Annual Report 2007-8 - The British School at Rome

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Annual Report 2007-8 - The British School at Rome
THE BRITISH SCHOOL
AT
ROME
Patron: HM The Queen
President: HRH Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, KG, GCVO
The mission of the British School at Rome is to promote knowledge of and deep engagement with all aspects of the art,
history and culture of Italy by scholars and fine artists from Britain and the Commonwealth, and to foster international and
interdisciplinary exchange.
The BSR aims to support:
I residential awards for visual artists and architects
I residential awards for research in the archaeology, history, art history, society and culture of Italy
I exhibitions, especially in contemporary art
I an interdisciplinary programme of lectures and conferences
I research projects, including archaeological fieldwork
I a specialist research library
I a programme of publications
I short specialist taught courses.
THE BRITISH SCHOOL
AT
ROME
Via Gramsci 61, 00197 Rome, Italy
Tel. +39 06 3264939 Fax +39 06 3221201
E-mail [email protected]
www.bsr.ac.uk
BSR London Office (for scholarship and publications enquiries):
The BSR at The British Academy
10 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AH, UK
Tel. +44 (0)20 79695202 Fax +44 (0)20 79695401
E-mail [email protected]
Registered Charity no. 314176
1
A N N U A L R E P O R T 2007–2008
Reports
Chairman’s Foreword
Director’s Report
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Development
Humanities Awards
Humanities Activities
Events
Archaeology
Faculty of Archaeology, History and Letters
Fine Arts Awards
Fine Arts Scholars’ Activities
Faculty of the Fine Arts
Contemporary Arts Programme
Publications
Library and Archive
3
4
11
14
15
16
19
21
26
27
27
31
32
34
35
Appendices
Publications and Exhibitions by Staff
Staff
Trustees’ Report
Financial Statements
Subcommittees and Honorary Fellows
BSR Publications in Print
Subscribers
How to Support the British School at Rome
2
37
39
40
42
51
52
54
56
CHAIRMAN’S FOREWORD
I
t’s a particular pleasure to re-engage with the British
School at Rome as the incoming Chairman. It feels
almost like an institutional tradition, as one of my
predecessors as President of Trinity College, Oxford —
Henry Pelham, Professor of Ancient History — was not
only the first Chairman of the BSR, just over a hundred
years ago, but the prime mover behind its launch. My time
as Ambassador in Rome gave me a very comprehensive
and pleasurable introduction to the BSR’s work but seeing
it from the other side, as it were, has been equally
rewarding, if challenging. I was constantly struck while
Ambassador by the breadth of the BSR’s activities. I
attended lectures on Renaissance art, a presentation of
Pompeii by its author, Robert Harris, concerts, site visits to
Herculaneum and Pompeii, and art exhibitions. But that
was a mere taster. This report illuminates and illustrates
the quite remarkable range of activity from the
Herculaneum Conser vation Project to Portus, from
Italian film to contemporary art, from work on the Punic
Mediterranean to the Viva Roma project. And all this
against a background of very real financial pressure
exerted on the School’s activities by the vagaries of the
sterling/euro exchange rate. It is a signal mark of the
BSR’s achievements and of the confidence our
stakeholders have in us that we continue to attract
generous grants. It will be one of my priorities to try to
encourage our core grant provider, the British Academy,
to look at some overseas price mechanism, as used by the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the British
Council, to mitigate the effects of the fall in the value of
sterling. Without some such system in place, any financial
planning becomes a lottery.
I have stepped into big shoes in taking over from my
distinguished predecessor, Peter Wiseman. The BSR is
greatly in his debt for five remarkable years of dedication
and leadership. Peter and I had a han-over ceremony in
Buckingham Palace with our President, HRH Princess
Alexandra, whose visit to the BSR in October 2007 was
one of the highlights of the year. Besides a memorable
visit to Portus, our Royal visitor presented honorary
fellowships and attended a poignant lecture by Peter
Wiseman. But there are other debts beyond those to
Peter. I am ver y grateful to my fellow members of
Council and its subcommittees, whose wise counsel often
guides my steps. I think it right to recognise in particular
the hard work of those who chair the committees. Special
thanks this year are due to Jenni Lomax and Ricky
Burdett, whose tireless work for the BSR is nearing its
term. We shall be pressed indeed to find replacements for
such vigorous and hard-working colleagues.
As Ambassador, I was particularly well placed to see
how the Director’s high standing internationally raised the
BSR’s profile and lent breadth to its activities. Without
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill’s unique blend of scholarship and
vision, for instance, it is doubtful that the Packard
Humanities Institute would have chosen the School as a
partner in the Herculaneum Conservation Project. We are
very lucky to have such an inspiring leader of the team
and fortunate, too, that he is supported by such able and
dedicated colleagues in London and Rome. My personal
thanks to Elly Murkett, the Director’s PA, for being a
tremendous source of support and for being so patient as
I learn on the job.
Sir Ivor Roberts
Chairman of Council
3
DIRECTOR’S REPORT
T
he visit from our President, HRH Princess Alexandra,
at the beginning of the academic year, did not mark,
unlike her previous two visits, in 1998 and 2002, the
completion of a phase of building work. For the intervening
five years, the institution has been mercifully free of
intrusive construction, and has been able to exploit its
renewed facilities with exceptional levels of activity, in terms
of projects, activity programmes and a steadily increasing
range of scholarships and fellowships. The Royal visit
celebrated this renewed vigour, and marked the end of the
quinquennium as Chairman of Professor Peter Wiseman,
distinguished historian of Rome, together with the
hand-over to his successor, Sir Ivor Roberts, former
British Ambassador to Italy and current President of
Trinity College, Oxford. It was also a chance to mark the
gratitude and respect of the institution to a distinguished
new group of Honorary Fellows, including the former
Secretary of the British Academy, Peter Brown, our
for mer Honorar y Treasurer, Mike Stillwell, the
distinguished Roman epig raphist, Professor Silvio
Panciera, and the for mer President of the Italian
Confederation of Industry, our new neighbour Avv. Luca
Cordero di Montezemolo. After a welcoming dinner,
generously hosted by our Ambassador, Edward Chaplin,
and his wife Nicky, the main presentation ceremony took
place on the second day. This was followed by a
beautifully pitched and evocative lecture by Peter
Wiseman, ‘Images of a city: Turner, Ashby and Rome’,
and an opportunity to see the exhibition of Ashby’s
photographs I giganti dell’acqua: acquedotti romani del Lazio
nelle fotografie di Thomas Ashby.
The final day of the visit gave our distinguished
visitors a chance to visit the jewel in our archaeological
crown, Professor Simon Keay’s excavation at Portus, the
artificial harbour built by the Emperor Trajan, where
over the preceding month his team had exposed a
hitherto unknown harbour installation. After visiting the
site, the group of visitors was spectacularly entertained
4
by Duke Ascanio Sforza Cesarini and his family. Their
property includes the lake itself, formerly the central
basin of Trajan’s harbour, and now an oasis for birds and
wildlife, around which the party was driven in horsedrawn traps, to be offered a sumptuous lunch in the
lakeside villa. Our deepest thanks are due to all who
made HRH’s visit so memorable, to the Duke and his
family, the Soprintendenza of Ostia, to Edward and
Nick y Chaplin, and to Riccardo Picci and Mark
Moscardini of British Airways and Enrico Romano of
Jaguar for taking care of HRH’s transport (other than in
the Duke’s barouche).
If the year started on a high, it continued with a
stunning record of activities, as my colleagues illustrate in
the following pages. Dr Susan Russell, as Assistant
Director, is especially to be commended for the wealth of
the Events programme for which she bears overall
responsibility. The bare statistics suggest the scale and
variety, if not the sustained quality and interest, of these
events: eleven conferences and workshops, four
presentations and press launches, 34 academic lectures,
five arts exhibitions (of which three by our resident
artists), three architecture lectures with linked exhibitions,
two exhibitions of photographs from the Archive, two
concerts of classical music, a series of events in contemporary music, let alone three events for subscribers in
London. With over 50 events in our Rome premises, it
means that few weeks have passed between October and
June without at least two events. Our new lecture theatre
and exhibition spaces are fully realising their potential.
In the archaeological field, projects flourish. Simon
Keay has already won widespread praise for the exemplary
publication of the results of the geophysical survey of
Portus in the volume written with Martin Millett (see
below, Publications p. 34). His present project enriches
the earlier research: while geophysical survey gives an
exceptional overall, bird’s-eye, view of the site, excavation
of a carefully chosen area, lying on the junction between
D I R E C T O R ’ S
major phases of development of the port, casts vital light
on its chronological development. At the same time, this
close study of one particular port (albeit the most
ambitious artificial harbour constructed in antiquity)
belongs in the context of a broader examination of ports
in the Mediterranean, through the creation of a network
of scholars working on different ports. With the support
of a special grant from the British Academy, it has been
possible to organise an ambitious workshop, bringing
together the major players, held in March 2008, and
followed in September by two panel sessions on
Mediterranean ports in connection with the International
Congress on Classical Archaeology. At the same time, the
pioneering use of geophysical survey has enabled Simon
Keay to build up an exceptional team, based both in
Southampton and Rome, who have maintained over the
R E P O R T
Above: HRH Princess Alexandra visits Portus, accompanied by (left to
right) Lady Egerton, Lidia Paroli, Lady Mumford, HE Edward
Chaplin, British Ambassador to Italy, Nicky Chaplin, Simon Keay
Left: Honorary Fellow Peter Brown, former Secretary of the British
Academy, with his successor, Dr Robin Jackson
last year a non-stop series of surveys of Roman sites, with
notable gains to our knowledge of ancient landscapes and
cityscapes: not only in Italy, at Anagni, Calatia, Gabii,
Potenza, Spina and Tivoli, but fur ther afield in
Montenegro, at the principal Roman centre of this littleexplored area, at Doclea (near the capital, Podgorica), at
Amara West in Sudan, and in Spain, Simon Keay’s old
stamping ground, both in the area of Tarragona and of
Italica. Not only is there a constant g ain in new
5
D I R E C T O R ’ S
R E P O R T
knowledge, but the scale of operations allows the development of a team with exceptional levels of experience
and skill, both in the field and in the interpretation of
results. A further bonus of this programme is that it is
able to generate its own funding, so raising absolutely the
level of activity that would be otherwise possible for
either of the partners, BSR and Southampton University.
Another impor tant step towards expanding our
traditional horizons has been a new thread of interest in
the Punic world. In a collaboration with the Society for
Libyan Studies, we have started to pull together an
international network of scholars working on the Punicspeaking peoples (Phoenician and Carthaginian) of the
western Mediterranean. In Britain, study of the Punic
world seems to have lain dormant, despite its essential
role in linking North Africa with Spain and the islands of
the western Mediterranean — Sicily, Sardinia, Malta and
the Balearics. The geographical pattern foreshadows that
of the Islamic interface with Christendom in the Middle
Ages. Supported by a special grant from the British
Academy, the present year has seen a preliminar y
workshop, building up to a session at the International
Congress of Classical Archaeology in September, with a
major conference planned for November 2008. We are
indebted to the energy of two former BSR scholars in
developing this promising initiative, Dr Jo Crawley Quinn,
of Worcester College, Oxford and also editor of the
Papers, and Andrew Wilson, Professor of the Archaeology
of the Roman Empire at Oxford.
There is some danger, with such a successful
archaeology programme, that we give fuel to those critics
who maintain that British overseas institutes have too
nar row a scope, too heavily weighted towards
archaeology. It is inescapable that archaeology should
enjoy some prominence in our activities — both because
archaeology as a discipline has the most pressing need of
institutes to support fieldwork abroad, and because its
projects tend to be more expensive than those of other
6
humanities and social sciences disciplines. But the
institution has always prided itself on its disciplinary
breadth, and that breadth is fully borne out by the range
of scholars and award-winners (see p. 15), and by the
Events programme itself. This year has been no exception
in seeing our scholars working on subjects that range
from the sanctuaries of Roman Italy, to the trade in Baltic
amber in early modern Rome to the extraordinary female
‘mar tyr’ of fascism, Ines Donati. There is no set
distribution of scholarships between different disciplines
and periods: the competition is open, and fierce, and the
members of the Faculty that elects them, whose own
subjects range across the disciplines, have no inclination
to support candidates in their own discipline against
stronger candidates in others.
However, to underline our commitment to the modern
as well as the ancient, the BSR in 2006 set up a new
Research Professorship in Modern Studies, with a role to
promote that commitment. In his second year of tenure
of that position, David Forgacs has been able to build on
his many links with Italian colleagues, and on his
profound knowledge of Italian film, to organise a series of
screenings and discussions. His work intersects at many
points with that of our artists, and it is no coincidence
that he organised a number of events jointly with Jacopo
Benci, Assistant Director (Fine Arts).
Our commitment to the Fine Arts is undiminished: at
any one moment, there are roughly equal numbers of Fine
Arts and Humanities award-winners in residence, and in
the activities programme, art and architecture events make
a conspicuous impact. The Fine Arts scholars, in contrast
to the Humanities scholars, are elected by a variety of
bodies: not only the Faculty of Fine Arts, but in the case
of some externally sponsored awards, by other panels,
especially the Abbey Council, the Australia Council for
the Arts, and the panel for the Sainsbury Scholarships.
This variety guarantees, if guarantee were needed, that our
artists and architects represent a wide range, both in
D I R E C T O R ’ S
terms of career stage and of artistic direction. What is the
more impressive is that, despite all differences in
background, the artists collaborate closely. As Jacopo
Benci shows in his report, the joint shows put on
throughout the year are not merely mixed bags of
unrelated works, but thought through together
thematically, as in the show entitled The Dir ector’s
Apartment, which took its impulse from the archival
photographs of the director’s apartment in the days of
Eugenie Strong and recreated within the Gallery an
intense space in which ar t works jostled in close
proximity, including the remarkable doll’s house created
by Prisca Thielmann within the ‘director’s desk’. The
sense of close collaboration, not only between the artists,
but between them and the Humanities scholars, was much
enhanced by two scholars whose projects involved others:
Lindsay Seers, the Wingate Scholar, used her project on
Queen Cristina of Sweden to involve others in a series of
videos and perfor mances; while Cian Donnelly’s
remarkable choir, The Order of the Golden Ghost, drawn from
the body of residents, in perfor ming his own
compositions at each of the shows, provided a delightful
element of shared experience.
To the rich mix offered by the artists in residence, the
programme of contemporary arts events curated by
Cristiana Perrella has long added an important element of
enrichment and outreach. A long-standing focus on video
reflects both the Curator’s expertise and an important
stream within contemporary art, and coincides with the
practice of several of our scholars, as well as of our
modernist, David Forgacs. This year The Secret Public
showcased the work of the decade from 1978 to 1988.
The Viva Roma! project over the course of a decade has
brought in selected artists to produce site-specific work
in response to Rome: Chris Evans’s As Simple As Your
Life Used To Be offered an unusual take by a British artist
on four influential Italian politicians. The series of
contemporary musical events, entitled Tracks, curated by
R E P O R T
Daniela Cascella, has brought us a figure as famous (and
charming) as Little Annie. It is difficult to look back on
the richness and variety of this programme without
regret that the changed financial circumstances of next
year will make it impossible to sustain the same level of
activity. Cristiana Perrella deser ves the institution’s
warmest thanks for everything she has achieved over the
last decade.
Over this successful programme, and over all the BSR’s
activities, there hangs a long shadow. Between September
2007 and April 2008, sterling lost 14% of its value against
the euro, a fall from which it has not recovered over the
intervening months. Nor is there any reason to suppose
that the days of the strong euro are past. The impact on
the institution’s finances is grave, since we receive virtually
all our funding in sterling, but incur the majority of our
expenditure in euros. With an income (excluding the
Herculaneum project) of around two million pounds a
year, this is equivalent to a loss in spending power of a
quarter of a million pounds. We do not know what the
future holds for sterling, whether further fall or (as we all
hope) recovery, but it is clear that we must re-dimension
the ambition and scope of our activities. The loss in value
of sterling affects all aspects of our institution: the library
can afford fewer books, the Camerone fewer computers;
and as fuel costs and food prices press ineluctably
upwards, it will become ever more difficult to keep the
books of the residential hostel in balance.
Inescapably, we will be able to put on fewer events in
our activities programme, though we attach importance to
sustaining the disciplinary range of our activities and the
balance between Fine Arts and Humanities. The financial
pressures only underline the importance to the institution
of the multiple sources of funding that sustain us. Our
core grant comes from the British Academy, as part of
government funding for the Academy’s programme of
research, including its cluster of overseas institutes and
societies. The Academy, and specifically BASIS, the
7
Above: Professor Peter Wiseman gives a lecture at the BSR
Below: Visitors to the estate of the Sforza Cesarini family at Portus
8
committee responsible for these grants, chaired by
Professor Michael Fulford, has long shown itself to be
responsive to our needs, and under its President, Baroness
O’Neill, and its new CEO, Dr Robin Jackson, the
Academy has embraced a welcome policy of raising the
public profile of the work of the institutes it supports.
Last November, thanks to the hard work of the dynamic
Margot Jackson, responsible for Academy-sponsored
Institutes and Societies, it arranged a major event at the
Barbican Centre in London, under the title Evolving
Societies to showcase the work of the institutes, at which
no less than three BSR representatives spoke — David
Forgacs on ‘Migration to contemporary Rome: work,
settlement and social exclusion’ , Simon Keay on ‘The
past at risk: the contribution of British archaeology to
safeguarding Italian heritage’, and Cristiana Perrella
screening a sample of videos on the theme ‘Viva Roma!’.
We are delighted that the Academy is taking this upbeat
line, and share the enthusiasm of BASIS for a widening of
the disciplinary and geographical range of its institutes,
which has enabled us to make a first, tentative, move into
the Western Mediterranean at large and into Punic studies
(see above). The irony is that as the spending power of
sterling has dropped, we have been attempting to broaden
our coverage, and hard thinking will be needed in future
on what can be sustained on limited resources without
reducing quality.
The Academy’s core grant only supports about half our
spending (this year, excluding the Herculaneum project,
48%), and it is in the added value made possible by
additional funding sources, on the back, so to speak, of
the Academy grant, that our range and quality depends.
Arts scholarships are almost entirely supported by outside
bodies, in addition to the income of the F.W. Sargant
fund: we reiterate our gratitude to the many bodies that
finance these residencies, the Abbey Council, the
Australia Council for the Arts, the Linbury Trust (for the
Sainsbury Scholarships), the Harold Hyam Wingate
D I R E C T O R ’ S
Foundation, the Derek Hill Foundation, and the
collaboration of Arts Council England, the Ruskin School
of Drawing and Fine Art, and St Peter’s College, Oxford,
together responsible for the Helen Chadwick Fellowship.
In the Humanities, we have a particular debt to the Paul
Mellon Centre for the Study of British Art, which has sent
us a series of outstanding Mellon Fellows, as well as
supporting various conferences and projects. Bob and
Elizabeth Boas continue to support an impressive cluster
of young architects for special summer awards. This series
of partnerships much enriches the institution, and it has
been an especial pleasure this year to welcome the
creation of the Giles Worsley Travel Fellowship in
architecture and architectural history, thanks to Joanna
Worsley’s formidable fundraising efforts in memory of
her late husband. In addition, new partnerships have been
set up with Photoworks, which is funding a new threemonth fellowship in photography, and, thanks to the
tireless efforts of Marina Engel, with the Conseil des Arts
et des Lettres du Québec for a new three-month award
for an architect from Quebec. Many other sponsors are
thanked in the detailed reports that follow.
Individual projects are made possible by specific grants.
It is a major achievement on behalf of the Library to have
secured a second three-year g rant from the Getty
Foundation, to support the cataloguing and digitisation of
the extraordinary photographic archive. The first grant
covered the work of a g roup of outstanding
photographers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth
centuries, Father P.P. Mackey, the Bulwer sisters and
Thomas Ashby himself. The new project is targeted on
the more recent archive of the photographs of John
Ward-Perkins, whose records both of Italian sites and of
North Africa have within half a century become an
impor tant historical document in themselves. The
combined energies of the Librarian, Valerie Scott, and of
her team, led by the Archivist, Alessandra Giovenco, are
such that these ambitious projects are delivered on time,
R E P O R T
Top: HRH Princess Alexandra visits the exhibition of Ashby photographs,
I giganti dell’acqua, accompanied by Valerie Scott and Rita Turchetti
Above: Honorary Fellows Michael Stillwell, Professor Silvio Panciera
and Peter Brown
9
D I R E C T O R ’ S
R E P O R T
and produce much else as spin off. This year has seen no
less than two exhibitions of the photographs of Thomas
Ashby: I giganti dell’acqua followed him in pursuit of the
aqueducts of Lazio, in a series of haunting images, thanks
to the generous support of the Regione Lazio, in consort
with the Comune di Roma and the Istituto Centrale per il
Catalogo e la Documentazione; this was followed later in
the year by the no less striking images of the Itinerari
Abruzzesi. The success and interest of these initiatives has
attracted sponsorship of other kinds, and we are
particularly pleased that the John R. Murray Charitable
Trust is now supporting the conservation and restoration
of some of our rare books. John and Virginia Murray were
also generous in hosting a fundraising event in the old
seat of the publishing house in London: our goal is to
bring an exhibition of Ashby photographs to Sir John
Soane’s Museum, with which we have set up a welcome
new partnership.
Our archaeology is equally dependent on external
support, on the major grant from the Arts and Humanities
Research Council that supports Simon Keay’s work at
Portus, and the ability of the collaboration with
Southampton University in geophysics to undertake
numerous other projects. The greatest single item on our
budget, however, is the Herculaneum Conser vation
Project, a long-standing collaboration with the Packard
Humanities Institute and the Soprintendenza Archeologica
di Napoli e Pompei (Naples and Pompeii have been
merged by a reform this year, still under Professor Piero
Guzzo). The impact of a project with a turnover of nearly
two million pounds a year is much more visible on site at
Herculaneum than in Rome, but the allowance of an
administration fee to the BSR, in recognition of the
significant impact of the project not only on the Director
but on our Bursar, Alvise Di Giulio, and on the institution
at large, makes a material difference to our finances.
We have no doubt that the future prosperity of the
School depends more on building further this network of
10
partnerships and sponsorships, rather than drawing more
heavily on a shrinking public purse. We repeat our
g ratitude to all these bodies, but also to the many
individuals, university departments, colleges and bodies
that provide subscriptions and donations, all of which
cumulatively give life-blood to the institution. We also
thank the numerous friends and supporters, in Rome,
London and elsewhere, whose kindness and, often, whose
unpaid efforts, keep the show on the road: above all to
the Chairs of our committees, who undertake a notable
burden (with especial thanks to Jenni Lomax, who will
soon complete a six-year term with the Faculty of Fine
Arts), to the Editor of our Papers (with especial thanks to
Dr John Patterson, who after five volumes has handed
over to Jo Crawley Quinn), and to the numerous committee members, friends and supporters. But I close, as
ever, with thanks to our own staff, both in Rome and
London, and in particular to Sarah Ciacci, who left the
London office in March 2008. Our staff form a team of
exceptional dedication, to whose efforts both this Report
and the healthy state of the School itself bear ample
testimony.
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
Director
H E R C U L A N E U M C O N S E R VAT I O N P R O J E C T
T
he recent declaration by the new government of a state
of emergency in Pompeii underlines what has been
well-known for decades to those working in the Vesuvian
sites: that these best-loved of tourist destinations are in a
critical state, overwhelmed by uncontrolled mass-tourism,
with its notoriously short-term goals, and literally crumbling
into ruins for lack of investment, and for the inadequacies
of the current system of heritage management. In this
context, the project at Herculaneum, in which the BSR has
been privileged to play a role for the last seven years, has
come to prominence as an example of the site at which, with
the advantage of exceptional external sponsorship, new
solutions and approaches can be experimented with and
tested. Over this period, the equivalent of nearly ten million
pounds has been invested in the site by the Packard
Humanities Institute. But what counts is not spending
money, but spending it well. The winning formula of the
Project has been its willingness to tangle with basics, like
drainage and leaking roofs, and at the same time to use high
technology not for generating flashy effects, but analysing
intractable problems. Gradually, but quite perceptibly, the
site shows signs of new life; and while tourist numbers sink
elsewhere on the Bay of Naples, they rise in Herculaneum.
Two features of the project are becoming increasingly
apparent. The first is the extent of new archaeological
knowledge that can be generated by a conservation project.
The geological research of Professor Aldo Cinque has not
only shown how urbanisation transformed the natural
geological terrain, cutting back the tip of a volcanic flow to
create a defensive seawall, but has revealed the profound
modifications caused by the bradyseism that caused the land
to rise and fall in relation to the sea-level by as much as five
metres, causing the abandonment of entire storeys of
buildings. At the same time, the investigation by Dr
Domenico Camardo (HCP) and by Professor Mark Robinson
of Oxford of the rich contents of the sewers beneath a
multi-storey block of shops and flats is casting a vivid life
on diet and the household waste of the first century AD.
The second important feature to underline is the
increasing collaboration between this archaeological project
and the local stake-holders, represented by the Comune di
Ercolano. The site takes the form of a vast hole in the fabric
of the modern city, with modern housing balanced
precipitously above ancient ruins. The project’s attention to
the peripheries of the site culminated in summer 2007 with a
major programme of demolitions of condemned properties
on the edge of the site, carried out by the local authority
itself, in close collaboration with both the Soprintendenza
and Project. On the one hand, this brings very much closer
the prospect of new excavations in the area of the ancient
Basilica Noniana; on the other, it has led to closer relations
between the Comune and the archaeological community.
This year, the BSR, as one of a partnership of three with the
Soprintendenza and Comune, was proud to have seen the
launch of the International Centre for the Study of
Herculaneum, with Christian Biggi as its first Manager.
Wholly financed by the Comune through a national grant, it
has sought to promote greater mutual understanding, on the
one hand by undertaking participatory initiatives with the
local community, on the other by a series of international
workshops, in partnership with ICCROM, the Rome-based
international centre for conservation. Among the numerous
initiatives of the new Centre was the support, thanks
especially to the efforts of Sarah Court and the HCP team,
of a new film, directed by Marcellino de Baggis, Herculaneum:
diari del buio e della luce (‘Herculaneum: Diaries of Light and
Dark’), featuring extensive archival footage of the early
excavations. It was awarded the first prize at the Rome
archaeological film festival, Capitello d’Oro. If this project
flourishes, it does so because of convictions shared with us
by three parties: the Soprintendente, Piero Guzzo, the
Mayor of Ercolano, Nino Daniele, and the President of the
Packard Humanities Institute, David W. Packard.
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
Director, Herculaneum Conservation Project
11
H E R C U L A N E U M
C O N S E R V A T I O N
Right: Ground cleared by demolitions
above the Basilica of Herculaneum
Below: Three-dimensional digital model
of the site of the Basilica of
Herculaneum, designed by Ascanio
D’Andrea
12
P R O J E C T
Right: Herculaneum, ancient
and modern
Below: The Mayor of
Ercolano, Nino Daniele,
Director of the site of
Herculaneum, Dr Maria
Paola Guidobaldi, and
Sopraintendente of Naples
and Pompeii, Professor Piero
Guzzo
Below right: Cover of prizewinning film on
Herculaneum by Marcellino
de Baggis
13
DEVELOPMENT
T
April. The latest YMFA Scholar, Stefan Cassomenos, played
to the audience and toasts to the BSR, its Director and its
future were raised from a crowd of supporters.
In addition to these events, the School’s UK outreach
activity continued throughout the year with three wellattended lectures, culminating in a tour de force from the
Director on Herculaneum: new light in the dark, including the
viewing of scenes from the new film of Marcellino de
Bag gis, Herculaneum: Diaries of Light and Dark. The
importance of keeping up these links with friends and
alumni of the School is well understood. An illustration
of the enduring warmth that former relationships in
Rome can lead to came this year when, out of the blue,
we learnt that William T.C. Walker, a Rome Scholar in
Architecture 1937–9 and member of the Faculty of
Architecture in 1951, had generously bequeathed over
£25,000 to the School ‘to further the study of Classical
or Renaissance architecture in Rome at the British
School’.
Our thanks, as always, go to the London office of the
School — in particular Sarah Ciacci, who has now started a
new career but who worked hard on our UK outreach
programme —, to Elly Murkett and Alvise Di Giulio in
Rome, as well as to our group of volunteers who always
provide invaluable back-up for our UK events.
hanks largely to the School’s new benefactors, John
and Virginia Mur ray (via the John R. Mur ray
Charitable Trust), a new partnership has been formed with
Sir John Soane’s Museum. The Director and Director of
Development of the Museum responded very positively to
a BSR proposal for the Museum to host the BSR
exhibition of the Mackey collection of late nineteenthcentury photographs of Rome held in the Archive. This
exhibition was shown in Rome in January 2005, and now
the Librarian has worked on a more ambitious plan to
bring the exhibition to London in the summer of 2009.
The title is: Images from the Past: Rome in the Photographs of
Father Peter Paul Mackey, 1890–1901. There is a natural
synergy between the Museum and the BSR as a result of
their respective interest in and focus on Italy and the
classics, as well as a mutual scholarly approach to collection
and exhibition. It is hoped that a reciprocal arrangement —
with Soane Museum activity in Rome — will emerge in due
course. Unable themselves to fund this particular project,
the Murrays generously held a fundraising reception in June
both to promote the idea of this show and to celebrate an
alliance between two institutions that they support. Now,
fundraising for the costs of a catalogue to accompany the
exhibition in London is under way.
Another of the School’s donors, Di Bresciani, who funds
the Youth Music Foundation of Australia Scholarship, put
on a celebratory dinner with the Chair of Development, in
honour of the BSR, during the latter’s visit to Melbourne in
Jill Pellew
Chair of Development
Donors
Donors to the BSR in 2007–8 include: Arup Italia; the
Comune di Brindisi; the British Council; Mr P.W.H. Brown;
Buro Happold; the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge; the
Cochemé Charitable Trust; the John S. Cohen Foundation;
Lady Egerton; the Getty Foundation; the Gladstone
Memorial Trust; the Bryan Guinness Charitable Trust;
Knauf Italia; Dr Jane Larner and family; the Marc Fitch
Fund; the Regione Lazio; the Craven Committee, Oxford;
St John’s College, Oxford; PARC (Direzione Generale per
la Qualità e la Tutela del Paesaggio, l’Architettura e l’Arte
Contemporanea); the Packard Humanities Institute; the
Society of Dilettanti; the Society for the Promotion of
Roman Studies; the Swedish Embassy in Rome; Ms
Vanessa Somers Vreeland; the late Mr W.T.C. Walker.
14
H U M A N I T I E S AWA R D S
Balsdon Fellow
Dr Maureen Carroll (University of Sheffield)
Burial and commemoration of babies and neonates in Roman Italy,
Gaul and the Celtic North
Frances Parton (University of Cambridge)
The Liber Pontificalis and Franco-papal relations 824–91
Benjamin Russell (University of Oxford)
Sculpted stone and the Roman economy, 100 BC–AD 300
Hugh Last Fellow
Dr Penelope Davies (University of Texas at Austin)
Art and persuasion in Republican Rome
Tim Potter Memorial Awardee
Victoria Leitch (University of Oxford)
Trade in Roman and late Roman north African cookwares in Italy
Paul Mellon Centre Rome Fellow
Dr Viccy Coltman (University of Edinburgh)
Marble mania: the art history and historiography of sculpture in
Britain since 1790
Melbourne Rome Scholar
Katrina Grant (University of Melbourne)
The representation of gardens and nature in Arcadian Rome
Rome Fellows
Dr Lucy Davis (Courtauld Institute/CASVA Washington DC)
‘Pittori Fiamminghi’ at the Accademia di San Luca, c. 1590–1630
Dr Sarah Morgan (University of Sydney)
Ines Donati, ‘La Capitana’: the making of a female fascist martyr
Rome Scholars
Annelies Cazemier (University of Oxford)
Sanctuaries in southern Italy and Sicily in the face of Roman expansion
Rachel King (University of Manchester)
Communities of craftsmen and consumers of Baltic amber in early
modern Rome
Ralegh Radford Rome Scholar
Dr Paul Johnson (University of Southampton)
Trade, exchange and the development of Italian maritime cities in late
antiquity
Macquarie University Gale Scholar
Dr Jaye McKenzie-Clark (Macquarie University)
Ceramic production in Campania: the supply and distribution of
tableware to Pompeii
Rome Awardees
Sarah Burnett (University of Warwick)
A saint between east and west: the cult of Saint Nicholas in medieval Italy
Matthew Dal Santo (University of Cambridge)
Orthodoxy, asceticism and the cult of saints as aspects of Byzantine
Latinism in the writings of Pope Gregory the Great (590–604)
Youth Music Foundation of Australia Scholar
Stefan Cassomenos
Research Fellows
Dr Diane Archibald
Gendered spaces: private and public spaces in Renaissance Rome
Dr Patrizia Cavazzini
The painter Agostino Tassi; the art market in Rome
Dr Roberto Cobianchi
Ceremonies for canonisation in Renaissance Rome
Dr Elizabeth Fentress
Roman archaeology
Dr Inge Lyse Hansen
Provincial identity and patronage in the Greek east
Dr Andrew Hopkins
Committenza architettonica fra Venezia e Roma nel Seicento
Dr Clare Hornsby
Edition of the papers of Ilaria Bignamini
Dr Helen Langdon
The painters Salvator Rosa and Claude Lorrain
Dr Erika Milburn
Critical edition of the lyric poetry of Luigi Tansillo
Dr Caspar Pearson
Representing the city in fifteenth-century Italy: image, text and the
Rome of Sixtus IV
Dr Lori-Ann Touchette
Ancient Roman art
Dr Karin Wolfe
The Venetian painter Francesco Trevisani
15
HUMANITIES ACTIVITIES
T
his has been a special year for collaborations and
crossovers between Humanities and Fine Arts awardholders, and a dynamic one for events and activities, both
academic and social. Katrina Grant (our first Melbourne
Rome Scholar), Rachel King, Victoria Leitch, Jaye
McKenzie-Clark, Sarah Morgan, Sue Russell and several
Fine Arts award-holders and residents, sang in the choir
organised by Cian Donnelly (Arts Council of Northern
Ireland Fellow) to perform at the Fine Arts exhibitions.
Sarah also sang in a choir that performs regularly in
Rome’s churches. In this musical year a notable event was
the concert by Stefan Cassomenos, his considerable
talents as pianist and composer superbly demonstrated
before a responsive audience that included HE Amanda
Vanstone, Australian Ambassador to Italy, and BSR’s new
Chairman, Sir Ivor Roberts. Several scholars gave papers
at international conferences: Matthew Dal Santo in
Toronto, Rachel King in Poland, Jaye Mackenzie-Clark in
Sheffield, Sarah Morgan in Lyon, Ben Russell in Toulouse,
Annelies Cazemier at the Symposium Cumanum, and Paul
Johnson in Amsterdam. Paul, Ben, Annelies and Victoria
Leitch also contributed papers to Associazione Internazionale di Archeologia Classica (AIAC) meetings in Rome.
Paul successfully defended his PhD in Januar y.
Congratulations to the following on securing posts:
Roberto Cobianchi (Rome Scholar 2003–4) at Messina,
Emma-Jayne Graham (2005–6) at St Andrews, Jessica
Hughes (2003–4) at the Open University, and Caspar
Pearson (BSR Research Fellow) at Essex. Lucy Davis
(2007–8) will return to the BSR in 2008–9 as Sue Russell’s
Research Assistant.
A highlight of the Humanities events programme was
the exhibition and conference held to celebrate the 500th
anniversary of the birth of the architect Andrea Palladio.
The exhibition had as its focus a digitally animated map
constructed by Alan Day (Bath) of itineraries from
Palladio’s Roman guidebooks, published as Palladio’s Rome
(Yale University Press, 2006) by the two other organisers,
16
Award-holders on a trip to the Villa Pamphilj
Vaughan Hart (Bath) and Peter Hicks (Fondation
Napoléon). Rare antiquarian books and maps from the
BSR Library and Archive were also exhibited. The event
opened with a lecture on the Pantheon and its reception
by Mark Wilson Jones (Bath) to a crowded lecture theatre.
The interdisciplinar y, one-day conference on
antiquarianism that Sue Russell organised for the following
day was a great success, with scholars from Australia,
France, Ger many, Italy, Norway and the UK giving
stimulating papers.
The lecture prog ramme included accomplished
presentations by this year’s fellowship-holders.
Unfortunately Maureen Carroll broke her arm at the end
of her stay and was unable to deliver the year’s final
lecture, which will be rescheduled. Three guest lecturers
focused on artists who were the subject of major Italian
exhibitions during the year : James Hamilton
(Birmingham) on Turner in Rome, Ann Sutherland Harris
(Pittsburgh) on Bernini as painter, and Piers Baker-Bates
(2002–3) on Sebastiano del Piombo. Piers was the first
Rubinstein Fellow from the Society for Renaissance
Studies, speaking on the occasion of what will be an
annual event sponsored by the Society. Other speakers
included Cordelia Warr (Manchester) on Italian images of
stigmata in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Andrew
Leach (Queensland) on Manfredo Tafuri’s writings about
Borromini, Dana Arnold (Southampton) on the reception
H U M A N I T I E S
of antiquity in eighteenth-century Rome, and Clare
Hornsby (Paul Mellon Centre Special Projects Fellow) on
finishing the late Ilaria Bignamini’s book, Digging and
Dealing in Eighteenth-century Rome. BSR Modern Studies
Professor David Forgacs spoke on ‘Ethnographies of the
Italian South from Giuseppe Pitrè to Er nesto De
Martino’, part of his ongoing research project ‘Language,
space and power in Italy since 1800’. With his guest, Luigi
Goglia (Roma Tre), he gave a presentation on ‘Fascism,
racism and colonial representations in photographs and
postcards of the 1930s’. David also screened the
documentary Matti da slegare (1975) and discussed the film
with Maria Grazia Giannichedda (Fondazione Franco
Basaglia) and planned a series of informal film screenings
with Jacopo Benci.
The Architecture programme, curated by Marina Engel,
is now well established and, as usual, attracted big
audiences. British architects Amanda Levete of Future
Systems and David Adjaye showcased their work in
autumn and winter, completing the series ‘Spaces for Art’.
A C T I V I T I E S
Ma0, the Roman architectural practice, commenced a new
cycle in spring on the theme ‘London-Rome: Work in
Process (eight architecture practices)’ which will be a
collaboration with PARC (Direzione Generale per la
Qualità e la Tutela del Paesaggio, l’Architettura e l’Arte
Contemporanee) in Rome and the Architecture
Foundation in London.
Site visits included trips to Pompeii and Herculaneum;
the Castello Ruspoli at Vignanello and Castello Orsini at
Valanello (courtesy of the Approdo Romano); the Palazzo
Chigi at Ariccia and the Museo delle Navi at Lake Nemi;
the Abbey of Farfa; the Palazzo Farnese; the Palazzo
Farnese at Caprarola; the Villa Pamphilj; the Abbey of San
Nilo at Grottaferrata and Frascati; the Tower of the
Winds in the Vatican and the Archivio Segreto Vaticano;
Santa Maria del Priorato; the Palazzo Pamphilj and Villa
Madama.
Susan Russell
Assistant Director
City of Rome students exploring the maritime theatre in Hadrian’s Villa at Tivoli
17
H U M A N I T I E S
A C T I V I T I E S
Taught Courses
The School’s City of Rome postgraduate course, which runs
annually through April and May, is now in its thirteenth year
and is offered at twelve British universities. The course
provides students of classics, ancient history and archaeology
with a full immersion in the topography, art and architecture
of the city, from its origins to the end of the Empire
(although later periods are by no means neglected). In 2008
twelve students attended, from the universities of Cardiff,
Exeter, Liverpool, Manchester, Oxford, Reading, Royal
Holloway and St Andrews. The course was directed by
Robert Coates-Stephens and administered by Elly Murkett,
with ex-student Chris Siwicki providing welcome logistical
support. Permits for access to restricted monuments were
arranged with great efficiency and diplomacy by Maria Pia
Malvezzi, and Geraldine Wellington saw to the hostel
arrangements with characteristic brio.
Site visits for m the key element of the teaching.
Highlights in 2008 included the ongoing excavations of the
domus beneath the Palazzo Valentini (with the site director,
Paola Baldassari), the archaic houses of the Via Sacra (with
Dunia Filippi), the new German project in the Palatine’s
Flavian Palace (with Ulrike Wulf-Rheidt) and a bravura tour
of the Via Annibaldi Nymphaeum by Frank Sear. Guest
lecturers included John Clarke, Filippo Coarelli, Penelope
Davies and Lynne Lancaster.
The Library staff dealt generously with the annual invasion,
and by the course’s end a fine series of essays had been
produced on such topics as the narrow procession friezes on
Rome’s honorific arches, Ovid’s subversion of the city’s
Augustan ‘moral landscape’ and a density analysis of
commercial structures in the fourteen regions. Past students
of the course are now teaching and working at places as far
afield as the universities of Santiago de Chile, São Paulo,
Sydney, Reading and Oxford, as well as the British Museum,
and, since half of this year’s intake is going on to doctoral
study, we may hope that this trend continues. As in previous
years, we are grateful for the support of the Roman Society,
18
Robert Coates-Stephens with City of Rome students at the Pantheon
which has allowed us to offer this rare opportunity to
promising young scholars and future generations of academics.
Twenty-six students from the universities of Bristol,
Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh, Glasgow, King’s College
London, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, Reading, Royal
Holloway, Southampton, St Andrews and Warwick attended
the undergraduate Summer School in September 2007, which
was directed by Matthew Nicholls (University of Reading)
and Robert Coates-Stephens. The Gladstone Memorial Prize
was awarded to Emma Wright of Brasenose College, Oxford.
The course, which serves as an introduction to the city for
students with varying backgrounds and interests within the
broad study of the ancient world (archaeology, ancient and
medieval history, classics and art history), focuses on the
social, economic, political and religious activities that
constituted life and death in the ancient city. ‘Themed’ days
included: the Tiber and provisioning Rome, politics and the
Forum, war and the triumph, the city and the urban plebs,
roads and cemeteries, and the transformations of late
antiquity. Visits out of Rome included Ostia, the Isola Sacra
and Tivoli. The course directors provided a series of nine
supplementary lectures to introduce each itinerary. Once
again, we would like to express our thanks for the generous
support of the Roman Society, the Faculty of Classics at
Cambridge, the Craven Committee at Oxford and the
Gladstone Memorial Trust.
Robert Coates-Stephens
Cary Fellow
EVENTS
C ONFERENCES , W ORKSHOPS AND R ELATED E VENTS :
Identifying the Punic Mediterranean. One-day workshop organised in
collaboration with the Society for Libyan Studies
Associazione Internazionale di Archeologia Classica meeting:
Economia e società, chaired by Sergio Fontana, with contributions
from Paul Johnson (BSR; Southampton) and Victoria Leitch
(BSR; Oxford)
Filosofi dalla scuola di Aristotele. Cameleonte e Prassifane: frammenti per una
storia della critica letteraria antica. Opening day of the three-day
conference, part of the ‘Theophrastus project’ organised by the
Istituto Svizzero di Roma
Lazio e Sabina. Day one of a three-day conference organised in collaboration with the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Lazio
Agricoltura e scambi nell’Italia tardo repubblicana. The morning session
of day two of the conference organised by the Danish Academy
and the Università di Roma, ‘La Sapienza’
Before and after Palladio’s Rome: antiquarianism from antiquity to the
nineteenth century. One-day conference and exhibition Palladio’s
Rome, organised by BSR in collaboration with Vaughan Hart &
Alan Day (Bath) and Peter Hicks (Fondation Napoléon)
Recent research at Portus and in its hinterland. One-day workshop
Port networks in the Roman Mediterranean. Two-day workshop organised
in collaboration with Timmy Gambin (University of Malta and
Aurora SP Trust)
Building Roma Aeterna. Day one of a two-day conference organised in
collaboration with the American Academy in Rome and the
Institutum Romanum Finlandiae
A RCHAEOLOGY AND H ISTORY L ECTURES
Peter Wiseman (Exeter): Images of a city: Turner, Ashby and Rome
Presentation of Herculaneum: Diaries of Light and Dark by Marcellino
de Baggis (onionskin productions) in collaboration with the
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Jaye McKenzie-Clark (BSR; Macquarie): Patterns of social
differentiation at Pompeii: the ceramic evidence
Christophe Morhange and Nick Marriner: The geoscience of ancient
Mediterranean harbours
Bryan Ward-Perkins (Oxford): Sorpasso. Constantinople and the
overtaking of Rome
Annelies Cazemier (BSR; Oxford): Networking with gods: the spread of
Roman hegemony seen from sanctuaries in southern Italy and Greece
Paul Johnson (BSR; Southampton): Urban trajectories: Rome, Milan
and the transformation of Italian cities in late antiquity
H ISTORY OF A RT , H UMANITIES AND M ODERN S TUDIES L ECTURES
James Hamilton (Birmingham): Turner in Rome
Ann Sutherland Harris (Pittsburgh): Gianlorenzo Bernini as painter:
some thoughts on current research and a new exhibition
Cordelia Warr (Manchester): Marking the body, performing the body:
visualising stigmata in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries
Viccy Coltman (BSR; Edinburgh): Marble mania: the art history and
historiography of sculpture in Britain since 1760
David Forgacs (BSR; UCL): Ethnographies of the Italian South from
Giuseppe Pitré to Ernesto De Martino
Andrew Leach (Queensland): Francesco Borromini and the crisis of
the Humanist universe
Luigi Goglia (Roma Tre): Fascism, racism and colonial
representations in photographs and postcards of the 1930s
Dana Arnold (Southampton): ‘He saw places as they were, not as they
are’: remembering and experiencing Rome in the eighteenth century
Piers Baker-Bates (Society for Renaissance Studies): Beyond
Michelangelo; new perspectives on Sebastiano del Piombo’s career
at Rome
Mark Wilson Jones (Bath): The Pantheon and the idea of Rome from
Palladio to today
David Forgacs (BSR; UCL) and Maria Grazia Giannichedda
(Fondazione Franco Basaglia): Screening and discussion of the
documentary Matti da slegare
Clare Hornsby (BSR; Paul Mellon): Digging and Dealing in Eighteenthcentury Rome: writing Ilaria’s book
Sarah Morgan (BSR; Sydney): Ines Donati, ‘La Capitana’: the making
of a fascist martyr
Rachel King (BSR; Manchester): Whale’s sperm, maiden’s tears and
lynx’s urine — Baltic amber and the fascination for it in early
modern Italy
Lucy Davis (BSR): ‘Pittori fiamminghi’ at the Accademia di San Luca,
c. 1590–1630
C ITY OF R OME P OSTGRADUATE C OURSE L ECTURES AND S EMINARS
Penelope Davies (BSR; Texas): The individual, the state and
architecture in Republican Rome
Robert Coates-Stephens (BSR): Sources for Roman topography
John Hopkins (Texas): On archaic Rome
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill (BSR): Building identities in late Republican
Italy
Saskia Stevens (Oxford): Roman boundaries/pomerium
Filippo Coarelli (Perugia): Substructio et Tabularium
19
E V E N T S
Pieter Broucke (Middlebury College): The five Pantheons
Maureen Carroll (BSR; Sheffield): Memoria and Damnatio Memoriae:
preserving and erasing identities in Roman funerary commemoration
John Clarke (Texas): Viewer-based models for reading Imperial
monuments
Lynne Lancaster (Ohio): Technological innovation in Imperial Rome:
what can ancient concrete tell us about Roman society?
Paul Johnson (BSR; Southampton): Changing relationships with the
city in late antiquity
Fabio Barry (St Andrews): The Mouth of Truth and the Forum Boarium
Michele Salzman (California): Apocalypse Then? Jerome and the fall
of Rome in 410
Susan Russell (BSR): Pirro Ligorio as architect and archaeologist
A RTS AND A RCHITECTURE E VENTS
Presentation of Jacopo Benci. Faraway and Luminous
Press launch of 20Eventi — Arte contemporanea in Sabina
Fine Arts Awardees’ Exhibitions
December 2007: Party at the American Academy; Spartacus Chetwynd,
Cian Donnelly, Anthony Faroux, Harriet Harriss, Aisling
Hedgecock, Leslie Matthews, Lindsay Seers, Prisca Thielmann,
John Walter. Curated by Jacopo Benci
March 2008: The Director’s Apartment; Jonathan Allen, Gordon Burn,
Cian Donnelly, Anthony Faroux, Nadia Hebson, Aisling
Hedgecock, Jennifer Marshall, Prisca Thielmann, John Walter.
Curated by Jacopo Benci
June 2008: Tutti Frutti; James and Eleanor Avery, Cian Donnelly,
Anthony Faroux, Aisling Hedgecock, Catrin Huber, Marta Marcé,
Prisca Thielmann, John Walter. Curated by Jacopo Benci
Architecture Programme
‘S PACES FOR A RT ’
Amanda Levete (Future Systems): Lecture and exhibition, Working
with artists
David Adjaye (Adjaye Architects): Lecture, Art and architecture (with
accompanying exhibition at Casa dell’Architettura)
‘L ONDON –R OME : W ORK IN P ROCESS ’
Ma0/emmeazero: Lecture and exhibition, Borderlines
Contemporary Arts Programme
Exhibition: The Secret Public: the Last Days of the British Underground
1978–1988. A Video Library. Curated by Stefan Kalmàr, Michael
Bracewell and Ian White
20
Screenings and talks: Cosey Fanni Tutti, in conversation with Daniela
Cascella (including a video about Throbbing Gristle)
Scratch Video
Panel discussion of ‘Underground culture in Italy in the 80s’
Book presentation: Ian Kiaer, in conversation with Cristiana Perrella
Exhibition: Chris Evans. As Simple As Your Life Used To Be. Curated
by Cristiana Perrella
Tracks series: Little Annie with Paul Wallfisch. Curated by Daniela
Cascella
Lecture/performance: Martin Creed, Words
Book presentation: Film d’artista, by Maria Rosa Sossai
M USIC E VENTS
Performance: Fantasies for Piano, by Stefan Cassomenos (BSR;
Melbourne)
Performance: Enoch Arden, by Graham Roos and James Keay
L IBRARY E VENTS
Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica. Two-day workshop organised in
collaboration with Charlotte Roueché (KCL) and Joyce Reynolds
Care and identification of non-silver photographic printing processes. Three-day
‘History of Photography’ workshop organised in collaboration
with Lorenzo Scaramella and Giulia Cucinella Briant
Exhibitions in the series ‘Immagini e memoria’.
I giganti dell’acqua: acquedotti romani del Lazio nelle fotografie di Thomas
Ashby (1892–1925). Curated by BSR Library and Archive staff
Itinerari abruzzesi: archeologia, arte e folklore nelle fotografie di Thomas Ashby
(1901–1923). Curated by BSR Library and Archive staff
UK E VENTS
Roman Reflections: Views from the BSR, 2006–7
Alexandria in Pompeii: reflections on cameo glass and wallpaintings
Susan Walker, Balsdon Fellow 2006–7
Do mice think in Italian?
Edwina Ashton, Wingate Rome Scholar 2006–7
Presentation of Jacopo Benci. Faraway and Luminous, with Jacopo Benci
in conversation with Anthony Downey and Eric Parry
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill (BSR): Herculaneum: new light in the dark
(including a viewing of scenes from the film of Marcellino de
Baggis, Herculaneum: Diaries of Light and Dark)
ARCHAEOLOGY
T
his year saw the development of our flagship research
programme — the Roman Ports Project — with a first
season of excavation at Portus, as well as a geophysics
programme that is extending its horizons beyond Italy and
involvement in several other collaborative projects.
THE ROMAN PORTS PROJECT
This project, directed by Simon Keay, aims to enhance our
understanding of Portus, the port of Imperial Rome, through
excavation, survey and the analysis of finds, and to explore
its relationship to other ports across the Mediterranean.
centuries AD. After the completion of the excavation at the
end of the first week of October, there was a formal visit to
the site by HRH Princess Alexandra, led by Simon Keay,
accompanied by the British Ambassador, the DeputyMinister for the Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali,
the Mayor of Fiumicino, the Secretary to the Director of the
Regione Lazio, the Soprintendente per i Beni Archeologici
di Ostia ad interim and other guests. This was followed by a
visit to the part of Portus that lies within the property of
Duke Ascanio Sforza Cesarini, followed by a reception at
the Villa Torlonia.
Excavations and Survey at Portus
Additional Geophysics
The first main area of activity focused upon excavation and
survey at Portus — the Portus Project — funded by the Arts
and Humanities Research Council and the Soprintendenza
per i Beni Archeologici di Ostia. Activities undertaken in the
course of 2007–8 can be broken down into three areas.
These excavations were complemented by continued
AHRC-funded geophysical survey within the port complex.
The most important element was a two-week season by a
joint BSR/Archaeological Prospection Ser vices of
Southampton (APSS) team ( June 2008). It used ground
penetrating radar, high definition resistance, magnetometry
and topographic survey techniques to understand better the
immediate environs of the excavation and the Palazzo
Imperiale. The team also undertook the survey of a six
hectare area within the basin of the Claudian harbour
(November 2007), funded by Duke Sforza Cesarini, which
revealed the alignment of buildings, possibly dating to the
late antique period, by which time it would have silted up.
The Excavation
The first season took place over five weeks during
September and early October 2007, was directed by Simon
Keay and Graeme Earl (Southampton), assisted by Dott.ssa
Lidia Paroli (Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di
Ostia), and involved participants from the universities of
Southampton, Cambridge, Rome ‘La Sapienza’, Aix-enProvence, Tarragona and Seville. It built upon two earlier
seasons of topographic work (March 2007) and resistance
tomography (June 2007). The excavations uncovered a large
(250m 2 ) open area at the eastern edge of the Palazzo
Imperiale, a key building at the centre of the port, revealing
a large rectangular dock or canal that was probably of
Claudian date, defined by a spectacular series of moles on
the south side of the main Claudian basin of the port. This
was filled with sand in the course of the first and second
centuries AD, and its central stretch subsequently covered by
a large circular building in the Severan period. The whole
area was extensively replanned in the later fifth and sixth
The Portus Hinterland Survey
This forms a key element in our strategy to understand
better the broader landscape in which Portus is situated. A
first month-long season of magnetometer sur vey in
February covered circa eighteen hectares of the northeast
quadrant of the Isola Sacra, an island that lies between
Portus and Ostia to the south. This element of the Portus
Project was directed by Professor Martin Millett
(Cambridge), Kris Strutt (APSS) and Paola Germona
(Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di Ostia). It
focused upon the northeastern part of the Isola Sacra,
21
A R C H A E O L O G Y
revealing traces of structures associated with the Roman
marble yards — the statio marmorum — and possible tombs
along the façade of the Tiber. In addition to this,
geophysical work on the site of the Stagno Maccarese at
Acilia was undertaken by a BSR/APSS team, funded by
PirelliRe (July 2008), enhancing our understanding of the
lagoonal hinterland of Ostia.
monograph. This event also saw the launch of the Port
Networks project which involves a number of participants
at the Workshop. It will involve computer-based analyses of
Roman ceramics and marble by three Southampton PhD
students, and will draw upon the expertise of post-doctoral
fellows and research assistants from collaborating
institutions in Italy and across the Mediterranean.
The results of the first year of the Portus Project were
discussed at the first public Portus Workshop, which was
jointly organised by Simon Keay and Lidia Paroli, and held
at the BSR in March 2008. It commenced with an address
by Professor Anna Gallina Zevi and involved sixteen
speakers and a capacity audience. The topics included a
review of the results of the BSR project, as well as reports
on work in the hinterland of the port by colleagues in the
Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di Ostia and the
Soprintendenza Archeologica di Roma. The papers are
being written up for publication and will be submitted for
consideration as a BSR monograph in autumn 2008.
West Mediterranean Port Hinterlands
Roman Port Networks
This aspect of the project explores the changing economic
relationship between Portus and other Mediterranean
Roman ports. It was inaugurated in March 2008 with the
Roman Port Networks Workshop, organised by Simon Keay
and Timmy Gambin (Aurora Trust and University of Malta)
in conjunction with the Society for Libyan Studies, financed
by a special grant from the British Academy as part of its
Reconnecting the Mediter ranean initiative, and was also
supported by the Escuela Española de Historia, Arte y
Arqueología, the Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica, the
Universidad de Sevilla and the Centre Camille Jullian of the
Université d’Aix-en-Provence. It involved 22 speakers and a
capacity audience. The aim of the conference was to explore
the archaeological evidence for the existence of trading
networks between Portus and other ports across the
Mediterranean. The proceedings will be submitted as a BSR
22
This aspect of the project aims to establish a Mediterranean
context for Portus by means of the geophysical analysis by
BSR/APSS of the hinterlands of some of the key provincial
ports supplying Rome. Attention to date has been focused
upon ports in Iberia and north Africa.
A geophysical survey was conducted in the hinterland of
the major Roman port of Tarraco (Tarragona) in eastern
Spain in October 2007, in conjunction with, and funded by,
the Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica in the context of
its new study of the ager Tarracoensis. Its research aim was
to advance understanding of important villa and industrial
sites supplying the port of Tarraco. The results have made
an important contribution to several key villa sites, such as
Centcelles and Els Antigons. Further south, a brief
exploratory programme of geophysics was undertaken in
the port area of the Roman city of Italica (Santiponce) in
southern Spain, a satellite of the great sea-port of Hispalis
(Seville). This builds upon work undertaken by Simon Keay
and others at the site in the 1990s. The site of the river-port
is adjacent to the Rio Huelva, a tributary of the
Guadalquivir, and remains were located at a depth of circa
three metres. Geophysics was also undertaken at sites in the
vicinity of the river-port of Roman Laelia (Olivares), to the
west of Italica, along the course of the river Guadiamar in
late 2007/early 2008. Here our work was part of a larger
project coordinated by Dr F. Amores Carredano (Sevilla).
The results so far are very promising and have revealed a
range of prehistoric and Roman sites. The survey is being
complemented by a surface survey undertaken by a Spanish
A R C H A E O L O G Y
PhD student currently supervised by Simon Keay and based
at the Universidad de Sevilla.
Simon Keay and Sophie Hay made an exploratory trip to
Leptis Magna (Libya) in May 2008, with a view to
undertaking a geophysical survey in 2008 or 2009 in
conjunction with the Society for Libyan Studies, on the
grounds of Leptis’s close commercial links and topographic
similarities to Portus.
OTHER FIELD PROJECTS
A third five-week season of excavation was undertaken at
Falacrinae, the birthplace of the Emperor Vespasian, as part
of the project led by Dr Helen Patterson (Molly Cotton
Fellow) and Professor Filippo Coarelli (Perugia). This work
saw the first season of excavation of a Roman villa that has
been the subject of geophysical survey by the BSR team
(2007 and 2008). The excavation successfully identified
various parts of this large complex, and focused in
particular on the important late antique levels. Concurrently,
excavation continued at the site of the vicus of Falacrinae,
where a further two houses were identified. The fieldwork is
funded by the Comune di Cittareale, the VI Comunità
Montana and the Provincia di Rieti, with the collaboration
of the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici per il Lazio
(Dott.ssa Giovanna Alvino).
BSR staff were also involved in a number of other
archaeological projects. Collaborative projects included the
excavations at Villa Magna (Dr Elizabeth Fentress,
Pennsylvania and UCL), those of Dr Roman Roth
(Cambridge) for the first season of excavations at the site of
Capena, and topographical survey at the Roman town of
Grotte di Castro (Bolsena, Lazio) directed by Dr Simon
Stoddart (Cambridge) and Dr Gabriele Cifani (Roma Tre).
GEOPHYSICS
BSR and APSS staff have continued undertaking research
projects elsewhere in Italy, and contributing towards their
publication. Impressive results came from continuing work
at the Villa of Marcus Aurelius at Villa Magna (Anagni,
Lazio), in conjunction with Elizabeth Fentress, revealing
important new details of the layout of this important
complex. The magnetometry work at the Latin town of
Gabii (Lazio), undertaken on behalf of Dr Nicola Terrenato
(Michigan) in 2007 and 2008, has covered approximately 36
hectares of the town, successfully mapping previously
unknown areas and producing important results. The team
also undertook a further season of geophysical survey at
Potentia (Marche) within the Potenza Valley Survey, directed
by Professor Frank Vermeulen (Ghent) (October 2007),
providing clear evidence for a continuation of the street
grid, the city wall to the north and, possibly, a theatre. It
also completed a very successful first season of survey at
the Etruscan Adriatic port of Spina (Emilia Romagna), in a
project directed by Dr Vedia Izzet (Southampton) and
Professor Christoph Reusser (Regensburg), uncovering
some sixteen hectares of an orthogonally planned
portscape. Last, but not least, 2007 saw the completion of
the joint research programme of geophysical survey at
Calatia by the BSR, the Soprintendenza per i Beni
Archeologici per le Province di Napoli e Caserta and the
Comune di Maddaloni.
In line with BSR extending its remit beyond Italy into the
western Mediterranean at large, a first season of geophysical
survey was undertaken at the Roman town of Doclea,
Montenegro. A two-week preliminary survey was conducted
on behalf of the Museum of Podgorica as part of its New
Ancient Doclea project, commissioned and financed by the
Council of the city of Podgorica and undertaken in
conjunction with the Università di Urbino (Professor Sergio
Rinaldi Tufi). The magnetometry survey successfully
recorded previously unknown structures across the site,
thereby making a first contribution to a major re-appraisal
of this key site. Sophie Hay, Stephen Kay and Leonie Pett
presented the results at the 42 nd Parallel conference in Bari
organised by the Regione as part of an international
collaborative agreement with the Montenegran government.
23
A R C H A E O L O G Y
The team also undertook a three-week magnetometry
survey at the site of Amara West in Sudan, for a project run
by Dr Neal Spencer of the Department of Ancient Egypt
and Sudan at the British Museum, with the assistance of the
National Corporation of Antiquities and Museums of
Sudan, producing some outstanding images of a Pharaonic
fortress.
CONFERENCES
In May 2008 Simon Keay gave a keynote paper at the
international colloquium Changing landscapes. The impact of
Roman towns in the western Mediterranean organised by the
Universidade de Evora, in which he made comparisons
between Tiber valley towns studied by means of geophysics
and those similarly studied in the Guadalquivir valley. He
also gave a paper at the conference ‘Quell’ansia di voler tutto
dire’ di Andrea Carandini per i suoi
settanta anni at the Università di
Roma, ‘La Sapienza’ in June
2008, in which he argued for the
importance of geophysical
survey in the analysis of urban
and rural landscapes. In January
Helen Patterson and Stephen
Kay participated in the workshop
Archeologia dei paesaggi, organised
by the Reale Istituto Neerlandese
a Roma, and discussed comparative issues in landscape
archaeolog y based upon the
results of the British School’s
Tiber Valley Project. In late 2007
the BSR hosted the first day of
the annual Lazio e Sabina
conference, organised by the
24
A R C H A E O L O G Y
Previous page, top right: Geophysical
survey at Amara West, Sudan
Previous page, bottom left: Results
from geophysical survey at Amara
West
Left: Aerial view of excavations at
Portus
Below: Research assistants Leonie
Pett and Greg Tucker in circular
structure excavated at Portus
Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici per il Lazio, during
which Helen Patterson presented the results of the third
season of the BSR’s excavations at the site of Falacrinae.
The BSR also hosted a conference on Roman concrete —
Building Roma Aeterna — in March 2008, organised by Dr
Robert Hohlfelder.
STAFF
In September, Rose Ferraby (Geophysical Research
Assistant) left the School after two years to undertake a
Masters at the University of Edinburgh. Her place was
temporarily filled by Rob Fry (Reading) and then, from
March 2008, by Giles Richardson, a Masters graduate in
Maritime Archaeology from the University of Southampton.
Simon Keay
Research Professor in Archaeology
25
F A C U LT Y
T
OF
A R C H A E O L O G Y, H I S T O R Y
he Faculty’s size and scope have increased during this
year as a result of its reintegration with the School’s
Publications Advisor y Committee. With a planned
membership of fifteen, this expansion has brought wider
academic expertise to the Faculty’s deliberations over the
award of fellowships and scholarships at its spring meeting,
while the addition of an autumn meeting will enable the
committee to play a greater role in advising the School on
its academic and archaeological policies, in monitoring
ongoing work by fellows and scholars, and in helping
formulate publication plans. This last area, however,
remains in the ambit of the Chair of Publications (as well as
of the Editor of the Papers, of course), who, like the Chair
of Archaeological Fieldwork, now operates from within the
Faculty. One practical benefit of this positive reorganisation
is that School staff are required for one less meeting each
year in London. The new colleagues from the Publications
Advisory Committee were welcomed at the March meeting
of the Faculty, at which occasion departing members David
Atkinson and Maria Wyke were also warmly thanked for all
their work on the School’s behalf.
At its March meeting the Faculty worked through another large set of applications for fellowships, scholarships
and awards. It is gratifying to find that the School’s
academic reputation continues to make it so sought-after a
location for many of the best eligible students and scholars
working within its fields.
From 2008 the School will also host the new Giles
Worsley Travel Fellowship, founded in memory of the
British architectural historian and writer who died aged 44
in 2006. Since the Fellowship is open to either an
architectural historian or an architect, it represents a
welcome collaboration with the Faculty of the Fine Arts,
whose Chair was consulted on the applications received in
the first round. The Royal Institute of British Architects
was also represented, along with Giles Worsley’s family, at
the selection meeting. In this, as in all of the proceedings
described above, I have continual reason to be thankful for
26
AND
LETTERS
the calm and well-organised administration of the School’s
Registrar in London, Gill Clark, as well as to the Director
and his colleagues in Rome.
The activities of the scholars and fellows who have been
in residence at the School during 2007–8 are detailed
elsewhere in this Annual Report, as are the many events that
fall under the umbrella of Faculty interest. I should like,
however, to mention one event in which I had personal
involvement. This was the conference staged by Sue Russell
in February 2008 entitled Before and after Palladio’s Rome:
antiquarianism from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Linked as
it was to a fine exhibition (in the Sainsbury Lecture Theatre
foyer) of works related to the topic, selected by Valerie
Scott from the School’s rare books collection, this conference seemed a model of what the School can achieve. It
was also a fitting tribute in the 500th anniversary year of
Palladio’s birth, drawing a number of notable persons from
other national institutes in Rome into its audience. On the
warm, sunny, morning following the event, the speakers
(who came from six different countries) were invited to
conduct a small symposium on the architecture and
decorative programme of Pirro Ligorio’s Casino of Pius IV
in the Vatican Gardens — though they were regrettably not
invited to participate in the luncheon being laid out in the
Casino during their visit for a group of fortunate Cardinals!
Frank Salmon
Chair, Faculty of Archaeology, History and Letters
F I N E A R T S AWA R D S
Abbey Fellows in Painting
Spartacus Chetwynd
Catrin Huber
Marta Marcé
Abbey Scholar in Painting
Anthony Faroux
Arts Council England Helen Chadwick Fellow
Jonathan Allen
Arts Council of Northern Ireland Fellow
Cian Donnelly
Australia Council Residents
Eleanor and James Avery
Amanda Marburg
Jennifer Marshall
Leslie Matthews
Derek Hill Foundation Scholar in Portraiture
Nadia Hebson
Rome Fellow in Landscape Architecture
Harriet Harriss
Rome Scholar in Architecture
Prisca Thielmann
Sainsbury Scholars in Painting and Sculpture
Aisling Hedgecock
John Walter
Sargant Fellow in Curatorial and Critical Studies
Gordon Burn
Wingate Rome Scholar
Lindsay Seers
FINE ARTS SCHOLARS’ ACTIVITIES
T
his year saw Fine Arts scholars busy with an
unprecedented number of individual and group
activities, at the School and elsewhere. The year was also
marked by the wider range of countries from which Fine
Arts scholars came, including Germany with Catrin Huber
and Prisca Thielmann, France with Anthony Faroux, and
Spain with Marta Marcé.
Three evenings of short illustrated talks took place in
October 2007, January and May 2008. Fine Arts scholars
introduced themselves and their practice to the other
scholars, residents and BSR staff.
The first exhibition at the School, Party at the American
Academy, opened on 14 December 2007 (until 22 December).
It brought together in a communal project all the resident
artists, Spartacus Chetwynd, Cian Donnelly, Anthony
Faroux, Aisling Hedgecock, Leslie Matthews, Lindsay Seers,
and John Walter as well as the architects Harriet Harriss and
Prisca Thielmann. Works by Colin Langridge (Australia
Council Resident, July–September 2007) were also included.
The exhibition reused elements of previous shows — Future
Systems (Architecture programme), and The Secret Public
(Contemporary Arts Programme). The opening night also
saw a well-attended public performance by The Order of the
Golden Ghost, a choir consisting of Fine Arts and Humanities
scholars (and members of staff) performing songs written,
arranged and conducted by Cian Donnelly.
The second scholars’ exhibition, The Director’s Apartment
(13–22 March 2008), continued the collaborative approach
and comprised paintings, drawings, sculptures, assemblages
and installations, by Jonathan Allen, Gordon Burn, Cian
Donnelly, Anthony Faroux, Nadia Hebson, Aisling
Hedgecock, Jennifer Marshall, Prisca Thielmann and John
Walter. On the opening night, a new line-up of The Order of
the Golden Ghost performed in the small ‘apartment’ that
occupied one-third of the overall space of the Gallery.
The end-of-year Fine Arts exhibition opened on 13 June
(until 21 June). Entitled Tutti Frutti, it presented works by
James and Eleanor Avery, Cian Donnelly, Anthony Faroux,
27
Top left: Bat Opera, 2007, by Spartacus Chetwynd (Abbey Fellow in Painting) Top right: Fountain I, 2008, by Jennifer Marshall (Australia Council
Resident) Bottom right: Morte a Roma, 2007, by Harriet Harriss (Rome Fellow in Landscape Architecture)
Aisling Hedgecock, Catrin Huber,
Marta Marcé, Prisca Thielmann and
John Walter. The exhibition opening
included distribution of ‘tutti-frutti’ icecream (donated by the renowned
Gelateria dei Gracchi), and a final
performance by The Order of the Golden
Ghost.
Reaction to this year’s singing choirs,
bizarre titles, and the overlapping and
mixing of works by different people
was certainly very positive.
External Exhibitions and Events
In October 2007, Aisling Hedgecock
participated in Roma Design+, an
annual event that includes Italian and
foreign architects, designers and artists.
In late April 2008, she conceived and
directed The Hula-Gloop Experiment,
which was performed throughout the
streets and piazzas of Rome on 25
28
F I N E
A R T S
S C H O L A R S ’
A C T I V I T I E S
Above left: Intercision: Lozenges, 2008,
by John Walter (Sainsbury Scholar in
Painting and Sculpture)
Above right: The Order of the Golden
Ghost, 2007, by Cian Donnelly (Arts
Council of Northern Ireland Fellow)
Below left: The Director’s Apartment,
2008. Left to right, works by Gordon
Burn (Sargant Fellow in Curatorial
and Critical Studies), Jonathan Allen
(Arts Council England Helen
Chadwick Fellow), Aisling
Hedgecock (Sainsbury Scholar in
Painting and Sculpture), Nadia
Hebson (Derek Hill Foundation
Scholar in Portraiture), Prisca
Thielmann (Rome Scholar in
Architecture), Cian Donnelly (Arts
Council of Northern Ireland Fellow)
29
F I N E
A R T S
S C H O L A R S ’
A C T I V I T I E S
April, and further extended from 26 April to 4 May at
RialtoSantambrogio.
Building on the success of the exhibition Transiti in the
Spazio Cultura of Æmilia Hotel (December 2006–January
2007), a second show was planned by Marianna Di
Giansante featuring BSR Fine Arts scholars. At the end of
November 2007, Cian Donnelly, Aisling Hedgecock,
Lindsay Seers and Prisca Thielmann spent a long weekend
in Bologna as guests of Æmilia Hotel. Lindsay and Prisca
returned to Bologna in January for reconnaissance and
filming. This led to the exhibition Bologna Grand Tour: the
British School at Rome that was inaugurated on 23 May at
Æmilia Hotel Spazio Cultura (and lasted until 21 June).
Alberto Tessore, a cultural promoter and organiser of
20Eventi — Arte contemporanea in Sabina, now in its third
year, chose to invite Great Britain to participate in 2008
(following France in 2006 and Germany in 2007). Cristiana
Perrella, curator of the Contemporary Arts Programme, put
him in touch with Richard Wentworth, Master of the Ruskin
School of Drawing and Fine Art at the University of
Oxford. Fourteen young artists from the Ruskin came to
the Sabina to create works in response to outdoor and
indoor spaces throughout four towns. Richard Wentworth
has a long relationship with the British School, and he is
currently one of the selectors for the ACE Helen Chadwick
Fellowship. The British participation in 20Eventi08 extended
to Fine Arts scholars. In February and April 2008, Cian
Donnelly, Anthony Faroux, Aisling Hedgecock, Marta
Marcé and Prisca Thielmann went on reconnaissance to the
Sabina. The resulting interventions were very different from
each other, both in form and medium, but equally engaged
in responding to the ‘spirit of place’.
The collaborations between the BSR and the other
foreign academies in Rome continue to bear fruit. Shara
Wasserman (Arts Liaison Officer, German Academy) has,
for the third year, devised and curated events that involve
artists from various academies. In October 2007, in
collaboration with the Fondazione Musica per Roma, she
30
organised CinemArt at the Auditorium Parco della Musica,
involving six artists from five academies, with Lindsay Seers
representing the BSR. In May 2008, she curated Academy
Architects at the Acquario at Casa dell’Architettura, in
collaboration with the Ordine degli Architetti di Roma e
Provincia. Eleven architects from seven different countries
(with Prisca Thielmann representing the BSR) presented
works dealing with their study of different facets of Rome.
Contacts between the British School and the German
Academy also led to the exhibition Germany–1, England–1,
at the gallery of Temple University Rome in June 2008,
bringing together two painters, Sainsbury Scholar John
Walter and German Academy resident Elke Zauner.
Finally, the sixth edition of Spazi Aperti was held at the
Romanian Academy from 11 to 25 June. The exhibition
included the work of more than 50 artists from various
foreign academies and institutions in Rome, with James and
Eleanor Avery, Anthony Faroux, Catrin Huber and John
Walter representing the BSR.
Research Staff
Rome-based painter Alessandra Giacinti, former assistant
to Italian master director Michelangelo Antonioni, worked
as Fine Arts Research Assistant from October 2007. She
proved reliable and helpful in all areas, including sourcing
materials and other information for the artists, assisting in
site visits, reconnaissance and public relations.
Christine Zhu, an undergraduate student from Rhodes
College, Memphis, Tennessee, worked as Fine Arts Intern in
May–June 2008, notably for the exhibitions Bologna Grand
Tour: the British School at Rome in Bologna and Tutti Frutti at
the BSR.
Jacopo Benci
Assistant Director (Fine Arts)
F A C U LT Y
I
OF THE
FINE ARTS
t is always the case that the various artists and architects
who take up the opportunity of working at the School
over any academic year are representative of a wide range
of ages, forms of expression, disciplines and passions. This
year the creative mix was added to by the piloting of a new
Sargant Fellowship in Curatorial and Critical Studies. The
recipient, Gordon Burn, who is an influential novelist and
writer on contemporary art and artists, brought a different
focus and outlook to engaging with Rome, resulting in
some thoughtful collaborative projects during the period of
his stay.
In addition to showcasing work in the g roup
exhibitions, organised three times a year by the Assistant
Director (Fine Arts), Jacopo Benci, the resident artists
and architects contributed to a lively range of external
projects with academies and institutions elsewhere in
Rome and other Italian cities. These creative initiatives
included 20Eventi08 — Arte contemporanea in Sabina, a joint
project involving artist Richard Wentworth and the
Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of
Oxford, together with five artists from the School who
made work for indoor and outdoor spaces in towns
throughout the Sabina region.
The Contemporar y Arts Programme, curated by
Cristiana Perrella, presented a number of projects by
British artists; As Simple As Your Life Used To Be, an
exhibition by Chris Evans, a talk by Martin Creed and the
publication of a comprehensive book on the work of Ian
Kiaer, who showed in the Gallery in 2006. A third series of
the contemporary sound and music project, Tracks,
attracted a broad audience from Rome and beyond.
Marina Engel has continued to organise interesting talks
by influential architects; Future Systems and David Adjaye
presented the final two talks in a series looking at the
design of art spaces. The Rome-based practice Ma0 has
started off a new cycle of events London–Rome: Work in
Process, examining architects’ relationships to Rome and
London.
A three-month fellowship for mid-career artists working
in lens-based media has been agreed with Photoworks,
initially tenable in alternate years until 2012–13. However,
the Wingate Foundation regrettably has decided not to
continue funding for the Wingate Rome Scholarship
beyond the coming year. This five- or six-month residency,
open to artists working in any media, has been of
tremendous value over the ten years for which we received
funding, providing important opportunities to artists at
different stages of their careers.
There have been many notable successes for past
resident artists this year, including Mark Wallinger, who was
awarded the 2007 Turner Prize; and Sigrid Holmwood,
Daniel Silver, Marta Marcé, Eamon O’Kane and Milly
Thompson have all had recent solo exhibitions or completed public art projects.
Recognising both the challenges ahead and the past
achievements within the Fine Arts programme (sensu lato), a
working group comprising members of the Faculty and of
Council has been brought together to suggest ways of
articulating a strong and coherent vision for the future. The
aim of the process is to ensure a strong residency, exhibitions and events programme that will attract future
sustainable funding and continue to develop the School’s
reputation and profile within Great Britain and Italy.
Jenni Lomax
Chair, Faculty of the Fine Arts
31
CONTEMPORARY ARTS PROGRAMME
A
nother very intense year has gone by, my tenth as
Curator of the Contemporary Arts Programme: two
exhibitions and many events, talks, live performances and
book presentations have taken place.
From 14 November to 7 December the CAP presented
The Secret Public: the Last Days of the British Underground
1978–1988. A Video Library, curated by Michael Bracewell,
Stefan Kalmár and Ian White, showing moving image work
from the exhibition of the same name that was organised
earlier in 2007 by the Kunstverein Munich and also shown
at the ICA in London. Disquieting, playful and intensely
urban, the exhibition was rooted in the political landscape
of the 80s and examined the dark flowering of creativity
that took shape in the UK between 1978 and 1988. It
juxtaposed some of the extraordinary art works from a
history that has remained undocumented as fashion, dance,
burlesque, music, video and film emerged as dominant
aesthetics and activities.
To coincide with the opening of the exhibition, a
programme of screenings and talks was presented in the
Sainsbury Lecture Theatre every Thursday night from 9 to
11 p.m. It featured: Cosey Fanni Tutti in conversation with
critic Daniela Cascella, introducing the screening of a video
programme about Throbbing Gristle; a video programme
about Scratch Video; and a panel discussion of
‘Underground culture in Italy in the 80s’.
On 21 January the book about British artist Ian Kiaer,
published in May 2007 following his November 2005
exhibition at the BSR, was launched. The book collects
Kiaer’s main art projects, with an introduction by Cristiana
Perrella, text by Mark Godfrey and an interview with the
artist by Caoimhin Mac Giolla Leith.
From 8 February to 8 March the CAP presented Chris
Evans’s exhibition As Simple As Your Life Used To Be, the
latest commission in the Viva Roma! project. From
conversations with four influential politicians (Giulio
Andreotti, Giulio Caradonna, Emanuele Macaluso, Oscar
Mammì) whose careers have spanned the history of the
32
Italian republic, Evans produced a series of allegorical
images and maquettes. All the works, along with the short
film that completed the show, were produced under the
umbrella of CAP.
On 12 February, as part of the Tracks series, curated by
Daniela Cascella for the CAP, a concert by Little Annie
(voice) and Paul Wallfisch (piano) was held in the Lecture
Theatre.
On 27 May Martin Creed was back at the BSR — after a
solo show in 1997 and an installation for the façade in 2003
— with a talk/performance. The event coincided with
Creed’s first solo show at the Lorcan O’Neill Gallery in
Rome.
Finally, on 8 July, the CAP closed the 2007–8 year with a
book presentation: Film d’artista, by Maria Rosa Sossai,
considers the productive relationship between art and
cinema, a topic that has often been explored by our exhibition programme over the course of the years.
All that was delivered this year would not have been
possible without the invaluable work of Assistant Curator
Maria Cristina Giusti, who sadly left in March 2008 after
four years of collaboration. A big thank you to her, and a
welcome to Alessandra Troncone, who started work in
April as part-time voluntary assistant to the programme.
An intense campaign of fundraising, addressed to both
institutional and private sponsors, has been launched in the
light of the financial restraints for 2008–9. Applications to
the Regione Lazio, the Provincia di Roma and the Henry
Moore Foundation were made to support specific projects
(Richard Wentworth’s installation in the entrance hall,
Tracks3 — the music programme of the CAP, and the
production of Kutlug Ataman’s new work for Viva Roma! in
2009), while contact with Mini Cooper was established.
Professional fundraisers have been consulted with a view to
increasing corporate sponsorship.
Cristiana Perrella
Curator, Contemporary Arts Programme
C O N T E M P O R A R Y
A R T S
P R O G R A M M E
Top left: Little Annie signing her CD for
Cristiana Perrella after the gig, with
Daniela Cascella in the background
Top right: Installation shot of The Secret
Public: the Last Days of the British
Underground 1978–1988. A Video Library
Below left: Installation shot of Chris
Evans’s exhibition, As Simple As Your Life
Used To Be
33
P U B L I C AT I O N S
A
‘
short review cannot do justice to the rich
documentation, detailed explanations, and careful
analysis presented in this book, which is an important
contribution in itself and is bound to stimulate more
scholarship and further investigations’, Journal of Roman
Studies 97 (2007); ‘… the book provides a valuable synthesis
of what is currently known about Portus, and it has broader
significance for this reason. It is likely to be consulted and
cited by scholars with an interest in the imperial harbor for
years to come’, Journal of Field Archaeology 32 (2007); ‘dans
une zone aussi menacée par les développements urbains,
aéroportuaires et touristiques, la nouvelle carte
archéologique dressée constitue aussi un instrument de
première importance dans la gestion et la sauvegarde du
patrimoine … Saluons le remarquable travail d’équipe qui a
pu gérer efficacement l’urgence et les difficultés techniques
pour un résultat original et novateur sur le plan historique’,
L’Antiquité Classique 76 (2007); ‘Despite its weight, this
book is reader-friendly. The paired full-page illustrations
and interpretations are an inspired idea, all the evidence is
made available, and the contributions of Italian colleagues
are valuable. It is an opulent production, well written and
produced, worthy of a splendid achievement’, Antiquity 80
(315) (2008); ‘This richly illustrated text is a paradigm for
how to conduct a well-funded, thorough, unobtrusive
geophysical survey. It provides a vital new compendium
about the function and design of Rome’s artificial harbor
and its relationship to Imperial maritime life … These and
other carefully informed conjectures afford the scholarly
world fresh insights into the complexity of Portus. Rome’s
great harbor complex hides many secrets, but thanks to
this meticulous publication, more have now been
revealed’, American Journal of Archaeology 112 (2008).
Such has been the reception of Portus: an Archaeological
Survey of the Port of Imperial Rome, by Simon Keay, Martin
Millett, Lidia Paroli and Kristian Strutt, published by the
BSR in 2005. Its popularity has been such that this year
we had to reprint, in order to satisfy demand.
34
Papers of the British School at Rome 75 (2007) was
published in November. It contains a range of papers,
including contributions on the archaeological survey of
the Faliscan settlement at Vignale, Falerii Veteres (by Simon
Keay and Martin Millett and their collaborators, a project
that forms part of the BSR’s Tiber Valley Project), on the
location of the Porta Romanula (by Peter Wiseman, Rome
Scholar 1961–2, Balsdon Fellow 1984–5, and Chair of the
School’s Council 2002–7), on Pirro Ligorio, Cassiano Dal
Pozzo and the Republic of Letters (by Susan Russell, the
School’s current Assistant Director), and on French policy
in Italy and the Jesuits, 1607–38 (by Anthony Wright,
Rome Scholar 1969–71).
The 2008 volume (vol. 76), which is currently in
production, will be the first one produced under the
Editorship of Josephine Crawley Quinn. It will also have a
new design, which we hope will prove more attractive
and, at the same time, easier for the reader.
This year has also seen the merger of the Publications
Advisory Committee with the Faculty of Archaeology,
History and Letters. This will allow a more efficient and
clear link between the research that the School is
supporting and the publications programme. Bryan WardPerkins remains as Chair of Publications within the
Faculty, and all members agreed to become members of
the Faculty. Thus academic validation for the formal
academic publications of the School now rests with the
Faculty of Archaeology, History and Letters.
Gill Clark
Publications Manager
A list of publications in print and details of how to order books appear on
pages 52–3. Any enquiries should be addressed to the School’s London office.
LIBRARY
A
AND
ARCHIVE
ll Library and Archive publications, exhibitions, special
projects and events are funded externally, and fundraising is now one of the Librarian’s main activities. As
reported previously, 2006–7 was a very successful year in
this respect, also thanks to close collaboration between Jill
Pellew, Chair of Development, and the Librarian. It is a
pleasure to report on the results of the past year.
The second project funded by the Getty Foundation to
catalogue and organise part of the J.B. Ward-Perkins
photographic collection (some 15,000 images) in the BSR
Photographic Archive began in September 2007. All the
images will also be digitised and made available on the
internet. Three sections have been selected and the
cataloguing of the 5,450 images of archaeological sites in
Libya is now complete. We are collaborating with Professor
Charlotte Roueché, King’s College, London, and the
University of Chapel Hill on their project to publish the
Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica (IRC) on the web, which
will be linked to our photographs. The first IRC workshop
was held at the BSR in February 2008 and the project was
presented to Italian, American and Polish archaeological
missions working in Libya. The response was enthusiastic.
Professor Roueché has also secured funding to publish
the BSR publication Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania on the
web, which will also be linked to our photographs. This
forms part of a collaborative project between the Centre for
Computing in the Humanities at King’s College, London,
and New York University, who were among the first to
receive a new Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grant
awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities
and the Joint Information Systems Committee — the BSR
Archive will be a partner in this project.
Work has now begun on the photographs relating to war
damage and the South Etruria Survey. Ward-Perkins, as
Lieutenant-Colonel in the British army, led the SubCommission of the Allied Government for Monuments and
Fine Arts, set up to document damage to monuments
caused by bombing throughout Italy during World War II,
and he secured a set of 1,250 photographs for the BSR. The
South Etruria Survey, the first archaeological survey in Italy,
carried out by Ward-Perkins in the 1950s and 60s, is
recorded in over 8,000 photographs and continued Thomas
Ashby’s pioneering study of the topography and
archaeology of the Roman Campagna.
The John R. Murray Charitable Trust awarded the
Library a very generous grant for the restoration and
conservation of volumes in the Rare Book collection and to
complete the restoration of Thomas Ashby’s photograph
albums. This year, three of the remaining ten photograph
albums have been restored by Fotocartarestauri in San
Casciano dei Bagni near Siena, who specialise in the
conservation of photographs. Work on the Rare Book
collection by our conservator, Luigina Antonazzo of
Laboratorio Aelle, has progressed very successfully, and the
refurbishing of 389 volumes has been carried out this year.
We have reported on the progress of our retrospective
conversion project for many years, and a final fundraising
effort is needed to complete this, as there are now only three
sections left to catalogue. This year we have completed the
Italian medieval and Renaissance history section, and the
4,000 records are now available on the URBS catalogue.
Work has begun on the section that includes ecclesiastical
and non-Italian history. Beatrice Gelosia, Deputy Librarian,
has completed cataloguing all periodicals, both current and
‘deceased’ (a total of 1,150 titles) onto the URBS system, as
well as all articles from PBSR from vol. 1 to the latest issue.
Prof. David Marshall, University of Melbourne, secured
funding from the Australian Research Council for a onemonth pilot project successfully completed in January 2008.
Caterina Sciacca, a postgraduate student from Melbourne,
studied the Library’s 112 miscellaneous prints and engravings
(sixteenth–nineteenth centuries) from the Thomas Ashby
collection which were then added to the URBS catalogue by
the Deputy Librarian and digitised by the Centro di
Fotoriproduzione, Legatoria e Restauro degli Archivi di Stato.
These images will soon be available on the internet.
35
L I B R A R Y
A N D
A R C H I V E
Even though the American Academy Library reopened on
schedule in September 2007, the number of outside readers
has continued to increase during the year, reaching a
maximum of 57 readers in one day, due to the ongoing closure
of the Vatican Library, the German Archaeological Institute
and the Hertziana. Thanks to the sympathetic support of
David Packard, through the Packard Humanities Institute, the
Library has been able to employ extra staff for the next three
years to extend the opening hours to outside readers until 6.45
p.m. and to re-shelve books and assist with readers’
enquiries. We are particularly grateful for this support which is
essential if the Library is to continue functioning efficiently.
The Library lent 50 early guides to Rome and four
engravings from the Rare Book collection to the Arcidiocesi
di Brindisi for an exhibition, Viaggi di pellegrinaggio nei testi e
nelle incisioni della British School at Rome, which opened on
the occasion of the Pope’s visit. The exhibition was curated
by Luigina Antonazzo (BSR conservator) and Professor
Giacomo Carito and thanks are due to the Arcidiocesi for
the generous donation for further restoration work on the
Rare Book collection.
Two photographic exhibitions have been organised by
the Library and Archive staff this year. On 4 October 2007
the fifth exhibition of Thomas Ashby’s photographs
opened. The title, I giganti dell’acqua, refers to his images of
Roman aqueducts in Lazio — the subject of the exhibition.
Over 250 people came to the opening and the response was
very positive. Both the catalogue and the exhibition, which
was shown at the Expo in Zaragoza, Spain in July 2008, were
financed by the Regione Lazio, Assessorato Cultura,
Spettacolo e Sport. The Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali of
the Comune di Roma and the Istituto Centrale per il
Catalogo e la Documentazione participated in the project.
The exhibition Itinerari abruzzesi: archeologia, arte e folklore
nelle fotografie di Thomas Ashby (1901–1923) opened on 23
April 2008. The subjects of these images — processions,
festivals, markets, costumes and landscapes — prove that
Ashby’s interests were not limited to archaeology. The
36
Above: Sulmona, market c. 1909, a photograph by Thomas Ashby
exhibition was then shown at the Società Geografica
Italiana in the Villa Celimontana in Rome, as part of an
event entitled Viaggio nelle regioni d’Italia: l’Abruzzo. A
number of Comuni in Abruzzo have already expressed
interest in hosting the exhibition in the future.
We are delighted to report that our Archivist, Alessandra
Giovenco, was offered a prestigious one-month residency in
August 2007 on the Advanced Residency Program of the
George Eastman House, Rochester (NY), the world’s
leading institution for the conservation of photographs. She
visited the Library of Congress and attended a five-day
seminar on Preserving Photographs in a Digital World.
This year thanks and appreciation must go to the team,
which includes permanent members of Library and Archive
staff, project collaborators, cataloguers, conservators, book
re-shelvers and all who have worked with commitment and
enthusiasm to achieve these excellent results.
Valerie Scott
Librarian
P U B L I C AT I O N S
AND
EXHIBITIONS
Jacopo Benci
2007 Jacopo Benci. Faraway and Luminous. London, British
School at Rome.
2007 Itinerari senza io, TraLeVolte, Rome.
2007 La memoria del futuro, Calabria Film Festival, Cosenza.
2007 Expotrastiendas 2007, Centro de Exposiciones de la
Ciudad, Buenos Aires.
2008 ‘Michelangelo’s Rome: towards an iconology of
L’Eclisse’, in R. Wrigley (ed.), Cinematic Rome: 75–94.
Leicester, Troubador.
2008 Jacopo Benci. L’infraordinario, TraLeVolte, Rome.
2008 Basta!, Gutleut15, Frankfurt.
2008 Spazi Aperti 6, Romanian Academy, Rome.
2008 In/Out, Nuovo Cinema Aquila, Rome.
2008 Artisti uniti per Rosso Malpelo, Centro Polifunzionale
Comunale, Nissoria.
BY
S TA F F
2008 ‘Modernisierungsängste: die Italienische Gesellschaft
und die Medien in den 1960er Jahren’, in T. Koebner
and I. Schenk (eds), Das Goldene Zeitalter des Italienischen
Films: die 1960er Jahre: 21–43. Munich, Text+Kritik.
Simon Keay
2007 ‘Reflections on the epigraphy of Roman Celti’, in M.
Mayer, G. Baratta and A. Guzmán (eds), XII
Congressus Internationalis Epigraphiae Graecae et Latinae.
Provinciae Imperii Romani. Inscriptionibus Descriptae.
Barcelona, 3–8 Septembris 2002 (Monografies de la Secció
Histórico Arqueológica X): 763–72. Barcelona, Institut
d’Estudis Catalans.
2008 with M. Millett and K. Strutt, ‘Recent archaeological
survey at Portus’, in R. Hohlfelder (ed.), The Maritime
World of Ancient Rome: 97–104. Michigan, Michigan
University Press.
Robert Coates-Stephens
2007 ‘The reuse of ancient statuary in late antique Rome
and the end of the statue habit’, in F.A. Bauer and C.
Witschel (eds), Statuen in der Spätantike (Spätantike —
Frühes Christentum — Byzanz. Kunst im Ersten
Jahrtausend. Reihe B: Studien und Perspektiven 23):
171–87. Wiesbaden, Reichert.
2007 ‘S. Saba and the xenodochium de via Nova’, in Rivista
di Archeologia Cristiana 83: 223–56.
David Forgacs
2007 ‘Michelangelo Antonioni’, in P. Bertetto (ed.), Action!
How Great Filmmakers Direct Actors: 201–13. Rome,
minimum fax (simultaneously published in Italianlanguage edition, Azione! Come i grandi registi dirigono gli
attori).
2008 ‘Gramsci’s notion of the ‘popular’ in Italy and Britain:
a tale of two cultures’, in M. Pfister and R. Hertel
(eds), Performing National Identity: Anglo-Italian Cultural
Transactions: 171–89. Amsterdam and New York,
Rodopi.
Cristiana Perrella
2008 Graciela Iturbide, El baño de Frida. Rome, Punctum.
Susan Russell
2007 ‘Rape, ritual and the responsible citizen: the Sala della
storia romana at Palazzo Pamphilj in Rome’, in Storia
dell’Arte 118 (n.s. 18): 57–72.
2007 ‘Pirro Ligorio, Cassiano dal Pozzo and the Republic
of Letters’, in Papers of the British School at Rome 75:
239–74.
2007 Exhibition review: Gone to meet the south. The
landscapes of Herman van Swanevelt, Stadsmuseum,
Woerden (7 April–8 July), in Print Quarterly 24. 4:
431–2.
2007 ‘Sant’Agnese in Agone auf der Piazza Navona’, in C.
Strunck (ed.), Rom: Meisterwerke der Baukunst von der
Antike bis Heute: Festgabe für Elisabeth Kieven: 382–8.
Petersberg, Imhof.
2008 ‘A taste for landscape: Innocent X Pamphilj and
Palazzo Pamphilj in Piazza Navona’, in J. Burke and
37
P U B L I C A T I O N S
A N D
E X H I B I T I O N S
B Y
S T A F F
2007 ‘Conservation in the shadow of Vesuvius’, in ICON:
the Preservation Quarterly of the World Monuments Fund 1:
22–9.
2007 ‘Vivre dans une petite ville: de Pompéi à Bliesbruck’,
in J.P. Petit and S. Santoro (eds), Vivre en Europe
romaine. De Pompéi à Bliesbruck-Reinheim: 61–8. Paris,
Editions Errance.
2008 ‘Housing the dead: the tomb as house in Roman
Italy’, in L. Brink and D. Green (eds), Commemorating
the Dead. Texts and Artifacts in Context: 39–77. Berlin
and New York, de Gruyter.
2008 ‘Introduction: the Herculaneum Conser vation
Project’, in special edition of Conser vation and
Management of Archaeological Sites 8.4: 187–91.
2008 with M.P. Guidobaldi, D. Camardo and V. Moesch,
‘Le ricerche archeologiche nell’ambito dell’Herculaneum
Conservation Project’, in P.G. Guzzo and M.P.
Guidobaldi (eds), Nuove ricerche archeologiche nell’area
vesuviana (scavi 2003–2006) (Atti del convegno
internazionale, Roma, 1–3 febbraio 2007): 409–24. Rome,
‘L’Erma’ di Bretschneider.
2008 Special edition of Conservation and Management of
Archaeological Sites 8.4:
J. Thompson, ‘Conser vation and management
challenges in a public-private partnership for a large
archaeological site (Herculaneum, Italy)’, 192–205.
D. Camardo, ‘Archaeology and conservation at
Herculaneum: from the Maiuri campaign to the
Herculaneum Conservation Project’, 206–15.
P. Pesaresi and M. Martelli Castaldi, ‘Conservation
measures for an archaeological site at risk
(Herculaneum, Italy): from emergency to
maintenance’, 215–36.
P. Pesaresi and G. Rizzi, ‘New and existing forms of
protective shelter at Herculaneum: towards
improving the continuous care of the site’, 237–52.
2008 A. Cinque and G. Irollo, ‘La paleogeografia dell’antica Herculaneum e le fluttazioni, di orgine bradisismica, della sua linea di costa’, in P.G. Guzzo and
M.P. Guidobaldi (eds), Nuove ricerche archeologiche
nell’area vesuviana (scavi 2003–2006) (Atti del convegno
internazionale Roma, 1–3 febbraio 2007): 425–38.
Rome, ‘L’Erma’ di Bretschneider.
2008 S. Court, ‘Herculaneum’s Amazon: new archaeological results from a conservation project’, in
Teaching History 42: 1, 34–5.
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Camerone
2007 D. Camardo, ‘On site insights’, in Current World
Archaeology 29: 66.
2007 J. Thompson, ‘Engagement in public–private
partnerships for cultural heritage: the case of
Herculaneum, Italy’, in ICCROM (ed.), Privatisation
and Cultural Heritage: 120–34. Rome, ICCROM.
2007 J. Thompson and S. Court, ‘Learning together:
sharing conservation decisions with the Herculaneum
Conservation Project’, in R. Varoli-Piazza (ed.),
Sharing Conservation Decisions: Lessons Learnt from an
ICCROM Course: 154–60. Rome, ICCROM.
2008 S. Hay, ‘Dati dalle prospezioni magnetometriche’, in
M. Medri (ed.), Sentinum. Ricerche in corso I: 60–7.
Rome, ‘L’Erma’ di Bretschneider.
M. Bury (eds), Art and Identity in Early Modern Rome:
155–70. Aldershot, Ashgate.
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
38
S TA F F
Core Staff
Academic Project Staff
Director
Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill,
OBE MA DPhil FSA
Assistant Director
Susan Russell, MA PhD
Research Professor in Archaeology
Professor Simon Keay, BA PhD FSA
Research Professor in
Modern Studies
Professor David Forgacs, BA PhD
Cary Fellow
Molly Cotton Fellow
Robert Coates-Stephens, BA PhD
Helen Patterson, BA PhD
Assistant Director (Fine Arts)
Jacopo Benci #
Curator, Contemporary Arts
Programme
Cristiana Perrella, MA #
Archivist
Valerie Scott, BA
Beatrice Gelosia
Francesca De Riso, BA #
Francesca Deli
Alessandra Giovenco, BA #
Registrar & Publications Manager
Administrative Assistant
Gill Clark, BA PhD
Sarah Ciacci, MA # *
Director’s Assistant
School Secretary
Hostel Supervisor
Hon. Secretary, Subscribers
Eleanor Murkett, MA
Maria Pia Malvezzi
Geraldine Wellington
Jo Wallace-Hadrill, MA #
Bursar
Domestic Bursar
Accounts Clerk
Maintenance
Cleaners
Alvise Di Giulio, BA
Renato Parente
Isabella Gelosia #
Fulvio Astolfi
Donatella Astolfi
Alba Coratti
Marisa Scarsella
Librarian
Deputy Librarian
Library Assistants
Cooks
Technical Assistant & Waiter
Waiters/Porters
Giuseppe Parente
Dharma Wijesiriwardana
Giuseppe Pellegrino
Antonio Palmieri
Rino Ramazzotti #
Portus Project / Archaeological Survey
Research Assistants
Roberta Cascino, MA
Elizabeth De Gaetano, MSc
Giles Richardson, MA°
Cinzia Filippone, MA
Robert Fry, BA°*
Stephen Kay, MSc
Leonie Pett, MA
Archaeological Illustrator
Sally Cann, BA
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Project Manager
Jane Thompson, MA DipArch
Research and Outreach
Co-ordinator
Sarah Court, MA
International Centre for the Study of Herculaneum
Centre Manager
Christian Biggi, MSt °
Website
Research Assistants
Director’s Projects
Research Assistants
Raphael Helman, BArch
Martina dalla Riva, BA°
Aimee Forster, MA
Christopher Siwicki, MA
Assistant Director’s Projects (Humanities)
Research Assistant
Roberto Cobianchi, BA PhD *
Architecture Programme
Curator
Marina Engel, MA
Contemporary Arts Programme
Assistant Curator
Maria Cristina Giusti, BA*
Assistant
Alessandra Troncone, BA°
Fine Arts Programme
Research Assistant
Intern
Alessandra Giacinti, BFA°
Christine Zhu
Press and Publicity
Press Officer
Rosanna Tripaldi, MA
________________
# Part-time
° Joined in 2007–8
* Left in 2007–8
39
TRUSTEES’ REPORT
Structure, Governance and
Management
The British School at Rome was founded in
1901 and incorporated by Royal Charter in
1912 (Supplemental Charter, 1995). It is a
registered charity, no. 314176. The
governing body of the School comprises the
President, HRH Princess Alexandra, the
Hon. Lady Ogilvy, KG, GCVO, and the
Council. The Director, Professor Andrew
Wallace-Hadrill, acts as the School’s Chief
Executive, has the right of attendance at all
meetings of Council and its Subcommittees,
and provides the secretariat from among the
School staff.
A list of all members of Council
(Trustees) who have acted during the
2007–2008 financial year appears below,
together with details of the School’s financial
advisers, members of all Subcommittees, and
a full list of members of staff.
Under the terms of the Royal Charter,
two Council members are to be appointed
by the President of the British Academy and
the rest are appointed by the Council. No
fewer than seven members must be selected
from the fields of specialisation and work
enshrined in the School’s objectives. Care is
taken to secure a balance between
specialists in the Fine Arts and the
Humanities and generalists with legal,
financial and fundraising skills. Members of
Council serve for a term of five years,
renewable for a maximum of a further five
years. Members of Council are normally
required to be under the age of 70 on
election. They are normally expected to be
familiar with the School and its work on
appointment, and are invited to visit the
School in Rome and to meet staff both
40
there and in London as part of an induction
process. Council meets three times a year.
Council is advised on all matters of
finance and personnel by the Finance and
Personnel Subcommittee, which consists of
the Chair of Council, the Treasurer, and the
Chairs of all Subcommittees, and meets
normally four times a year.
Grants are awarded by Council on the
recommendation of two specialist advisory
committees, the Faculty of Archaeology,
History and Letters and the Faculty of the
Fine Arts. Chairs of Faculties are appointed
by Council, and must be members of
Council. Members of Faculties are
appointed for a five-year term by Council
on the recommendation of the Faculties;
they are chosen to represent the full range
of specialist interests that fall within the
chartered objectives of the School.
Fellowships, scholarships and awards are
advertised once a year, and the Faculties
meet once annually to consider applications,
and to monitor reports by recipients of
awards. The awards process is administered
from the London office by the Registrar.
Details of how to apply for awards together
with relevant forms are available on the
School’s website.
Council is advised on all academic
publications of the School by the Faculty of
Archaeology, History and Letters, under the
chairmanship of the Chair of Publications.
The Chair is appointed by Council, and
must be a member of Council.
Council is advised on development and
fundraising by the Chair of Development;
the Chair is appointed by Council, and must
be a member of Council.
.
Risk Management
Council has identified and reviewed the
major risks to which the School is exposed
and considers that, to the extent that it is
able, it has systems in place to mitigate
those risks. It reviews its risk assessment on
an annual basis.
Objectives, Activities and Plans for
the Future
The objects of the School are set out in the
Supplemental Royal Charter (1995) as
follows:
(a) To promote the study in Italy of
archaeology, history and letters, architecture, painting, sculpture, printmaking and
other arts.
(b) To establish and maintain in Rome a
hostel for students attending the School
who are studying arts, archaeology, history
and letters and who are of British or
Commonwealth birth, education or
residence.
(c) To establish and maintain studios and
other buildings for the purposes of the
School and their use by the students and
other persons attending the School.
(d) To pursue archaeological and other
researches and publications in the subject
areas specified in (a) above.
(e) To maintain in Rome a general
library of the arts, archaeology, history and
letters.
(f) To award Scholarships, Exhibitions,
Bursaries, Research Grants and other forms
of assistance to those of British or
Commonwealth birth, education or residence,
engaged in the study of the arts, archaeology,
history or letters.
T R U S T E E S ’
The School’s mission statement and
summary statement of activities in pursuit
of its objects are given on the opening page
of this Annual Report. The objectives for
the year, achievements and plans for the
future are set out in detail above, in the
Director’s Report and in the reports on
individual activities that follow: these
constitute an integral part of the formal
Trustees’ Report.
COUNCIL
Professor R. Burdett
Mr R. Cooper
Professor S. Farthing
Mr M.N. Higgin (Hon. Treasurer)
Mr T.D. Llewellyn
Ms J. Lomax
Professor M.J. Millett
Mr A.R. Nairne
Dr J.H. Pellew
Sir Ivor Roberts (Chair from January
2008)
Dr F. Salmon
Mr B. Ward-Perkins
Dr S. Walker°
Professor M. Warner
Professor C.J. Wickham
Professor T.P. Wiseman* (Chair to
December 2007)
The Chief Executive of the British Academy
is invited to observe Council meetings.
Director
Professor A. Wallace-Hadrill
R E P O R T
Auditors
HLB Vantis Audit plc
82 St John Street
London EC1M 4JN
Accountants
Vantis Group Limited
82 St John Street
London EC1M 4JN
Italian Financial Adviser
Fragano & Partners
Via A. Gallonio 8
00161 Rome
Investment Managers and Advisers
Cazenove Capital Management Limited
12 Moorgate
London EC2R 6DA
Bankers
National Westminster Bank Plc
186 Brompton Road
London SW3 1XJ
Credito Emiliano
Via del Tritone 97–8
00187 Rome
Finance and Personnel Subcommittee
Mr M.N. Higgin
Ms J. Lomax
Dr J.H. Pellew
Sir Ivor Roberts° (Chair from January 2008)
Dr F. Salmon
Mr B. Ward-Perkins
Professor T.P. Wiseman* (Chair to
December 2007)
___________________
Charity Number: 314176
° Joined during 2007–8
* Left during 2007–8
San Paolo–IMI
Agenzia 36, Via Civinini 50
00144 Rome
41
F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
FINANCIAL REVIEW
The financial statements should be read in
conjunction with the reports on pages 3 to 36.
The School’s normal activity, disclosed
under ‘unrestricted funds’ in the statement of
financial activities, ended the financial year
with a surplus of £30,000 (2007 surplus of
£10,000).
Restricted income includes the major
grants from the Packard Humanities Institute,
principally to fund conservation work at
Herculaneum, and grants from the Getty
Foundation for Library projects. The
movements in restricted funds are disclosed
in note 18.
The fall in investment values in the current
year resulted in a decrease in reserves of
£125,000. Council may invest in any securities
approved by law for the investment of trust or
charitable monies, or such other securities as
the Council may from time to time approve.
Council has appointed investment advisers to
manage the School’s investment portfolio,
with the objective of maintenance of income
and growth. Both the income and growth
objectives were achieved.
Unrestricted reserves decreased at year
end by £82,000 to £2,411,000 mainly as a
result of the valuation losses on investments.
The level of unrestricted reserves is
considered by Council to be adequate to meet
the immediate needs of the School. The
balance on restricted funds may only be used
for the purposes described in note 18 and is
not available for the general purposes of the
School.
42
The School’s reserves comprise general
funds, designated funds, and restricted funds.
Council’s policy is that:
- designated funds and restricted funds
should be retained for the specific
purposes for which they were set up
- the level of general funds, after
eliminating all unrealised revaluation
surpluses, should not fall below three, nor
exceed twelve months’ core running costs
of the School.
STATEMENT OF TRUSTEES’
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Trustees are responsible for preparing the
Annual Report and financial statements in
accordance with applicable law and United
Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting
Practice.
The Trustees are required to prepare
financial statements for each financial year
which give a true and fair view of the state of
the School’s affairs at the end of the financial
year and of the School’s activities for the
financial year. In preparing those financial
statements, the Trustees are required to:
- select suitable accounting policies and
apply them consistently
- make judgements and estimates that are
reasonable and prudent
- state whether applicable accounting
standards and statements of recommended
practice have been followed, subject to any
departures disclosed and explained in the
financial statements
- prepare the financial statements on the
going concern basis unless it is
inappropriate to presume that the School
will continue in operation.
The Trustees are responsible for:
- keeping proper accounting records that
disclose with reasonable accuracy at any
time the financial position of the School
and which enable them to ascertain the
financial position of the School and to
ensure that the financial statements comply
with Charities Act 1993
- safeguarding the assets of the School and
hence for taking reasonable steps for the
prevention and detection of fraud and other
irregularities.
The Trustees confirm that, so far as they are
aware, there is no relevant audit information of
which the School’s auditors are unaware. They
have taken all the steps that they ought to have
taken as Trustees in order to make themselves
aware of any relevant audit information and to
establish that the School’s auditors are aware
of that information.
By order of the Council (Trustees) 23 June 2008
Signed on its behalf by
M.N. Higgin — Honorary Treasurer
F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT
TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH
SCHOOL AT ROME
We have audited the financial statements of
the British School at Rome for the year ended
31 March 2008 on pages 44 to 50. These
financial statements have been prepared under
the accounting policies set out therein.
This report is made solely to the charity’s
Trustees, as a body, in accordance with
Section 43 of the Charities Act 1993 and with
regulations made under Section 44 of that Act.
Our audit work has been undertaken so that we
might state to the charity’s Trustees those
matters we are required to state to them in an
auditors’ report and for no other purpose. To
the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not
accept or assume responsibility to anyone
other than the charity and the charity’s
Trustees as a body, for our audit work, for this
report, or for the opinions we have formed.
RESPECTIVE RESPONSIBILITIES OF TRUSTEES AND
AUDITORS
As described in the Statement of Trustees’
Responsibilities, the charity’s Trustees are
responsible for the preparation of the financial
statements in accordance with applicable law
and United Kingdom Accounting Standards
(United Kingdom Generally Accepted
Accounting Practice).
We have been appointed as auditors under
Section 43 of the Charities Act 1993 and report
in accordance with regulations made under
Section 44 of that Act. Our responsibility is to
audit the financial statements in accordance
with relevant legal and regulatory requirements
and International Standards on Auditing (UK
and Ireland).
We report to you our opinion as to whether
the financial statements give a true and fair
view and are properly prepared in accordance
with the Charities Act 1993. We also report to
you if, in our opinion, the Trustees’ Report is not
consistent with the financial statements, if the
charity has not kept proper accounting records,
or if we have not received all the information
and explanations we require for our audit.
We read other information contained in the
Annual Report and consider whether it is
consistent with the audited financial
statements. We consider the implications for
our report if we become aware of any apparent
misstatement or material inconsistencies with
the financial statements. Our responsibilities
do not extend to any other information.
BASIS OF AUDIT OPINION
We conducted our audit in accordance with
International Standards on Auditing (UK and
Ireland), issued by the Auditing Practices
Board. An audit includes examination, on a test
basis, of evidence relevant to the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statements. It also
includes an assessment of the significant
estimates and judgements made by the
Trustees in the preparation of the financial
statements and of whether the accounting
policies are appropriate to the charity’s
circumstances, consistentIy applied and
adequately disclosed.
We planned and performed our audit so as
to obtain all the information and explanations
which we considered necessary in order to
provide us with sufficient evidence to give
reasonable assurance that the financial
statements are free from material misstatement, whether caused by fraud or other
irregularity or error. In forming our opinion we
also evaluated the overall adequacy of the
presentation of information in the financial
statements.
OPINION
In our opinion the financial statements:
- give a true and fair view, in accordance
with United Kingdom Generally Accepted
Accounting Practice, of the state of the
School's affairs as at 31 March 2008 and of
its incoming resources and application of
resources, including its income and
expenditure, in the year then ended; and
- have been properly prepared in accordance
with the Charities Act 1993.
HLB Vantis Audit plc
Chartered Accountants
Registered Auditor
82 St John Street
London EC1M 4JN
17 September 2008
43
S TAT E M E N T
OF
FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES
for the year ended 31 March 2008
Income and Expenditure
INCOMING RESOURCES:
Incoming resources from generated funds
Voluntary income
Grant from the British Academy
Other grants, donations and legacies
Subscriptions
Activities for generating funds
Appeal income
Other income
Investment income
Incoming resources from charitable activities
Publications
Residential income
Other income
Other incoming resources
Exchange gains
TOTAL INCOMING RESOURCES
RESOURCES EXPENDED:
Costs of generating funds
Costs of generating voluntary income
Charitable activities
Governance costs
TOTAL RESOURCES EXPENDED
Notes
Restricted
Funds
£’000
1,018
350
9
20
3,121
-
1,038
3,471
9
991
2,346
14
2
44
77
12
15
14
44
92
27
66
79
27
328
185
-
27
328
185
29
293
8
2,040
223
3,391
223
5,431
3,853
2
1,957
51
2,010
1,582
1,582
2
3,539
51
3,592
8
3,764
57
3,829
30
1,809
1,839
24
22
(134)
2
(15)
24
(149)
59
54
(82)
2,493
2,411
1,796
620
2,416
1,714
3,113
4,827
137
2,976
3,113
2
3
4
5
6
7–9
10
Net incoming resources before other recognised
gains and losses
OTHER RECOGNISED GAINS AND LOSSES
Realised gains on investments
Unrealised (losses)/ gains on investments
Net movement in funds
Opening funds
Total funds carried forward
13
13
The notes on pages 46 to 50 form part of these financial statements.
The statement of financial activities is prepared on the basis that all activities are continuing.
44
Total Funds
Total Funds
Year Ended
Year Ended
31 March 2008 31 March 2007
£’000
£’000
Unrestricted
Funds
£’000
BALANCE
SHEET
as at 31 March 2008
2008
Notes
Fixed Assets
Tangible assets
Heritage assets
Investments — unrestricted
Investments — restricted
Total investments
Total Fixed Assets
Current Assets
Debtors
Cash at bank and in hand — unrestricted
Cash at bank and in hand — restricted
Total cash at bank and in hand
Creditors — unrestricted
Creditors — restricted
Creditors: total amounts falling due within one year
12
12
14
15
Represented by:
Funds
Unrestricted
Restricted
Total Charity Funds
£’000
£’000
75
500
1,908
240
2,148
2,723
13
Net Current Assets
Total Assets less Current Liabilities
Less:
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Net Assets
£’000
2007
£’000
99
500
2,035
240
2,275
2,874
67
308
2,323
2,631
2,698
16
224
642
866
882
(215)
(147)
(362)
(214)
(262)
(476)
2,336
5,059
406
3,280
16
(232)
4,827
(167)
3,113
17
18
2,411
2,416
2,493
620
4,827
3,113
Approved by the Council on 23 June 2008 and signed on its behalf by
Sir Ivor Roberts — Chairman
M.N. Higgin — Honorary Treasurer
The notes on pages 46 to 50 form part of these financial statements.
45
NOTES
T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Basis of Preparation
The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Statement of
Recommended Practice ‘Accounting and Reporting by Charities’ (SORP 2005),
applicable accounting standards and the Charities Act 1993. The accounts have
been prepared on a going concern basis, under the historical cost convention as
modified by the revaluation of certain fixed assets and using the following policies.
a) Incoming Resources
All income is gross without deduction for related expenditure.
Legacies, including payments on account of legacies, are recognised in the
accounts when there is reasonable certainty of receipt and the amount can be
ascertained. Grants for general support, research, scholarships or fixed assets
are recognised on a receivable basis and are deferred only when the donor has
imposed pre-conditions on the use of the grant.
The School recognises the intangible value of accommodation provided to
recipients of awards and scholarships as a credit to residential income and a
charge to grants and scholarships.
b) Resources Expended
Liabilities for expenditure are recognised in accordance with the accruals concept.
Grants payable for research and scholarship fall due only when such
research is undertaken or upon attendance at the School and accordingly are
accounted for over the period of research or attendance. More details on the
nature of awards are shown in the Annual Report. Expenditure for research
and academic studies, residential research programmes, library and
publications disclosed within charitable activities includes departmental
salaries. A proportion of salary costs is allocated to governance costs based on
the approximate time expended on such activities.
Support costs are allocated in full to expenditure incurred on charitable
activities. The majority of costs are allocated on a pro rated basis over the
different activities undertaken by the School, excluding activities which are
financed by restricted funds. Support costs which are related to a specific
activity are allocated to that activity in full. The Trustees consider this to be
the most appropriate method of allocation.
c) Pensions
The School contributes to the UK Universities Superannuation Scheme for
certain of its employees. The Universities Superannuation Scheme is a
defined benefit scheme which is externally funded. The assets of the scheme
are held in a separate trustee-administered fund. It is not possible to identify
each institution’s share of the underlying assets and liabilities of the scheme
and hence contributions to the scheme are accounted for as if it were a
defined contribution scheme in accordance with FRS 17. The charge
recognised within the Statement of Financial Activities is equal to the
contributions payable to the scheme for the year.
46
d) Staff Termination Fund
The School provides for deferred pay which is due to Italian employees when
they leave the employment of the School. The amount payable is calculated in
accordance with existing Italian legal requirements and the Italian national
labour contract. The charge is recognised within the Statement of Financial
Activities.
e) Fixed Assets
Fixed assets other than library books are disclosed at cost. Depreciation is
provided by the School to write off the cost less the estimated residual value
of tangible fixed assets over their useful economic lives as follows:
Computers
25% straight line
Motor vehicles
25% straight line
Office equipment
20% straight line
Furniture and fittings
20% straight line
The Library is considered to be a heritage asset and is stated in the balance
sheet at an attributed value based on its insured value. The annual cost of
additions to the Library, which is equivalent to an annual depreciation rate of
approximately 10% straight line, is charged to the Statement of Financial
Activities to represent the notional write down in the useful economic life of
the Library.
f) Investments
Investments are carried at market value with any unrealised gains and losses
being included in the Statement of Financial Activities allocated between
restricted and unrestricted funds.
The proportion of investment income relating to restricted funds is retained
for use within restricted funds.
g) Foreign Currency
Foreign currency conversion for the balance sheet is at year-end rates,
except where the balances are covered by forward contracts to meet known
future liabilities, when the contract rate is used. During the year the
translation is at average rates on a month to month basis, or forward
contract rate as applicable. Exchange gains or losses are treated as other
income or expenditure in the Statement of Financial Activities where they
cannot be directly related to individual activities. Where exchange gains or
losses can be directly related to individual designated or restricted projects
the gain or loss is attributed to the relevant fund.
h) Cash Flow Statement
The School is exempted by FRS 1 (revised) from preparing a cash flow
statement.
i) Funds
Details of the funds of the School, how they have arisen and their use are
given in notes 17 and 18.
NOTES
T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
2. OTHER GRANTS, DONATIONS AND LEGACIES
7. CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES
Unrestricted
Funds
£’000
Restricted
Funds
£’000
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
347
3
3,088
33
3,435
36
2,340
6
350
3,121
3,471
2,346
Other grants
Donations and legacies
3. APPEAL INCOME
Appeal income primarily relates to funds raised to preserve some of the
Library’s rare books.
Expenditure on charitable activities is made up as follows:
Direct
Expenses
£’000
Research and academic salaries
Residential research programmes
Research projects
Library
Publications
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Fasti on line project
Support
Costs
£’000
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
551
530
106
294
11
1,407
118
203
178
35
102
4
-
754
708
141
396
15
1,407
118
715
651
426
46
1,849
77
3,017
522
3,539
3,764
Included within charitable expenditure is the following restricted expenditure:
4. INVESTMENT INCOME
Dividends — UK equities
Interest — UK fixed interest securities
Interest on cash deposits
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
49
15
28
45
17
17
92
79
Herculaneum Conservation Project
Fasti on line project
Scholarships (within residential research programmes)
Getty Library project (within Library costs)
Library appeal fund (within Library costs)
PHI Library project (within Library costs)
Murray project (within Library costs)
British Academy Grant — collaborative project
(within residential research programmes)
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
1,407
118
6
17
11
8
10
1,849
77
13
-
5
-
1,582
1,939
5. RESIDENTIAL INCOME
Residential income includes the intangible
value of accommodation provided to
recipients of grants and scholarships of:
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
140
120
6. COSTS OF GENERATING FUNDS
Costs of generating funds comprise sundry expenses incurred in raising funds.
8. GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
Charitable activities include the cost of grants and scholarships awarded. Grants
and scholarships comprise £329,000 (2007 — £277,000) awarded to 57 (2007 —
51) individuals. There were no grants payable to Institutions (2007 — none).
Total
2008
Total
2007
No.
£’000
No.
£’000
Grants paid:
Research
17
Scholarships
40
Intangible value of accommodation
74
115
140
13
38
54
103
120
57
329
51
277
47
NOTES
T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
9. SUPPORT COSTS
Support costs, which are allocated to charitable activities, are as follows:
Support staff salaries
Building maintenance and utilities costs
IT and equipment maintenance
Depreciation
Travel expenses
Consultants’ fees
Other
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
232
96
56
48
11
42
37
204
201
43
50
13
44
31
522
586
All support costs relate to unrestricted funds.
10. GOVERNANCE COSTS
Salaries and pensions
Auditors’ remuneration
Accountancy fees
Annual Report
Council and committee meetings
2008
No
2007
No
7
8
2
5
5
1
7
8
2
5
5
1
The Trustees of the School received no remuneration in the year under review
(2007 — £nil). An aggregate of £3,338 (2007 — £1,340) was reimbursed to
eight (2007 — seven) Trustees in respect of travel charges.
2007
£’000
15
11
3
7
15
20
10
3
7
17
12. FIXED ASSETS
51
57
Cost or Valuation
11. TRUSTEES AND EMPLOYEES
48
The average number of employees
analysed by function was as follows:
Academic programmes
Residential research programmes
Publications
Library
Support
Management and administration of the charity
2008
£’000
All governance expenditure relates to unrestricted funds.
Aggregate staff costs comprise:
Wages and salaries
Taxes, social security and related costs
Pensions
Staff termination pay (note 16)
The School participates in the Universities Superannuation Scheme. The latest actuarial
valuation of the scheme was at 31 March 2005. At the valuation date, the assets of the
scheme were 77% of the accrued liabilities based on projected pensionable salaries and
the value of the past service deficit was £6,568 million. This is based on a funding target
of £28,308 million and the actuarial value of assets of £21,740 million. The institution
contribution rate will be maintained at 14% of salaries. Surpluses or deficits which arise
at future valuations may impact on the School’s future contribution commitment. The
total UK pension cost for the School was £14,016 (2007 — £16,898). The contribution to
the provision of staff termination pay for the year was £38,124 (2007 — £23,922). No
employees earned more than £60,000 per annum (2007 — none).
Library Computer
Office Furniture
Books Equipment Equipment & Fittings Vehicles
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
Total
£’000
Brought forward
Additions
500
-
313
13
196
7
121
4
61
-
1,191
24
Carried forward
500
326
203
125
61
1,215
Brought forward
Charge for year
-
286
16
169
14
85
12
52
6
592
48
Carried forward
-
302
183
97
58
640
At 31 March 2008
500
24
20
28
3
575
At 31 March 2007
500
27
27
36
9
599
Depreciation
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
584
279
14
38
535
227
17
24
915
803
Net Book Value
Fixed assets held are all for direct charitable use.
NOTES
T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
Under an agreement dated 25 April 1912 between the Comune di Roma and the British
Ambassador at that time, the British School at Rome was granted, for an annual rental
of one Italian lira, the use in perpetuity of the land on which the School is built, provided
that the land is used exclusively for study and research in the humanities, archaeology
and fine arts. Should the land not be used for such purposes, it has to be surrendered to
the Comune without any compensation for its cost or value. On this basis, no value is
ascribed to the School building in the accounts or to any additions or improvements to
the building. Such expenditure is written off to the Statement of Financial Activities in
the year of expenditure.
The Trustees consider that it is not possible to ascribe a meaningful value to the
intangible benefit of the use of the land on which the School is built.
The Trustees consider the Library of books, papers, manuscripts and pictures to be a
heritage asset within the definition of SORP 2005. Many of the contents are considered
to be irreplaceable. On this basis, the Trustees have ascribed the insured value of the
Library as its value to the School. The Library's holdings consist of approximately 60,000
volumes of which 50,000 are monographs and 10,000 periodicals. 600 current
periodicals are taken. Specialisms include: Mediterranean archaeology, prehistory,
ancient history and texts, the history of ancient religions, ecclesiastical and medieval
history, Italian topography, history of art and architectural history, and the writings of
travellers in Italy. The open-shelf reference Library provides the bibliographic resources
and services necessary to support the research activities of the School. The Library aims
to complement UK academic libraries through its holdings of local Italian publications
and periodicals, and welcomes all scholars, undergraduates and graduates studying in
any field relevant to its collections.
The movement on quoted investments comprises:
Market value at 1 April
Additions at cost
Disposal proceeds
Realised gains on disposals
Unrealised (losses)/gains
Market value at 31 March
2,040
390
(441)
1,989
59
54
2,102
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
67
16
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
362
362
476
476
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
232
167
15. CREDITORS: amounts falling due within one year
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
1,917
231
2,148
2,102
173
2,275
16. PROVISIONS
1,725
1,761
This liability represents deferred pay due to employees at 31 March 2008,
payable when they leave the School. The amount payable is calculated in
accordance with existing Italian legal requirements and the Italian national
labour contract.
The movements on the provision in the year are as follows:
The following investments individually comprise the investments held:
Cazenove Unit Trust Management:
Growth Trust for Charities
Income Trust for Charities
Absolute Return Trust for Charities
Equity Income Trust for Charities
European Fund
Property Trust
2,102
18
(78)
2,042
24
(149)
1,917
Other debtors and prepayments
13. INVESTMENTS
Historical cost at 31 March:
Quoted investments
2007
£’000
14. DEBTORS
Other creditors and accruals
UK quoted investments
Cash on deposit
2008
£’000
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
610
283
366
535
28
95
680
280
320
686
27
109
Provision for staff termination pay
Balance at 1 April
Increase in provision for the year
Payment to existing employee
Exchange loss
Balance at 31 March
2008
£’000
2007
£’000
167
38
27
232
151
24
(8)
167
49
NOTES
T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
for the year ended 31 March 2008
17. UNRESTRICTED FUNDS
General
Funds
£’000
Capital
Fund
£’000
Designated
Funds
£’000
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
At 1 April
908
Transfer from
restricted funds
Net incoming/(outgoing)
resources
32
Realised gains
on investments
16
Unrealised (losses)/ gains
on investments
(96)
278
1,307
2,493
2,373
-
-
-
9
-
(2)
30
10
-
6
22
54
-
(38)
(134)
47
At 31 March
278
1,273
2,411
2,493
860
The designated funds are funds set aside by Council for various grants for
research and scholarship and arise from unrestricted bequests.
18. RESTRICTED FUNDS
British Academy
Fund
£’000
At 1 April
Getty
Fund
£’000
Cary Appeal
Fund Funds
£’000
£’000
PHI
Funds
£’000
Other
Funds
£’000
Total
2008
£’000
Total
2007
£’000
-
-
164
30
380
46
620
603
Transfer to
designated funds -
-
-
-
-
-
-
(9)
Total incoming
resources
20
115
7
13
3,173
63
3,391
1,953
Total resources
expended
(5)
(17)
(7)
Realised gains on
investments
-
-
2
(11) (1,533)
-
-
2
5
Unrealised (losses)/ gains on investments
(12)
-
-
(3)
(15)
7
2,020
97
2,416
620
At 31 March
50
98
154
32
19. ANALYSIS OF NET ASSETS BETWEEN FUNDS
Unrestricted
Funds
£’000
Fund balances at 31 March 2008 are represented by:
Tangible fixed assets
575
Investments
1,908
Cash
308
Other current assets
67
Current liabilities
(215)
Long-term liabilities
(232)
Total net assets
2,411
Restricted
Funds
£’000
Total
£’000
240
2,323
(147)
2,416
575
2,148
2,631
67
(362)
(232)
4,827
20. COMMITMENTS
The School has awarded grants and scholarships totalling £85,210 to be paid
in 2008–9 (2007–8 — £88,000). No provision has been made for these grants
as the conditions attaching to the grants had not been met at 31 March 2008.
(9) (1,582) (1,939)
-
15
The bequest establishing the Cary Fund was restricted and Council determined in
November 1995 that it should be used to create a fellowship to enable an
academic to undertake research in Rome and to be involved with a School
postgraduate taught course.
The Packard Humanities Institute (PHI) Funds represent grants given by the
Institute to finance specific projects, principally in Herculaneum.
The British Academy Fund relates to funding for a collaborative project with the
Society for Libyan Studies to fund a series of Punic Mediterranean workshops.
The Getty Fund represents grants given by the Getty Foundation for the
arrangement and description of the J.B. Ward-Perkins photographic collection.
21. CONTROLLING PARTY
The activities of the School are controlled by Council. There is no ultimate
controlling party of the School.
SUBCOMMITTEES
Faculty of the Fine Arts
Ms E. Bonham Carter
Ms J. Farrer
Mr J. Fobert °
Ms A. Gallagher
Mr J. Gill
Ms C. Hawley
Professor C. Hopkins
Ms J. Lomax (Chair)
Ms V. Lovell º
Ms B. Lowe *
Mr D. Masi
Mr E. Parry *
Ms A. Turnbull
Dr A. Williamson
Mr A. Wilson
Faculty of Archaeology, History and
Letters
Dr D. Atkinson *
Dr C. Burdett
Dr E. Isayev
Dr V. Izzet º
Dr R. Jackson
Professor R. McKitterick
Professor M. Millett (Chair of Archaeology)
Professor S. Milner
Dr J. Crawley Quinn º
Professor L. Riall º
Dr C. Richardson
Dr C. Robertson º
Dr F. Salmon (Chair)
Dr A. Sennis º
Dr R. Skeates
Mr B. Ward-Perkins (Chair of Publications)
Professor R. Whitehouse º
Professor A. Wilson
Mr M. Wilson Jones º
AND
HONORARY FELLOWS
Publications Advisory Committee
With effect from 1 January 2008 this
committee merged with the Faculty of
Archaeology, History and Letters
Dr G. Clark
Dr V. Izzet
Dr J. Crawley Quinn
Dr L. Riall
Dr C. Robertson
Dr F. Salmon (ex officio)
Dr A. Sennis
Mr B. Ward-Perkins (Chair)
Professor R. Whitehouse
Mr M. Wilson Jones
Professor M. Wyke *
Development Advisory Group
With effect from 1 January 2008 this
committee was disbanded
Mrs D. Baring
Mrs C. Colvin
Mr N. Cranston
Lady Egerton
Mr M.N. Higgin
Mr S. Oddie
Dr J.H. Pellew (Chair)
Mr H. Petter
HONORARY FELLOWS
Professor Girolamo Arnaldi
Professor Anna Maria Bietti Sestieri
Dr Angelo Bottini
Mr Peter Brown
Professor Andrea Carandini
Mr Roderick Cavaliero
Professor Filippo Coarelli
Professor Lucos Cozza
Professor Francesco D’Andria
Professor Stefano De Caro
Professor Paolo Delogu
Lady Egerton
Professor Emanuela Fabbricotti
Mr Robert Jackson
Professor Anna Gallina Zevi
Professor Pier Giovanni Guzzo
Professor Adriano La Regina
Professor Eugenio La Rocca
Dr Tersilio Leggio
Professor David Marshall
Professor Fergus Millar
Avv. Luca Cordero di Montezemolo
Professor John Osborne
Dr David Woodley Packard
Professor Silvio Panciera
Professor Paola Pelagatti
Dr Anna Maria Reggiani
Professor Geoffrey Rickman
Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover
Mr Michael Stillwell
Professor Mario Torelli
Professor Maria Luisa Veloccia Rinaldi
Professor Fausto Zevi
___________________
° Joined during 2007–8
* Left during 2007–8
51
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Illustration Acknowledgements
Cover: Luftschloss (If wall decoration was structural),
2008, by Prisca Thielmann, photograph courtesy of
Prisca Thielmann; Black Sea, 2007, by Nadia
Hebson, photograph by Claudio Abate
Page 5 Photographs by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
Page 8–9 Photographs by Andrea Ruggeri and
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
Pages 12–3 Photographs by Andrew WallaceHadrill, image by Ascanio D’Andrea
Page 16 Photograph by Alan Brent
Pages 17–8 Photographs by Allison Weir
Pages 24–5 Photographs by Sophie Hay, Mario
Letizia and Andrew Wallace-Hadrill; image by
Leonie Pett
Page 28 Photographs by Claudio Abate, Silvia
Stucky, and courtesy of Spartacus Chetwynd
Page 29 Photographs by Claudio Abate, and
courtesy of Cian Donnelly, John Walter
Page 33 Photographs by Mimmo Capone, Maurizio
Isidori and Thomas Toti
Page 36 Photograph in BSR Archive collection
Graphic Design Silvia Stucky
Printing Società Tipofrafica Romana, Rome
September 2008
2007–2008 Annual Report
of the British School at Rome
© the British School at Rome
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receive the Papers free of charge (UK and Commonwealth institutions only)
I
receive discounts on BSR publications
I
can request assistance in securing permissions for group visits
I
can participate in taught courses organised by the School
I
can, subject to availability, make residential bookings for groups.
Subscription enquiries may be sent to the Subscriptions Secretary at the
BSR. A subscription form is enclosed with this Annual Report.
DONATIONS
The School welcomes donations to its Appeal, which aims primarily to
increase the endowment for awards to fellows and scholars. Your continued
support, if possible taking advantage of Gift Aid (see below), is vital.
Gift Aid
The School can recover tax on almost any gift made to it by a UK
taxpayer. You only need to fill in a Gift Aid Declaration once for us to
benefit on all your future subscriptions and donations. A suitable form is
enclosed with this Annual Report.
56
Gifts from U.S Residents
If you wish to make a gift and take a U.S. income tax deduction, you may
make a donation to the British Schools & Universities Foundation Inc.
(BSUF), which enables U.S. residents to support British Schools and
Universities in a tax efficient manner. The BSUF is a charitable organisation
recognised by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service under Section 501 (c) (3) of
their Codes. You should express ‘a preference for the British School at
Rome, Italy’ when making a gift, but cheques should be made payable to
BSUF. Such preferences are respected by BSUF but all grants are made at its
sole discretion, as required by the IRS. Further information can be found on
their website at www.bsuf.org. Donations and enquiries should be sent to:
The Secretary, BSUF, 575 Madison Avenue, Suite 1006, New York, NY
10022-2511, USA; tel. (212) 662-5576; email [email protected]
The British Schools & Universities Foundation Inc. has formally
approved The British School at Rome as a full member.
Legacies
If you have profited from and enjoyed your time at the British School, you
might wish to consider supporting future scholars by including it in your
will. A legacy will help to ensure that others are able to benefit from the
enriching experience that the School provides.
As a Registered Charity the School pays no tax on gifts of money or
property received through a legacy. In addition, a legacy to the School may
reduce the inheritance tax payable on your estate.
The School recommends that you consult your legal adviser, but it may be
helpful to set out some of the various forms of legacy you might wish to consider:
The Pecuniary Legacy: a simple form of legacy giving a specified
amount of money to a named individual or organisation;
The Residuary Legacy: the bequest of all or part of the net residue of
your estate after all pecuniary legacies, debts, fees and other charges have
been met;
The Conditional Legacy: ideal for those who would not otherwise
consider a bequest. It provides an alternative to your estate going to the
Crown should none of your named dependents or beneficiaries survive you.
There are other forms of legacy on which your solicitor can advise you.
Further information can be obtained by contacting the BSR Chair of
Development (address below).
Appeal enquiries, donations and legacy enquiries to: The Chair of
Development, 30 Taynton, Nr Burford, OX18 4UH, Oxon;
or email [email protected]
Cheques should be made payable to ‘The British School at Rome’.

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