2013 - Open Government - Government of Alberta

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2013 - Open Government - Government of Alberta
Alberta Parks
2013
guide
Free year-round
guide to activities
and experiences
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8
reserve.albertaparks.ca
Readers Survey
albertaparks.ca/exploresurvey
This publication has been funded
by the Government of Alberta. We
acknowledge the sponsorship of
our advertisers who made this 2013
edition possible.
The Explore Alberta Parks Guide is
published once a year by Alberta
Tourism, Parks and Recreation.
350,000 copies are distributed
throughout Alberta and Western
Canada.
ISBN: 978–1–4601–0501–6
Northwest
Northeast
65
66
68
71
72
74
76
76
76
77
78
78
Camping Reservations
West Central
10
South
11
Classic Camping
12
Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park
13
Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park
14
Dinosaur Provincial Park
15
Dinosaur Provincial Park Social Media
16
Kinbrook Island Provincial Park
16
Tillebrook Provincial Park
20
Kananaskis
21
Your Experience to Choose
23
Visit Nature, Close to Home
26
Find the Quieter Side of Kananaskis
27
Discover the Legacy All Over Again
28
Alberta Parks Programs
30East Central
31
Big Knife Provincial Park
33
Pigeon Lake Provincial Park
34
Pigeon Lake Region
35
Comfort Camping in Alberta Parks
36
Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area
38
West Central
39
Winter Wonderland
42
Alberta’s Northern Rockies
47
David Thompson Corridor
49
David Thompson Corridor Interpretive Programs
50
Northwest
51
Two Lakes Provincial Park
52
Kakwa Wildland Park
53
Musreau Lake Provincial Recreation Area
56
O’Brien Provincial Park
58
Northeast
59
Athabasca and Area
61
What’s Your Camping Style?
62
Grand Rapids Wildland Provincial Park
East Central
The Coleman® Instant Tent, exclusive to
Canadian Tire. Water resistant, rugged and takes
60 seconds to set up. It comes in four different sizes
that comfortably sleep 4, 6, 8 or 10 people.
Learn more at canadiantire.ca/instanttent
or scan the QR code to see the demo video.
The Value of Alberta Parks
Map of Alberta
Kananaskis
GO FROM
ZERO TO TENT
IN 60 SECONDS.
albertaparks.ca
South
Contents
Website
Let’s Go Outdoors
Help Protect Alberta’s Water Resources: Stop Aquatic Invaders
Camping Reservations
Parks Day
Explore More
Mountain Biking in Alberta Parks
Need More Information?
Calgary and Edmonton RV Show Winners
We Want to Hear From You
Watching Wildlife Responsibly
Regulations
Etiquette and Safety
PEFC/01-31-106
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3
Dinosaur Provincial Park
Message from the Honourable Dr. Richard Starke
Minister of Tourism, Parks and Recreation
Welcome to Alberta Parks!
Alberta’s provincial parks are some of our most valued treasures – offering us
the chance to learn about nature, to lead active lives in the great outdoors, and
to create lasting memories with family and friends. For more than eight decades,
we’ve shared Alberta’s incredible backyard with visitors from near and far – a
tradition we will continue for generations to come.
We take great pride in giving you our best, and Alberta Parks is here to help you
create your ideal outdoor experience. Explore gives you a glimpse into Alberta’s
vast and diverse provincial parks system, and there is more waiting for you online
at AlbertaParks.ca.
Whether you’ve grown up in Alberta’s provincial parks, or are discovering them for
the very first time, you’ll be sure to find something new at every turn – no matter
the season. Enjoy!
Dr. Richard Starke
Minister of Tourism, Parks and Recreation
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The Value of Alberta Parks
SAFE CAMPING TIPS
Parks protect critical habitat for many endangered plants
and animals, including 7,500 square km of woodland
caribou habitat.
Over 9,000 square km of protected lakes and wetlands in
Alberta’s parks help maintain, store and purify water.
Hiking, cycling, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing,
horseback riding, swimming and other activities you can
do in provincial parks are part of active lifestyles that help
relieve stress and reduce risk of chronic diseases.
Tell us why you value Alberta’s parks. Take our survey at
albertaparks.ca/exploresurvey.
IT ONLY TAKES ONE
TO START A WILDFIRE
Selecting a site
Preparing your campfire
Putting the campfire out
In a campground, always use the
designated fire facilities. Stoves, rings
and pits are designed to prevent the fire
from spreading to our forests.
Dig or scrape down to the bare soil an
area for your campfire that is one metre
in diameter. Remove all flammable
materials such as dry leaves, grass, twigs
and moss within another metre of your
cleared area.
Let your fire burn down completely
before extinguishing. Spread the remains
of the fire evenly around the pit. Add
water or loose dirt and stir with a stick or
shovel until you no longer see smoke or
steam.
Never use lighter fluid, gasoline or any
other accelerant to start your fire.
Gradually build your campfire with
kindling and then add larger pieces of
wood.
To ensure your campfire is completely
extinguished, place your hand over the
ashes. If you don’t feel any heat and you
can touch the ashes, your fire is
completely out.
Keep your campfire small and never
leave it unattended.
Remember, soak it, stir the ashes and
soak it again.
If you are backcountry camping or your
campsite has no designated fire facilities,
ensure your campfire is safe as possible.
Choose level ground away from dry
grass, heavy bush, logs, leaves and
overhanging branches. If possible, try to
choose a site close to a water source.
Always have a large container of water
on hand in case your fire accidentally
spreads.
Dinosaur Provincial Park
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2
Dunvegan
Moonshine
Stoney
Lake
49
Lake
35
Peace River
Notikewin
Winagami
Lake
Peace River
88
Northwest
Fort Vermilion
88
Northwest
Notikewin
Twelve
Foot Davis
Gregoire
Lake
Calling
Lake
Grand
Rapids
Wildland
Otter-Orloff
Lakes Wildland
63
63
Sir Winston
Churchill
Gregoire
Lake
Fort McMurray
Grand
Rapids
Wildland
Fort McMurray
Northeast
Northeast
SK
SK
Saskatoon
Island
40
BC
BC
West Central
Kananaskis
Kananaskis
Hilliard’s
Bay
West Central
49
USA
USA
South
South
East Central
East Central
Lakeland
Otter-Orloff
Cold
Lesser Athabasca
Lakes Wildland North
Lake
Buck Lake
Slave Lake Cross
Musreau
Lake
Grande
2
High
Lake
55
43
Kakwa River Young’s Point
Cold Lake
Prairie
Prairie
43
Two Lakes
CallingLong Lake
Sir
Winston
Moose
Lake
Lake
Southview
Carson-Pegasus
Kakwa
O’Brien
Williamson
GarnerChurchill
Lake
Wildland Grande
2
28
Thunder
Cache Pierre Grey’s
Whitecourt
Lakeland
Lake Athabasca
40
Lakes
North
WhitneyCold
Cross
Buck Lake
LakesLake
Musreau Lake
Lake
Lois Hole
55
Kakwa
River
Cold
Lake
43
Long Lake
Centennial
Two Lakes
Sundance
41
William A.
16
Obed
Moose
Lake
Strathcona
Science
Southview
Switzer
Carson-Pegasus
Vermilion
Kakwa
Lake Edson
Wabamun Edmonton Cooking
Garner Lake
Rock Lake
Wildland Grande
22
2
16
Lake
28Lake-Blackfoot
Hinton
Thunder
Wildhorse
Cache Pierre
Whitecourt
Grey’s
Lake
Lloydminster
Lake
Miquelon
Eagle
Drayton
Lakes
Whitney
Lake
2
Point
40
Valley
Lakes
LoisPigeon
Hole
Wainwright
14
Whitehorse
36
Jasper
Centennial
Lake
Sundance
13
41
Wildland
William A.
16
Obed
Strathcona
Science
Switzer
21
Vermilion
Lake Edson
Wabamun Edmonton Cooking
Rock Lake
Dillberry
Crimson
22
16
Lake-Blackfoot
Lake
Hinton
Wildhorse
Lake
Lake
Nordegg
Aspen
Big
Knife
Lloydminster
Sylvan
Lake
11
Miquelon
Eagle
93
12
Drayton
Rochon
Beach
Lake
Lake
2
40
Rocky Point
Valley
Sands
11
Fish
12
Gooseberry
Mountain
Pigeon
Wainwright
14
Whitehorse
Lake
Thompson
36
Red Deer
Jarvis Bay
Jasper
Lake
House
Lake
13
56
Wildland
Creek
Ram Falls
Red Lodge
21
Kootenay
Dry Island
22
587
Dillberry
Crimson
Plains
Buffalo Jump
Lake
Lake
21
Nordegg
Aspen
Big
Knife
Sylvan
11
93
93
12
Northeast
Rochon
Beach
Lake 2
9
Rocky
Sands
Midland 12
11
Fish
Northwest
Gooseberry
Mountain
Drumheller
Lake
Thompson
Red Deer 9
Jarvis Bay
Lake
House
56
West Central
Little Fish Lake
40
Creek
Big
Hill
Ram
Falls
Red
Lodge
41
Banff
Springs
Kootenay 1
David Thompson Corridor
Glenbow
Dry
Island
22
587
Calgary
56
Plains
Ranch
Buffalo
Jump
East Central
1 21
Canmore
Bow
93
Northeast
Nordic
36
Valley
Wyndham9
2
Kananaskis
Spray
Centre
Fish
Carseland
Midland
Dinosaur
Northwest
Valley
Creek
1
Drumheller
Kananaskis Country
Brooks
24
Peter Lougheed
9
West Central
Little Fish Lake
40
Big Hill
Sheep
River 23
South
40
41
Banff
Springs
Tillebrook
1
Kinbrook
David Thompson Corridor
Glenbow541
Calgary
National Park Boundary
56
Island
Ranch
Medicine
2
East Central
1
Canmore
Bow
Hat
Little
Bow
Highway
Nordic
36
Valley Chain
WyndhamKananaskis
23
Spray
Centre
Fish Willow
Carseland
Lakes CreekCreek
Dinosaur
Secondary Highway
Valley
1
Kananaskis Country
Brooks
24
Park
Lake
Peter Lougheed
Cypress
22
3
887
Camping Available
Hills
Sheep Oldman
River 23
South
40
Red Rock
Tillebrook
Lundbreck
Dam
Kinbrook
Lethbridge
541
Day Use Only
Coulee
National Park Boundary
Falls
3
61
St. Mary Island
Medicine
2
Town/City
Reservoir
Hat
41
Little
4 Bow
Highway
879
2
Chain Beauvais
501
Provincial Park
Willow 23
Lake
Lakes
Secondary Highway
6 Creek
Writing-on-Stone
Woolford
5
Park Lake
Provincial Recreation Area
Cypress
22 Outpost
Police
501
3
887
Camping Available
Hills
Oldman
Red Rock
Lundbreck Dam
Lethbridge
Day Use Only
Coulee
Falls
3
61
St. Mary
Town/City
Reservoir 4
41
879
Beauvais 2
501
Provincial Park
Lake
6
Writing-on-Stone
Woolford
5
Provincial Recreation Area
Police Outpost
501
2
Lesser
Slave Lake
NWT
NWT
Fort Vermilion
Figure Eight
Hilliard’s
49
Saskatoon Queen Elizabeth
Bay
IslandFairview
Grande
2
High
Twelve
Young’s Point
43
Prairie
Foot Davis Prairie
Dunvegan
49
Moonshine
Winagami
O’Brien
Williamson Lake
49
Lake
49
Figure Eight
Queen Elizabeth
Fairview
Sulphur
Lake
Stoney Lake
Sulphur Lake
Twin Lakes
Twin Lakes
58
High Level
35
58
High Level
Map of Alberta
South
Classic Camping
What, Who and Why!
Remembering the days of tents, backpacks with external frames,
and pet rocks may be difficult for some, but those die hard
campers who refused to cook on anything other than a fire, use a
generator or pull a trailer that is newer than 1970 and larger than
a Boler, are the people who fit the definition of “Classic Campers”.
9
Today’s classic camper seeks out campsites that are tent friendly,
level, more dirt than rock, nicely tucked away in the forest and
wonderfully positioned in a cell phone-free zone. No need for
hook-ups or power; the classic camper’s site is usually a short walk
to a well maintained outhouse and a water tap.
56
41
WyndhamCarseland
36
Dinosaur
24
1
23
Brooks
Tillebrook
Kinbrook
Island
539
23
Classic campers are folks who enjoy travelling in small groups.
Their tents may appear worn, but are actually well taken care
of, often patched and also well used. Their hiking boots are
lined up with wool socks hung drying over each just inside the
vestibule every night. Almost every classic camper knows what a
vestibule is.
845
2
Chain
Lakes
529
Little Bow
Willow
Creek
Bob
Creek
Wildland
22
Lundbreck
Falls
Lundbreck Falls
3
Park Lake
Oldman
Dam
Castle
Falls
Beauvais
Lake
In southwest Alberta, glimpses of a classic camper and their
family could occur at Beauvais Lake Provincial Park, or Police
Outpost Provincial Park. Families can receive a good dose of
classic camping experience at Castle Falls and Lundbreck Falls
provincial recreation areas, without making the full commitment
of a considerable drive from the main road.
Medicine
Hat
Cypress
Hills
887
Red Rock
Coulee
Lethbridge
3
61
St. Mary
Reservoir
4
41
879
Why? Is it a trip down memory lane? Does it more closely
connect you with nature? Is it the simplicity? These questions and
more have to be answered individually. The classic camper may
contemplate this, as they sit by the campfire with others, telling
stories and reflecting on life.
2
501
6
Police
Outpost
5
Woolford
Writing-on-Stone
501
Classic Camping
Classic camping is an outdoor recreational activity
that became popular in the early 20th century. The
participants (known as classic campers) leave their
urban home ranges to enjoy nature while spending
one or several days outdoors at a campsite. Classic
campers sleep in a tent, a small, older trailer, or no
shelter at all. Classic campers frequent national or
provincial parks, natural areas or privately owned
campgrounds that offer out of the way, wilderness
experiences.
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Writing-on-Stone
Provincial Park
Comfort Camping
Experience a natural gem hidden deep in southern
Alberta. The rolling prairie carries you along and the
majestic Sweet Grass Hills draw you southward. Just
before you reach their base in Montana, the sacred
landscape of Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park and the
ancient Milk River valley come into view.
Take a park tour with First Nation’s guides to view the
ancient carvings on the rocks and listen to the stories of
their ancestors. Learn about the early European settlers
of the area and the North-West Mounted Police who were
stationed here to catch whiskey smugglers.
Bring your kayak for a serene trip down the Milk River,
while you listen to the songs of over 150 species of
birds. Try one of Writing-on-Stone’s luxurious Comfort
Camping tents. Writing-on-Stone also offers serviced and
unserviced campsites suitable for most camping styles.
Wrap up your day enjoying a beautiful sunset. Then
experience the dark night sky, away from the glare of city
lights, and see some of the most spectacular star-scapes.
The distinctive day and nighttime landscapes, the sounds
of the living prairie and intriguing stories of the past are
sure to make your family vacation unforgettable.
Cypress Hills
Interprovincial Park
Experience hands-on nature and history activities for the
whole family.
With its mix of rolling hills, lakes and grasslands, this high
plateau offers many weekends of adventure and relaxation
in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Explore over 75 km of trails
for hiking, mountain biking or horseback riding.
Comfort Camping
Whether you are a first-time camper or just looking for
that extra level of comfort, our three premium campsites
at Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park will provide you with
an unforgettable experience in a beautiful setting.
Nestled beneath a cottonwood canopy and tucked away
in a semi-private location within the main campground,
three comfort camping sites await you. Each unit offers
a private deck, fridge, table and chairs, BBQ, futon and a
comfortable bed that will take your experience to the next
level of luxury.
An ancient meeting place and hunting grounds for First
Nations, the Hills remain an excellent wildlife viewing site.
Over 250 bird species, 47 different mammals, and rare and
unusual reptiles and amphibians can be found.
Within the park, more than a dozen campgrounds and
two small communities provide the amenities, including
restaurants, lodges, ziplines and golf courses.
Guided Activities and Events
Popular guided activities in Alberta include Learn-to-Fish,
GPS Geocache Adventures and the Wildlife Watching
bus tour. Visit the bird banding station or enjoy an event
such as Parks Day / Dragonboat weekend, or the annual
Stargazing party in Saskatchewan in August!
In Saskatchewan’s Centre Block, try zip-lining, gaze at
stars in the new observatory or enjoy the many daytime
and evening programs!
Escape to Fort Walsh National Historic Site and follow the
footsteps of the North-West Mounted Police, who brought
law to the Canadian West. Your kids will love becoming
Parks Canada Xplorers as you experience life in the 1870s
and discover how Fort Walsh presided over one of the
most dramatic periods of change on the prairie.
For more information, visit us online at albertaparks.ca or
at cypresshills.com for our park partners.
Elkwater Beach
Check out page 35 for more comfort camping experiences
in Alberta Parks. Call to reserve at (403) 647–2364, ext 0.
To book a tour or campsite at Writing-onStone Provincial Park, visit our website at:
albertaparks.ca/writing-on-stone.
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Dinosaur Provincial Park
48 km North of Brooks
With Canada’s largest area of badlands, Dinosaur Provincial
Park is recognized globally as having the highest concentration
of dinosaur fossils from the Late Cretaceous Period. It is also
recognized for its important riverside habitats, unusual and
abundant wildlife and outstanding aesthetic value.
Service and Facilities
You can:
• Enjoy a campsite that has a view of the badlands or
shade from the cottonwood trees
• Experience Comfort Camping in a furnished wall
tent with riverfront views, a fridge, and a real bed
• Visit the restaurant and convenience store to get
meals, supplies and, of course, ice cream!
• Take in the Visitor Centre and enjoy the exhibits or
see a movie
• Shop for local and fair-trade items in the gift shop
• Drive the scenic loop road or hike a self-guided trail
• Choose from a huge selection of guided programs
designed for all ages and abilities. Summer
programs begin May long-weekend and end
Thanksgiving weekend.
Dinosaur Provincial Park
Social Media
“Land of Awe”
is a short
visually-stunning
video that will
make it clear
why Dinosaur
Provincial Park is
a must-see! Check
out this and many
other videos on
the Alberta Park’s
YouTube channel
at youtube.com/
albertaparks.
Tour the Badlands
Capture Your Memories
Dig and Discover
“Explorer’s Bus Tours” and “Fossil Safaris”
run daily in July and August and are a
fun way for all ages to learn about this
amazing park and its history.
Photograph wildlife and amazing
landscapes. The “Sunset Tour” is designed
for photographers and runs select
evenings throughout the summer.
You might discover a new species of
dinosaur! Join a real dinosaur dig on
a “Guided Excavation” or search for
dinosaur bones on a full day of “Fossil
Prospecting”.
How do I get
there? What
should I expect?
What should
I make sure
I don’t miss?
These questions
and more will
be answered in
three different
podcasts available
on YouTube to
help you prepare
for your visit.
Dinosaur
Provincial Park is
one of the most
photogenic places
in the world.
Check out some
of the stunning
scenery on our
Flickr site.
Hike and Explore
Experiences for all ages
Stay the Night
Explore the badlands on your own or
with a knowledgeable guide. Visit a vast
dinosaur graveyard on the “Centrosaurus
Quarry Hike” or take the family on an
adventurous “Great Badlands Hike”.
Enjoy hands-on, interactive activities
for all ages. “The Dinosaur Daycamp”
is designed just for kids, and “Palaeo
Puzzlers” will get the whole family
working together to solve a fossil mystery.
Spend a magical night under the stars
in an RV, tent, or one of our comfort
camping units. Campsites can be
booked via reserve.albertaparks.ca and
comfort camping can be booked by
calling (403) 378–4344.
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Be Prepared for the Badlands Environment
• Wear light, breathable clothing
• Consider wearing long sleeves and pants to protect
your skin
• Bring your camera
• If you find a fossil, photograph it and record its
location, but leave it where it is
• Bring a good sunhat and sunglasses
• Carry lots of water to stay hydrated
• Wear sturdy footwear for good grip and to protect
your ankles
• Try to go out in the morning or the evening
• Avoid hiking in wet conditions due to the
slippery clay
• Try using GPS to stay orientated as you explore.
For information
on the park and
its features,
access to
online program
bookings and the
latest scientific
discoveries, go to
albertaparks.ca/
dinosaur.
Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
15
Kinbrook Island Provincial
Park
Tillebrook Provincial Park
The Jewel of Newell
Just 90 minutes east of Calgary, 15 km south of Brooks you’ll find
an oasis on the prairie. Beautiful Lake Newell is a large irrigation
reservoir with 69 km of shoreline.
Named Tillebrook after the village of Tilley and the city of Brooks,
this provincial park is situated between the two. Six km east of
Brooks and adjacent to Highway #1, it’s just a 40 minute drive to
the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Dinosaur Provincial Park, and
only 10 minutes to Kinbrook Island Provincial Park on Lake Newell.
On a sandy island along its eastern shore, Kinbrook Island
Provincial Park is a unique destination in southern Alberta, where
you can:
• Swim in the warm waters of Lake Newell
Relax in the peaceful campground with well treed sites and fire pits.
There are 85 sites including 65 with power, and 4 barrier-free sites.
A shower building, trailer dump station, playground, hiking trail
and small store at campground booth are provided at the park.
• Build sandcastles on the beach
You don’t even have to get up from your picnic table to listen to
the songbirds in the trees, or you can take a hike and watch for
prairie wildlife like the meadowlark, mule deer or Richardson’s
ground squirrel from the trail. Enjoy the cool shade in a quiet
campsite after a day at the lake at Kinbrook Island Provincial
Park, or in the badlands at Dinosaur Provincial Park.
• Relax under a shade tree in your campsite enjoying an ice
cream from the concession
• Walk around the Marsh Trail with your binoculars, looking
for yellow-headed blackbirds in the cattails or white pelicans
soaring in the blue sky
• Watch a magnificent prairie sunset over the lake while you sail
on the breeze
Kinbrook Island
A Trans-Canada Highway Oasis
Tillebrook Campsite
• Launch your boat and waterski or pull your friends around the
lake on a big inflatable tube
• Canoe to a sheltered bay to fish for northern pike or walleye
• Try out that new stand-up paddleboard.
For your comfort and enjoyment, the park can also boast:
• Playgrounds
• Campground with 169 sites including 79 with power
• 3 group camping areas
• Shower and laundry facilities
Kinbrook Beach
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19
Kananaskis
Your Experience to Choose
From urban parks to backcountry wilderness, the
Kananaskis Region offers a wide array of remarkable
landscapes and experiences any time of year.
If you are in the Calgary area, you can enjoy a leisurely
bike ride through an aspen forest on the trails in Fish
Creek. Join a volunteer with the Glenbow Ranch Park
Foundation on a walking tour about the local ranching
history or get your adrenaline pumping at the Canmore
Nordic Centre mountain bike skills park.
584
Sundre
22
Red Deer
River
93
Ghost
Reservoir
Banff
Canmore
Canmore
Nordic
Centre
742
2
40
Waiparous
Creek
1
Explore a little further into the Kananaskis Region by
driving Canada’s highest highway over the spectacular
Highwood Pass. Share some quality family time with a
picnic by the beautiful Sheep River Falls, or let the views
of the Kananaskis Valley take your breath away while
attending a conference at one of the area’s great hotels.
27
Big Hill
Springs
1A
Cochrane
Glenbow
Ranch
Sibbald
Lake
Bow
Valley
Kananaskis
Village
9
Calgary
1
68
Bragg Creek
66
Fish Creek
22X
Elbow
Falls
Spray
Valley
40
Kananaskis
Country
2
7
Peter Lougheed
Sheep
River
40
546
Turner Valley
Sandy McNabb
Longview
23
Create your own fish tales while fishing for cutthroat
trout in Lower Kananaskis Lake or visit in the winter to
try your hand at ice fishing on the Spray Lakes Reservoir.
If you’re camping overnight at Elkwood, Bow Valley, Mt.
Kidd or McLean Creek campgrounds, our award-winning
interpretive programs will have you laughing, singing and
discovering the amazing plants and animals of the area.
Visitors with physical, mental or sensory challenges can
take in the beauty of Peter Lougheed Provincial Park while
staying at the unique William Watson Lodge.
Glenbow Ranch
For that wilderness experience, pack up and ride your
horse into an equestrian backcountry campground in
the Elbow Valley, adventure into the Ghost Wilderness to
climb world-class frozen waterfalls or cross-country ski
and snowshoe with friends through the forests of Peter
Lougheed Provincial Park.
No matter your ability, your interests, or the season… the
Kananaskis Region has many experiences to choose from.
William Watson Lodge
22
541
Highwood
Junction
20
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
21
Lower Lake
Sheep River Falls
Don’t just visit, volun-tour!
Each year, volunteers contribute
hundreds of hours in support of
the protection and enjoyment
of provincial protected areas
in the Kananaskis Region.
Next time you visit, consider
helping to build a mountain
bike trail in Canmore Nordic
Centre Provincial Park or
repairing a hiking trail in Bow
Valley Provincial Park. If you live
nearby and you’re looking for
opportunities to…
Interpretive Programs
• work in the outdoors
• contribute to your community
and parks
• learn new skills and interesting
facts about the local flora and
fauna
• or apply your knowledge and
abilities in a meaningful way
…then you might consider
volunteering with Alberta Parks.
For additional information on
volunteering in the Kananaskis
Region, visit the volunteering
section of the Fish Creek
Provincial Park, Glenbow Ranch
Provincial Park or Kananaskis
Country websites.
Highwood Pass
Fish Creek
Visit Nature, Close to Home
One of the great things, whether you visit or live in the
Calgary area, is the closeness of nature. Within thirty
minutes of the city the Kananaskis Region offers several
amazing natural areas to help you get away from it all.
Sibbald Pond
Consider packing a picnic lunch and visiting Sheep
River Provincial Park and picturesque Sheep River Falls,
located only 35 km west of Turner Valley. Or if camping
is your focus, try the newly-renovated Sandy McNabb
campground with expanded sites and electrical hookups. In the heart of horse country, these are some of the
region’s best-kept secrets.
Another hidden gem is Sibbald Lake Provincial Recreation
Area, located just 30 km west of the city and 20 km south
of Highway 1. With a 134-site campground, a popular
picnic area and a lake stocked with rainbow trout, you’ll
wonder why you ever drove further to visit the great
outdoors.
In less time than it takes to drive from the suburbs to
downtown, you can be in some of the most beautiful
and peaceful surroundings imaginable. So what are you
waiting for? Nature’s calling!
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
23
1X
1
Eagle Hill Trail
1A
Sibbald
Flat Trail
68
J
Ole Buck
Loop Trail
Reforestation
Trail
68
Eagle Hill Trail
Moose Creek Trail
MOOSE MOUNTAIN
Fullerton Loop
Sulphur Springs
Trail
Trail
Diamond T
Loop
W
in
ter
C
ur
e
Pine Woods
Loop Trail
l os
40
66
Prairie Creek Trail
40
Prairie Link
Trail
lls Road
e
wd
Po
l
Trai
il
Tra
ce
rfa
MOOSE MOUNTAIN
o
Elb
w
d
face
Jumpingpound
Ridge Trail
Fa
r
Powde
Riverview Trail
Powderface
Ridge Trail 66
a
Ro
ek
Cre
ean
McL
Sibbald Snow Vehicle
Forest Land Use Zone
McLean Creek
Off-Highway Vehicle Zone
Husky Energy Facility
Maps courtesy of Government of Alberta.
Husky Energy Inc. has been actively involved in energy
development in the Kananaskis area for more than 19 years. In
the Moose Mountain/McLean Creek area, Husky operates five
facilities, shown above.
Husky employs a number of environmental best practices,
Gorge Creek Trail (road)
currently closed after
including:
Husky has rigorous safety precautions including daily on-site
maintenance, automatic emergency shutdown controls and an
up-to-date emergency response plan. Only qualified operators
are permitted on the lease sites. Area recreational users are not
permitted within the fenced boundaries of these facilities.
• Minimize land footprint and visual impact
Recreational users are also reminded to exercise care and
attention when approaching and crossing any industrial roads.
Husky is committed to operating with as little environmental
impact as possible. Husky minimizes environmental impacts by
conserving flare gas volumes and supporting plant improvements to increase sulphur recovery. Husky also participates in
the Moose Mountain Environmental Enhancement Fund for
local ecological restoration and enhancement projects in the
area. The fund is jointly managed by Husky, Shell Canada and
the Bragg Creek Environmental Coalition.
Ware Creek Day Use due to
flood dama
• Long-term environmental and recreational usege.studies
• Collaborative, staged development to minimize infrastructure
• On-site electricity generation to reduce power lines
• Advanced sound reduction technology
• Reducing emissions and odours
Husky is committed to an open dialogue with people
concerned or affected by its operations. The Company’s
involvement with regulatory agencies, environmental interest
groups, recreational users and area residents is ongoing.
If you have questions or would like more information about
Husky’s activities in this area please contact:
Paul Augustin
Asset Manager
(403)298-6791
www.huskyenergy.com
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Husky Energy Explore Alberta Ad Feb 08 2013.indd 1
Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
2/8/2013 3:32:08 PM
25
Find the Quieter Side of
Kananaskis
Black Prince Cirque
For a quieter visit to the Kananaskis region, and a very different
experience, consider an outing to a picnic spot, campground or
trail in the middle of the week or during the spring and fall, when
there are fewer visitors.
Discover the Legacy All
Over Again
On September 22, 1978, the Honourable E. Peter Lougheed, 10th
Premier of Alberta, officially dedicated Kananaskis Country. This
year marks the 35th anniversary of Kananaskis Country, and
while Lougheed is sadly no longer with us, his legacy lives on in
this truly awe-inspiring place.
Alternatively, why not try a quieter location.
A helicopter ride over the Kananaskis Valley was all it took
for local MLA Clarence Copithorne, and Calgary architect and
environmentalist Bill Milne to convince Lougheed to create
Kananaskis Provincial Park and set aside the rest of Kananaskis
Country as a multi-use area.
The Red Deer River Provincial Recreation Area, in the foothills
west of Sundre, has beautiful campsites along the Red Deer River
that are open until early autumn. From the recreation area, find
your way onto one of the rugged hiking trails or spend a peaceful
day casting your line in one of the mountain streams that flow
into the Red Deer.
With 4,200 km2 of wilderness in the Kananaskis, Spray, Bow,
Elbow, Highwood and Sheep river valleys, as well as the Sibbald
Flats area, Kananaskis Country is as diverse as Albertans
themselves. No visit can ever be the same as the last, in this place
of towering mountain peaks and placid lakes, where rushing
The Black Prince Cirque Interpretive Trail in Peter Lougheed
Provincial Park is a gem for hikers of all levels. Follow SmithDorrien Creek, where fishing is closed to protect our provincial
fish, the bull trout, to a short but steep climb up a wide trail
with views across the Spray Valley. The loop trail then meanders
through an old-growth spruce and fir forest. At the end of the
trail, the trees open up and you arrive at an emerald green cirquelake where you can sit with the majestic Mount Black Prince
in the background. Don’t forget to download your interpretive
brochure from the Alberta Parks website before you go. Enjoy
the trail!
For tranquil wildlife viewing, check out Bow Valley Provincial Park
in the spring – early snow melt and chinook winds allow you to
enjoy this park earlier than others. By mid-May the Middle Lake
Interpretive Trail is dotted with prairie crocuses, and ducks, such
as the Barrow’s goldeneye, grace the shoreline of the lake.
rivers tumble over waterfalls and wildlife roam in abundance.
Whether kayaking the Kananaskis River, hiking to a backcountry
campground or enjoying a viewpoint, you can see the wisdom of
Lougheed’s decision to protect this area and preserve it for future
generations.
Peter Lougheed was Alberta’s Premier for 14 years. As a tribute,
Kananaskis Provincial Park was renamed “Peter Lougheed
Provincial Park”. This caught Lougheed completely by surprise,
and brought him to tears. Reflecting on his time in office,
Lougheed listed the creation of Kananaskis Country as one of his
greatest accomplishments.
The millions of Albertans and visitors from outside our borders
who spend time in Kananaskis Country every year can also see,
in their own way, why Peter Lougheed loved this place. Come
see for yourself and celebrate Lougheed’s legacy with us on our
35th anniversary.
Emergency Services
Bow Valley In Spring
Kananaskis Country is a
9–1–1 area. In the event of
an emergency, dial 9–1–1 on
the telephone and ask for
Kananaskis Dispatch.
Emergency medical services,
firefighters, RCMP, conservation
officers, alpine rescue and
STARS air ambulance respond to
emergencies within Kananaskis
Country.
Many areas within Kananaskis
Country do not have cellular
phone coverage. If you are using
a satellite phone, you can reach
Kananaskis Dispatch directly,
24 hours a day, by calling
(403) 591–7767.
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
27
Alberta Parks Programs
One of the special treats of camping at a provincial park is the
opportunity to get closer to nature through programs delivered
by enthusiastic park staff. Visitor programs are available at many
parks through the camping season on weekends, and at some
parks, all week long.
Some parks have self-guided activities, like scavenger hunts and
activity guides, or you can sign out activity packs to help you
explore pond life, learn about animal tracks, study bugs, watch
birds, do art in the park, or get started with astronomy and
geocaching.
Park staff are often seen in campgrounds, at trail heads and on
beaches interacting with visitors.
You can find out more by looking up your favourite park at
albertaparks.ca.
At Miquelon Lake Provincial Park, southeast of Edmonton,
guided programs are offered weekly from Thursday through Sunday,
from the July long weekend until the September long weekend.
In the south, Cypress Hills Provincial Park, invites you to
hop aboard the
bus for a Wildlife
Tour. Learn to
fish, or take part
in a nature based
in water colour
painting program.
Discover the thrill
of geocaching,
or explore the
night sky in our
new portable
planetarium!
When you visit
Kananaskis
Country, be
sure to take in
an interpretive
theatre program.
The excellence
of these shows
has earned many
national awards.
Or take part
in a one-hour,
activity-based
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
program where fun, hands-on learning experiences are designed
for the whole family. You can also chat with a park interpreter
one-on-one at select trailheads, day use areas and visitor centres.
Campfire Treats
In the Northern Rockies, take a guided hike to identify edible
and medical wild plants, mushrooms or wildflowers at William
A. Switzer, Rock Lake, Whitehorse Wildland, Wildhorse Lakes
or Pierre Greys Lakes provincial parks. You can help catch
and identify beautiful butterflies for our butterfly monitoring
program or learn ancient human technology, with primitive
weapons, fire lighting, flint knapping and forgotten bush craft.
Nothing defines camping like the warmth, the glow,
the crackling and the smoky smell of the campfire.
Here’s one easy treat to try.
In northeast parks, visitors to Sir Winston Churchill or Long
Lake provincial parks can take part in amphitheatre programs,
guided hikes, spontaneous presentations, displays, family
programs and special events with hands on activities that can
combine natural or cultural history and physical activity.
Brownies Baked In An Orange
• Use a purchased brownie mix, or your favourite
home made brownie mix.
In northwest Alberta, amphitheatre programs are delivered on
Saturday nights at Saskatoon Island and Young’s Point provincial
parks. Drop in programs at Young’s Point, Saskatoon Island,
Musreau and Moonshine provincial parks share topics like Learn
to Fish, Buggin’ Out, Encountering Wildlife, Beautiful Birds and
Nature Detectives.
Visitor centres provide valuable information, helpful tips and
interesting displays at Dinosaur, Cypress Hills, William A.
Switzer, Writing-on-Stone and Lesser Slave Lake provincial parks,
and in Kananaskis at Peter Lougheed, Bow Valley, Sheep River,
Canmore Nordic Centre provincial parks, as well as in the Elbow
Valley and near Barrier Lake.
Find out more about our programs at albertaparks.ca under
Education and Interpretation.
For this you need to have good red coals, and very
little flame. You could do this by separating the coals
to one side of the firepit, away from all the flames.
• You will need about a half dozen large oranges to
use up all the mix.
• Cut the top off the orange – about half an inch
down. Keeping the whole skin intact, scoop out
all the orange pulp. This is a good thing to give
the kids to do – they can eat the orange as they
scoop.
• Mix up the brownie batter as directed on the
package and fill the oranges – no more than 2/3
full.
your Family
playcation
!
Destination
• Put the top back on each filled orange and wrap it
firmly in tin foil.
• Let the oranges cook in the coals for about 20
minutes; turn it over once after about 10 minutes.
• Open one of the oranges carefully to see if the
brownie is baked through. If yes, then remove all
the oranges from the fire and enjoy!
Scan this 2D barcode with your smartphone to
Experience the VORTEX!
FOR RESERVATIONS AND DISCOUNT TICKETS VISIT
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2013-02-13 8:57 PM
Rated “Top 10” by Trip Advisor in 2012 for Family Friendly Resorts
Voted #1 Hotel for the past 2 years by Calgary's Child Magazine!
Enhance your Kananaskis adventure in the Summit Spa and Fitness Centre
or with one of the many activities available in the Valley of Adventure.
Winter
Summer
• downhill skiing
• hiking
• X-country skiing
• golfing
• ice skating
• mountain biking
• snowshoeing
• horseback riding
• sleigh rides
• whitewater rafting
• tobogganing
• fly fishing
For more information:1-866-432-4322 or visit: www.deltalodgeatkananaskis.com
Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
29
East Central
41
Strathcona Science
Cooking
Lake-Blackfoot
Vermilion
Edmonton
Lloydminster
Miquelon
Lake
2
Pigeon
Lake
22
16
36
13
14
Wainwright
21
Dillberry
Lake
Sylvan
Lake
Aspen
Beach
Big Knife
12
Rochon
Sands
11
Jarvis
Bay
12
Gooseberry
Lake
Red Deer
56
Red Lodge
22
Dry Island
Buffalo Jump
587
21
9
Midland
9
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
Little
Fish Lake
Big Knife Provincial Park
to unwind and watch the deer, swans, geese and other
wildlife that are attracted to the cool river environment.
Big Knife Provincial Park, located north of Halkirk on
Secondary Highway 855, marks the confluence of Big
Knife Creek and the Battle River.
The 6 km Highland Trail begins with a gradual uphill
climb that rewards hikers with a great vantage point for
panoramic vistas of the park and the beautiful Battle River
valley.
In this area, the Cree and Blackfoot were in a constant
state of war over hunting rights to the land. In fact, Big
Knife Creek was named after a battle between a Cree
named “Big Man” and a Blackfoot called “Knife” in which
both warriors were mortally wounded.
In spite of its violent history, Big Knife Provincial Park,
established in 1962, is the perfect area to relax and enjoy
nature. Two trails in the park are used for hiking in summer
and cross-country skiing in winter.
The Lowland Trail is an easy 4.5 km hike, that takes you
to scenic views of the Battle River and the Big Knife
hoodoos. Benches along the trail are the perfect places
Fish for pike and walleye from the shore or from your boat.
The boat launch accommodates all sizes, from canoes
to motorboats. The park also provides play facilities for
families, including a playground, horseshoe pits and
volleyball net.
Nearby, the Diplomat Mine Interpretive Centre, Diplomat
Trout Pond, and the villages of Forestburg and Donalda
are close enough to explore while you are staying at the
park.
To help plan your next visit to Big Knife Provincial Park,
go to albertaparks.ca or call Alberta Parks toll free
1–866–427–3582.
Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
31
Big Knife Hoodoos
Battle River Valley
Pigeon Lake Provincial Park
Thanks to an extensive redevelopment plan, park visitors will
enjoy a variety of upgrades and renovations in 2013 and 2014.
When the sun is shining in the blue summer sky, it’s time to head
to Pigeon Lake, central Alberta’s outdoor playground. Within an
hour’s drive of Edmonton and Red Deer, Pigeon Lake Provincial
Park is the perfect place to visit for a day, weekend, or extended
holiday. Nestled on the western shore of the lake, the park offers
an abundance of outdoor family recreation opportunities.
Zeiner Campground will be fully open in 2013 with the addition
of a new shower building.
In addition to its large, easily accessible campgrounds,
Pigeon Lake features two attractive beaches that are perfect
for picnicking, swimming and family outings. Anglers enjoy
fishing for the lake’s walleye and whitefish, while water sports
enthusiasts find their thrills power boating, waterskiing,
windsurfing, sailing or kayaking.
The park also features a trail system that is ideal for mountain
biking and hiking. In fact, the Trans Canada Trail system passes
right through here. Nature lovers will delight in the scenic
woodlands situated throughout the park, that showcase a variety
of habitats from creeks and shorelines to mixed-wood forest.
Pigeon Campground will be fully open for the May long weekend
and will feature 274 upgraded campsites, of which 158 have
power. Further upgrades include an improved access road, as well
as new fire pits, signage, picnic tables and shower building.
Construction will continue in the park this summer with smaller
campground projects like landscaping, painting and work on
bathroom buildings being completed.
In the fall of 2013, the day use areas will be enlarged and updated,
and camper’s boat launch added. Pigeon Lake Provincial Park will
remain open to visitors throughout the spring and summer, with
all upgrades expected to be completed by spring 2014.
Summer isn’t the only season to enjoy the park. In winter,
groomed cross-country ski trails are available. Ice fishing is a
popular pastime, easily accessed from the boat launch parking
lots. There are also six winter campsites available with 15 amp
power in Pigeon Lake Campground, Loop A.
Hike Break at Big Knife
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
33
Advertising Feature
Covenant Bay
Covenant Bay
Pigeon Lake Region
“One day at the lake is worth a month in town.”
Comfort Camping in
Alberta Parks
Have you ever wanted to go camping, but you just didn’t have
access to camping equipment? Or maybe you couldn’t take time to
dig out the tent, stove, sleeping bags and all your gear.
So… here’s the thing. We all like our warm days, floating on the
water, chasing after that elusive perfect golf round, the gentle
caress of a summer breeze or simply having an excellent family
meal. When we enjoy these moments surrounded by abundant
wildlife and an endless chorus of feathered Pavarotti’s then yes…
we have all the makings of something quite exceptional.
You can book a comfort campsite at three Alberta provincial
parks, pack your personal belongings and arrive at your site
without toting anything extra – except your cooler filled with
provisions for your stay.
Pigeon Lake, just an hour southwest of Edmonton, is one of those
special places. This is lake country and in addition to its natural
beauty, the local businesses are able to accommodate the needs of
the many campers, hikers and shoppers who come knocking.
Dinosaur Provincial Park
Camp like a dinosaur hunter in a furnished wall tent in the
badlands at Dinosaur Provincial Park, northeast of Brooks. Your
themed accommodations look rustic but feel luxurious, from the
canvas wall tent, bed, dining table, fridge to the fan and extra
power outlets for charging cell phones and camera batteries.
Nearby amenities include food services, showers, playground,
trails and visitor centre.
Five golf courses, fine restaurants, unique shopping, a world class
spa, hiking trails and many boat launches provide access and
amenities so visitors can get on with what they came for in the
first place… almost 250 km2 of fun on the water.
This is a terrific place with an amazing roster of brilliant events
and activities going on. Yes, it is a great escape… Alberta’s best
kept secret. Find yourself at Pigeon Lake – where memories are
made (www.pigeonlake.com).
Dinosaur
Call (403) 378–4344 and book one or all seven units, and make it
a reunion for friends or family.
Miquelon Lake Provincial Park
Located southeast of Edmonton, on the shore of Miquelon
Lake, several comfort camping sites are set apart from the main
campground and boast a semi-private beach, private deck and
deck chairs, futon and queen-sized bed. The high-quality canvas
wall tent is on a wooden deck, complete with wooden pony walls.
Amenities include bedding, cooking utensils, pots, dinnerware,
propane BBQ, small refrigerator, kitchen table with chairs and
much more.
Covenant Bay
Miquelon Lake
Battle Lake
Dinosaur
Each of these wheel-chair accessible sites has a maximum capacity
of 4 people. You can reserve by calling from May to September at
(780) 672–7308.
Enjoy guided hikes, tours and family programs offered in these
parks, return to your comfort campsite to cook supper on the
provided barbecue and roast marshmallows over your own fire pit.
Then sit back under a starry sky and listen to the coyotes howl.
Comfort camping sites are also available at Writing-on-Stone
Provincial Park, east of Milk River. Details on page 12.
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35
Cooking Lake-Blackfoot
Provincial Recreation Area
The park’s rich history includes the Sarcee, Cree, and Blackfoot
First Nations, who have used this area as a hunting ground
for centuries. Historical cattle grazing that began in the 1920s
continues in the park to this day.
Steeped in over 10,000 years of human history, Cooking LakeBlackfoot Provincial Recreation Area is a paradise for outdoor
enthusiasts on Edmonton’s eastern doorstep. Four day use areas
provide access to over 170 km of trails that are just waiting for
hikers, mountain bikers, equestrian riders and skiers. Visit in the
spring and summer to enjoy those trails. Or do some canoeing,
cross-country running, geocaching and wildlife viewing.
Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area – so close to
the city, with so much to discover.
Come back in the fall and winter for unparalleled outdoor
adventures. Listen to the wind whistle in your ears as powerful
sled or skijor dogs pull you along the trail. Marvel at the twinkling
constellations and dancing auroras of the winter night sky
– magical moments in this part of the Beaver Hills Dark Sky
Preserve.
Islet Lake
Child’s Play at the Birkebeiner
To find out more about this outdoor playground, call the park at
(780) 922–3293, or go to albertaparks.ca.
Canadian Birkebeiner
Capture the swift glide of a whiskey jack or the tilt of a deer’s
head with your zoom lens. Follow the tracks of squirrels, foxes
and moose as you experience their snowy world on snowshoes or
cross-country skis.
2013 marked the 25th anniversary of the Canadian Birkebeiner,
the largest classical cross-country skiing event in Canada and one
of only three such races in the world. Each year, on the second
Saturday in February, athletes commemorate the Norwegian
Birkebeiner legend as they race across 55 km of groomed trails
with 5.5 kg packs on their backs. If that sounds crazy, recreational
skiers of all abilities can challenge themselves to numerous
smaller events and races of the day, all using the extensive crosscountry ski trail system at beautiful Cooking Lake-Blackfoot.
Birkebeiner Medal
Bordering Elk Island National Park, Cooking Lake-Blackfoot
features forests, wetlands and pastures. These protected habitats
are home to a variety of animals, including elk, coyotes, beavers,
muskrats, skunks and weasels, as well as the occasional cougar,
lynx, wolf or bear. The area is also a critical rest stop for over 200
species of migratory birds in the spring and fall.
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37
West Central
Winter Wonderland
Carson-Pegasus
Whitecourt
To Grande Prairie
Sulphur
Gates
Grande
Cache
Willmore
Wilderness Park
Pierre Grey’s
Lakes
Rock Lake
Wildhorse
Lake
2
William A.
Switzer
Hinton
Sundance
Obed
Lake
Edson
40
Wabamun
Lake
16
22
Drayton
Valley
Eagle
Point
Whitehorse
Wildland
Jasper
David Thompson
Corridor
93
Cross-Country Skiing
Ice Climbing
William A. Switzer Provincial Park in the Northern Rockies
district, provides over 50 km of groomed cross-country ski
trails for both skate skiing and classic skiing. Two popular
trails in the park, Joachim Valley Ski Trail and the Jarvis
Lake Trail, both begin from the Jarvis Lake Campground.
The Athabasca Lookout Nordic Centre is the premier site
for leisure skiing as well as ski and biathlon races. For
more information about trail conditions and trail ratings
visit the Hinton Nordic Skiers website at hintonnordic.ca.
When the rivers freeze over, waterfalls in the area become
towering ice sculptures inviting adventurous spirits. Some
of the best ice climbing in Alberta is found along the David
Thompson Corridor. Crescent Falls Provincial Recreation
Area is an excellent location to experience frozen vertical
thrills.
If you continue north up Highway 40, Pierre Grey’s Lakes
Provincial Park also provides 15 km of groomed ski trails
in a lovely foothills setting.
Thunder
Lake
43
When it’s 30 degrees outside and you are searching for a
piece of shade, picture yourself frolicking in a cool white
wonderland. When summer is passed and winter comes,
Alberta’s Northern Rockies and the David Thompson
Corridor transform to snowy playgrounds.
Bonhomme, held annually in February, combines culture
and winter recreation with cross-country skiing, making
maple syrup, food, music, and sledding at the Athabasca
Lookout Nordic Centre. Bring the family to Switzer Park in
February and enter the annual Ice Fishing Derby hosted
by the Fish & Game Club. Can you catch the biggest
whitefish or northern pike? Trophies and prizes await the
fisherman of the day.
Lois Hole
Centennial
Edmonton
28
Luge
Yes there really is a luge track in a provincial park. The
Hinton Luge Association operates a 900 meter luge track
in William A. Switzer Provincial Park, generally ready for
use by early January. The Luge Association offers training
programs for families, schools, and individuals.
Wildlife Viewing
Wildlife viewing actually gets easier in the winter at
the Kootenay Plains Ecological Reserve. With the ever
present, warm and dry wind, deep snow does not
accumulate here. This creates a winter refuge for large
herds of elk and bighorn sheep and makes for easy
winter hiking across the “Serengeti of Alberta” to see an
abundance of winter wildlife.
Kootenay Plains
Frozen Waterfall, Ogre Canyon
Snowshoeing and Winter Survival
11
Crimson
Lake
Nordegg
Rocky
White Goat Fish
Mountain
Wilderness Lake
House
22
Ram
Falls
Thompson
Kootenay
Plains
Creek
Siffleur
Wilderness
12
11
From the ice age to the present day, people have learned
to survive winters in the Rockies. School students and
community groups can register for a two–hour guided
program in Switzer Park. Groups will travel by snowshoe
and learn to build a variety of shelters. Find out how to not
only survive, but thrive comfortably, in the great outdoors.
One of the best ways to explore the David Thompson
Corridor in the winter has not changed for hundreds of
years. Guided interpretive snowshoe programs are offered
all winter at Crimson Lake Provincial Park where you can
enjoy 20 km of cross-country ski trails and an annual
Family Day celebration in February.
Winter Magic Festivals
Not one, but two events bring outdoor fans to Switzer
Park to celebrate winter fun! The popular Carnival
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www.epbrparkscouncil.org
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Sulphur Gates
Switzer Park
Alberta’s Northern Rockies Map
Sheep Creek
William A. Switzer Provincial Park
Alberta’s Northern Rockies
Alberta’s Northern Rockies are an outdoor paradise with
thousands of square kilometres of rugged and untamed
wilderness. In this wild landscape, many parks provide a treasure
trove of recreation opportunities including camping, fishing,
boating, hiking, skiing, mountain biking, horseback riding and
more.
The scenery varies from lofty mountain tops and glaciated peaks
to deep valleys, clear lakes and wild rivers. Rolling foothills are
covered with forests of pine, spruce, aspen and fir. This area is
home to a wealth of wildlife including black and grizzly bears,
wolves, cougars, moose, caribou, bighorn sheep, mountain goats,
elk and deer.
With a lifetime of exploration at your fingertips, Alberta’s
Northern Rockies will entice you to return again and again.
Willmore Wilderness Park
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Switzer Park is the hub of the Northern Rockies. Enjoy all the
comforts of front country camping, while you explore the five
lakes in the park. Try the interpretive canoe route on Jarvis Creek
or check out numerous trails for hiking, biking, skiing and wildlife
viewing opportunities. Stop at the park visitor centre to find out
about exciting interpretive programs and other information to
make your stay memorable.
Smoky River
South
Sulphur Gates
Grande Cache
West Central
Pierre Grey’s
Lakes
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Big Berland
Willmore Wilderness Park
Wildhay Glacial
Cascades
Natural Area
Willmore Wilderness Park
Ancient glaciers, high mountain peaks, thick forests and raging
rivers define these 4,600 km2 of untamed wilderness. Historically
showcased to visitors from around the world by local horseback
outfitters, as a protected wilderness today, it still remains wild.
Backpackers and horseback riders seeking a true backcountry
experience can explore over 750 km of trails where wildlife is
abundant. Visitors to Willmore must be experienced and well
equipped for a rugged backcountry adventure.
William A. Switzer
Rock Lake
Rock
Lake-Solomon
Creek Wildland
Sundance
16
Obed Lake
Hinton
Wildhorse
Lake
16
McLeod River
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Watson Creek
Whitehorse
Whitehorse Creek
Wildland
Rock Lake Provincial Park
Nestled between the Willmore Wilderness and the Rock Lake
Solomon Creek Wildland Park, Rock Lake is surrounded by
stunning mountain views. Visitors can enjoy camping, boating,
fishing and equestrian staging areas. Elk, deer, bears and bighorn
sheep are often seen in open meadows on the hillsides.
Pinto Creek Canyon
Natural Area
Jasper
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Rock Lake
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
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The Alberta Northern Rockies are calling you –
Alberta Northern Rockies
make 2013 the year you answer.
Hinton and Yellowhead County
TRAVEL ALBERTA PHOTO
Each year, more and more Albertans are making Hinton and the Northern
Rockies part of their vacation plans – and it isn’t hard to see why. The
natural landscape and choice of outdoor activities to enjoy are what make
this area a must for your vacation bucket list. When you visit, make sure
you leave enough time – you’ll be surprised at how much there is to do.
You could start your day with a morning bike ride at the Hinton Bike Park
and pedal through the thick stands of trees that embrace the Happy Creek
trail system. Pack a picnic lunch and head to Kelley’s Bathtub or Jarvis Lake
for a refreshing swim – or stop at any of the other viewpoints or parks in
William A. Switzer Provincial Park. What’s that – you lost track of time?
Return to town for a bite of dinner at any of the great restaurants Hinton
has, but get your dessert to go. Dusk is the perfect time to take in the
beavers hard at work at the Beaver Boardwalk.
TRAVEL ALBERTA PHOTO
If instead of spending the night at one of the area’s bed and breakfasts or
comfortable hotels, you camped at one of the 1,000 campsites within an
hour’s drive of Hinton, or if you cantered down a scenic trail on a guided
horseback adventure, you’d already know that the Northern Rockies
landscape is striking.
Terms like, “rugged splendour” and “unspoiled wilderness” are often
bandied about when describing what visitors experience in this area, but
what will that mean for you?
Calling all free spirits...
When was the last
time you ventured
off the beaten track?
It means that you’ll marvel at the vast forest backdrop overlooking inviting
lakes, and towering mountaintops in the distance as you trek through
William A. Switzer Provincial Park. It means you’ll stop in your tracks when
you come across a grazing herd of bighorn sheep in Cadomin, the heart of
Yellowhead County’s historic Coal Branch area. But what it really means is
that memorable moments await you in the Northern Rockies – moments
that will call you back for another taste of adventure.
Visit www.hinton.ca/visitors or www.visityellowheadcounty.com
to plan your trip to the Alberta Northern Rockies.
• Mountain Biking • caMping • hiking • Quadding •
• Fishing • canoeing • Festivals • horseBack riding •
TRAVEL ALBERTA PHOTO
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
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Pierre Grey’s Lakes Provincial Park
Pierre Grey’s Lakes
This park is known by the locals as a fishing paradise where the
lakes are stocked with brook trout and rainbow trout. Many
campsites are located close to the water for easy canoe access.
The park is named after a very successful Métis fur trader who
operated a trading post in the late 1800s. The remains of Pierre’s
log cabins are still visible along the lakeshore.
Whitehorse Wildland Provincial Park
Backcountry hiking and horseback riding are popular activities
in Whitehorse Wildland. Visitors can experience the fragile
beauty of the alpine meadows on the Cardinal Divide. Colourful
harlequin ducks nest along high mountain streams and natural
caves provide critical habitat for brown bats. Camping facilities
and equestrian staging areas are available at nearby Whitehorse
Creek Provincial Recreation Area.
Still More to Explore
Once you have been to the Northern Rockies, you will find many
reasons to return. Discover the peculiar and elegant hoodoos at
Sundance Provincial Park, go whitewater rafting at Sulphur Gates,
or splash in the waterfalls at Ogre Canyon. If relaxation is your
quest, stretch out your beach towel on the sand at Jarvis Lake.
The possibilities are endless.
Spidercreek in Willmore
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Whitehorse Wildland
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David Thompson Corridor
Crescent Falls
Discover a string of spectacular parks from Red Deer to the Rocky
Mountains, all along Highway 11. Nineteenth century explorer,
fur trader and map maker, David Thompson, lived and worked in
this often unsung mountain corridor where you will find some of
Alberta’s best kept secrets for rugged mountain scenery, wildlife
viewing and outdoor adventure. Spend a day or spend a week and
discover an abundance of uncrowded camping, site-seeing and
hiking treasures.
Along the corridor there are camping opportunities for every
interest. Have fun at the beach and enjoy excellent family
camping at Crimson Lake Provincial Park. Spend the day riding
the large network of mountain bike trails starting right from
your campsite at Fish Lake Provincial Recreation Area. See vistas
few have seen on a backcountry camping trip into White Goat
Wilderness Area. Or enjoy camping by the river at Saunders or
Horburg provincial recreation areas, after an exhilarating day of
paddling the North Saskatchewan River.
Explore the rich history and countless recreational opportunities
at over twenty provincial parks and recreation areas along
Highway 11 and find there is an adventure waiting for everyone.
For more information on the David Thompson Corridor, call
(403) 845–8349.
Ogre Canyon © Alan Marshall
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40
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David Thompson Corridor
West Central
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12
Twin Lakes
Rocky Mountain House
11
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White
Goat
Wilderness
N
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David
Thompson
Corridor
Crimson Lake
11
Ram Falls
40
Siffleur
Wilderness
David Thompson Corridor
Interpretive Programs
Interpretive programs are enjoyed year-round. In the winter,
come out to Crimson Lake for a guided snowshoe program.
And for school and community groups, curriculum based
environmental education programs are available every season.
There are so many places to see, experience and explore along
Highway 11. Interpretive programs, offered at parks throughout
the corridor, are your connection to discovering even more!
Ask that burning question, go pond dipping, find a hidden
geocache, get out and explore more along the David Thompson
Corridor through an interpretive program!
During summer months at Crimson Lake, Fish Lake, Crescent
Falls, Kootenay Plains and Thompson Creek, park interpreters
regularly present fun and memorable programs, and provide
information about other activities you can do in the area. The
guided programs reveal and connect you to amazing natural
and cultural wonders protected within the parks of the David
Thompson Corridor. Program schedules are posted online and in
these parks.
For more information, go to
albertaparks.ca/albertaparksca/news-events/events.
If you want to explore on your own, self-guided programs are also
available. Borrow a geocaching kit or discovery backpack from the
volunteer campground hosts at Crimson Lake or Fish Lake and
head out into the park fully equipped for a day of adventure.
Alberta Parks and Suncor have received the
2013 Responsible Canadian Energy Award
from the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers in the Social
Responsibility category for our partnership delivering the David
Thompson Corridor Visitor Services Program.
p
Hiking At White Goat Wilderness © Gord Farrington
Top 5 David Thompson Corridor Experiences
1. Summer interpretive program: Enjoy fun and
memorable interpretive programs offered at Crimson
Lake, Fish Lake, Crescent falls, Kootenay Plains and
Thompson Creek in July and August.
2. Paddle the North Saskatchewan River: Canoe the
length of the David Thompson Corridor camping at a
different park each night.
3. Backpack the White Goat Wilderness Area: Be
rewarded with majestic scenery and rugged wilderness
every step of a multi-day backcountry camping trip.
4. Picnic at Crescent Falls: Set out a blanket on the
smooth riverside rocks and enjoy a relaxing afternoon
soaking in the incredible surroundings.
5. Mountain Bike Fish Lake: Ride straight from your
campsite to access over 40 km of challenging trails
through meadows, forests, and foothills.
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Northwest
Two Lakes Provincial Park
Caribou
Mountains
Wildland
Hay-Zama
Lakes Wildland
High Level
Located 130 km and just over two hours drive southwest of
Grande Prairie, Two Lakes Provincial Park offers adventures that
everyone will enjoy. The drive itself can be an experience, on the
industrial gravel road, depending on weather conditions. But,
don’t let that stop you! Once you see the rolling, forested foothills
of the park and the shimmering beauty of the lakes, you will not
be disappointed.
This remote scenic park in the foothills of the Northern Rockies
has two lakes nestled among forested hills, where you can camp
on the lakeshore, find your favourite fishing hole or watch
wildlife. Go canoeing, boating or hiking, all the while surrounded
by the most incredible views!
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Fort Vermilion
Rugged trails throughout the park allow you to enjoy the lakes,
forests and meadows. Deer, elk, moose, grizzly and black bears
can all be spotted in the park. Come prepared and be bear aware!
Three separate campgrounds are located along the lakes, offering
a total of 86 basic campsites. There are no power sites at this park.
Gunderson Meadows is ideal for tenting, with pristine views of
North Lake. Campsites here will also accommodate RVs. Pine
Hollow, on the south shore of North Lake, has towering trees that
offer complete seclusion. Moberly Flats, on South Lake, is the
most popular campground, with sweeping views of the valley and
RV campsites located along the shore for easy access to boating
and fishing.
Call the Grande Prairie Regional office to get updates on road
conditions or wildlife issues at (780) 538–5350.
Both lakes are stocked with trout; cutthroat in South Lake
and rainbow in North Lake. Power vessels are only allowed on
the South Lake and speed is limited to 12 km/h. The North
Lake offers a quiet place for fly-fishing, canoeing and viewing
trumpeter swans and loons.
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Twin Lakes
Chinchaga
Wildland
Notikewin
Sulphur Lake
Stoney Lake
Peace River
Figure Eight
Queen Elizabeth
Fairview
Twelve
Foot Davis
Dunvegan
Moonshine
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Lake
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Winagami
Lake
2
Hilliard’s
Bay
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Saskatoon
Island
Grande
Prairie
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Young’s Point
O’Brien
High
Prairie
2
Lesser
Slave Lake
Williamson
40
Two Lakes
To Grande
Kakwa
Cache
Musreau Lake
Kakwa River
43
Southview
Wildland
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Kakwa Wildland Park
Kakwa Falls
Kakwa Wildland Park is a rugged and remote place of incredible
beauty with tree-carpeted valleys, crystal clear lakes, high
mountain ridges and breathtaking meadows.
Located 27 km south of Two Lakes Provincial Park, this isolated
park is accessed by all-terrain vehicles; a more than 2 hour trek
along rough roads. Once in the park, the all-terrain vehicles are
only permitted on the trail to the Kakwa Falls day use area.
This wild mountain park is home to woodland caribou, elk,
bighorn sheep, grizzly and black bears, wolves and a wide range
of other animals and plants typical of the Northern Rocky
Mountains.
Along the Kakwa River, Alberta’s highest waterfall drops 30
meters into a spectacular canyon. Emerald coloured kettle lakes
give evidence of glacial outwash. There are 100 km of extremely
rugged trails which are not patrolled.
Experience camping, fishing and hiking in a truly wild place.
Wilderness adventures can be rewarding in many ways, but there
are many inherent risks. Be prepared for all potential hazards
and conditions! Contact the Grande Prairie Regional office at
(780) 538–5350 for detailed information to help you plan your
trip wisely.
Hiking to the Bowl
Musreau Lake Provincial
Recreation Area
Located about an hour drive south of Grande Prairie and
6 km off Highway 40, Musreau Lake Provincial Recreation
Area is a great place for a day trip or a weekend of
camping.
Enjoy sun bathing, build a sandcastle at the beach, or
take family and friends out on the lake for a tube ride
behind your new boat. Warm up around the campfire after
a refreshing dip in the lake.
Explore the “Woodpecker Trail” where you can watch
for wildlife and hear the birds that live in this mature
boreal environment. Take your canoe for an early morning
paddle, following the forested shoreline for a completely
different view of the park. Relax with the motion of the
boat and the sound of your paddle slicing through the
water.
Stay a while in one of 69 quiet and scenic campsites. Fire
pits and firewood, as well as vault toilets and a boat launch
provide for your basic camping and recreation needs.
Kakwa Falls
The spruce, pine and aspen trees that tower over you,
the rich habitat of the forest shrubbery and the clear
waters of the lake make this a scenic and enjoyable
location for visitors looking for a true boreal forest
camping experience.
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
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COUNTY OF
Northern Lights
Reconnect with nature, discover the
Northern Peace Country!
Secret lakes, dense boreal forests and majestic rivers lie within the
County of Northern Lights. Join us for the 2013 Paddle the Peace
and discover the beauty of our region.
Get closer to nature on our campgrounds, on our trails, or explore
the communities of our pristine municipality.
For County Events, Parks & Recreation visit www.CountyofNorthernLights.com
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Northern Flicker
Peace to Mackenzie Travelogue
Explore the Peace and Northward: From the
dramatic valley of the Peace River, cross the
distinctive Dunvegan Bridge and point your wheels
north to discover a northern paradise of trees and
water, where you can enjoy the sights and sounds of
the boreal forest at many parks along the way.
Queen Elizabeth Provincial Park is perfect for quiet
relaxing, simply enjoying the beach, watching late
summer sunsets over Lac Cardinal or sitting by the
campfire under the stars.
Too shallow to support fish populations through
winter, Lac Cardinal is not a fishing lake. But it is a
great place for motor boating, tubing and sailing. Stroll
along trails through the woods, watching for birds,
deer and other animals.
If you like fishing, you’ll love Figure Eight Lake
Provincial Recreation Area, 20 km northwest of
Grimshaw. Stocked with rainbow trout, the lake keeps
anglers happy in both summer and winter. Fish from
your boat (electric motors only) or from the seawall.
Hikers can explore the trail around the lake to view
waterfowl and forest birds as well as beaver, otter, mink
and other wildlife.
O’Brien Provincial Park
If you are close to Grande Prairie and don’t feel like driving too
far to find a beautiful park, O’Brien Provincial Park is the perfect
day use destination, right beside the Wapiti River. Located 10 km
south of the city, this park has just what you need to relax and
enjoy the outdoors!
Explore the majestic riverside forest, hiking on trails that wind
through tall poplar trees. Watch and listen for the many bird
species that make their homes here. There are open sunny spaces
for sunbathing and picnicking or try a float in the cool river on a
hot day.
These are just a few of the reasons that people come to this
charming park. Visit O’Brien Provincial Park to spend the day in
nature and find your own reasons to come back again and again.
When you visit Peace River, stop at 12 Foot Davis
Gravesite for a spectacular view of the town, the
valley and the confluence of the Peace and Smoky
rivers. Signs at the site tell the story of local legend,
12 Foot Davis. His grave monument is original, first
installed about 1913.
Twin Lakes Provincial Recreation Area along the
Mackenzie Highway between Grimshaw and High
Level is an ideal spot to camp or to stop for a picnic.
Camp among tall conifers and aspens beside one
of the lakes. There is a playground and a small
beach just right for a refreshing swim. You can fish
for rainbow trout from shore, canoe or an electric
powered boat. Walk the forested trail to the second
lake, watching for ospreys, loons, great blue herons,
moose, deer and the occasional bear.
There are many more provincial parks and recreation
areas to explore in northwest Alberta.
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Northeast
Athabasca and Area
Colin-Cornwall
Lakes Wildland
Calling Lake
Characterized by boreal forest and abundant wildlife, the
Northeast region is the perfect retreat for the outdoor enthusiast.
Families will find refuge from city life in the area’s many
campgrounds and recreation areas, enjoying activities such as
fishing, hiking, boating, ATVing, canoeing, bird watching and
swimming.
La Butte
Creek
Wildland
The rich riparian habitat, old growth forests, sand hills, vast
wetlands and lush valleys support a diverse population of wildlife
and excellent sport fishing opportunities.
Maybelle
River
Richardson River Wildland
Dunes Wildland
Calling Lake Provincial Park
Calling Lake Provincial Park continues to be one of Alberta’s sport
fishing hot-spots, with an abundant walleye population drawing
in anglers from all corners of the province.
Marguerite
River
Wildland
Birch
Mountains
Wildland
Gipsy
Lake
Wildland
Fort McMurray
Grand
Rapids
Wildland
Gregoire
Lake
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Stony Mountain
Wildland
The improved campground at Calling Lake has 81 sites – all
fully-powered, expanded and upgraded to accommodate various
camping units from small tents to large RVs. For those large
family gatherings, the campground also includes a group use area,
available by reservation. Within the provincial park, the shoreline
remains in its natural state, allowing visitors to enjoy the native
flora and fauna of this northern boreal forest riparian habitat.
Calling Lake Boat Launch
Otter-Orloff
Wildland
Calling
Lake
Sir Winston
Churchill
Athabasca
North
Buck Lake
Cross
Lake
2
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Lakeland
Cold Lake
Moose
Long Lake
Lake
Garner Lake
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Cold
Lake
Whitney
Lakes
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Cross Lake Provincial Park
Long Lake Provincial Park
Along the shore of Steele Lake, the campground at Cross Lake
Provincial Park provides 130 fully-powered campsites and many
other amenities including a shower building, playgrounds, day use
beach area, boat launch, permit booth, vault toilets and reservable
group use campsite.
As you drive off of Highway 831 into Long Lake Provincial Park,
you will notice a slow decent into a valley that holds the gem that
is Long Lake, popular for boating, fishing, hiking, biking and bird
watching. Approximately 15 km long, the lake has ample room
for water skiing, wakeboarding, tubing and canoeing on those hot
summer days.
The park is nestled within an old growth forest; the habitat of
choice for species such as the barred owl and pileated woodpecker.
Fishing is successful for humans as well as osprey, bald eagles,
great blue herons, loons and white pelicans, any of which can be
seen at work on Steele Lake.
George’s Point backcountry campground is a 7-site campground,
accessible by boat or by a 4 km hiking trail that starts from the
main campground. George’s Point is one of the few backcountry
camping experiences within 150 km of Edmonton.
Cross Lake
Along the shore, on the west side of the lake, sits a beautiful
campground with 220 campsites, of which 145 are powered. Some
amenities include beaches, boat launches, group use sites, paved
hiking trail, hot food concession and a shower building.
The more adventurous hiker will find additional trails to explore
in the White-Earth Valley Natural Area, adjacent to the park’s
southern boundary. In the natural area a rustic, multi-use
trail runs along the lake shore and through the boreal forest.
Many species of birds and mammals inhabit the area. Common
sightings include great horned owls, various songbirds, deer,
moose and black bear.
What’s Your Camping Style?
North Buck Lake
Try backcountry camping at Otter-Orloff Lakes Wildland
Provincial Park or plan a family campout at North Buck Lake,
Chain Lakes or Lawrence Lake provincial recreation areas.
The Athabasca area offers an abundance of recreation
opportunities in these featured parks, and other provincial
parks and recreation areas. Your visit will be memorable and
worthwhile, whether you are seeking adventure or relaxation.
Lawrence Lake
Chain Lakes
Long Lake
Long Lake
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
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Grand Rapids Wildland
Provincial Park
An Adventure Paddler’s Paradise!
Grand Rapids Wildland Provincial Park can be found southwest
of the city of Fort McMurray, where it surrounds and preserves
the nationally significant Rapids Reach of the Athabasca River.
The Rapids Reach is very scenic, with numerous rapids, rock
outcrops and slump blocks. For skilled paddlers, most of this
exciting stretch can be navigated, but it can be very dangerous for
inexperienced canoeists. The 16 named rapids are classed the full
range from 0 to the Class 6 Grand Rapid which is unnavigable
and must be portaged.
Numerous historical sites along the river banks are a reminder
of when the mighty Athabasca River was a major trade route for
First Nations people, trappers, settlers, gold miners and explorers.
The incised meanders that cut into the bedrock, over 150 meters
deep in some places, are a significant feature of the park.
The park protects the untamed, beautiful landscapes that are
important habitat for wildlife. Forested valley slopes are critical
moose wintering range. Important fish species in this stretch
of the river include walleye, lake whitefish, mountain whitefish,
arctic grayling, pike and goldeye. Elk, moose, deer, bears and
wolves as well as numerous species of waterfowl and birds of prey
make this protected area their home.
In addition to the historic and natural significance of this
protected area, Grand Rapids Wildland Provincial Park has
much to offer the adventurous spirit. The historic Grand Rapids
Portage Trail has recently been developed and re-opened. The
improved facilities include cleared trail, the addition of stairs on
steep sections, bear-proof lockers and two backcountry campsites
with fire pits and a toilet. The upgraded trail will aid canoeists
who come to enjoy this wilderness experience by providing a
designated and maintained portage route around the Class 6
Grand Rapids of the Athabasca River.
If backcountry camping is not for you, the Grand Rapids
Wilderness Adventure Lodge and Cabins is located just inside the
southernmost boundary of the park and 13 km upstream from
the historic Grand Rapids. For more information about the lodge,
visit athabasca-river.com.
All year long, Grand Rapids Wildland Provincial Park is the
perfect destination for backcountry enthusiasts who want to
experience a quintessential wilderness setting.
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Let’s Go Outdoors
Nations peoples and the rock art found at Writing-on-Stone
Provincial Park/Áísínai’pi National Historic Site.
Check out Alberta Parks on Let’s Go Outdoors
Television and Radio
Alberta Parks is featured weekly on Let’s Go Outdoors Radio
and TV shows that are all about the outdoors aired locally and
nationally!
See programs introducing new comers to the outdoors at Fish
Creek Provincial Park, where they learn outdoor skills like
setting up a tent and how to safely build a campfire. If you like
horses you won’t want to miss the feature on Alberta Parks’ Horse
Patrol in urban parks like Fish Creek Provincial Park and in the
Rockies in Kananaskis Country.
Discover more about Alberta Provincial Parks for your next
getaway or summer vacation.
For more information, please visit albertaparks.ca online or at
letsgooutdoors.ca.
Come along for an adventure on the canoe circuit at Lakeland
Provincial Park, or join us star gazing at Cypress Hills
Interprovincial Park dark sky preserve, where breathtaking
vistas will captivate you in this unique landscape in Southern
Alberta.
Take a walk with us along the boardwalk to see birds and wildlife
at Lois Hole Provincial Park where there are easy adventures in
St. Albert, near Edmonton. Discover the history of Blackfoot First
6 pm Mountain Time Sunday evenings on CTV 2 &
6 pm Eastern Time Wednesday evenings on Discovery
World HD through to the end of April 2013.
Tune in to your local radio station to hear daily short
features and a weekly half hour program on Sunday
mornings.
If you missed the first season, you can
see all of Season One online at YouTube:
youtube.com/user/letsgooutdoors.
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Help Protect Alberta’s Water
Resources: Stop Aquatic
Invaders
Eurasian Milfoil
Many of Alberta’s lakes, wetland ecosystems and habitats are
protected under Alberta Parks, providing world-class recreational
angling, ice fishing, canoeing, rafting and kayaking opportunities.
These same water resources provide potable water for urban
and rural communities, as well as water for industrial and
agricultural use.
When you enjoy Alberta’s water resources, you may be
unintentionally infecting them with aquatic invasive species.
When non-native plants and animals are introduced to vital
ecosystems and habitats they can cause irreparable damage.
Purple Loosestrife
Some of these invaders are:
• Eurasian milfoil
• purple loosestrife
• didymo algae and
• zebra and quagga mussels
These invasive species hitchhike from infected waters on boats
and trailers, unwashed and wet fishing and recreational gear, as
well as through the illegal transfer of fish and disposal of bait.
Take action to prevent and stop the introduction and spread of
aquatic invasive plant and animal species:
• INSPECT and REMOVE vegetation and debris
• CLEAN, DRAIN, DRY your boat and equipment.
An international cross-agency working group is collaborating
to provide consistent and accurate information to help prevent
and manage the spread of aquatic invasive
Didymo Algae
species. For more information visit online at
protectyourwaters.net.
Zebra and Quagga Mussels
Mosquitoes can’t bite you
if they can’t find you.
• Use an insect repellent with DEET.
• Wear light-coloured long-sleeved
shirts and pants, and a hat.
• Consider staying indoors at dawn and
dusk when mosquitoes are most active.
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Some mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus,
so it’s best to avoid being bitten at all.
For more information and tips, visit fightthebite.info
or call Health Link Alberta at 1-866-408-5465.
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67
Camping Reservations
water, power and sewer hook-ups. A $3.00 fee is charged at
sewage disposal stations.
Camping Season
Firewood
Peak season at provincial campgrounds is mid-May until early
September. Some campgrounds remain open longer. Camping
season dates are listed on each park’s web page at albertaparks.ca.
Maximum stay in provincial campsites is 16 consecutive nights.
Check out time is 2:00 p.m.
Firewood is provided at many provincial campgrounds, either for
sale at a concession or through a surcharge on the camping fee.
Alberta is currently free of Dutch elm disease, but it can easily be
spread from infested elm firewood brought in from other parts of
Canada or the United States. To prevent this, visitors are asked not
to bring out-of-province firewood into provincial campgrounds.
Camping Etiquette
For More Information
Everyone comes to parks for an enjoyable camping experience;
visitors are asked to be considerate of their fellow campers and
refrain from disorderly behaviour and excessive noise. Quiet
hours in provincial campgrounds are 11:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m.
For current information on provincial parks and recreation areas
or to obtain the “Alberta’s Parks & Protected Areas” map, contact:
Electric power generators should be used in moderation
(i.e. for only a couple of hours at a time), unless required for
medical reasons. Electrical sites are available at many provincial
campgrounds for visitors who require power for longer periods.
Constant running of generators is considered excessive noise.
Kananaskis Country information is also available year-round at:
Reserving Your Campsite
Many campsites and group camping areas can now be reserved
online. At reserve.albertaparks.ca, you can search for campsites
available on the dates you want. There are photos of campsites
and other areas of the park. You can view campground layouts and
make your reservation in real time. You will receive confirmation
once you complete and submit the online reservation form.
For assistance in making online reservations call
1–877–537–2757.
There are still some parks that cannot be reserved online and
must be booked by calling the park directly.
Campsites at many provincial campgrounds are available on a
“first come-first served” basis. This information and other details
about reservations are available at albertaparks.ca or call our
general information line at 1–866–427–3582.
Alberta Parks
Phone: (780) 427–3582
Toll-free: 1–866–427–3582
albertaparks.ca
OHVs
CAN START
WILDFIRES
Barrier Lake Visitor Centre
Phone: (403) 673–3985
To call any Alberta government office toll-free from an Alberta
telephone, first dial 310–0000 and then the number.
Reserve.AlbertaParks.ca
KEEP YOUR
MACHINES
CLEAN
Book your campsite up to 90 days in advance
at one of our many provincial campgrounds.
Make your reservation online or call
1–877–537–2757.
Visit our website: esrd.alberta.ca or call 310-0000
Camping Fees
Camping fees vary depending on facilities and services. Basic
overnight camping fees range from $5.00-$23.00/night.
Additional fees of $6.00/night are charged for each of the
following: pre-paid access to showers, horse corrals, pressurized
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
69
Canada’s
Parks Day
July 20, 2013
Parks Day
A day celebrated all across Canada! July 20, 2013
Canada’s Parks – Real Nature, Real History, Real Experiences
First celebrated in 1990, Canada’s Parks Day is the perfect
opportunity for Albertans and our visitors to experience how
our parks restore us with the beauty of nature, the excitement of
adventure and the space to relax and breathe deeply.
Events such as hot dog roasts, bird walks, eco-challenge hikes,
sand castle building contests and demonstrations of rescue and
forest fire fighting techniques are held all across the country in
celebration of our awe-inspiring Canadian parks and historic sites.
Mark your calendar to come and celebrate with us! Here are some
parks we already know will be celebrating Parks Day on July 20,
2013:
• Crimson Lake Provincial Park, west of Rocky Mountain House
• Cross Lake Provincial Park, west of Athabasca
• Cypress Hills Provincial Park, south of Medicine Hat
• Dinosaur Provincial Park, northeast of Brooks
• Eagle Point Blue Rapids Provincial Park, near Drayton Valley
• Kinbrook Island Provincial Park, south of Brooks
• Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, north of Edmonton
• Long Lake Provincial Park, south of Boyle
• Miquelon Lake Provincial Park, east of Edmonton
• Moonshine Lake Provincial Park, north of Grande Prairie
• Pembina River Provincial Park, near Entwistle
• Saskatoon Island Provincial Park, just west of Grande Prairie
• Sir Winston Churchill Provincial Park, east of Lac La Biche
• Tillebrook Provincial Park, east of Brooks
• Wabamun Lake Provincial Park, west of Edmonton
• William A Switzer Provincial Park, west of Hinton
• Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, east of Milk River.
On Sunday, July 21, Parks Day is celebrated at Bow Valley
Provincial Park, in Kananaskis Country, 65 km west of Calgary.
More parks will confirm events for Parks Day as we get closer to
July. Check albertaparks.ca for the latest information.
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71
Explore More
Advantages To Off-Season Camping
Parks in Winter
Off-Season Adventures
• Reservations not required with the exception of the
Thanksgiving weekend in some parks
Whether in spring or fall, off-season camping is enjoyed by more
and more visitors who are seeking a unique parks experience.
• Earlier darkness is ideal for stargazing
Some parks remain open through the winter for adventurous
souls who camp, cross-country ski, ice fish and enjoy the peace
and magic of winter in Alberta. These can be found by searching
albertaparks.ca:
• Cooler temperatures are better for hiking and other day time
activities; especially in badlands parks like Dinosaur and
Writing-on-Stone
It is recommended that you call the park before you venture out
in our off-season. Ask if the park is open and what services are
still available, so you can make the necessary plans to have a
memorable spring, autumn or winter camping experience.
• Wildlife is more likely to come into the parks when there are
fewer people and pets
• No mosquitoes
• Quiet
May is an ideal time to explore southern Alberta parks. The heat
is not as intense as in summer months, making good travelling
and sightseeing weather. Experience prairie and badlands awaking
from winter sleep. Meadowlarks sing from fence posts and red
tailed hawks hunt in the long grasses.
Continue south to visit the badlands again in Dinosaur Provincial
Park or to see and hear the flurry of feathered activity along the
Kinbrook Marsh Nature Trail, near Kinbrook Island Provincial
Park.
It’s worth the drive to venture to the southeastern corner of the
province to Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park. Once you are in
the neighbourhood, you should take the little side trip to see the
surreal landscape of Red Rock Coulee Natural Area, southwest of
Cypress Hills. This rolling prairie is littered with perfectly round
red rocks, called concretions, that were formed when the last
glaciers receded thousands of years ago.
Camping is available at provincial parks along this route and
Visitor Centres at Dinosaur and Cypress Hills provincial parks
have interesting displays and helpful staff that help to make your
spring tour a worthwhile adventure.
• Select Find A Park, then from the left side navigation click
camping, then winter camping.
• No crowds
Take a Spring Tour of Southern Alberta
From the viewpoint just off the highway at Dry Island Buffalo
Jump Provincial Park, you are treated to a spectacular view of
the Red Deer River Valley. You can travel along the intriguing
Red Deer River badlands all the way from Bleriot Ferry through
Midland Provincial Park in Drumheller, and beyond.
• Select the search by winter activities like cross-country skiing,
snowshoeing or ice fishing, or
Some Important Differences In Off-Season Camping
The result will be a list of parks that offer winter camping, along
with some details and contact information.
Kananaskis
• Call before you go
• Self-registration in effect
• Dress in layers
Cooking-Lake Blackfoot
• Be prepared for all kinds of weather
• Reduced services in campgrounds
• You may need to bring fire wood
• You may need to bring potable water
Fall Camping in Provincial Parks
Though our main camping season runs from Victoria Day
weekend until Labour Day weekend, many provincial parks and
recreation areas remain open until Thanksgiving for campers to
enjoy the great fall weather we get in September and October.
Some of our best camping is enjoyed in the fall. September
typically has clear blue skies and sunny days. Fallen leaves crunch
on the trail and the smell of campfire smoke drifts through the
campground. Daylight hours are shorter and so you can take
advantage of the dark skies away from the lights of the cities
and do some stargazing. The campfire is a great place to gather
after the sun goes down and the air starts to chill. Mosquitoes
are usually long gone. And what would a camping trip be without
waking up with a little frost on the tent and the familiar Vs of
calling geese winging their way to warmer locations.
To prevent freezing water lines, most water service in parks is
turned off by mid to end of October, but water may be available
somewhere in the park. Firewood may not be re-stocked over the
winter and shower facilities may be closed.
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73
Mountain Biking in
Alberta Parks
From gentle passages through sun dappled forest to rocky
drops and sweet single track, mountain biking is a terrific way
to experience Alberta’s parks. Ever since the first knobby-tired
pioneers ventured off the pavement, more and more park visitors
have discovered the joys of mountain biking.
Just as bikes have evolved since those bone jarring jalopies of old,
so too have the trails. Gone are the days of long, lonely fire roads
and boggy drainages. Today’s mountain bikers enjoy panoramic
views and purpose-built trails offering a sense of “flow” that
elevates the mountain biking experience to a whole new level.
Every year hundreds of volunteers throughout the province take
up shovels, rakes and Pulaskis, (a classic trail builder’s tool), to
cut new lines, shore up side slopes and tease as much flow as they
can from undulating terrain. Their dedication helps to preserve
trails and to ensure that Alberta’s parks continue to offer some of
Cypress Hills
Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park
The challenging EKG Loop, (a.k.a. Orange Loop), takes in virtually
every riding experience imaginable along its full 7 km of glory.
The view of Mount Rundle on the descent through the old mine
meadow is spectacular. Mountain bike rentals are available right
next to the trailhead.
William A. Switzer Provincial Park
Winding through rolling hills, meadows and mixed-wood forests,
the Jarvis Lake Trail offers 13 km of intermediate-rated mountain
biking pleasure. Tip: On your way, be sure to drop by the Hinton
Bike Park, one of the best mountain bike parks in the country.
Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park
Mountain biking isn’t just for the mountains. The steady 4 km
climb up the forested Horseshoe Canyon Trail is rewarded with
spectacular views of the Southern Alberta rangeland. A trip to
Cypress Hills is highly recommended for mountain bikers looking
for a totally unique experience.
Explore More Biking
There are excellent biking trails for you to try at Chinook Provincial
Recreation Area and Beauvais Lake Provincial Park, located in
the southwest. Try out Whitney Lakes Provincial Park, Lakeland
Provincial Park or Cold Lake Provincial Park in the northeast. In
the central part of the province, there are approximately 110 km
of trails at Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area,
just east of Edmonton and about 18 km of trails at Miquelon Lake
Provincial Park, southeast of Edmonton.
Alberta’s provincial parks and recreation areas offer much
more for you to explore on your bike. Search our website at
albertaparks.ca by activity: biking and find over 50 locations.
Riding a Skinny at Canmore Nordic Centre Skills Park
Northern Rockies
74
the best mountain biking experiences anywhere. Here are some
favourites:
Savouring Some Single Track
Canmore Nordic Centre
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75
Need More Information?
Get up-to-date events, fire bans, campsite vacancies, swimming
advisories and trail reports to help you plan your visit at
albertaparks.ca. Here you will find downloadable campground
maps and park guides in addition to individual web pages for each
park. You can search for parks, facilities and activities.
If you need help navigating the website or have any questions, call
our parks general information line at 1–866–427–3582.
Book your campsite up to 90 days in advance at one of our many
provincial campgrounds online at reserve.albertaparks.ca or call
1–877–537–2757.
Calgary and Edmonton RV
Show Winners
Did you visit with us at the Edmonton or Calgary RV Shows earlier
this year? We gave away an Alberta Parks RV Vacation where our
winners get the use of an RV and an Alberta Park campsite this
summer.
Congratulations to our winners:
• Ellen M. of Rocky Mountain House, winner of seven days
• Blaine S. of Edmonton, winner of four days
• Sharon H. of Edmonton, winner of three days.
Visit Alberta Parks on You Tube at
youtube.com/user/albertaparks.
We Want to Hear From You
See and hear more on Let’s Go Outdoors, on radio, CTV Two and at
letsgooutdoors.ca.
Answer 5 easy questions in our online customer survey and we’ll
send you a Parks Day water bottle.
Many family traditions are started and carried on in provincial parks.
We hope this guide helps you find places to make your own family
memories.
Watching Wildlife Responsibly
When you are watching for wildlife, please use courtesy and
common sense. Some ethics for the field include:
Keep to designated trails, viewing platforms and blinds.
Be considerate of wildlife. Observe animals from a distance
that does not cause them any distress. Avoid nesting sites and
respect resting periods. Try not to surprise wildlife and never
chase or flush wild animals.
Don’t approach or pick up baby animals. Your actions may
expose them to predators or prevent their parents from returning
to care for them. Even though not visible, the mother is likely
close by.
Pets can harm wildlife and hinder viewing opportunities. They
should be under your control at all times or left at home, tethered
in your campsite or, under suitable conditions, in your vehicle.
Be considerate of the environment. Leave viewing sites,
including the plants and animals, undamaged by your visits. Be
sure your garbage is properly disposed of or carried out to where
you can dispose of it.
Help us to keep improving this guide.
Go to albertaparks.ca and tell us if this guide has given you new ideas
for places to explore and information to help you make plans.
Need a campground map?
Be considerate of others. While friendly sharing of information
and observations can be part of the wildlife watching experience,
avoid disrupting the wildlife viewing activities of others in the area.
Wildlife Viewing Tips
Find out best viewing locations and best time of year to see them.
Early morning and late afternoon are often best for many birds
and mammals.
Spring and fall are particularly good seasons to observe migratory
birds; many just pass through Alberta between wintering areas
and summer breeding ranges.
Look for tracks, nests, cavities, droppings, and bits of fur or
feathers.
Use binoculars and spotting scopes to get that close-up, detailed
look. Field guides can be very helpful especially when identifying
smaller mammals and the many bird species.
Patience and quiet: Move slowly and quietly, or even stop for
several minutes at a time, to help wildlife to be more accepting of
your presence. Wear clothes that make little noise when walking.
Reduce your visibility: Use vegetation, topography, or your
vehicle as visual screens. Wear clothes with dull darker colours
and irregular patterns.
Use all your senses: The full range of sights, sounds and smells
around you can help in locating and identifying some of the more
secretive species.
Mule Deer
While you are on our web site, you can view and print many
downloadable maps and park guides. We are working on making
the website more compatible with hand held devices. We appreciate
your patience.
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76
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
77
Regulations
Etiquette and Safety
To protect lands, habitats and wildlife, and to keep our parks
safe for visitors, regulations are necessary. Here are a few of the
important rules we enforce so that everyone can have a safe and
happy holiday.
Park Neighbours
• Be good neighbours. Help protect one another’s property
• Make sure your camping gear and valuables are securely stored
• Report acts of vandalism
• Day use areas are open from 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.
• In campgrounds, the maximum stay is 16 consecutive nights
and checkout time is 2:00 p.m.
• Quiet hours are 11:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m.
• Everyone enjoys the peace and tranquility of our parks; please
avoid making excessive noise, including excessive use of
generators
• Consumption of liquor is allowed only in your registered
campsite
• For your safety and to protect wildlife do not approach, feed or
harass wild animals
• Never take food and other articles that could attract wildlife
into your tent or tent trailer; use the park garbage bins to
dispose of garbage
• Gathering dead wood from around the campground for
firewood is not allowed. It is also illegal to remove, deface,
injure or destroy plants, fossils and rocks
• Protect your pet, wildlife and other campers by keeping your
pet on a leash; pets are not allowed on public beaches, in public
swimming areas and in public buildings. Please pick up after
your pet
• Be considerate of swimmers and boaters; please obey all signs
at boat launches and on lakes
• For more information about boating regulations, contact
Transport Canada at 1–866–995–9737 or www.tc.gc.ca/eng/
marinesafety/debs-obs-menu-1362.htm
• Make sure you have an Alberta fishing license if you will be
fishing during your stay. Details are available from Fish and
Wildlife offices or at albertafishingguide.com
• Operation of off-highway vehicles (OHVs) is not permitted in
most provincial parks.
For more information and the complete parks regulations
brochure, please visit albertaparks.ca.
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
We all go to our favourite park to relax and enjoy the surroundings.
Be considerate of others – keep the volume down on radios and other
electronics, and run your generator only when necessary. Make sure
your dog is on a leash and comfortable, and it is not barking and
disturbing people and wildlife.
Campfire Safety
• Campfires are permitted only in facilities provided. Never leave
your campfire unattended
• Make sure your campfire is completely out before you leave your
campsite.
Hiking
• Use well-defined trails
• Walk single file to avoid widening trails
• Don’t create your own pathways around muddy or rough sections
of trail; this makes multiple paths and worsens the problem
• Avoid low wet areas and if that isn’t possible, take care to
minimize disturbance of vegetation
• Keep litter in your pockets or bring along a bag to put it in. As you
hike pick up litter that may have been left along the trail.
Cycling
Stay alert! You could startle bears or other wildlife as you move
quickly and quietly along the trails. When coming up behind other
trail users and when approaching blind corners, use your bell to warn
others of your presence.
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Explore Alberta Parks Guide albertaparks.ca
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