134 W.S. Boundary, Suite H,
Perrysburg. Call, 419-873-6121
or send an email to
[email protected]
ART CLASSES - Group & Private. Drawing, painting & figure study. Beginning through
advanced. EDGERTON ART
Studio & School, Perrysburg. Current schedule and
registration forms available
online at www.EdgertonArt
.com; Call: 419-290-OILS
[6457], Email: Edgerton
[email protected]
WANTED TO RENT
PERRYSBURG FAMILY
looking to rent a 3 bedroom
home in Perrysburg area,
long term. Excellent on time
payment history. Excellent
references,
non-smokers.
567-202-3476.
PROFESSIONAL FAMILY
looking for 3-4 bedroom home
to rent in Perrysburg or surrounding area. 419-261-3790.
VACATION RENTALS
Class A CDL
BLACK HORSE CARRIERS has openings in the
Perrysburg area: Dedicated
routes, Some Dock Work
Required, Average $1100
plus a week. Home daily, 2
PM Dispatch 5 day work
week. New Equipment
(2013), XM Radio. These
full time positions come
with full Benefits, 401K
and paid vacation. If you
have 3 yrs. Exp. and a Class
A CDL with a clean MVR,
call 708-478-6020 or email
to [email protected] EOE. Drug Testing is a condition of
employment.
As a boxed ad
1 col. x 3.75”
Cost would be
Cryogenic Transporta$47.81/week.
tion, a highway subsidiary
of the Kenan Advantage
Group, is now seeking
Class A CDL Drivers out
of Riga, MI!
The hiring schedule
will be local, home daily!
(various shifts available)
Apply within and
immediately see the
advantages of joining
our driving team:
·Competitive pay
·Excellent benefits
·Paid training
·Paid vacations & holidays
·401K w/company match
·And so much more!
We require Class A CDL,
2 years recent, verifiabletractor-trailer experience,
Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain)
and a safe driving record.
800-871-4581
for more information
or apply online at
TheKAG.com
COMPUTER REPAIR. Occasional help with computer
problems
Classand
A software
CDL at my
PLACE YOUR
location.
Reply
with hourly
BLACK
HORSE
CARRIERS
has Rentals
openings in the
Vacation
rate. See Craig’s List. ComPerrysburg
area: Dedicated
here.routes,
Call usSome Dock
puter
PO Box 796 Perrysburg
Ohio
43552.Required, Average
Work
$1100 plus
419-874-4491
to a week.
place5your
Home daily,
2 PM
dayad.
work week.
DIRECTOR
OF Sales,
hotel Dispatch
andNew
customer
service experiEquipment
(2013), XM Radio. These full
ence required, extended stay
time positions come with full Benefits, 401K and
hotel expereince preferred but
vacation.
notpaid
required.
Must applyIf inyou have 3 yrs. Exp. and a
BEDROOM
person,
Candlewood
Class
A CDL Suites,
with a 1clean
MVR, plus
call den,
708-478laundry hook up, 1 year lease,
27350 LakeVue.
6020 or email to [email protected]
security deposit, no pets, non
EXCEL
Help at is smoking.
419-466-1350.
EOE.PROJECT.
Drug Testing
a condition
of employment
my location to type into Excel.
About 20 hours total job. Re- 154 ELM Street, Rossford. 2
ply with hourly rate. See bedroom, living room, dining
Craig’s list. Excel PO Box room, fenced-in yard, shed.
796 Perrysburg, OH 43552.
$700/month plus utilities and
deposit. 419-350-1558.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Church in Perrysburg is look- 2 BED upper duplex in
ing for a part time church mu- downtown
Perrysburg.
sician who can play the piano Washer/dryer. Water included.
and work with the church $660/month. 419-704-1362.
choir. Playing organ a plus.
Please call 765-461-8788 or
2 BEDROOM villa. C/A,
e-mail
gas heat, attached garage,
[email protected]
washer/dryer
hook-ups,
HIRING SERVER/HOST- $680/month.
ESS. Apply in person, Jed’s 419-874-0889.
Perrysburg, 7101 Lighthouse
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, 1,800
Way. Ask for Nick.
square-foot ranch style condoRETAIL SALES in a kitchen minium with 2 car garage.
store and bakery in downtown Available December. Call
Perrysburg. Part-time, daytime 419-466-6292.
hours. Apply in person at our
main store: The Baker’s 3 BEDROOM Perrysburg
Kitchen, 6433 Monclova ranch, in town, 1.5 bath, living
room, family room, attached
Road, Maumee.
garage, $900/month. Available
WILLING TO educate. now. Call Mary, Agent/Owner,
Highly motivated individual 419-654-9834.
for rewarding career in financial services. Start part-time. HOUSE FOR rent, 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage,
Call 419-348-9278.
fenced yard. $1,600/month.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real
419-410-3500. 419-343-4633.
FOR RENT
Original e-ma
estate advertising in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing
Act which makes it illegal to advertise
“any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or intention to make
any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes
children under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is
in violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Call the Fair Housing Center, 2436163, before you run your advertisement. To complain of discrimination
call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
MEIGS ON the River, 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home. Updated kitchen, appliances included. $1,800/month. Deposit, lease and references required. Non-smoking. 419-2612330. Available January 1.
ONE BEDROOM ranch style
apartment. Washer/dryer, private entrance/patio, central air,
great location. Call for our
great move in specials.
419-389-0555.
PERRYSBURG 2 bed condo,
1.5 bath, attached garage.
Three Meadows. No pets,
non-smoking. $1,100/month.
419-874-2405.
Page 10 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
FOR RENT
PERRYSBURG ONE bedroom upper apartment with
stove and refrigerator. Only
$375/month, plus gas and
electric. $375 deposit with
year lease. Not in an apartment complex, if credit good
rent this inexpensive apartment. 419-509-7500.
PERRYSBURG
TOWNSHIP 2 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath
townhouse.
New
paint,
washer/dryer included. No
pets.
$555/month.
419-260-7583.
ROSSFORD 2 bedroom
starting at $450. Quiet community. Pet friendly. 1110
Lewis. By appointment,
419-385-0704.
Gas heat, all appliances,
including washer/dryer.
Perrysburg Township.
$345/month
1 Bedroom Mobile Home
419-215-8378
Apts: Bowles Court
Walking distance to laundromat, pharmacy, shopping and banking. Large 1
bedroom apartments with
private front and rear entrance and patio, parking
space, A/C and appliances.
Freshly renovated with all
new flooring etc. in the
heart of Maumee. $435.
419-666-5320. Call now
for a tour!
Tired of Heat Bills?
2 bed apartment with
heat and hot water
paid, garage, balcony,
a/c, no pets. $620.
Broker/Owner
419-874-1112
419-874-1188
FREE CABLE
Cordoba Apartments
Perrysburg Township.
Close to Owens & Crossroads.
Rent starting at $410
419-381-0600
Perry’s Landing
Space for Rent
•Commercial/Office
Space, 500 sq. ft.-1800
square feet available.
•1 bedroom apt. available, $525 plus utilities.
419-352-0717
AVAILABLE NOW!
WAREHOUSE SPACE
1,200 To 2,400 SQ. FT.
WITH OFFICES
RESTROOM
OVERHEAD DOOR
13 FT. CEILINGS
VERY CLEAN
MODERN, SECURE
26963 ECKEL ROAD
PERRYSBURG
CALL 419.874.5307
REAL ESTATE
201 WALNUT, corner of 2nd.
Beautiful location, 1 block
from downtown and river.
$150,000. 419-872-2131.
Perrysburg
Real Estate
News and Stats
at
www.PerrysburgBlog.com
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising
in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise “any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or intention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination.” Familial
status includes children
under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in
this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the Fair
Housing Center, 2436163, before you run your
advertisement. To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free
telephone number for
the hearing impaired
is 1-800-927-9275.
Auditor’s office offers advice
to consumers buying firewood
Michael Sibbersen, Wood
County auditor, reminds the
consumer that the Weights &
Measures division of his office assures that products
meet claims for actual
weights and volumes. As part
of these responsibilities, the
Auditor’s Weights and Measures Division enforces
Ohio’s laws defining the
units of measurement for
firewood sales.
Mr. Sibbersen recommends consumers protect
themselves from fraud by
following these tips when
purchasing firewood:
•Buy firewood by the
“cord”–Ohio Law protects
consumers by requiring that
firewood be sold by the cord
or fraction of a cord. Other
measurements such as “rick,”
“rack,” “facecord,” or “truck
load” are illegal and strictly
prohibited.
•Firewood is defined as:
any kindling, logs, boards,
timbers or other wood, split
or not split, advertised, offered for sale, or sold as solid
fuel.
•A cord is defined as 128
cubic feet in volume when
well stowed and tightly
stacked. Traditionally a cord
is a stack of wood eight feet
long by four feet high and
four feet wide. A properly
stacked cord of wood should
have pieces placed parallel to
each other in a compact manner. Firewood is frequently
sold at grocery stores in
small bundles which are
measured in fractions of
cubic feet. Such packaging
would be in compliance with
the law.
•Get a receipt–Firewood
sellers must provide a sales
invoice to buyers. It must
contain the name and address
of the seller and buyer, delivery date, quantity delivered,
quantity upon which the
price is based, total price of
amount delivered and the
identity of the product in descriptive terms.
•Inquire about the sourcecitizens should inquire about
the source of any firewood
they buy and avoid purchasing ash logs.
Ohio Department of Agriculture has enacted a quarantine that prohibits the
movement of any ash material, including firewood,
from areas where the Emerald Ash Borer has been
found in Lucas, Wood and
many other counties. There
is a $4,000 fine for bringing
any ash tree material or firewood into Ohio from Michigan.
For more information,
call the Wood County Auditor’s Office, division of
Weights & Measures at 419354-9156 or toll free at 1866-860-4140,
extension
9156.
Happy
Holidays
from
Welch
Publishing
REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE, SUN., NOV. 24, 1-3
9530 Charlemont Rd., Perrysburg
Three bedroom ranch on corner lot. Large eat in
kitchen, full basement, priced to sell! $145,900.
Call
Jeff Studer
419.349.4051
26580 Dixie Hwy., Ste. 107, Perrysburg
Office: 419.872.3584
[email protected] • JeffreyStuder.danberry.com
Area Holiday Happenings
The following is a listing
of area events in celebration
of the holiday season.
To have an item added to
the listing, send an e-mail to
[email protected]
Wildlife Holiday Open
Houses at Magee
Marsh set for Dec. 8
Magee Marsh Wildlife
Area will hold its Holiday
Open House on Sunday, December 8, from noon to 4 p.m.
Vendors will be on hand,
and all items at the bookstore
will be discounted. There will
be cookies and candies for
sale and unique hand painted
bird ornaments.
The Friends will have free
food on hand, which you can
enjoy while listening to live
music by the Twisted Strands.
Visitors also can enjoy the
warm fire and holiday decorations. There also will be activities for children.
Ottawa National Wildlife
Area and Black Swamp Bird
Observatory also will hold
their open houses on the same
day.
Those who attend all three
will be entered into a free
drawing.
Magee Marsh Wildlife
Area is located at 13229 West
State Route 2, Oak Harbor,
and Ottawa National Wildlife
Refuge is located just to the
west of Magee Marsh at
14000 West State Route 2.
For more information, call
Mary at Magee Marsh, at 419898-0960, extension 31.
Seven churches in the
Holland/Springfield Township area are seeking donations for Thanksgiving and
Christmas food baskets,
which will be distributed to
area families in need.
“We need assistance covering the cost of perishable
food items,” said Pastor Josh
Plaisance of the Dwelling
Place, adding that items such
as turkey, ham potatoes, eggs
milk, bread and apples will
cost about $30 per basket.
“We are providing baskets
for more than 100 families
each at Thanksgiving and
Christmas,” he said.
To donate, send a tax-deductible gift to the Dwelling
Place. PO Box 35, Holland,
Way Library holiday
wreath workshop set
for December 5
Registration is under way
for a holiday wreath workshop at Way Library.
Participants will create a
fresh boxwood holiday wreath.
The workshop will be led by
floral designer Lynn Fleure.
The
holiday
wreath
“make-and-take” program
will take place on Thursday,
December 5, at the library.
Participants can choose to attend at 2 or 6:30 p.m.
There is a fee of $13 due at
time of registration. Space is
limited. Register at the Way
Information Desk by November 21.
Bittersweet Farms of Whitehouse
to host Holiday Shop December 2-20
Bittersweet Farms will
host a Holiday Shop Monday
through Friday, December 220, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The Holiday Shop, which is
located in the administration
building at Bittersweet
Farms, is open to the public.
The program offers an opportunity to purchase holiday
gifts while supporting individuals with autism.
All items are created and
handmade by individuals
with autism served by Bittersweet. Items include: Christmas ornaments, hand woven
rugs and placemats, original
art pieces, glass and ceramic
pieces, gift baskets, cookies
and pies.
Bittersweet Farms is a
local non-profit that serves
people with autism through
various vocational, residential and recreational pro-
PERRYSBURG 419-872-2410
Info + Photos on all MLS properties
go to www.danberry.com
New Listing – 10195 S Shannon Hills,
Perrysburg – $199,900 – Gorgeous ranch,
3 bed, 2 bath condo with many upgrades.
New Listing – 2536 W. Village, South
Toledo – $79,999 – 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
basement condo with newer floor, windows, roof and private patio.
1485 Marsh Hawk – NEW PRICE – Perrysburg – $185,000 – Open and airy floor
plan with 3 beds, 2 full baths, basement
ranch.
616 W. Broadway, Maumee – $87,900 –
Cute 3 bedroom home with great yard, large
open kitchen, den in Olde Maumee.
10066 Linwood Road, Bowling Green –
Churches seek donations for food baskets
$214,900 – 3 bed, Wayne home on 1.69
acres with fenced yard and pool.
531 Harrison, Perrysburg – New Price
$224,000 – 4 bed, with open family
room/kitchen, one of the largest lots in
subdivision, basement.
0 Georgia Road – PENDING
320 W. 6th Street – PENDING
4141 Ariel – PENDING
725 Turnbury – SOLD
716 River Glen – SOLD
Barb Stout, ABR, e-Pro
419-346-7510
www.barbstout.com
Infoline # 419-539-1020
Build your dream home here!
Newer subdivision, large lot, ready to build
Harley
Woods
Country living
City Convenience
One acre lot of land
in Tontogany, OH inside
a semi-private
cul-de-sac in Harley
Woods Subdivision
off of Tontogany Road.
This lot is ready to
build now and has
electric, city water,
natural gas, sanitary and
storm sewers complete
with taps. Otsego Schools.
REDUCED
Asking price is $55,000.
Call Chet Welch for more details at 419-215-4482.
grams, using a unique farmstead model. It is located at
12660 Archbold-Whitehouse
Road, Whitehouse.
Ohio 43528 or visit the Web
site at www.aplace tomeetgod.org and follow the Helping Hands link to make a
secure tax-deductible gift.
Area churches also are
providing Christmas presents
for close to 400 students in
the Springfield School District.
“We will have children’s
names and needs on an Angel
Tree at the Christmas Tree
Lighting on December 5,”
said the pastor.
The annual event will be
held at 6:45 p.m., at the
Lodge at Strawberry Acres.
Churches participating in
the programs are Providence
Lutheran, Maumee Valley,
First Baptist of Greater
Toledo, Dwelling Place,
Compelled Church, Holland
Free Methodist and Timberlake.
Toledo Bar Auxiliary
to hold Holiday
Trunk Show Dec. 6
The Toledo Bar Association Auxiliary will hold its
seventh annual Holiday
Trunk Show on Friday, December 6.
The event will be held
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., on the
main floor of The Toledo
Club.
The show will feature
handcrafted gifts created by
more than 26 local artists.
Featured items include paintings, garden art, blown glass,
jewelry, knitted items, purses,
stationery, children’s items
and more.
There also will be a display of holiday trees.
The Toledo Club is located at 235 14th Street,
Toledo.
Holiday Art Trail in Sylvania is Dec. 6, 7
The fourth annual Holiday Art Trail to be held December 6-7 in downtown
Sylvania will feature 15
sites.
Art Galleries and studios
in the Sylvania area will be
open on Friday, December 6,
from 5 to 8 p.m. and Saturday, December 7, from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. Each of the
stops along the trail will
offer light snacks, wine tastings, demonstrations and art
for sale. The Sylvania Community Arts Commission
(SCAC) organized the event,
which will also feature a
drawing to win an original
linocut print by Jaye Brumbaugh from Hudson Gallery.
To enter the drawing pick
up a trail checklist at any of
the stops along the trail and
visit the locations. All stops
will be identified with Holiday Art Trail signage.
The 15 stops include the
following sites/artists:
•Sylvania Schools Superintendent Art Show depicting work from all of the
schools, grades K-12;
•The Hickman Cancer
Center at Flower Hospital,
5308 Harroun Road;
•For the Love of Art –
Watercolor artist Cynthia
Rotondo;
•American
Gallery–
bowls, plates and mugs in
clay, glass, wood, metal and
paper by 20 artists, Saxon
Square, Sylvania Avenue and
McCord Road;
•Lourdes University Art
Department Student Exhibit
and Sale, Sylvan Plaza, McCord and Brint Road;
•All
Good
Things
Gallery–various works of art
for sale, Lourdes University
Campus, Convent Road;
•Peace, Love and Pottery–ceramic artwork by
owner Julianne Reinhard,
Timberstone Commons, McCord and Brint Road;
•Mary Weis & Friends
Open House–six artists featuring mixed media, fiber
art, jewelry, kiln-formed
glass, pottery and furniture,
14 Winding Creek Place;
•Frameworks – airbrush
demonstrations by Heavy
Metal cover artist/owner
Michael Calandra, Mayberry
Square
•Ann Tubbs Studio–ceramics, 8029 Sterns Road,
Ottawa Lake, Michigan;
•Interrupt–printmaking
by Matt Squibb, 5703
Maplewood;
•SCAC Pop-Up Gallery–
six artists featuring fabric,
photography, jewelry, children’s apparel, puzzles &
prints, illustrations, Maplewood;
•Treo Restaurant–One2
Lounge and wine tasting,
5703 Main Street;
•Hudson Gallery–jewelry
trunk show with Liz Sue
Zabo and Regina Jankowski,
5645 North Main Street;
•Beautiful Blooms by
Jen–artist
interpretations
using flowers, 5646 Summit
Street, and
•River Centre Foundation
– paintings by Dani Fuller
and friends, 5445 Main
Street.
For more information,
call Jennifer at 419-5170118 or visit the Web site at
www.SylvaniaArts.org.
Metroparks offer many holiday events
The following is a sampling of Metroparks programs offered for December.
Reservations for the following programs can be made by
phone at 419-407-9700.
On Friday, December 6,
there will be A Cup Of
Christmas: Holiday Tea At
Stranleigh, Wildwood Preserve at the Manor House,
from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Enjoy a delightful ‘Tea
At Stranleigh’ among the
“Holidays” splendor of the
Manor House. Seating for
this new event is limited and
reservations must be prepaid. Guests will enjoy a
morning tea, with musical entertainment, followed by a
stroll of the decorated Manor
House before it is opened to
the public. Prepaid reservations will be taken at 419-
344-4765. Price is $20.
On Saturday, December 7,
there will be a Victorian
Christmas at the Oak Grove
School, at Wildwood Preserve, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy
Christmas activities from
days gone by in the one room
school house. St. Nicholas
will be sitting by the pot belly
stove ready to listen to everyone’s wish lists. This is an
open house, so come anytime
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m,
stay as long as you like.
Reservations needed.
Holidays in the Manor
House will run December 7
through December 15 at
Wildwood Preserve, at the
Manor House, 10 a.m. to 8
p.m. For more than 30 years
volunteers have decorated the
Manor House at Wildwood
for all to enjoy.
A t te n ti o n Bu s i ne s s O w n er s
W el c h Pu b l is h in g is p r o m ot i n g
Small Business Saturday
on Nov. 30
50% off
your small business advertisement
to run in the November 27/28 issues of
the Perrysburg Messenger and Rossford Record Journals.
Ads must be received by 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 22. New display ads only.
Call 419-874-4491 or e-mail [email protected]
RHS drama
production
set for Jan.
The Rossford High School
Drama Club, under the direction of Julie Zatko and Ryan
Mahaffey, are in rehearsals for
the upcoming January production of “The Seussification of
A Midsummer
Night’s
Dream” by Ken Bloedel.
The Bard’s beloved romantic comedy gets the full
Seuss treatment in this playful
adaptation. Two madcap Narrators chronicle the tale of
four Athenian lovers–Hermia
and Demetrius and Helena
and Lysander–as they wander
through a mystical Seussian
forest full of whoosh bush
tush beasts and fairies dueling
with bumballoon swords.
Told in rhyming couplets,
this reimagining is how
Shakespeare’s magical tale
might have played if Dr. Seuss
had gotten his hands on it.
The grade-school-geared,
family-friendly production
runs January 23 through 26,
on the Wilcox Stage in the auditorium at Rossford High
School. Thursday through Saturday performances will be at
7:30 p.m., with a Sunday
matinee at 2 p.m. General admission is $6.
For more information,
send an e-mail to rhs
[email protected]
Place your ad
in the Record!
Call 419-874-4491.
ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL — November 21, 2013 — Page 11
Indian Hills, Eagle Point Elementary students honor veterans as U.S. heroes
On Election Day, Indian
Hills Elementary School and
on Veterans Day, Eagle Point
Elementary School had the
opportunity to celebrate veterans–the real heroes of the
United States of America.
The students, many attired
in red, white and blue, assembled in the gym to sing a
dozen patriotic songs such as
“50 Nifty United States,”
“The Star Spangled Banner,”
“This Land Is Your Land” and
“The Stars and Stripes Forever.”
A number of poems and
reflections were read by the
fifth and sixth graders about
veterans, too. Several songs
were led by student soloists,
trios, and quartets, and one
song, “Peace Is The World,”
included all students signing
the words.
Mrs. Krolavic, Eagle Point
secretary, shared some of her
pictures from Washington,
D.C., as she had the opportunity to be a chaperone for the
Honor Flight from Northwest
Ohio this past July. Also, via
technology, students heard
from two former Marines,
Dan Mikolas and TJ Mikolas.
Dan is the husband of third
grade Indian Hills teacher
Dawn Mikolas.
High school sweethearts,
they have two children, Jack,
9, and Lyla, 5.
TJ is Mrs. Mikolas’
brother-in-law, and he has a
daughter, Avery, 4.
These men come from a
long line of family veterans,
and served in the military
from 1995 to 1999 and from
Pictured at the assembly in red, white and blue are, front row: Sadie St. Mary, Sophia Helton, Emma Moore, Jaydah
Hurst. Back row: Emily Pruss, Emma Bias, Michael Ferguson, Abbey Britton Lowden and Madelyn St. Mary.
2001 to 2004. Both men
earned the rank of sergeant.
They both grew up in Graytown, Ohio, and still live there
today.
Dan Mikolas served in
Hawaii, Japan, Australia,
Korea and Indonesia. TJ
served in Iraq and Camp
Pendleton, California. Dan
was an infantry man and
squad leader during his time
of service to our country. TJ
was a military radio operator.
Jeff Taylor, principal at
Eagle Point, and Lee
Marciniak, custodian at Indian Hills are also veterans.
All Saints school students learn calligraphy
Students in the grades 5
through 8 at All Saints
Catholic School have been
discovering the beauty and
complexity of the art of calligraphy. The students were
first exposed to an awareness
of the ancient script when
they had an opportunity to
see, study and reflect upon the
visiting St. John’s Manuscripts, a rare and special
Bible, of which several prints
are on display now at All
Saints Catholic Church.
The Bible’s words of
Scripture are written in calligraphy on 1,150 pages in seven
volumes and accompanied by
160 illuminations, or pieces of
gold embossed artwork.
The students had a guided
tour and prayer meditation experience with Fr. Kent Kaufman and their teachers, as
well as a video viewing experience to deepen their understanding of the technical
process of calligraphy and illuminated finishing.
To deepen their appreciation of the challenge and com-
TJ Mikolas and Dan Mikolas
SICK AT 3,
BUT THE BOSS NEEDS YOU
Holiday
craft show
is Dec. 7
TO STAY UNTIL 9?
Trinity Lutheran Church
and School will host a Holidays craft show on Saturday,
December 7, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m.
There will be more than
35 vendors and artists offering items for sale. There also
will be a cookie walk and
basketball games. The event
will be held at the church located at 4560 Glendale Avenue.
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plexity of the art form, the
students have spent time in a
special calligraphy writing
center in the art room. The
writing center exposes them
to the evolution of the tools of
the trade, feather quills, bone
quills and India ink and modern calligraphy pens, allowing
them to try their hand with
each tool using special laminate tracers to develop some
comfort with the tools. Their
calligraphy verses come from
specially selected scriptures
connected to classroom study
and are finished with handmade paper elements and gold
and jewel toned paints.
Students work on calligraphy at All Saints School.
Wayward Inn
Restaurant and Lounge
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Open for lunch daily: 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dinner until
9:30 p.m. weekdays & Saturdays; until 10:30 p.m. on Fridays,
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Wayward Inn
1213 Schreier Rd., Rossford
Oriental Lunch Just off E. River Rd., around the corner from
All Saints Church.
or Dinner
Expires Nov. 30, 2013
Carryout Available! 419-666-3288
Bill and Cheryl Smith, proprietors for 45 years!
week
t
x
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A
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n
ie
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f
d
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a
f
with
think
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w
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iv
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Students showing their patriotism at the assembly honoring veterans include, front row:
Kaitlyn Crawford, Emma Blakeley, Brooke Nusbaum, Makayla Edmond. Back row: Maddy
Stacey, Aryanna Klocko, Macenzie Novak, Anna Schunk.
Drs. Zouhary
& Fishewray
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Rossford
419-666-3327
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Page 12 — November 21, 2013 — ROSSFORD RECORD JOURNAL
RHS girls basketball
excited to compete
for league title
By Michael Krieger
First year coach Eric
Simon believes the Rossford
Lady Bulldogs basketball
team should compete for the
Northern Buckeye Conference championship when
they tip off the 2013-14 season tomorrow night at home
against Oak Harbor.
Last year’s team posted a
league record of 10-4 and
finished second place in the
final league standings.
A core of players from
that squad will return for
this season.
The Lady Bulldogs will
look to seniors Margo Jackson and Maddie York for
leadership on the floor.
Senior Julie Hotz also
brings athleticism to the
equation and will be expected to contribute in several
areas,
especially
scoring.
Jessica Pietrasz and
Kelly Swope will play a significant role for the team,
especially if Swope, who is
recovering from an injury,
can get healthy.
In addition to the senior
leadership for Rossford,
Simon believes junior guard
Kirsten Keller will add some
intensity for the girls.
Depth is a problem, however. With only 15 girls in
the entire program from junior varsity to varsity, the
Lady Bulldogs will lean
heavily on their seniors, but
also will need to give key
minutes to the underclassmen on the team.
Simon, even though new
to the Rossford program, is
not new to coaching girls’
basketball.
He spent the past 10
years coaching at Springfield High School as the
freshman, JV and assistant
varsity coach.
His coaching philosophy
involves playing an uptempo offense that allows
the girls to run the floor and
to look for good, early shots.
He wants his team to apply
a man-to-man pressure defense to create turnovers and
transition baskets.
“My major emphasis is
no turnovers,” said Simon,
who believes that despite the
lack of depth, his team is
ready to compete for an
RHS basketball to host
Moonlight Madness Sat.
Join the hoopla by supporting this season’s Rossford High School basketball
program on Saturday, November 23, at Joe Stalma
Court in the RHS gymnasium. The doors will open at
7 p.m.
First on the agenda is an
Alumni Game from 7:30 to
8:30 p.m.
Any Rossford Bulldog
alumni player who would
like to participate can contact Brian Vorst, boys varsity
basketball coach, through
the high school office at
419-666-5262, extension
1219, or sign up online at
www.ross fordbulldogbasketball.com.
The program also will include the introduction of
athletes, shooting contests,
Tell them you
saw it in
the Record!
cheerleading, dancing and
more.
Moonlight Madness will
end with a rally to introduce
and support the varsity girls
and boys basketball coaches
and players.
Admission to the rally is
a donation of canned foods
or $2. The SOS Club also
will accept donations of
items for military personnel
serving overseas.
The RHS varsity girls basketball team members: first row– Maddie York. Second row–Kirsten Keller, Nicole Beyer,
Heather Schaller, Jessica Pietrasz, Margo Jackson. Third row–Coach Eric Simon, Julie Hotz, Haley Gozdowski,
Cheyenne Davis, Kelly Swope, Coach John Walker.
NBC championship in his
first season.
He is certain that they are
talented.
“If we don’t turn the ball
over and if we make shots,
we will compete for an NBC
title and achieve our goal of
a tournament run,” Simon
“Oak Harbor has a similar style–they like to get it
up and down the floor, too.
They have one player that
we will really need to watch,
but we’re ready for the challenge and we’re excited to
start the season,” Simon
said.
said with confidence.
The first challenge of the
girls’ season comes Friday
when they square off against
the Oak Harbor Rockets in
the George G. Wolfe Field
House.
Coach Simon expects it
will be a good match-up.
The votes have been tallied, and the winning name for the All Saints Catholic School’s
falcon mascot is Felix.
All Saints students voted for their favorite name and “Felix” is now the official name
of the falcon who helps generate spirit and support at school activities and events.
Lee Williams
Rossford
941 Dixie Hwy.
419-666-0091
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Cardinal Stritch
posts honor roll
The following students
from Rossford were named
to the honor roll for the first
quarter at Cardinal Stritch
Catholic High School.
First Honors
Bradley Billmaier and
John Jardine.
Second Honors
Cecelia
Gozdowski,
Haylie Stuck and Matthew
Szymanski.
The JV game will tip off
at 6 p.m., and the varsity
game will immediately follow.
All Saints students name mascot
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2% GAL. MILK
LIMIT
2
EA.
CHOPS
With additional
purchase.
LARGE EGGS
LIMIT
2
DOZ.
With additional
purchase.
SUPER FRESH 16 OZ.
The RHS junior varsity girls basketball team members: first row–Brittany Johns, Natalie
Jones. Second row–Nicole Beyer, Hailey Beyer, Regan Clay, Peyton Horton-Theobolds.
Third row–Coach Tim Yenrick, Cheyenne Davis, Haley Gozdowski, Heather Schaller,
Coach Nicole Nirschl.
Central Catholic
posts honor roll
At Central Catholic High
School, 531 students earned
academic honors for the first
quarter. The following students from Rossford are on
the honor roll.
First Honors
GPA of 3.9 and Higher
Jessica Arnold, Alex
Heban, Elizabeth Kraus,
Madison Lehman, William
Sattler.
Second Honors
GPA of 3.5 to 3.89
Ryan Roberts.
Third Honors
GPA of 3.1 to 3.49
Caitlin
Davenport,
Nicholas Frisbee.
ADD A
SHRIMP
KABOB
$2.39 EA.
EA.
WHITE
BREAD
EA.
Limit 2.
With additional purchase.
EA.
HOT DOG BUNS - HAMBURGER BUNS
NOT AVAILABLE AT THE ANDERSONS
BEEF LOIN 8 OZ. EA. - $7.98 LB.
PORK LOIN BNLS 4 OZ. - $3.16 LB.
SENIOR DAY - THURSDAY, 11/21/13 - 10% DISCOUNT
GROUND BLACK ANGUS CHICKEN
DRUMSTICKS
ENGLISH
SIRLOIN
OR THIGHS
USDA CHOICE
ROAST
Visit the Record
on the web:
rossford.
com
LB.
BEEF SIRLOIN TIP GROUND
LB.
LB.
BEEF SIRLOIN TIP BONELESS
DEER PROCESSING AVAILABLE
Sausages • Landjagers • Salami
NOT AVAILABLE AT THE ANDERSONS. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES.
MY MOM IS BATTLING CANCER. I NEED TO WORK FULL TIME. I
All the care you need
ANT TO BE THERE EVERY DAY. HOW CAN I DO IT ALL? MY MOM IS
om is battling
“I could never have done it on my own
need to work f
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F LL TIME. I WANT TO BE THERE EVERY DAY. HOW CAN I DO IT ALL?We are the area’s largest and most experienced provider of hospice
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I NEED TO WORK FULL TIME. I WANT TO BE THERE
TTLING CANCER. I NEED TO WORK FULL TIME. I WANT TO BE THERE
“I wasn’t familiar with watching somebody you love pass away.
I felt a weight had been lifted off my shoulders when Hospice of
When life’s emergencies happen, get all the care you need
from the hospital you trust – ProMedica St. Luke’s Hospital.
Northwest Ohio got involved because I had no idea what I was
doing, and they explained everything to me.”
Offering advanced emergency services and a full spectrum of
hospital care, ProMedica St. Luke’s Hospital has the expertise
to treat all injuries and emergencies right here – close to home.
April, daughter of a Hospice of Northwest Ohio patient
Answers for Living the Last Months of Life
419-893-5911
VT-235-13
l
www.stlukeshospital.com
l
E ERY DAY. HOW CAN I DO IT ALL? MY MOM IS BATTLING CANCER.
© 2013 ProMedica
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EED TO WORK FULL TIME. I WANT TO BE THERE EVERY DAY. HOW
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battling
Visit hospicenwo.org
419-661-4001 (Ohio) • 734-568-6801 (Michigan)
© 2013 Hospice of Northwest Ohio

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