Beer glaze makes sweet, Stouthearted Carrots

Transcription

Beer glaze makes sweet, Stouthearted Carrots
FooD
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Erie Times-News | GoErie.com | 3D
Beer glaze makes sweet, Stouthearted Carrots
By LEAH ESKIN
Tribune News Service
stouthEartED carrots
Stout means sturdy,
brave and true. And yet,
it lacks the bravado of its
brethren. It’s not as keen
as steely, as tough as rugged or as brawny as robust.
Frankly there’s something
sweet about stout.
Maybe that’s because
stout also means tubby,
pudgy and round. Pooh
Bear knows stout. He
earned the honor not in
combat, but at the honey
pot.
Same for beer. Stout is
named for its dark-brewed
brawn, but it offers a hint
of sweet. We like stout simmered to a bittersweet
glaze over carrots. Seems
likethesortofsnackPooh’s
colleague Rabbit might
TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
appreciate after a long
day with the Friends and
Relations. A fine reason
to kick up a couple of paws
and indulge in a stout pint
of stout.
4 carrots
1 tablespoon unsalted
butter
1 cup stout beer, such as
Guinness
1 tablespoon honey
1
⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
1
⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
1 teaspoon freshly
squeezed lemon juice
2 teaspoons fresh thyme
leaves
Flaky salt, such as Maldon
1. Slice: Peel and trim
carrots. Slice on the
diagonal into 1-inch
thick ovals.
2. Melt: Heat butter
in a large nonstick
skillet set over medium
heat. Slide in carrots
and toss to coat.
3. Simmer: Pour in
beer and honey; stir in
kosher salt and pepper.
Heat to a boil, reduce
heat and simmer until
little liquid remains,
about 25 minutes.
Lower heat and,
watching closely, stir
until liquid has
disappeared and
carrots are sticky with
glaze (but not
scorched), about 5
minutes. Deglaze pan
with lemon juice.
4. Serve: Scrape
carrots into a serving
bowl. Sprinkle with
thyme and flaky salt.
Makes 4 servings
aDvicE
Leave guy with trust issues
Dear Abby: I’m madly in
love with a man I’ve been
dating for almost a year,
but I don’t think he’s in
love with me. He claims
he’s been hurt twice from
two failed marriages.
He keeps giving me
mixed signals. He
questions me about my
male friends constantly.
He shows up at my
apartment without calling
in hopes that he will catch
me with another man.
During his last drive-by,
he saw me in my car at
midnight listening to
music while surfing the
Web on my phone. Of
course, he thought I was
on the way out to a
boyfriend’s house because
I had my gym bag and a
grocery bag in the front
seat with me. He ordered
me to open my bags so he
Dear Abby
Jeanne
Phillips
could see if I had any
overnight clothes inside.
After he saw there were
no clothes, he calmed
down. I don’t know if I
should keep this
relationship going or if I
should abandon ship.
— Mixed Signals In Virginia
Dear Mixed Signals: You
may be madly in love with
this man, but unless you
have agreed that your
relationship with him is
exclusive, he should not
be grilling you about your
friendships with your
male friends. That he
comes over with no notice
hoping to catch you
cheating is more than a
little sick, and what he
pulled during his
midnight prowl is off the
charts.
It is important that you
understand the only way
he will ever overcome his
insecurities and inability
to trust will be with
professional help. He is so
messed up that you could
enter a convent and he
would mount a security
camera at the back door to
make sure you weren’t
going out on him. Run fast.
Write Dear Abby at www.
dearabby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Heart risk dictates statin use
Dear Readers: In
Tuesday’s column I began
to answer a reader’s
question as to what I
thought about the new
statin guidelines. Today, I
finish my necessarily longwinded answer.
Statin drugs have (at
least) two powerful effects.
They lower blood levels of
LDL cholesterol (so-called
“bad” cholesterol). They
also fight inflammation.
Old guidelines said
doctors should prescribe
statins for people whose
LDL cholesterol levels
were high. New guidelines
say that doctors should
prescribe statins to people
who are at high risk for
heart disease, even if their
LDL cholesterol levels are
not high.
What are the risk factors
for heart disease? Age is a
Ask Dr. K
Anthony
Komaroff
risk factor: The older a
person is, the more likely
he or she will have heart
trouble.
Another risk factor is
gender. Until they reach
menopause, women are
less likely to develop heart
disease than men. That
probably is because a
woman’s estrogen (female
hormone) levels slow the
development of
atherosclerosis. Plaques
of atherosclerosis are the
cause of most heart
disease in developed
nations. In the United
States, the average age of
menopause is 51.
Yet another risk factor
is other close relatives
(parents, siblings) with
heart disease —
particularly at a young
age. Still other risk factors
are high blood pressure,
diabetes (including prediabetes), and eating lots
of refined carbohydrates
with a high glycemic load.
If you are a smoker, or past
smoker, that raises your
risk. Obesity and chronic
kidney disease are also
risk factors.
Write to Anthony Komaroff
via his website, www.
askdoctork.com, or write:
Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck
St., Second Floor, Boston,
MA 02115.
This Week’s National Career Cluster: Education and Training
Education: A profession of preparation
By DR. MARY JO MELVIN
Dept. of Education chairwoman
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
It has been said that education
is the profession that prepares
all other professions. With that
in mind, a degree in education
does indeed prepare one to becomethemostobvious,ateacher.
Butlookingmoreclosely,notonly
does one have the option to pursue a focus such as a preschool,
elementary,middle,secondaryor
content specific teacher, but also
the option for a myriad of other
professions. Oftentimes teaching careers lead to opportunities
such as principal, school admin-
activity
istration,highereducation,sales,
management, politics, non-profit
positions, consulting and various
entrepreneurial positions.
A degree in education does
indeed lay the foundation for
so many other professions. This
degree allows one to develop
the ability to plan, prepare, organize, discuss, present and negotiate outcomes. Interpersonal
skills as well as communication
and articulation skills are finetuned and definitely carry over
to many other fields. Education
is that baseline degree that
can be expanded to so many
other industries. The benefits,
of course, are many. A teacher
1. Choose a simple task, like
making toast or tying a shoe
and write out step-by-step
instructions.
becomes a catalyst, someone
who makes a difference each
day. The teaching profession is
fulfilling and provides an internal satisfaction. Relationships
with young people, families and
the broader community are developed that last a lifetime. The
intrinsic rewards are many but
there are also challenges. Mandates regarding curriculum and
assessment from the federal
government, budgets, funding
and public scrutiny to name a
few. Despite these factors, those
called to the teaching profession
are certainly a special breed that
will impact many and change
lives forever.
2. Break class into small
groups. Have each group
select a task, such as tying a
shoe or scrambling eggs.
THINKSTOCKPHOTOS.COM
Education is known by many as the profession that prepares all other
professions.
Instruct the groups to write out
each step on separate index
cards, one step per card. Once
that is complete, shuffle the
cards and have the groups
switch and reorganize the
instructions in procedural
order.
Fast Facts
EmployEr Focus: city oF EriE school District
Erie’s Public Schools was organized in 1870 and is the 10th largest district in the
state. The district educates students ranging from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade
and is committed to creating an environment of high expectations, trust,
collaboration and respect, with the recognition that all students can learn. With
more than 1,300 employees, the district is one of the largest employers in
Erie County. In addition to the instructional staff, the district also employs a number
of support staff including building engineers, bus drivers, clerical, custodians, food
service, IT, and a variety of building trades such as electricians, plumbers, HVAC
technicians, carpenters, painters, mechanics, and others.
This page brought to you by:
Salaries for education professionals:
▀ $50,240 for kindergarten teachers,
except special education
▀ $55,290 for elementary school
teachers, except special education
▀ $52,620 for middle school teachers,
except special and career/technical
education
▀ $54,120 for secondary school
teachers, except special and career/
technical education
▀ $59,500 for special education
teachers in kindergarten and
elementary
▀ $55,680 for special education
teachers in middle school
▀ $52,250 for special education
teachers in secondary school
▀ $21,120 for teacher assistants
*All information pertaining to salaries
was provided by Kenneth Louie, Ph.D.
director, Economic Research Institute
of Erie, associate professor of
economics, Sam and Irene Black
School of Business
Penn State Behrend
soFt skill: organization
It is easy to become overwhelmed at work. At the start of each day, take a
moment and assess the tasks that are expected to be completed and prioritize
them. Assess the time you have and the time it will take to accomplish these
goals and balance your day accordingly.

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