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PDF Report
ASSESSMENT REPORT
ON THE
SPEN CLAIM
Port Albemi
Area, British Columbia
Victoria Mining
Division
49” 03’ 05-N
124’ 37’ 75-W
NTS map sheet 92F 02
Gwner: Mr. Larry Crittenden
Gperator:
June, 2000
Aimra Mining
Ltd
TABLE OF CONTENTS
i.
LIST OF FIGURES
ii.
LIST OF TABLES
“1.
LIST OF APPENDICES
SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
1
LOCATION,
ACCESS AND TOPOGRAPHY
1
PROPERTY
OWNERSHIP
EXPLORATION
AND MINERAL
TENURE
1
1
HISTORY
5
REGIONAL
GEOLOGY
5
6
PROPERTY
GEOLOGY
17
7
1999 FIELD
WORK
17
7.1
Work Program
17
7.2
Detailed Geology
19
7.3
Rock Sampling
21
7.4
Geophysics
21
26
8
CONCLUSIONS
9
RECOMMENDED
10
BUDGET
29
11
COST STATEMENT
30
12
CERTIFICATE
31
13
BIBLIOGRAPHY
WORK
PROGRAM
OF QUALIFICATIONS
27
32
LIST
OF FIGURES
1
GENERAL
2
CLAIM
3
REGIONAL
4
STRATlGRAPHIC
5
MINERAL
6
PROPERTY
MAP - GEOLOGY
7
DETAILED
GEOLOGICAL
8
DIAMOND
DRILL
HOLE
SECTION
FlTZ-87-11
23
9
DIAMOND
DRILL
HOLE
SECTION
FIT%87-12
24
10
BEEPMAT
SURVEY
11
LOCATION
LOCATION
LOCATION
2
MAP
3
MAP
6
GEOLOGY
COLUMN
OCCURENCE
OF THE ALBERNI
LOCATION
AREA
7
11
MAP
AND LOCATION
OF THE 1999 WORK
MAPPING
18
pock&
25
MAP OF THE PROPOSED
LIST
PHASE
I WORK
28
OF TABLES
4
HISTORY
OF EXPLORATION
MINERAL
OCCURENCES
IN THE PROPERTY
ARE.A
12
MINERAL
PRODUCTION
IN THE PROPERTY
AREA
15
SAMPLE
DESCRIPTION
WORK
LIST
I
ANALYTICAL
II
DIAMOND
III
BEEP MAT UTILIZATION
IV
WEYERHAEUSER
RESULTS
DRILL
22
AND RESULTS
OF APPENDICES
LABORATORY
CERTIFICATE
HOLE LOGS
LETTER
INSTRUCTION
SHEETS
OF ACCESS RESTRICTION
INTRODUCTION
1.
This report was written in order to fulfill the assessmentwork requirements
Fieldwork, consisting of mapping, core logging and Beepmat geophysics, was conducted
between November 13 and December 1, 1999, and from May 29 to June 1,ZOOO.
2
LOCATION,
ACCESS AND TOPOGRAPHY
The SF’EN claim, located on Vaacouver Island, is centered at approximately 49” 03’ OS’N
and 124’ 37’ 7S’W, NTS map sheet 92F 02 (Figures 1 and 2). It is located at a 25 kilometres crow’s
flight and 3 1 kilomeires by road from the town of Port Albemi in a southeasterly direction. The
property is accessible by heading south towards Bamfield for approximately 18 kilometres, then by
turning east on the Museum Main logging road. From the Moseom Main junction, there is 12.2
kilometres to the M3 road junction, 13.6 kilometres to the M4 road junction, and 13.7 kilomeixs to
the Legal Comer Post (LCP) (Figures 2). Both the M3 and M4 logging roads partly cross the
property.
The claim is situated on the eastern flaok Mount Spencer where the topography is steep and
rugged with five hundred metres climb from the eastem boor&y located at the five h&red meties
level. Most of the sarface haa h
subjected to clear cut logging. Outcrops are gemxally restricted
to road-cuts and steep sided creek beds. The overbordeo is oaually thin, although some areas are
covered by glacial till.
3
PROPERTY OWNERSHD
AND MINERAL
TENURE
The property is part of the Victoria Mining Division. The claim comprises six units (2W-3s).
The mineral tenure information is as follows:
Tenure Number:
369419
Claim Name:
SPEN
Owner:
Mr. lany Critteaden
operator:
Ahura Mining Ltd.
status:
Good
Work Recorded to:
June 03,2003
4
Standing
HISTORY
The history of exploration in the immediate SPEN property area is summaGed in Table 1
SPENCLAIM
- I-
TABLE
1
YEAR
HISTORY
OF EXPLORATION
LOCATION
WORK
TYPE
7
OF WORK
HIGHLIGHT
RESULTS
Discovery of
flwnemus prospects
1962
HantingSurq
Corp.
1964-1966
Gumex
Ltd
Airborne magnetometer survey
incl. the SPEN property
Top of Mt Spencer
(Mary)
Comiaco
1976
Gold Valley
RlXl~
Top of Mt Spencer
summit Pass
Mining Corp.
Top of Mt Spencer
lmperialMetalr
Corp.
Top of Mt Spencer
1983-1985
geocllemical
8 diamond drill
6.56% cut 3m.
(Not assayed for
metals.)
precious
Mapping HLEM electmmagnetic geophysical survey,
9 diamond drill holes totaling
628m. (On a porphyry target)
1967
1979-1981
Geology,
sampling
holes
Ltd.
(Mary, Wine claim)
3 diamond
28Om.
drill holes totaling
(Cup claim)
(Mary, Cap claim, &
south of current
property)
Silt sampling, induced polarization and electromagretic
gmphyc=d
surveys, geolw
and geochemistry
1985-1986
Lode
Resources Ltd.
Port, starboard claims
Geological mapping and
prospectill& magnetometer
and VLF electromagnetic
geophysical survey
1987-1988
CreW
Starboard, Fitzwater
claim group
Soil geochemistry, indaced
pokkation
geophysical
surveys, 19 diamond drill
holes totaling 2,306 m., and
8Om. of trenching.
Ahura Mining
Ltd.
Spencer claim, current
fiospecting
1998
AhuraMilling
Ltd.
Toy claims
locatiOn
1999to
AhuraMinhg
Ltd.
Resources Ltd.
ITPResow
Ltd.
1992
p-t
DDH: 5.27%Cu
/l An. Trenches:
5.6% Cd 7m. and
5.6% Cd 3m.
location
curreat
Beep Mat geophysical
and mapping.
survey
SPEN CLAIM
-4-
5
REGIONAL
GEOLOGY
The following stratigraphy and geological descriptions and the Regional Geology Map of
figure 3 have been drawn Tom EMPR of British Columbia Open File 1988-24.
STRATlGRAPHY
The rocks of Vaacxmver Island am part of the Wrangellia terrane and were most likely fully
developed before its accretion to the North American Cordillera
Premetionary stratigraphy, illustrated ia figare 4, is dominated by three thick discrete
volcanic piles separated by thinner platformal sequences. They are immded by a major group of
plutoas that are czmsmgheous aad substanGIly coeval with the youngest pile. The tectonic settings
of the three superposed volcanic sequencesevolved fbxn a primitive marina arctoamafinedft,or
back-rat rift, and then to a mature emergeat arc (Sutherland Brown and Yorath, 1987). Neither the
base nor the top of these superposed piles has been recognized but tbe measured accutmdation is over
twelve kilomelres.
The stmtigraphy is as follows:
1.
The Sicker Gmup: Late Devonian in age it represents rocks of the early marine arc.
It can be divided into two distinct sequences:
l
l
The Nitinat Formation: dominated by augite-phyric basaltic andesite agglomerates.
The McLaughlin Ridge Formation: chamc&xd by volcaaiclastic sandstones,bat
also which contains aphiric andesitic pillow lavas or felsic volcanics.
la
The Buftle Luhz Sub-group: Carboniferous aad Permian sedimentary straw that
resulted from the development of a shallow marine platform They cao be divided into dmze
distinctive units:
l
The Cameron River Formation (Fourth Lake Formation): composed of thinly bedded
chert, argillite, sandstone and bioclastic limestone.
l
The Mount h&uk Formation: consistsof a massive bioclastic crinoidal limestone
l
The St. Mq’s
Lake Formation: consistsof a thin unit of sandstone and shale.
Minor folding, uplifting erosion and deposition of shalesoccuned through the MiddleTriassic before the eruption of the Karmutsen Formation.
The Vancouver Group:
2.
l
The Karmutsm Formation: a thick pile of cbemicaliy uaiform fern-tholeiite, Kamian
in age, which an be divided into three texhually different facies: a lower pilIow lava
member, au intermediate pillow breccia member aud au upper massive amygdaloidal
flow member
In addition, there is a hypabyssal suite of sheeted-dykes and sills.
SPENCLAIM
-5-
LEGEND
Symbol
SCALE
1 : 100,000
Fom~llm ndF&
This marine rift assemblage is overlain by sedimentary sequence composed of three
2a
members.
l
l
l
3.
The Quatsino Formation: mainly shallow water carbonate of late Kamiaa age.
The Parson Bay Formation: a thin unit of flaggy argillite and limestone of Norian
w.9
The Sutton Formation: a thin m&id limestone also of Norian age
The Bomnra
.
l
Group: Early Jurassic in age, it consists of
The Redbed Creek Facies: a partly marine, fin-
red felsic tuff, and
The Kkmawa Facies: a thick sequence of early pyroclastic and&es grading upwards
to subaerially deposited rhyolitic tiffi.
The Island intrusions were comagmatic with the Jurassic volcanism but their emplacement
and cooling contjnued beyond the time of emption.
Post-accretionaty sequencesin the Albemi region are represented mainly by the units of the
first cycle and the basal tit of the second cycle of the Late Cretaceous Naaaimo Group.
Fii
Cycle:
l
Benson Facies: a local conglomerates
l
The Comox Formation: a more widely dishibuted sandstone fties
l
The Haslam Formation: a shale and turbid& unit
Second Cycle:
l
The Extension Protection Formation.
Plutonism was renewed in the middle to late Paleogene and early Neogene resulting in the
emplacement of the Catface inhusions of quartz-diorite porphyry.
ECONOMIC GEOLOGY
The diverse, vohmiuous and long lasting volcanism, related plutooism, intercalated reactive
carbonates, aad repeated tectonic activity in the Wrangellia Terrace provided a uniquely fertile
environment for metallic mineralization as a provision of a wealth of sources, conduits and hosts.
The population of pm-accretionary occurrences and the major deposits consist of iron, copper and
zinc sulphides, precious metals, molybdenite and magnetite that occur in volcanic massive sulphide,
&am, porphyry and vein deposits. In the Albemi region, the majority of metallic deposits are veins
(ss%), followed by skams (26%) with lesser occurrences of massive sulphide related lenses or shears
(9%), porphyries (4%) and other unclassitied deposits (6%).
The government of British Columbia has inventoried, classiied and described nuoxrous
mineral occurream in their MINFILE d&base in the property area Thirty-five of these occurrences
SPEN CLAIM - 8 -
on 6gure 4 and listed in table 2. Of these, six have been classified as past producers,
one as a developed prospect, and three as prospects. These ten occurrences are described in detail
below. Past-production statistics are listed in table 3.
are delimited
The following descriptions are drawn t?om the government’s MINFILE database:
DEBBIE
092F-079
Past Prwhcer
Gold, Silver, Copper, Zinc
The Debbie area is underlain by rocks of the Devonian Nitinat, Duck Lake aud McLaughlin
Ridge formations (Figure 4). The north-northeast striking Mineral Creek fault cuts the subparallel
striking stmtigraphy. Four mappable units include immediate to mafic volcanics, bedded
volcaniclastics, mylonite and foliated volcanics. The Yellow and adjoining Debbie properties contain
two main gold zones known as the tieral Creek and Linda zones.
commodities:
The Mineral Creek zone is located 150 mehxs north and on strike with the old Vancouver
Island Gold mine and extends onto the Yellow claims. It occurs within the immediate hanging wall of
the east dipping Mineral Creek fault and has a 600 metre strike length, and widths ranging f?om 46 to
6 1 metros. Two styles of mineralization are present:
1)
gold occurs in a wide zone of cataclssis and pervasive at&rite-q--wicitepyrite alteration with minor arsenopyrite in bedded volcaniclas~ic and aphyric
basalt flow rocks adjacent to the fault and
2)
gold occurs in quartz veins with minor pyxite and arsenopyrite cutting both the
alteration zone and its immediate hanging wall aphyric basalt host. The veins are
considered to be Tertiary in age.
Inferred resources are estimated at 99,443 tonnes gmding 3.0 17 grams per tonne gold for the
Mineral Creek zone, and an additional 73,960 tonnes at 3.67 grams per tonne gold are infemxl for the
extension onto the Yellow claim (Northern Mmer - December 18, 1989).
The M
zone (Yellow), located 200 metres east of the Mineral Creek fault, consists of a set
of quartz-clay-ankeritcite-minor
write and arsenopyrite veins with native gold. The veiw
which are haloed by narrow ankerite-sericite-pyrite selvages, occur within a 230 metre wide, 600metre long zone of northeast s&e. This zone includes the various veins described lmder the old
Vancouver Island Gold mine which produced 365 tonnes of ore yielding 9425 grams of gold, 1679
grams of silver and 88 kilograms of copper f?om 1898 to 1936.
Inferred resources for the Linda zone are estimated at 4 1,164 tonnes grading 9.153 grams per
tonne gold (Northern Miner - December 18, 1989).
A 2-kilometre exploration tunnel allowing accessto the Mineral Creek and Linda zones,and
for use as a drill&g platform was completed in March 1989. The highest assay,obtained i?om the
1988 drilling in the tunnel, was of 19.78 grams gold per tonne (AssessmentReport 18936).
Anomalous gold values were found to be associated with quartz veins in argillaceous cherts and
visible gold was observed.
The three main gold-bearing quartz veins that were developed f%omthe old workings are,
from west to east, the Mac (called tie Dunsmuir to the north), the Belcher and the Waterfall. The
veins follow welldeveloped shear zones on the east side of Mineral Creek. They are lens-shaped and
consist of two generations of quartz. Pyrite, arsenopyrite and minor sphalerite axedisseminated in the
veins and &ee gold has also been reported.
The Mac vein, the main working, was traced for 75 metres by several opencuts and two adits.
The vein, ranging from 0.07 to 0.45 metre in width, strikes northeast in the southern part and north in
DEN
CLAIM
-9-
the northern part, aud dips between 40 to 55 degrees. Sixty-three samples taken over the length of the
vein rwmged 126.5 gmms per tonne gold over 15 centimetres (AssessmentReport 14483).
The Belcher vein is exposed over 290 mezresin several opencuts and one adit It strikes
north, dips 40 to 45 degrees and is up to 1.2 metre wide, averaging 0.20 m&e. Sampling in 1973
resulted in assaysfrom 0.1 to 9.95 grams of gold per tonne and from 2.1 to 3.4 grams of silver per
tanes over 1.5 metre lengths (Assessment Report 14483).
The Wcderhll vein, exposed by a few trenches over 35 me&es, strikes north and dips about 65
degrees east Widths range fbm 0.08 to 0.75 me&e. Sample values were generally low except for one
which assayed404 grams of gold per tonne over 0.15 m&es (AssessmentReport14483).
inferred and indicated geological reserves in three zones are of471,956 tomes [email protected] 6.23
grams of gold per tonne (Westmin Resources Ltd. 1990 Annual Report).
900
092F-33 1
commodities:
Gold
Developed [email protected]
The area is underlain by andesitic to basaltic flows pillowed basalts, tuK agglomerates,
cherty tnffs and chert of the Devonian Duck Lake and Nitinat formations of the Paleozoic Sicker
Group. The north-northeast striking Mineral Creek fault cuts the volcanic sequence,which trends
140 degrees (sub-parallel to the f&uh) and dips 20 to 40 degrees east. A volcaoiclastic interval
overlies and is in sharp contact with mainly aphyric and amygdaloidal basalt units. The volcanic
rocks are intruded by an andesitic porphyry body.
The 900 zone is located 1300 metres southwest of the Mineral Creek zone (092F 079 Debbie) and 200 metxeswest of the Mineral Creek fault. A lean iron formation with a magnetite-rich
base is locally isoclinally folded. Beneath and crosscutting the chert horizon is a quartz vein
stockwork wbicb may be younger (Tertiary? in age). Native gold, pyrite, magnetite and arsenopyrite
occur in quartz veinlets in the chert and jasper and also in narrow carbonate veinlets. The 900 zone
contains gold in magnetite-jasper-sulpbide beating bedded chert, in quartz veins and in stockwodcs
cutting ankeritic aphyric piLlow basalt. The mineral&d area strikes north for 180 metre.s,is 150
me&s wide and over 120 metres deep. The 900 zone is a pipe-like body which occurs in a flexure
resulting from the offset of the north-northeast 900 fault by a west-northwest fault.
Three different geolo&al emironments host gold:
1) the cherty iron formation which is generally flat aad folded,
2) a north trending, steeply west dipping fault wbicb contains a quiz stockwork and,
3) the intersections of a series of moderately altered east trending faults witb the noti
trending faulted quintz stockwork underlying the cherty iron formation.
Drill& on the 900 zone in 1988 intersected quartz stockworks with visible gold, and a series
of northerly trending narrow quartz veins south of the stockwork which coma&d native gold.
Trenching~to expose b&h-grade gold veins and diamond drilling to test the strike projection was
proposed for 1989.
Inferred reserves for the 900 zone are estimated at 28,285 tonnes grading 11.65 grams of gold
per tome (Nortbem Miner - December 18, 1989). whjte Hawk Ventores Inc. has shipped 894 tonoes
of ore to Bow Mine’s mill at Greenwood. From there, 7478 kilograms of concentrate has been
shipped to Cominco for refining (GCNL #2 19 (Nov. 14), 1997).
SPENCLAIM
-IO-
LEGEND
fINFILE
NAME
078
079
080
081
082
083
084
085
141
167
207
216
217
285
311
331
381
385
38.5
409
429
437
438
439
MO
441
442
443
444
459
460
546
547
561
pmjtd NO:
scale:
l:lOO.OOO
Orarm
Date:
Feb. 2000
F&We:
Bv:
by:
MA
5
TABLE
3
MINERAL
OCCURENCES
IN THE
PROPERTY
AREA
--..-..---
--..-.----
5448325
3lW34
49”
10’40”N
124” 39’ 35” w
Gold, Silver, CappR,
5447564
378511
49”
1o’IS”N
124” 4O’WW
Gold
Past Fkd”cer
5441449
382737
49” 07’ WN
124” 36’25”
lhistk
Pas, Pducm
5440382
3WXi25
49y 06‘ 24” N
124” 38’ 08” W
Gold. Silver. Coplrr
OS4
Black Panther
hw
Pmhlcer
5439596
382697
490 06’WN
,240
Gold, Silver, I fad, Cnppcr,%inc
141
www
hst
I’rodnceT
543 1844
376947
4’P 01 45” N
124’4,‘O”“W
Gold, Silver, Cgper,
Ilead, 7inc
437
Havilah
Part ,%chlcer
5440895
382624
49’ w42”N
124’ 36’ 3”” W
001~ Silw,
Copp,
Lend, Zinc
078
i7~!&
Pmpoct
5445553
37867”
49” 09’ 15-N
124’ 39’ 511” W
Gold, Silw,
Coppm,
Lad.
207
Mary
RuVpocl
5434408
379745
49” 03’ 10” N
124” 38’45”W
Copper.
Proupd
5440042
3113518
49” 06’ IS”N
124” 35’4J”
W
Gold, Silver.
showing
544065 I
383957
49* W35”N
124” 35’24”
W
Gold, Silver. Cqw,
Lead. Zinc
W
Cold. Silw.
lrad
079
Debbie
Past Rorluacr
331
WIJ
Duuel~d
082
Gillespie
on3
Pmspt
W
&Id,
36’25”W
438
Skyh
08”
Goldml
0x1
t3 and K
Showing
5440332
384437
49’ Gil’ 25” i-4
124’ 35‘00”
“85
tllack Lion
Showtilg
5438973
382948
49* 05’ 40‘ N
124’ 36‘ Iz“ W
rmld,
I%!&
GP
09’ 12-N
__-Zinc
Silver. Cop~fr.
Lead. Zinc
Molybdm~~n~.
Zinc
Silver, Lead. Zinc. Gold
Lead
Copper.
I.cad
167
“ank
Showing
5445577
380413
4v
124’ 38’ 24” W
Gold, Copper,
216
Port
Sh”Wi”8
5433971
378517
49” “2’ 5J” N
124’ 39’45”
W
Gold, Silver, Cupper,
217
Rdeu
Showing
5429779
379543
49” OO’WN
124” 3R’W
W
cop&XT, Guld, Silver, M”@dmm,
Gold. Silver, Car
Coppx,
285
Lizard
Shuaing
5443391
37Rh22
49” 08’ 00” N
124” 39’ 50” W
311
ican
Showing
5433397
383683
49y “Z‘ 40” N
124”
35~ 3o”W
381
CatlO”
Showing
5431817
379587
41)o “1’ 46-N
124’
38’50”
3R5
SdB
Showing
5441WX
382949
49O 07‘ 15”N
386
Museml
Showing
544OS25
377500
409
Mt. SpmcR
Showing
5434Mm
429
McQuillan
ShowinS
439
I’mhar
Showing
440
Panther Road S.
441
Lake
W
Silver, I.cnd
liead
Zinc
Zinc. Silw
(iold, Silw,
Zinc. Cnppr.
Lead
124’ 36,’ 15 W
GoI4
Copper,
Zinc, Mnlyhdmrm
49” 06’36”N
124” 40’ 43” W
3R2OW
49” 02’ 58” N
124” 36’ 54’W
CTW
LiiSlom
5442725
381950
49” 07’41”N
124” 37’05”
5439254
381372
49’ “5‘ 4c‘ N
124’ 37’ 30” W
Gold. Copper,
Showing
5437368
381433
49’ 04’ 47” N
124’ 37’ 25” W
Gold
Fbnlher
Sb”Wi”8
543*3*5
381556
490 05’ 20” N
124’ 37’ 2R” W
Gold, Copper
442
Sttddk
ShOWillg
5439629
381177
49” WWN
124’ 37’40”W
“old,
443
DoU!&S
Showing
5441671
379598
49” 07‘ 05” N
124” 39’ 00” W
Gold, Cupp~
444
McQuillan
Showing
5443941
381776
49” OX’ 20” N
124” 37’ Is” W
Coppx.
Silver
459
OlSUl
Showing
5431795
380602
4v
“1’4VN
124” 38‘ W
W
Copper.
Zinc
4M
tdt men
ShowinS
543lW5
379976
49
01’20”N
124’ 38’ 3”” W
Copper,
Silver
03’16”N
124’
Gold. silver.
Creek
Koad
W
37’19”W
Silw,
Ifad,
Iron, GRnstune
Silw
Silver, Zinc, Copper
546
ShdJWd
ShOWi”&!
34315.40
3Xl5Wl
49”
547
waler
Sbwing
5437170
3R156u
49” 04’ 41” N
124” 37’ 19”W
Gold, Silver, Cw
ziw.
561
hprd
ShowinS
5438250
377800
DrbeuuxCraek
showin
5446250
3R3Cw.m
49O “5’ 13” N
49’ 09’ 36” N
124” 40’ 25” W
124’ 3(r’ 17” W
Coppa.
565
co/J/w,
Lea/
Silver. Gold
Gold, P&&e,,
Cbmmim
Mt Spencer -12-
.,, -
_ -~ _. .- -
-
_. . _
_.”
-
-
-
HAVILAH
092F-437
Post Producer
commodities:
Go14 silver, copper, Lead, zinc
The McQuillan vein is located 600 mctres southeastof the Gillespie vein (092F 082) and the
HaviIah tie workings, about 20 I&me&es snutheast of Port Albemi
The atea is underlain by Devonian Sicker Group volcanic rocks (Duck Lake Formation).
Thescarecutbyalxxlyof
coarse-grained hybrid diorite of tbe Early to Middle Jurassic Island
Pltic
Suite. A noah trending fault bouads the diorite to the west and cuts andesite to the north of
the diode.
The McQuillan vein and the adjoining Albemi vein to the south, occur along a shear zone
which cuts andesite, dioritc and Tertiary quartz-feldspar porphyry. The shear zone, approximately 80
m&es long and 5 melres wide, trends 020 degrees and dips 70 degrees east. Quartz lenses along the
shear wntaiu pyrite, spbakite, galena and lesser chalcopyxite and arseaopyrite. A 60 centimehz
sample of a vein assayed5.5 grams of gold per tonne and 20.6 grams of silver per tonne (Minister of
Mines Ammal Report 1936).
GILLESPIE
092F-082
Pa.9 Producer
Commodities:
Gold, silver, copper, Lead, zinc
The Gillespie vein occurs in andesite along a north-northeast trending shear zone. It stsikes
0 IO degrees for about 200 metns, and dips 65 to 80 degrees east. The vein, 10 to 80 centimetxs
wide, contains ribbon-quartz with py&z, sphalerite, galen& pymhotite, arseaopyrite and chalcopyrite.
The wall-rock is replaced by mar&o&e and carbonate minerals. A 0.20 m&r. chip sample assayed
7.33 grams of gold per tonne, and 317.09 grams of silver per tonne (George Cross News Letter #2,
1990).
In 1936 and 1939,949 tonnes were mined and produced 8,056 grams of gold, 43,669 grams
of silver, 4,244 kilograms of copper, and 12,677 kilogrinns of lead.
BLACKPANTEER
092F-084
Pasl Producer
Commodities:
Gold, SiIver, Lead, Copper, Zinc
?he Black Panther mine was origimdly discovered in 1936. In tbe area, a north &king fault
separate andesites of the Devonian Duck Lake Formation (Sicker Group) f&n Early to Middle
Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite diorite.
Quartz veins, lenses, stockworks and stringers containing variable amounts of sulphides,
maidy pyrite, chalcopyrite, with minor galena and spbalerite occur in a shear zone wbicb is sub
parallel to the aadesite/diorite contact. The wallrock is strongly altered by a&critic carbonate for
widths of several centimetres to 9 metres. The main shear zone, which has been traced for at least 3.2
kilometrcs, is locally cut by quartz stringers. The stringers are 2.5 centimetres to 0.9 metre wide and
up to 12 m&es long. A subordinate shear set,trending 20 to 30 degrees, is also present Ore grades
arc highest where tbesc two shear setsintersect.
Reserves have been estimated at 12,250 tonnes grading 6.86 grams of gold per tonne
(Assessment Report 9639). The Black Lion sbowing (092F 085), about l/2 kilometx to the
southeast, is considered to be an extension of the main shearzone. Sampling of tbe workings in 1987,
rendered assayaverages of 18.5 grams of gold per tonne for vein material ranging from 1.7 to 2.1
metrcs wide {George Cross Newsletter #34, 1987). Production in 1947,1948 aad 1950 totaled 1715
SPENCLAIM
- 13-
tonnes which yielded 15,832 grams gold, 29,642 grams silver, 226 kilograms copper, aad 5,588
kilograms lead.
THISTLE
(L.91)
GJUUUOditi~:
092F-083
Past Producer
Gold, silver, copper
Basaltic Bows and pillow basalt of the Triassic Kamm&n Formation (Vaucouver Group) are
underlain by a complexly interlayered successionof volcauics and sediments of the Paleozoic Sicker
and Mississippian to Lower Permian Buttle Lake groups. These include basaltic flows, agglomerates
aud bedded tu& of the Upper Devonian McLaughlin Ridge Formation (Myra Formation), Sicker
Group and limestones and marbles of the Upper Pennsylvanaisn to Lower Permian Mount Mark
Formation (Buttle Lake Sub-group).
Disseminated to massive sulphide minenlintio~ consisting of pyrite, chalcopyrite aad minor
pyrrhotite plus sulpbide rich quartz-carbonate veins, OCCUT
in sheared pyritic qm-sericite schists
with chloritized matic volcanic flows (“Mine Flow Unit”) and tuffs of the Upper Devonian
MCRidge Formation. A nearby limestone, which strikes 170 degrees and dips 65 degrees
southwest, has largely been replaced by diopside (skam). Disseminated magnetite, some of which
has been oxidized to hematite, occurs in the.calcite aad malachite occur in places.
A1.8Two ore zones,40 metres apart, measure 2to20metreslongby1to8metmswide.
metre chip channel sample of a high grade shear at the south end of the lower glory hole assayed38.4
grams of gold per tonne, 30.5 grams of silver per tonne and 2.49 per cent copper (AssessmentReport
11064). A 20 centimetres sample of chloritic basalt including 2 centimetres of massive Mte &nn
the 1984 drilling assayed 17.6 grams of gold per tonne (AssessmentReport 15288).
WWW (L.37,38,39,
Commodities:
53)
092F-14 1
Pasi Producer
Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc
Three northeast trending quartz veins mineralized with pyrite, sphalerite aad galena occur
over a 300 m&e length in granodiorite and diorite (Conigan Creek Pluton) of the Early to Middle
Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite. The pluton intrudes volcaaics of the Upper Triassic Karmutum
Formation.
The No. 1 vein is 90 metxs long, 10 to 25 centimetreswide and dips 45 degrees southeast. It
is exposed iu one adit and 4 open cuts. In 1935, a 10 centimetre sample taken across the vein assayed
205.7 grams of gold per tonne and 137 grams of silver per tonne (Annual Report 1935). A 20
cmtimetre sample taken in 1970 assayed 7.3 grams of gold per tonne and 57 grams of silver per tonae
(Assessment Report 2771).
The No. 2 vein exposed by an adit, is 50 metres long, 0.20 metres wide and also dips 45
degrees southeast. A 0.10 metre sample assayed 58.6 grams of gold per tonne and 84 grams of silver
per tonne (AssessmentReport 2771).
The No. 3 vei& 94 metres long and 5 to 35 centimetres wide, dips about 25 degrees north. A
grab sample assayed35.3 grams of gold per tonne, 136.8 grams of silver per tonne, 0.3 per cent
Asesmut Report 277 1).
copper,0.13percentleadaud1.2percentzinc(
SPENCLAIM
- 14-
TABLE
3
MINERAL
PRODUCTION
IN THE PROPERTY
AREA
Black Panther
REGINA
(L.55G)
commoditi~:
092F-078
Pmpecr
Gold, SiIver, copper, zinc, Lead
The minet-abation occurs at tbe northwest edge of a 10 kilomeire belt of Paleozoic Sicker
Group rocks known as the Cowichan uplift. Tbe belt was best described by Ma&r (1980) as a
complex aW3nal uplift. Volcanic sod sedimex~taryrocks of the Devoniaa Duck Lake and Nitinat
formations underlie the area. The occurrenee is located near the fault contact between these
formations.
Work done. on a crown grant in tbe 1890’s coasisted of at least 8 adits driveo iato green
aadesite to explore the tight quark-solphide lensesaad veins found within. Lowlly, the aodesite is
highly silicified and pyritized. la 1987, Westtnin Resources Limited condacted a drill program
immediately adjacent to tbe crown grants and found that the area was underlain by basaltic flows,
volcaoiclastic rocks aad less exteasively by massive crystalline dacitic flows and lapilli tuffs.
Intercalated with the basalt3 are narrow magnetite-bearing tuffaceous units with associated
se~er~tary chert. Miaeralized quartz veim are found within tie basabs.
One adit is wok on a tight shear partly tilled by qwtz. The shear strikes 050 degrees sod
dips 20 degrees southeast. Quartz-chalcopyrite-galeaa veins up to 5 centimetres and quartz stringers
up to 13 centimetres are observed. One grab sample rehuaed 22.6 grams of gold per tonne and 480.0
grams of silver per tonne. A 60 centimetre sample assayed0.69 gram of gold per tonne and 27.43
grams of silver per tonne.
Mineralization in the drill core consists of qoartz veins containing massive pyrite and
chaIcopyrite with specksof sphaleribz. A l-m& interval nztamed a value of 1.41 grams of gold per
toane. Another I-me& sample rehaned a value of2 per cent copper (AssessmentReport 16144).
SPENCLAIM -IS-
(L. IOOG)
commodities:
SKYLINE
092F-438
Pmpecr
Gold, silver, Lead
The area is underlain by volcauics of the Devonian Dock Lake Fonnatioq Sicker Group
which have been intruded by Early to Middle Jurassic Island Plutonic Suite.
Two~elq~veins,3to9metresaparflieinan~trendingshearwithincarbonate
altered at&site. The veins are 15 to 30 centimetres wide, 40 metres long and dip 70 degrees west.
Banded mineral&ion wnsists of pyrite, arsenopyrite and galeoa
A 30 centime&e sample assayed52.1 grams of gold per tonne and 113.8 grams of silver per
Lb&e&
1965). Two 1980 drill holes lead to an inferred resource of 6000 tonnes of
5.8 gams of gold per tonne in two zones (AssessmentReport 9639).
tOMe
(Chtnex
MARY
092F-207
CommOditi~:
Copper, Molybdenum, Silver, L.e& Zinc, Gold
Prospect
Pillowed and massive aadesite and associated volcaoiclastics of the Upper Triassic
Karmutsea Formation are intruded by gabbroic and basaltic dykes and feldspar porphyry dykes. The
voicani~ are overlain by thin to medium-bedded limestone, likely of the Triassic Quatsino
Formation.
Several type3 of minemlimtion occur in an east-westtrending are+ measuring approximately
1000 by 400 metres, south of Mt. Spencer. These include: pyrrhotite, cbalwpyrite, molybdenite and
minor sphalerite and gakna witi
quartz veins and shear zOnesin andesite; basalt dyke [email protected] with
pyrrbotite; copper-bearing skam zones in limestone and; cbalcopyrite, pynhotiti and pyrite near
feldspar porphyry dyke contacts.
In Zone 1, disseminated to massive pynbotite, pyxite aad cbalcofite, up to 0.6 me&e thick,
occnr along hetures and joint surfaces over a 61 to 122 m&e wide by 366 metre long area The
average grade of the zone is 0.15 per cent copper, including a 6 me&e section of 0.63 per cent copper
(AssessmentReport8177). Adrillholeiatersectedl80gramspertomtesilverandl0.30percent
copper over 0.8 metres (AssessmentReport 6134).
Zone 2, located 250 metres to the northeast of&me 1, measures 15 by 300 meIre?.and
wntaim pods and dis semimtions of chalwpyrite and pyrrhotite. The average grade of the zone is 0.8
per cent copper, including a 6 me&e section of 0.97 per cent copper (AssessmentReport 8177).
One hundred meters north of Zone 2, Zone 3 contains disseminated aad massive pynhotite
and minor chalcopyrite w fixtare planes in andesite.
Zone 3a, about 600 metres to the east of Zone 1, contains dissamina&d and massive
chaicopyrite, pyrrhotite and molybdenite mineralization in narrow veins. A drill hole intersection
wntained 24.7 metres of 1.22 per cent copper and 0.066 per cent MoS2, including 3.1 metres of 71.7
grams of silver per tonne and 6.56 per cent coppa (Asxxsment Report 8177).
There are several other small mineralized zones in the area Pat’s vein, located 100 metres
south of Zone 3a, is a highly oxidized, chloritized and &tored quartz vein near a feldspar porphyry
dyke. It contains pyrrhotite, pyrite and chalcopyrite, and assayed0.61 per cent copper aad 1.1 grams
of gold per tonne (AssessmentReport 8177). Ball’s vein, located 350 me&es nor&west ofZone 1, is
a 40 ceniimetre by 50 metre quark vein containing galeoa, pyrite and chalcopyrite. A 20 centimetre
sample assayed221.5 grams of silver per tonne, 0.7 per cent copper, 1.2 1 per cent lead and 0.5 per
cent zinc (As sesment Report 14470).
SPENCLAIM
- 16 -
6
PROPERTY GEOLOGY
platform rocks of the Buttle Lake Subgroup, dipping 25-30 degrees E,
form a dip slope which rmderlies the major part of the property. The most prominent rock type
consistsof the massive bioclastic crinoidal limestone of the Mount Mark Formation. Sandstonesand
shalesof the St Mary’s Lake Formation and of the Fourth Lake Formation (Cameron River
Formation) also occur in places. The sedimentary sequenceis overlain by the basaltic lavas of the
Camiau Karmutsen Formation of the Vancouver group. These rocks occupy the higher eievation of
the property towards its western boundaty (Figure 4 and 6).
Thi2ShdlOWllKViW
The property is host to the STARBOARD Minfile Showing (546) where the crinoidal
limestonea are host to several shallow dipping, gold-heating, quartz and quam+xbonate veins
varying r?om 0.5 to 30 cm in thickness. Their sulphide content, up to 75%, includes variable
combinations of pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena and sphalerite. The veins occur
over an area 1600 metres long by 100 to 400 metres wide as outlined by geophysical and geochemical
surveys. Seveml interesting zones have been delineated and tested by chip sampling (Nicki Creek,
M6 Creek). A typical assay,Born the Nicki Creek zone (sample #20140), assayed 12.80 grams per
tomte gold, 21.3 grams per tonne silver and 7.88 per cent zinc (AssessmentReport 16731). Diamond
drilling has intersected sewal intensely altered horizons with quartz-csrbonatc veins hosting goldbearing polymetallic sulphides. For example, one of the intersections in DDH FlTZ 87-l 1 ran 2.35
g/t gold over 6.59 metres including 7.32 g/t gold over 0.48 me&es and 4.51 g/t gold over 0.92 metres.
These horizons have not been identified at surface.
7
1999 FIELD WORK
A field program was initiated on November 13 1999. The party consisted of myself Marthe
Archambault, geologisf and one techniciau, Larry Crittenden. Unfortunately, upon arriving on the
prop&y, we found out that a crew from Weyerhaeuser was helicopter loggins right on the property
using the landing at the switch-back of the M-3 logging road. The foreman instructed us that, for
safety reasons, accesscould not be granted while they were working in the area On Monday
morning November 15, we went to Weyerhaeuser’s office in Port Alberm to ask the area’s supervisor
to grant us ctccessto the arca We talked to Mr. Darrell Van OS whom told us that it was impossible
forhimtograntusaccess until they were done logging, a period of approximately two weeks. His
letter is included in appendix lV.
Once accesswar granted, a 6 day field program, including mobilization and demobilization
was conducted from November 26 to December 1, 1999, followed by a 4day program by the
geologist only from May29 to June 1,200O. The program was performed in order to f&ill the
assessmentwork requirements
7.1
Work Program
The short program comprised Beepmat surveying (600 sq. m), detailed mappin (800 sq. m)
and re-logging of four diamond drill holes. The ground between Ni* and M6 creek was chosen
mainly for its proximity to the anomalous zone discovered by drill&g in 1987. These two creeks
beds, being small canyons, are not accessible at this time of the year. The upper section of M4 road
was chosen because it was put in after the 1987 exploration campaign and had not previously been
mapped. Twelve grab rock samples were collected and sent to Acme Analytical Laboratories
SFEliCLAlM
- 17-
The diamond drill core from the 1987 campaign had been piled up outside, exposed to
weather. Unfommately, the state of the core boxes dictated which hole was accessible for relogging
Holes 10, 11,12 and 13 could be laid out. They were chosen because they intersect4 zonesof
mineralization Particular attention was paid to structure aad structural orientation which was not
recorded in the original logs. The drill logs are included in appendix LI.
‘l%e Beep-Mat survey and mapping areas are outlined on figure 6. Mapping and rock
sampling location and results are plotted on figure 7.
7.2
Detded
Geology
LlTHOLOGY AND ALTERATION
Several distinct lithologies have been mapped
A bedded package of omngy-beige weathering silty limestones with beds 30 to 40 cm thick
containing 5% of fossil and criaoid wenta
generally between 5mm to 3cm in size (Unit 3a) is
inteqmted to belong to the Cameron River Formation. The beds are separated by pal~weathering,
nxessive limestone interbeds of approximately 5 cm in thickness. This package occurs mainly to the
north-east of the upper switchback of M-l (Figure 7).
This basal package in conformably overlain by similar limestone beds int&edded with blrtck
chert beds and limestone beds containing large irregular, angular black chert fragments (Unit 3b). In
the area of the upper switchback of M-l, these rocks have been intensely crackled brecciated,
pervasively altered to iron-carbonate, aad the 6achres filled with quartz-carbonate veining. The
differential weathering leaves the quartz veining standing out, m&ring the brecciation really
obvious.
Stratigraphically the M&Mark Formation overlies the Cameron River Formation although, on
the property, their observed contacts are faulted. Three different units can be distinguished within
ti formation. The basal unit (Unit 4a), alsOthe more prominent one, consists of a bioclastic
crinoidal limestone. The cxinoids have been broken in platy fragmeats of l-2 mm with minor round
crinoid stem sections. The fragments form approximately 70 percent of the rock The limestones are
pale grey, massive, resistive and form small bluffs They weather pale grey with a slight maroan tint.
On the north side of Nicky Creek it is overiain by a similar bioclastic crinoidal Limestone,but
it has been crackled-brecciated to the cm scale and intensely, pervasively altered to iron-carbonate
(Unit 4b). The crinoid f&me& have been bleached and are only visible in places. The iron content
causesit to weather orangy-beige. The contact is slup and conformable. Both limestone units form
a dip-slope with a dip averaging 25” E. Their contact has beea measured at 352”/ 22’, 50” R5” and
52” /15’.
Unmineralized sample-swere taken Tom each one of these two limestone units, SP-14 and
SP-30, in order to compare their chemical differences. The analysis results confirmed that the upper
unit was not only altered with Iron-carbonate, but also enriched in arsenic, copper, lead, zinc and
silver (Table 4).
On the south side of Nicky Creek the basal unit is conformably overlain by silty limestone
beds(Unit 4~). This unit has been intersected by diamond drilling and crops out in one faulted block
along M-l immediately south of Nicky Creek where it shows beda of 30-4Ocm t&k separated by thin
limy interbeds and grades into calcareous [email protected] 4d).
SPENCLAJM - 19-
STRUCTJRE AND MINERALIZATION
Detailed mapping has shown at least four prominent structural pattems and cootrols. The
Iithological packages have been block-faulted in place.
Between M6 creek and Nicky creek the massive tioidal limestones form a series of
prominent benches controlled by a sat of tight fault oriented 145’to 165” and with dips of 60” to 90”
to the sxmtlnv~. They geimally occur every 10 to 15 m&es. This fault direction is carried out
throughout the property and is one of the directions of tbe block faulting. It forms the contact
between argillite and the limestones in tbe Nicky Creek bed just above the M4 road cut and tbe
contact between the Fourth Lake [email protected] and the basal limestone of the M&Mark Fm on the lower
section of M4 mad near the eastem claim line.
The next pattern varies from 12” to 30” and is generally sob-vertical. These faults appear to
have more movement than the previous set. It cau be measured at two different places in the
limestones of the 23+5OS creek bed where one comprises ao inclusion of argillite (dips 65” to the
east) and one is the general orientation of a brexia zone with bleaching alteration. It had beeo
previously mapped in the bend of Nicky creek aod one fault occurs parallel to tbe upper M4 road cut
immediately north of Nicky creek.
The third set consistsof shear zones approximately 2 m wide with a main orientation of 260”
to 28S”, also sub-vertical. They show a lenticular pattern of shearing with numerous fault
orientations. They have been mapped in two places along the road-cut where they form large
resistive zones. One of the zone occurs at SP- 15 and one at SP-22. The latter showed muneroos cm
wide rusty we.atheredmineralized veinI& of various orientations: 262” I 30°, 283” I 70°, 302” I 45“,
and 330” I 80”. Sample SP-22 was taken from the soutb side of the zone and retuned 5.9 p/t gold,
2.87 g/t copper, 1.04 g/t lead, and 3.37 s/t zinc. Sample SP-23 was taken s?om the middle of the ulne
and returned 9.8 g/t gold, 0.70 g/t copper, and 8.03 g/t zinc.
There is also a strong no&south fault zone which controls the orientation of the bluffs along
the lower segment of M-4 road.(Figure 7)
In addition to the main structural directions, some narrow pyritic q--carbonate
show slightly different orientations with generally shallower dips.
veinlets
Between Nicky and M6 creek mineral&d veinlets were mapped at two locations. At SP-18,
two 21x1 wide quam veinlets witb coarse pyrite grains in middle aad comb stmcture on edges are
oriented at 347’ / 38” and 048’ I 63” with the latter displacing the first one and therefore being
younger. At SP - 19, a 1to 2 cm quartz veinlet with l-2mm wide pyrite stringer in tbe middle is
oriented at 3 10” I 50”. Fine Fe-carbonate crackling and very fIna-gmined disseminated pyrite extends
1Ocm into the wall.
North of Nicky creek at SP-13, a quartz-pyrite veinlet 2 to 3 cm wide is oriented at 3 10” / 30”.
It post-dates the large 150°/ 60” shear. Between SP-15 and SP-16, pyritic 2 mm wide fmctares
hosted by the lower limestone unit (4a) is oriented at 348OI40”.
In drill core, mineralization occurs within large zones of dark alteration associated with
faulting. These zones consist of a mixture of chlorite, magnetite, carbon sod iron-carbonate alteration
with disseminations and blebs of pyrite and pyrrhotite. The alteration forms patchy and foliated
textwes. ArgiIlite may also occur in some of these fault zones as seen at the SP-4 location.
SPENCLAIM
- 20.
Mineralization occurs in two different types within these altemtion zones. One consists of
millimetre to centimetre wide quartz-carbonate veinlets with various amounts of pyrite and traces of
pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite associated to narrow faults. The second one consists of large, 0.5 to 5 metre
wide zones displaying open-space textures with large euhedral to subhcdral crystals of quartz,
carbonate and garnets varying in size from 1 to 10 centimetre in diameter. The massive sulphide
zones generally occur in the center of the vein, but minor amounts occur throughout. The sulphides
are mainly pyrite with lesser amounts of pyrrhotite. Minor chalcopyrite, galena and sphalerite are
present in places. Stratigmphically, the alteration aud minerahmtion zones occur below the silty
limestone unit (4~).
7.3
Rock sampling
Twelve rock samples were collacted and sent to Acme Analytical Laboratories for 30 element
aqua-regia ICP and gold by wet digestion and AA analysis or ICP-mass spectroscopy.
Chah samples were collected to test the amount of minemlimtion in zones of veining,
faulting, brecoiation or altaration. Sample location, description and results are presented ia Table 4.
The Laboratory certificate is included in Appendix I.
7.4
Geophysics
A BEEP MAT geophysical survey was conducted over some areas of known underlying
mineralization, figure 6. The traverses are sketchedon figum 10.
The BEEP MAT used was the BM4+ model. This equipment is a miniaturized electromagnetic survey instrument which instantly detects both conductive and magnetic outcrops hidden
under up to two meters of overburden It consists of a ‘mat” which is dragged on the ground and a
processor which is worn by the techniciau. The detection threshold is preset at 40 Hz for the
conductivity and 400 Hz for the magnetism, A magnetic reading of -1,000 Hz is cormsponds to
approximately 1,000 gammas. This equivalence is valid up to a magnetic value of-20,000 which
corresponds to approximately 20,000 gammas
The instrument gives continuous readhgs and produces a sound when going over a
conductor, or when au anomalous magnetic outcrop is detected (readings greatar than the threshold).
A survey area is traversed back and forth and the technician marks the location of the conductor or
magnetic anomaly with flagjng tape. The location of the anomaly is instantly mapped aud
investigated This survey is meant to be conducted in ateas where there is no marked grid or between
the lines. ‘Iha mode of utilimtion and operating principle are included in Appendix Ill
On the Spencer Prop&y, the back and forth traverses were made approximately 25 metres
apart (Figure 10). The survey did not outline any conductors or magnetic anomalies in the surveyed
area This indicates the absence of magnetite alteration and that the known sulphide veins and pods
are not conductive. Therefore, ground electromagnetic and magnetic surveys are not recommended at
least for the portion of the property underlain by limestones. However, a previous induced
polarization survey over a portion of the property has given good results.
SPEN CLAIM
- 21-
TABLE
GMPLE
4
SAMPLE
Small23+SOS Creek
,P 4
Near23+50S Creek
junction & E claim line
Near 23+SJS Creek
junction & E claim lie
M4 road cut, N of
Nicky Creek
M4 mad cut. N of
Nicky Creek
M4 road cut. N of
Nickv Creek
iP 11
;P I2
iP 13
AND
RESULTS
;AMPLE
DESCRIPTION
LOCATION
,P 3
IP 4A
DESCRIPTION
Brewialed limestone, ICP shows increased Ca
and Mg
Argillite block along fault in crinoidal
limestone, Diweminatcd pyTiteat &ages
Silicifiai shear zone - 4cm wide quar?? vein rusty ‘selva cs
Fault plane near siltstone - limestone contact,
omngc weathering
Silicified shear zone, I m wide
I
Min. veinlet along a joint pnpendicular to the
siliciticd zone (SPIT), Postdates the she=
zon-2
~-
jP IS
Smnll23+50 Creek
SP I9
Gully - 40 m. N of
23+5OS Creek
RESULTS
n 1 Ag
Quartz. veinlets .cm wide, in 2 orientations - Sulphides in center with comb stmcture along
the selvagcs
I -2mm wide sulphide in 1-2~117
wide quartz
veinlet. Very tine disseminated Mite and Fccarbonate crackling IOcm into liicstone host
U48/63&
347/38
3m wide siliciticd shear zone with later
283/7U
76
25
11
1104
433
199
-gm
0.6
277
224.
5.9
4531.2
3lU/50
765 1264
41 ~~ 593
--_9.4
576.2
1436
2874
1042
3370
526
702
316
8033
24
9804.9
55
124
36
46
1.3
<2
5
3
4
176.8
5925.1
283 I 70
f&the middle of the
shear zwc
M4 road cut, N of
Nicky Creek
SP 14
I
SP 30
M4 mad cut, N of
Nicky Creek
Upper crinoidal limestone, cracklcd and
intensely iron-carbonate altered with orangy
1 weathering
Lower crinoidal limestone, massive, unaltued
with mamon wcathaing
--
ii
< .3 ~-.__ c2
SPEN CLAIM
-22-
CONCLUSIONS
8
As a result of the 1999 field program on the Mount Spencer property, the foIlowing
conclusions cau be drawn:
Broad litbological formations can be sub-divided into smaller recognizable units.
SM
control plays a major role on the layout of both the litbologies and the
OliIl~OU.
Mapping indicates a block faulting-type pattern.
At least four main sub-vertical fault orientations axe repeated throughout the
property: 0 ', 30°, 155 “, and 280 O_Some of them carry tiMon.
Surface occurrences of minemlized veins and st~ctures show three main
and347”#S0.
orientations:48"/63°,310"/30-500,
Vein and sulphide mineralization formed in an extentional regime (open-space).
Rock sampling contirmed the presence of gold and base metal minemhzati~n
Results from previous exploration campaigns lead to the following conclusions:
l
Significant gold in soil geochemical anomalies were outlined.
.
Zones ofhigh chargeability were de6ned by an induced polar&ion
Survey.
.
Gold and base metal m&ml&d
diamond drilling.
l
geophysical
umes, which do not crop out, were intercepted by
The mine
zones consist of coarse [email protected] carbonate, and garnet with large
patches of pyrite witb lesser pyrrhotite, chalcopytite, sphaltite, and @Ed
The significant gold and base metal results outlined to date warrant follow-up exploration
work. An initial CDN$T!OO,OOOwork program is recommended, followed by a CDN$300,000 work
progmm contingent ou the results of the first phase.
SPENCLAIM
-26-
9
RECOMMENDED
WORK PROGRAM
The objectives of the recommended exploration program are to d&m the lmown zones of
mineralization and to explore for additional ones. The firs step towards reaching these objectives is
to fully understand the stmchxal controls on the lithologies and on the mineralization.
In order to do so, the fist phase work program comprises:
.
l
r.xstablishment of the grid
mapping of the [email protected] at a scale of 1: 1,000 with particular attention to StNcture
and its asso&ed alteration and mineralization
l
trenching in some critical areas in order to increase rock exposure
l
mapping and sampling the new trenches
l
extending tbe induced polarization survey to the smthem bamdary
.
l
refurbishing and reloging the existing drill co=, again with particular attention to
swncture and alteration
compiling all available data including the geochemistay and the induced polarization
surveys
The estimated completion time is of fifty-seven days.
The phase II work program, contingent on the results of this initial work phase, will consist of
1,220 me&es of diamond drilling. The e&mated completion time is of fifty days.
SPENCLAIM
-27-
10
BUDGET
The cost of the proposed work programs wmmarkd
below is stated in Canadian Funds.
phsse
DESCRIPTION
MobilkationlDemobilization
Camp & Support
Trudc Rental
Grid Preparation & Line Cutting
Bulldozer (for trenching)
Geological Work (geologist 8 technician)
Rode Sampling
Induced Polarization Survey
Core Boxes 8 Storage
Communications
Miscellaneous 8 Consumable
Technical Report
TOTAL
$ 7,000
$ 37,058
$ 8,550
$ woo
$ 8,500
$ 48,450
% 10,wo
$ 30,000
5 6,000
$ 1,000
$ 1,383
$ 10,008
TOTAL
$ 173,913
Contingency (15%)
GRAND TOTAL
$ 26,087
$ 200,ooo
Phase II
DESCRlPllON
TOTAL
Mobilization/Demobilization
Camp 8 Support
Truck Rental
Bulldozer (for drill pads and access)
Diamond Drilling
Geological Work (geologist 8 technician)
Rode Sampling
Core Boxes & Storage
Communications
Miscellaneous 8 Consumable
Technical Report
$ 7,000
$ 32,500
$ 7,500
$ 7,500
$ 122,000
$ 42,800
$ 25,000
$ 4.000
$ 1.m
$ 1,870
$ 10,000
TOTAL
$ 260.870
Contingency (I 5%)
GRAND TOTAL
$ 39,130
t 3owmQ
SPEN CLAIM
- 29 -
11 COST STATEMENT
DESCRIPTION
Geologist
NO OFUNlTS
2days
Technician
1.5 days
Car Rwtal (unlimited km)
2days
Truck Rental (off road 4x4, unlimited lan) lday
Accommodations (off-season rare)
Idays
Meal Allowance (off-season rate)
3.5 days
FenY
communications
RATE/UNIT
%5OO/day
s35o/day
$75/&y
$lSO/day
%6Oldqfpen
$4o/day/paTs.
TOTAL
COST
$1,000
S 525
s 150
$ 1.50
s 120
6 140
$ 68
% 25
S 2,178
SECOND TRIP
DESCRIPTION
Geologist
Technician
Car Rental (unlimited km)
Truck Rental (off road 4x4, tmhited
Accommodations (off-season rate)
Meal Allowance (off-season rate)
Ferry
Equipment Rental
Miscellaneous
Communications
NO OF UNITS
6days
4.5 days
2dals
RATJVUNIT
%5OO/dq
$3SO/day
S7Slday
%lSO/dq
$~fday/pers
$4O/day/pers.
4 days
%16O/day
km) 4.5 days
5 days
10.5 days
TOTAL
COST
$3,000
$1,575
s 150
$ 675
$ 300
S 420
$ 61
s 640
$ 100
$ 2s
$6,946
THIRD TRIP
DESCRIF’TION
GdOgiSt
Car Rental (unlimited km)
Accommodations (off-season rate)
Meal Allowance (off-season rate)
FW
Miscellaneous
Comolnnicatjons
RVJfi
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL
NOOFUNlTS
4days
4 days
3 days
4days
RATEfUNIT
%SOO/day
$7S/day
$6O/day/pers
$4o/day/pers.
COST
$2,000
$ 375
% 180
d 160
$ 71
% 65
% 2s
$4,000
%6.876
%16.000
SPENCLAIM
- 30 -
12
CERTIFICATE
OF QUALIFICATIONS
5 Mat-the Archambanlt, of Surrey, British Columbia hereby certify that:
I am a Consulting Geolo$t with an office at #1601 - 13880 101”
Avenue, Surrey, British Columbia.
.
.
I graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Geology from the University
of Montrzal, Montreal, Quebec (1980) and a Master’s degree in Geology 6-om the
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (1985).
I am a member of the Association of Professional Engineers and
Geosciekts of British Columbia, Reg&ation No. 19226.
.
I have practiced my profession as an exploration geologist for the
past 20 years.
and &ber
I have visited the Mount Spencer property between November 13
1 1999 and s%omMay 29 to Jute 1,200O.
.
I have no interest, direct or indirect, nor do I expect to receive any
interest, in the Mount Spencer property or Abura Mining Ltd.
Dated at Surrey, British Columbia this 10’ day of June 2000,
Marthe Arcbatnbault, P. Gee.
*
SPENCLAIM
-31-
13
BIBLIOCRAPW
B.C. Minishy of Energy aud Mines and Petroleum
19896.
Resources,
Open Fide 1987-2,
B.C. Minisiq
of Energy aad Mines and Petroleum Resources, Assessment Reports:
8722,9292,
13564, 13672, 14470, 14928, 15694, 16731,21330,25039.
1988-24,
and
6134,8177,
B.C. Mini&y
of Energy and Mines and Petroleum Resourca,
MINFILE
Database: 092F 078,079,
080,081,082,083,084,085,
141, 167,207,216,217,285,311,331,381,385,386,409,
429,437,438,439,440,441,442,442,444,459,460,546,547,561,565.
SPEN CLAIM
- 32 -
APPENDJX I
ANALYTICAL
LABORATORY
RESULT
CERTIFICATE
APPENDIX II
DIAMOND
DRILL LOG
FITZ 87-11& 12
DIAMOND
HOLE:
FIX?-87~10
CLAIM:
‘ROM
SPEN
TO
0
-4.57
AZIMUTH
DIP:
COLAR ELEV.
TOTAL DEPTH:
4.57
I1 .O
11.0
28.55
28.55
80.77
LITBOLOGY
DESCRIPTION
Casing
CLASTIC CRMOIDAL
LIMESTONE, massive,
medium grey with a 8ii8bt
mumon hue. Contains
approximately 70% of crinoid
and other fossil fra8nrentr.
SILTY LIMESTONE, wry tine
gain4 medium to dark grey,
trace of small fossil l?agmeuts
in places, up to I%
disseminated fite cubes .52mm in diamcta
CLASTIC CRINOIDAL
LIMESTONE, massive.
medium grey with a slight
maroon hue. cwlains
appmximately 70% of crinoid
FROM
TO
DRILL
HOLE
-90’
560 m
80.77 m
..ALTERATION
DESCRIPTION
LOG
&ATE DRILLED:
DATE LODGED:
Dccemba 1987
May 2000
LOGGED BY:
M. Axhambault
ERUCTURE
DESCRIPTION
MINERALIZATION
DESCRIPTION
_~~~~~~~
Weak calcite veining l-2mm wide, oriented
am to ca
LC - Faulted and crushed over 20 cm, 45 to
CB
15.8
21.7
18.7
29.1
Blesched to pale 8rey
Pervasive dolomite ah. & patchy
mange weathering iron carbonate
alteration
Moderate foliation 50.70 to M
LC - Sharp and conformable 75 ta ca
Blcachcd to pale grey or white in
6337 ~. Contad 5510 ca
63.57-Cantact55toca
and badcd with
1.2% ma~nire,
h3.37 -- 63.57 p?7itc “ci”
Foliation 65 to FB
and
Fitz 87-10, Page I of I
HOLE:
FlTZ-87-l
CLAIM:
SPEN
‘ROM
TO
0
6.1
6.1
26. I
26.1
51.55
I
LITAOLOGY
DESCRIPTION
AZIMUTH:
DIP:
COLAR ELEV.
TOTAL DEPTH:
FROM
TO
270”
-60”
560 m
169.77 m
ALTERATION
DESCRIPTION
Casing
SILTY LIMESTONE with
calcdrcous siltstone interbeds.
Dark kmy, massive beds of
irregular thichess separated by
silty immwls IO-2Ocm thick
with black hairline stylolite.
SILTY LIMESTONE, lmsa
silt compmmt hn above.
DATE DRILLED:
DATE UXtGED:
D.x.mbcI 1987
December 1999
LOGGED By:
M. Anhmnbmll
STRUCTURE
DESCRlFTlON
M~NR~LIWTION
DESCRIPTION
BmldinglSfylolitm - 4S to ca at 7.5m.
I R.hm -fault plaw with gmphitic foliation
ov~2hr-45toca
22.8.23.2m - Scvml slip planes at IU, 25,
and35 toca
25m -numerous ppbitic planes
25.5-26.1 -Slip pIrum at 80 toca
10.3m - 7cm wide quartz win
with 5% pyrite, SO to ca
26. I -28.2- foliation 45 to ca
Diamina&pyite
diameter, O-0.5%
I-Smm in
30.7-31.0. Faulting several sharp
argillaceous plants and foliation at 25 to cm
34.2 - tiuh with Ian thick gouge 35 to ca
34.4 - fault with I cm thick gouge 20 to ca
orange weathering and pervasive
dolomite alt. Minor chlorite
Fitz 87-11, Page I of 1
DIAMOND
‘ROM
LJTAOLOGY
DESCRJJ’TION
TO
__
‘ROM
TO
66ss
MN,
LOG
MINERALIZ4TlOPii
DESCRWTJON
STIUJCTJJRJ!
DESCRIPTION
rLTEJtATlON
DESCRIPTION
66.55
169.77
dASSIVE
LIMESTONE,
ncdium grey, very tine t3mined.
me stylolitc,
quartzcalcite
-
66.55
66.75
66.75
.-
BOLE
Large patches ofoxidined
rulphides with tnscr gamcts
patches ofcrystals.
PyTik lo”/, nrsellopylite
5%,
pul tme. of pynbotitc.
65.9
Wcdium
DRILL
to light
grey
71.6
72.05
72.05
86.6
__
86.6
88.21
Fresh
Start of patchy bleaching,
bleached
&id
iiagmcnb.
Dmic alteraticm with patches of
chlorite, manganese oxide, calcite,
large grins ofpynhciite
ZJmm,
and [email protected]?tc wnets
Wirh white ghosts of crinoid
Altered to dolomite
Dark &x&n
with patchof
chhitc,
manganese oxide, calcite.
large grains of pynhotite
2-5mm,
snd magnetite
garnets
)ne side of rhe core shows a foliation
parallel
DUI.
hkite winkt
80 to ca
17.5 m black alteration
marks sharp fault
rlmKs 50 to ca
JC - 45 to ca with foliation
.c-45lOca
20 cm garnet zone in the mid
ofthe inrmal
Minor (2%) coame g&cd
pyrrhmite
in dark all.
15.3 m Faulting
83.9 m-Pyrite
veinlei Imm.
Icmwide40taca.
_
86.G86.YGawt.lsr!qe
crystals with interstitial
trace
quartz, calcite, magm+a
86.9-87.05
fine grained <ICI
in diameter wins of quartz,
calcite and lesser wets
wii
minm chloritdscricite
87.05-87.485O%clustm
small garnet uysmls with ks
mnngamseoxidc,
malpwite
calcite, patches of IO-15%
pyrite, and minor pynbotitc
t
chalcopyrite.
87.48-87.68
qwlaaloitc
crislals clcm in diameter wit
up to 5% pmhw
DfpyTits.
30 to ca
JC - Xl to ca, sharp and irregular
ioliatkm
45 to ca
% - faulted 45 to CB.
contact
87.68.88.08-foliated
dark
greenish-black
composed of
calcite, chlorite. manganese
oxide. magnetite and quartz.
88.U8-88.27
mainly
calcite
with minor chlorite and
mangancsc oxid!.
Fitz
87-11,
Page
2 of 2
DIAMOND
?ROM
TO
LITHOLOGY
DESCRIPTION
FROM
RR.27
DRtLL
HOLE
ALTERATION
DESCRIPTION
TO
96
Bleached, pale gm?yto beige, same
clay altemtion.
LOG
STRUCTURE
DESCRIPTION
Foliation throughout 45 to ca
88.27-89. I Faulting in different orionbdions
IS, 25.30 to ca.
92.6m Crumbly fault, cmshd with 0, 45, and
RO to ca otienlations.
93. Im Fault plane
Dark alt. Contact 40 to ca
UC irregular 25 to ca
100.2-100.95 - Vein, mainly calcite, milky
and atamy oolwod carbonate forming
inxgtdarbatt&atM)toca
lOl.2 Post vein EmIt zone, ctvshed owt
Itknt. faul1 planes in all oricntaliml, rusty
#inctuting.
103.3 Fault and foliation 40 to ca
104.8 Fault and foliation 50 to UI
MINERALIWTION
DESCRIPTION
-
92-96 Mineralixd vein with
ptchy L-luamd.-gam~mittmpyitc (2-5*%) and men
of pynbaite.
Mainly catb. With a few gametcalcite patclm showing an
orientation in places: 93-94m O25toca
100.95-10S.65 -Carbquartzpyite vein with overall I-5%
pyrite and minor xsenofite
LC folistui & lb&cd 50 to ca.
105.65
106.95
106.95
108.95
10X.95
112.65
112.65
114.35
M&k L?yke, totally al&xl u,
chhite
Dark tdtemtio~ pat&y
chlmile. calcite and iron catiwtmte
alt.
lO5.77-106.5 Foliation 40 to ca
106.2 Fault 30 to ca
LC Vein- Sharp and irregular
109-109.5 Several sh¶rp faul1 planes, parallel
tocachothcr45toca
11o.5fatdtplawsI5&25toFa
Limestone with dcdomite-Ehlmih
alt minor iron carbonate
zntlc of scvelal abemating
open space veins scpamtcd by
bleached limestone sections.
Cart, vein with same patchy
qumtzaulphidc-gamet. and
some darker chlwitic intervals
ovaall 3.5% pete
2Ocm vein wedge with merging
mtltnct9.
DIAMOND
DRILL
HOLE LOG
1FROM
114.35
~
TO
__
116.2
ATERATION
DESCRlPTlON
Dark grezn, patchy chlorite-calcite
al1 mne
STRUCTURE
DESClUFllON
115.35-I 16.2 Large garnet
crystals up to 5cm in diamt :tet
form 80% of the xme. Tbt
crystals are rimmed by
mmtctitc and interstitial
cd&
An Pant carb. vein
20” large pyrite blebs 011,
1.6m qtwarb Y. wilh <5%
patches of pyrite overall.
LC-25toca
Ilh.l-l16.4-30cmofbleachod
IittEStOltP,
116.2
116.7
118
116.7
1181
123.7
123.7
151.3
151.3
__
55.25
155.25
158.45
158.45
166.2
166.2
169.77
Dolomite altctrd, massive, pale
m limestone
Large mne of imn catbmme,
calcite garnet. lesser chlmite and
ma&te
altexmiw, op space
veining and mittcmlization with
bttwlse mty wcsthcring
MINERALIZATIOR
DESCRlFTlON
hide
UC-50toca
135.25 Fault 0 to ca
136.5 ad 138.0 - Sewal
mtacts 50 to ca
small wins wbh
vein. Intensely weathewd
Approximately 15.20%
sulphides tbmugbwt.
-..
Bmdoi altemtion caused by
gmuplnmt of calcite, imtt
carbonate. dolomite, and
e4icitc/Fhlorite.
Dark ah mne. Carbonate 8. iron
catbottatc with patches of euhedml
game& up to Zcm in diametct
sutmuttdal by chlorite and
magnetite
MC&d texhw datk &my &
gremdsh c&w.
Dark ah. Zone. Patches of
chlmitefsericite, 20% garnets up to
2cmindiamctcrsunouttdedby
pmches & tints ofmagnetite and
miwr patches ofcream colound
carbonate. Qltml2 gTaitl3 in places
Foliated151.7-901oca
133.0-POtoca
154.4-45toca
UC -faulted 20 to ca
IX - imgular vein contact 90 to ca
Foliated - 50 to PO to ca
1646 -Fault O-30 to ca
168.8 - Fault 0 to ca
< 1% pyrite
DIAMOND
HOLE:
Frrz-87-12
CLAIM:
SPEN
-
ROM
0
3.05
TO
3.05
27.4
LITklOLOGY
DESCRIPTION
AZIMUTH:
DIP:
COLLAR ELEV.
TOTAL DEPTH:
‘ROM
I_
-
34.2
58.36
.LTERATION
9.5
XUNOIDAL LIMESTONE.
~idastic, massive, pa&d
rith white, mm size platy
rinoid 6qments and spprox l% ofmund crinoid salions in
medium grey matrix.
---G
DATE DRILLED:
DATE LQGGED:
Deanbex 1987
lJeGmbef 1%
LOGGED BY:
M. Archambaub
MINERALIWTION
DESCRIPTION
STRUCTURE
DESCRIPTION
ilLTY LIMESTONE-no
tioids
:RlNOlDAL LIMESTONE.
nassive, as 3.05-27.4m
-
Foliated - 45 to ca
14
20.5
I_ 20.5
22
23.5
23.5
27.4
-3
34.2
275’
45”
550 M
129.53 m
:a%ing
__
27.4
HOLE LOG
TO
11.1
-
DRlLL
Pervasive Fecarb & dol
Bleaching
Textured destroyed
Crinoid teaum bleached
Tedwed destmycd
vim wide pyritic veinlet - 35 to
a
Calcite filled tension gashes
FAULT Z0NE - swcml fault planes 20 to ca
22.0 m -all. conlact 25-30 to ca
_
23.5m - L. mIltact
26.8-27.lm - FAULT - 3Ocm crushed de
momenta-15-2Otoca
swasl fault plane.3 tbmugbout - 0 a 2s to
ca
--
Bleached with $wsts ofcrinoid
flI#malls.
42.:
46.E
46.1
49.:
__
Rusty fmchuing -mottled
bItaching with Fccarbmate
Mod. bleaching, crinoid fmgmmls
we visible
Tension gashes - 45 to ca
34.5m- Fault planer - 25 890 to ca
34.5-36m- faultins - 70 & 80 to ca
36.37.5m - brec&on
and m pwiz
tension gashes
37.5-38m - lntaw faulting - 20 to ca, very
bmken
38-38.6m - Cm broken and mushed
38.6-40.3m - Foliated 45 lo ca
40.3-40.8m- Mir
line tension gashes
40.8-i2.3m - Foliated with sewal fault
planes generally 3040 lo ca with some at IO0
&90mca
4KGi6.8 m - Strong fracmring sub-parallel
to ax, bmxiatiw
fault plana at 0, 25, 81 45
loca
--.I_-_-
46.0466 - Pyitic veinld < .0.5cm wide in parallel faults
White CBveining & iiactw
Foliation 30 to ca
at 40 to ca
Fitz 87-12, Page I of 3
DIAMOND
ROM
LLTHOLOGY
DESCRI~ION
TO
83.57
84
84
85.3
85.3
86.2
LIMESTONE,
TUR
PROM
83.57
93.6
LIMESTONE
1
1
84
94.2
94.2
--ii77
TUB
LIMESTONE,
Fault bound with swell
Molded, difliw alteration,
Chkxilic interval. massive and Iinc
grained
rbt rb-zocm~t~d&~
Chlmitic interval, possibly a
Lapilli TUR
U. contact - fwhcd, irregular at 20 to ca
Slip plane - 70 to ca
IV7
129.53
LIMESTONE,
86.8
87.7
91.6
93.6
93.6
94.2
brexiated
massive
-
parallel planes at 70
1
-
I
86.2 1
86.8 1
As 58.36 to 03.57
Matkl and speckled
__-
Bleached, mottled with rusty
fcfcAum
Chloritic interval, massive, fine
gfained.
Slnmg bleaching
95.0
--
MINERALIZATION
DESCRIPTION
Intense bleaching. almost totally
white
Mod. bleaching, crinoid kagments
are visible
Mod. rusty fmchuing
chloIbic intavd
A8 5X.36 to 83.57
Rusty w&wing
lvzyond
vxogniticii
93.6
LOG
STRUCTURE
DESCRIPTION
TO
massive
I
86.2
HOLE
,LTERATION
I
,,,_/:
5X.36
83.57
DRILL
95.5
Chlmitic interval
Minor dark slwation
tiOUgbW1
87-87.3 - lmnimtions 7lJ-VO to 03
87.7-88 -Fault parallel to ca
lh.Rm - Slarl ofminemlirnd
!oone.
u.cxmtaclsharp -45toca
Fine brexiation in places with carb.
hgmcnts 4cm - Open space texture. Posrminfaub-zoloca
L. contact foliated - 45 to ca
ntenscly oxidized. Appears to
,e 5 to I5 % pete with lssscr
,ynholite
U. contact faulted - 6U to ca
L. conkwl sharp. faulted wd brccciated
-1edwithq~za-70ioca
Brwiated BI mcemcnted
Bmkcn with several sharp fault planes with
alickensidcs in numenms~oric&ions
- IO,
25,40,50, & 70 to ca
95-95.5 - u. & L. ulntacf
Both contacts are irregular, bound by qacalb vcbling gmdblg into the moq oltcnltiml
intervals
Fitz 87-12.
Page 2 of 3
DIAMOND
FROM
LlTAOLOGY
DESClUl’TION
TO
<
T
1
-
DRILL
LTERATION
FROM
107
IU8.8
hmet, 2.5cm in diameter
)ark alteration inteval
-.I Il.38
Ill.86
I I LR6
112.1
112.1
116.2
+-carb-qtz ah with @met cryslals
-5cm in diameter
&k altemtion inteval
116.2
119.0
119
124.6
124.6
128.5
I
I
--
-.__
III.38
IOS(.R
LOG
STRUCTURE
DESCRWTION
TO
---
-..--
HOLE
u. contwA sharp and Fttrved - 35-45 to ca
open space texnue
Post min. faulting. irregular & curved plants
ato-3tJtoca
L.mntactsharp-8Utoca
Slight foliation 25 to ca
u. % L. Fontacts at 35 to ca
opal space teopen space textulF
hit, chhtitic interval
biittor irregular patches of garnet&xrb.
Zerb mixed with siltst. Garnet
latches in siltst ittterval~. Rusty
dtemtimt mainly in carb sections
Iark 8ltemtimt with garnets
--
MlNERALlZATlON
DESCRIPTION
Mittemlixd mnc
Garnets crystals and chlsters LUY
rimmedbydarkgreyqaina
matrix of ti-qla
and minor
pyrite (1.5%). Tltia texture
occurs on bolh sides of a 3Ucm
wide band ofalteti darker
rock.
---
Catbqtz-gamct and sulphidc
patches: Appmximately 5%
[email protected], lesser pynhotite
117.8 -one py+tic franwe parallel to ca
Weak foliation tbmughmtt - 70 to ca
MC fmmring with 1.2mm wide qtz-ca
veinlets with &hides
U. c.mtaCt - 25 to FB
L.c.mtKt-45toca
Sulphides occur in reinlets and
8s diss. in pervasive allnation
1.5% pyrite, @KS -2%
myrrhotite.
Large garnets and patchy
sulphides: 1.3% pyrite, t,aczz
pyniwtite
‘at&y Fe-z& alteration
jregh!~mestonc mod gny
Fitz 87-l 2, Page 3 of 3
DIAMOND
HOLE:
FJTZ-87-13
TEN
CLAIM:
MOM
_~~,_
TO
0
6.10
6.10
21.05
21.05
33.25
33.25
lO3:R4
LITHOLOGYDESCRIPTION
Casing
CLASTIC CRINOIDAL
LIMESTONE, massive.
medium grey with a slight
mmm hue. Contains
approximately 70% ofcrinoid
and olher fossil franmalts. __~
Similar limestone as above, but
separated by silty limestone
beds, themselves separated by
Zmm-lcm thick silt interbeds.
MASSIVE CRINOIDAL
LIMESTONE
__
FROM
AZIMUTH:
DIP:
COLAR ELEV.
TOTAL DEPTH-_
TO
DRILL
HOLE
LOG
-
-90”
550 m
172.8 m
ALTERATION
DESCRIPTION
_
STRUCTURE
DESCRIPTION
MINE~~LIzATI~N~~~_
DESCRIPTION
20.2 Vein contacts 60 to ca
Bedding: 22.8 - 65 to ca
25.0 - so to ca
28.0 - 75 to ca
32.9-70toca
33.25
34.4
34.4
36.7
36.7
46.0
Intense bleaching and crackle
veining hairline to 2mm thick of
gray quartz and calcite
Weak iron carbonate all.
Minor patchy bleaching and iron -
Foliated throughout
~,_
20.2 - 5cm calcite vein with
2% pylitc along selvages
-
..~
82.1 - 82.2 Fault gouge
Fitz 87-13,
Page I of I
APPENDIX III
BEEP MAT
UTILISATION
INSTRUCTION
SHEETS
The BM4+ is a powerful miniaturized
elwtromagnetic
sune? instrument that instaml? detects conductive and magnetic outcmy~ or
boulders hidden under up to 3 meters of werburdcn.
The tar%% are quickly delineated and sampled for assay to determine jt.ihe!~
are valuable showings or banen sulfide/Faphitic
conductors:
The new Beep Snow can be pulled by a snowmobilr
or ATV
Standard comoonents of the Beeo Slat
at 30 km/hour and it cntt detect conductors up to 4.5 meters deep.
Stop Screening...
Start F~inding !...
... by using a Beep Mat to sample conductors (sulfides.
gryhitesl
etc.) and choose among your assays the ones
that warrant diamond drilling !
2. Organimion
of your day.
.,.’
&
l
&
=
=
=
=
:Axis of EM conductor ifrom ground geophysirri
Airborne EM anomal?
Beep Mat armmat? t~ratues match diameter of circle)
Swamp
3700. boul. de la Chaudkre
Saint+Foy
(O&[email protected]
Canada
Instrumentation
GDD
inc.
Fax : (4’8) ‘77-4054
E-mail : gdd~gddinstrumentation.com
Website : www.oddinstrumentation.com
. . . .._
8. Holes arc drilled
in the hrdrock with
a gaz plugger.
-,
..
. .._.__.’
,’
12
If you keep [ONI pressed longor. tht dir&q
indicates the following
avaiiabic staox in this order (a few SeEonds by choice):
Initiaiization:
Standby:
OffZ
(sound signal)
2 seconds
(silence)
3 seconds
(second sound slgnal)
5 seconds
The Beep Mat will put itself in the displayed state if you release [ON] at
the precisemomenl when lhc smleyou selecled is displayed.
3.4
Oper&g
Purameters
rind Their
Thresholds
The default operating setiings of ihe Beep Mat when you turn the
inslrument on are:
ml, (mndudivily):
MAO (m~~diu):
dH f&b):
MC. (“wgldilc
mcniiml):
Ihd?M
g&
4OH7.
400 Hz
4HZ
1-2~-0-1s-10~80-1JL)-200.30wo
I-2.. .4o-*o-,so-zoo~w.3woo
1-~48-Is-U1-4680.1SDo.~oo~
103-102-101-1M)-99-98-97-96-94...70n
LOO$6
13
Depth in cm
aL value
dH value
MAG
conductor
delta
magnetite
32
66
176
407
1082
2716
7532
68
124
240
530
1329
3312
9233
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
VShlC
30
25
20
15
IO
5
0
Table I: BM reading versusdepth for a IS-cm diameter pyrrhotite
bOUldW
HZ
HE
Hz
To display one of these parameters, press [LEVEL].
The displayed
parameter only stays a few seconds and then returns lo the operating
.mcde. By pressing [LEVEL] again during these few seconds,the next
parameter is displayed, according to a cyclic sequence. It is possible to
modify the displayed parameterby pressing IT] and [k].
it is important to understand that when a value exceeds its threshold, an
alarm (sound signal) will be heard. Reduction of a threshold will result
in an incrcascdsensitivity of lhe Beep Mat. However, this may causetoo
many false signals. On the other end, an increase of the threshold will
result in a reduction of the sensitivity and the number of false alarms.
Usually. il is not rccommcndcd to incrcasc the thrcshoi& becausefewer
conductors might be found in a day.
Table 1 showsthe readingsvariations of a Beep Mat versus the depth of
a conductive sample located under the probe. With this table, you are
now able to evaluate what may result from the modhication of the
Ihreshoids
MC.
The M.C. prameter stands for Magnetic CociBcient. II is a correction
ureffxient for the e&cl of magnetite that enablesthe Beep Mal to adjust
the effect of magnetite versus the effect of a conductor. If you reduce that
coefficient, the oL value will lx diminished by the presenceof magnetife.
The oL value would therefootebecome non significant with a too small
magnetite cceflicient. For this reason, one musl be very experienced
before modifying that coefficient.
The magnetite coefficient must
normally be al 99% or 100%. It is sometimes possible to reduce it
slightly (ex. 96%) if the ground is highly magnetic and irregular and if,
al 100%, that causesseveral false alarms.
Generally speaking, it is stronrdv recommended not to modifv the
ooeralillg ~buuetor~ unlessthere are false alarms in rqrethion. For 95 %
of lhe tield surveys, Ihe Beep Mat will work just fine with ail Ihe defauil
parameterspreael by GDD.
Rememberthal if you modify loo many thresholdsand get confur with
ail the values, you can always turn the Beep Mal OFF then lum it ON
again. This will resetail dcfaulr parameters.
17
4.
OPERATING
PRINCIPLE
The probe contains WI inductive coil within its shell. When the p&e is
in normal position on the ground, as ahown nt illustr&im 6, the axis of
the inductive eledromagnctic
field transmitted by the c&l is in vatical
Influenw
I
, t .
/
Imnglnc thnt iaductive field as being compwcd
of scvcml
iaduction lines crossing the iaductive coil and which cknsity increases
towards the center of the coil. To illuntmtE that, only a few induction
lim are presented at illustfation 6. Therefore. the more of these tines
arc cmming the maductive or magnetic d-&t, the higher the displayed
valuea on the reading unit will k.
For tiulher &ails.
repert to
chnpter6.
Following
Zme
Axis
\
Ill
-.
- The delta value (dH) repents
the change of frequency of lhe
inductive coil, in hertz, since its initialization. The dH increa!u8 in
prance ofa conductor sad &zascs
in prcaencc of magnetite.
M&of
lndtiim
Field,
’ lndudion
Linm
is the significance of CL, dH, MAC3 aad RT valucx
Ssfondary
Field
pwenw
The conductor value (aL) represents a specific reaction to the
of a mnhctor
near the p&e, in hertz.
- The magaetite value (MAO) represents a specific reaction of
the. p&c (in hertz) to the. pmsenw of a magnetic tody, in particular one
containing magnetite.
hdwting
- The ratio value (RT) is the
indicates the quality of a conductor
iadepzadant of the quantity of present
valw te be calculated by the unit, there
Cdl
-Ll
value of olJdH. The ratio value
(intriasic mnductivity)
and is
material. Note that for the ralio
are twu mnditions:
-you nwd * positive dH ofat lcast 10 Hz
-no magnetite must be present (MAO=O)
illustration
6: ming
principlq
The influmw
xone of iu inductive field has an average radius
(called “mnge”) of about 3 me&s.
lhis inductive field is similar to the
tield of a magnet. Any cmductive or magnetic objed within the zone
reacts by sending out again a secondary tield (or “induad field”). The
secondary field is w&a
and has distinctive faturea. The pmbe rw~cts
on the part of this tleld that goes thmugh ita indube
ceil. That reauion
is then displayed on the rending unit in terms of GL., dH, MAO and RT
VdUeJ.
,“,I
,“~,,. ,/, ,,,,, ,”,.,,
-,
.,I
,,,“. ,,,,,. 1 ,,.,.
.“-,i._,,“,,
,,,, .,,.
,“,
If then is prcseace of magactite, the RTvalue is meaninglegs and
RT = ***% will k displayed. If W i8 below IO. the RT value is not
precise eaough and RT - 0% will be displayed
To have a better understanding of those values, one should look at
both examples ahown at illustration I I aad its explanations as a field
example.
33
9.
INTERPRETATION
OF VALUES
The Rcep Ma1 quantitatively gives n nwmurc of the apgnuent
conductivity andlor the avemgs magnetite contcmof the underlying rock
It also gives raneslimek of lhe lntrindc amdu&ily with the ratio vahu.
0.
9.1
MogIr&#
chtorlt
ThemagnelltecmllIentismeaNmdlnal-mete?wIumeunderthe
probe. alralilnallolwlDdiato~r~G~d-1,oooanrspDndr
to1’Kmagdteun&Tthe&Kdqwhichls~toatc4u
1,ooogamnlasforavohmleofafewm.
ThiaequMuweexfsu3up
to a magneticMIUCof 30,ooo. which is equivalent IO2qooo grmlmar. or
20 % magnetite.
9.2
ApparmI
condndivi!v
Up IO now, the apparent conductivity ha6 been calibtrded only in the
absenceof nmgnelite. The graph presented81illustration 16 (curve ‘a”)
shows the apparent conductivily according to the positive dH value and
in the absenceof magnetile. Be awaml A veinlet or a coin will 8uggesta
bad conductivily, lwcausc the instrument meamues the average
conductivily of the PM murounding the probe. Gn the odwr hand, lhe
inslNmcnt given a real memure of the amducRvily of an Mnite layer.
The closenessof water creeiu a negmivc signal (a value of about -100).
The estimare of the conductivity of a clay layer filled with weter is
slightly belter if one lifts the probe above the ground by 10 antimeters
because the intluence of water, just aa the irdhmncc of magnetite.
diminishes more rapidly than the effect of Abeconductor (see curves “b”
and “c” of illustration 16).
In the absmceof magnctile ([email protected] with a nmgne~),Ru ratio belweenuL
and dH (I&) givra a measure of the inlrinsic conductivity of the
conductor and this mlio is not inlluenced by lbe size of the conductor.
Therefore, a quarter placed on Ihe calibration point (the Rrsl “D” of
‘GDD”) will give valuca ranging from +70 to +80 for dH and oL and
lherefore a RT near lOO%, while a typical Abitibi clay layer will also
give a value of t80 for dH, bul zero for oL and therefore a RT near O?k
Remember,the ratio value will only be calculatexiif dH is at least 10 and
there is no magnethe (MAG = 0).
As menlioned lxfore, galem and compacl massive pyrite an nol always
conductive. One dog not hnow why there variation exiti, Inn since
lh sulRdesare semiwnduclors, lhis could dependon the imprrilies
illMrporalcd in Ihe CrySUdSSlNClUre,as for ImnSislOm.Fortmmlcly for
tbc Beep Ma1and prosgec~ors,Write veinlas, which am oRcn pre!znt in
gold-bearing quariz veins. are generally good amductom. We hnvc
noticed il in prlkular on gold-ring quartz veina thal do nd reacl to
mw other grephysical inslrumenl and that cnn bc dioxwered uuder rno~
oolybyiheBcepMa~orstrench.
APPENDIX IV
WEYERHAEUSER
LETTER
OF ACCESS RESTRICTION
A
Weyerhaeuser
The future is growing
m
West Island Woodlands
Division
Franklin Operation
Port Alberni, BC, Canada
V9Y 7N3
Telephone
Number:
(250) 720-4200
Fax Number:
(250) [email protected]
November 1.5.1999
To Whom It May Concern
Subject: Access to Museum Creek & Spencer Mountain Area
Larry Crittenden has requested access to the Mt. Specer area of our operations for the purposes of
accessing his mining holdings. We can not permit this at this time for safety reasons. This is
currently an active logging area is unsafe for the access of non-logging personal until December 1,
1999.
Regards.
Darrell Van OS
Administrative Engineer
Enclosure(s):