St Agnes`s United Church, Burmantofts, Community Audit Report

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St Agnes`s United Church, Burmantofts, Community Audit Report
 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts, Community Audit Report
Winter 2012
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Executive Summary St Agnes’s United Church conducted a community audit within Burmantofts to set the context in which the church is to engage in Mission, Ministry and outreach. The community audit gave evidence of the needs of the community and has helped the church work out how to address those needs. St Agnes's hope through the community audit process they can work alongside others in the community in meeting needs. The community of Burmantofts faces many complex issues as reflected in its status as one of the most deprived wards within Leeds. St Agnes's Church want to serve the needs of this community and shall devise a plan with partners and the community to help address the needs. The community audit has steered the church to look at how it can provide community facilities (space, events and activities). The next steps are to test these conclusions in the development of a project at the church. 1 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Contents Executive Summary ........................................................ 1 Contents ......................................................................... 2 Introduction .................................................................... 3 Aims of the Community Audit ........................................ 3 Description of the Area .................................................. 4 Government Defined Need ............................................ 7 Group defined needs .................................................... 72 Individual Defined Needs ............................................. 81 Analysis ......................................................................... 90 Gaps and barriers ......................................................... 95 Opportunities for St Agnes’ .......................................... 95 Demand for Services ..................................................... 96 Conclusions ................................................................... 96 Next Steps ..................................................................... 96 2 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Introduction St Agnes’s United Church have conducted a community audit within Burmantofts to set the context in which the church is to engage in Mission, Ministry and outreach. The community audit will give evidence with the needs of the community and work out how the church can address those needs. St Agnes's hope through the community audit process they can work alongside others in the community in meeting needs. Aims of the Community Audit 
To gain an understanding and evidence of the needs within Burmantofts 
Generate ideas for addressing the needs of the community at St Agnes's United Church 
Developing Partnerships with others within the community 3 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Description of the Area Definitions The community for this audit will include the area of the church within easy walking distance (1 mile) as that is realistically the likely extent of people that would use the events or activities within the church, as 69.5% of households have no car. The community around the church is made up of numerous different groups and communities. Some are geographically based, for example, the parish can be divided into 5 neighbourhoods: 
Ebor Gardens 
Shakespeare Estate 
Torres Estate 
Cowpers‐Comptons area ‐ to the north‐west of Compton Road 
Compton‐Clifton area to the south‐east of Compton Road Although, these areas are all cheek by jowl there is an understanding that all of them have their own separate identity. There are also a significant amount of different ethnic and cultural groupings in the area. Burmantofts became a dispersal centre following the 1999 Asylum and Immigration Act recommendations that people seeking asylum should be dispersed across the country rather than the financial burden being placed upon a few councils within the South East. A Mission Audit of St Agnes, Burmantofts and St Cyprian with St James, Harehills from August 2001 reflects that although Harehills was a multicultural area (with significant Kashmiri, Pakistani and Afro‐Caribbean populations) Burmantofts was still perceived as predominantly a white population. This is backed up by the 2001 census which state approximately 80% of the parish were white British or Irish. Although detailed population figures from the 2011 census are not yet available circumstantial evidence suggests that partly as a result of dispersal measures that the cultural mix within the parish is far greater now than in 2001. For example, 50% of all of the users of the Leeds Refugee Centre live within the LS9 and LS8 postcodes (i.e. Osmondthorpe to Gipton ‐ including the parish of St Agnes and St Stephens). Government Definitions of Areas LSOA: (Lower Super Output Area). This is the smallest geographical area for which the government release statistical information. There are approximately 1500 people within each LSOA and within the city centre it is the equivalent of a neighbourhood. Within the Indices of Multiple Deprivation information below the LSOAs have been named as neighbourhoods based on the names devised by the Oastler Centre in “Deprivation in East Leeds: Understanding Community Deprivation and Responses to it” (2011). LSOA give fine grained information that enables comparison between neighbourhoods. The Indices of 4 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Multiple Deprivation compares all of the LSOAs in England and ranks them in terms of Overall figures, Income, Employment, Health and Disability, Education, Barriers to Housing and Services, Crime and Living Environment. There are 476 LSOAs in Leeds and 32,482 in England. For the purposes of this audit statistics from 5 LSOAs ‐ Torre Road South (Leeds 064A); Mabgate to St James’s hospital (Leeds 064C); St Agnes and Shakespeare Towers (Leeds 064D); Torres and Ford Dealership (Leeds 065C); and Scargill and Lydgate Estate (Leeds 065D) ‐ are included. MSOA: (Middle Super Output Area). These are geographic areas designed to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales. MSOAs are built from groups of Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs). The minimum population of an MSOA is 5,000 and the mean is 7,200 (when originally generated). They are useful for comparing information because they have fixed boundaries that won’t change over time. The number of people living in each MSOA is large enough to identify meaningful differences between each MSOA and Leeds overall. Leeds is divided up into 108 MSOAs. England has 7,193 MSOAs in total. For the purposes of this audit statistics from 2 MSOAs ‐ Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens and Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells ‐ are included. Ward: A subdivision of a local authority drawn up for electoral purposes. Wards are represented at local authority level by councillors, and the availability of statistical information for wards has considerable importance for local government. Wards vary considerably in population size from a few with only a handful of residents, to a range of sizes between a few hundred residents to a few thousand residents in a typical local authority district, and to a range of sizes between several thousand residents to over 30,000 residents in the larger London boroughs, metropolitan districts, and Unitary Authorities. This 5 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
puts some limits on the use of wards as standard comparable areas. In Leeds there are 33 wards and some 8800 wards in England and Wales. For the purposes of this audit statistics from 1 ward – Burmantofts and Richmond Hill ‐ are included. Cluster: Education in Leeds is organised on a cluster basis with groups of schools working together in an area. St Agnes’ church is in the Inner East cluster which covers roughly the same geographical area as the parish up to Gipton to the north. There are 27 clusters in the Leeds metropolitan area. Wedge: Leeds city is divided into 10 wedges for planning purposes. These are called wedges and St Agnes is situated in the Inner East wedge. 6 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Government Defined Need Leeds City Government Defined Needs Leeds City Council release a significant amount of data about neighbourhoods within the city via the West Yorkshire Observatory. The data is presented by Middle Super Output Areas (MSOA), which are larger areas than the Lower Super Output Areas (LSOA) we see within the Indices of Multiple Deprivation information in the next section. There are 108 MSOAs in the metropolitan district of Leeds. The MSOAs each contain four LSOAs and there are two that span the parish ‐ Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens and Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells. For the purposes of this report if not named in full the former will be referred to as the western half of the parish and the latter will be referred to as the eastern part of the parish. The data includes the Neighbourhood Index which is made up from economic, income, housing, health, environment, education and community safety information. The index compares all the information on a city‐wide basis to help to prioritise council and other public resources. In addition health and wellbeing profiles have been developed in association with the NHS and Cluster Profiles for education within the city have been produced by Children’s Service. The last dataset is available for the Inner East Area of Leeds, which is one of the eight areas that the city is divided into for planning purposes and is made up of three city Wards and 12 MSOAs. Credits: GP audit data supplied by James Womack (Senior Public Health Information Analyst). Alcohol admissions, A&E admissions, population data and profile introduction by Frank Wood (Information Manager). Origins, Admissions, Mortality data by Richard Dixon (Information Manager) at NHS Leeds. ASC data supplied by Stuart Cameron‐ Strickland (Head of Policy Performance & Improvement and Adam Mitchell) at Leeds City Council. Neighbourhoods data, Neighbourhood Index, Service map and School Census data supplied by Jacky Pruckner (Information Officer, Strategy and Development) and Richard Haslett (Research Officer, Business Transformation Team) at Leeds City Council. Report produced by Adam Taylor (Senior Information Analyst at NHS Leeds) using CACI InSite software. Commentary thanks to: Sam Ramsey (Senior Administrator), Lucy Jackson (Consultant in Public Health), Jon Fear (Consultant in Public Health and Deputy Director of Public Health), Richard Dixon (Information Manager), Brenda Fullard (Head of Healthy Living and Inequalities), Bernadette Murphy (Public Health Manager), Diane Burke (Health Improvement Principal), Paul Lambert (Advanced Health Improvement Specialist ‐ Tobacco Control), Lorraine Shuker (Health Improvement Specialist, Workplace‐ Advanced), Louise Cresswell (Health Improvement Specialist ‐ Neighbourhoods), Pia Bruhn (Health Inequalities Manager ‐ Vulnerable Groups), Steph Jorysz (Health Improvement Specialist‐ Neighbourhoods), Gemma Mann (Health Improvement Specialist) at NHS Leeds. Stuart Cameron‐Strickland (Head of Policy Performance & Improvement, Leeds Adult Social Services), Jacky Pruckner (Information Officer, Strategy and Development, Business Transformation) at Leeds City Council. 7 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Definitions and data sources for Government Data Acorn ‐ A nationwide population segmentation tool. Combines geography with demographics and lifestyle information, places where people live with their underlying characteristics and behaviour, to create a tool for understanding the different types of people in different areas throughout the country. Over 400 variables were used to build describe the different Acorn types. Of these variables, 30% were sourced from the 2001 Census. The remainder were derived from CACI’s consumer lifestyle databases, which cover all of the UK’s 49 million adults and 25 million households. For more information about Acorn, including the characteristics of the categories, groups and types listed here, visit http://www.caci.co.uk/acorn‐classification.aspx Alcohol attributable admission ‐ A hospital admission which is partly caused by alcohol. NWPHO alcohol attributable fractions assign values to each type of admission, rating each by the effect alcohol has in its cause. Attributable admissions are sums of these fractions, not actual admissions. For more details see http://www.nwph.net/nwpho/publications/alcoholattributablefractions.pdf Alcohol specific admission ‐ A hospital admission solely caused by alcohol. APHO Association of Public Health Observatories BME ‐ Black and Minority Ethnic BMI ‐ Body Mass Index Deprived Leeds ‐ The area of Leeds where LSOAs rank in England in the 10% most deprived, in terms of Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). Almost 20% of the Leeds population live in this area. DSR ‐ Directly Age Standardised Rate Age standardising compensates for the fact that populations usually have varied age profiles. DSR is usually expressed as a rate per 100,000 and means we can exclude differences in age structure when investigating the underlying causes of different rates (see example below): “Wetherby West MSOA has a high prevalence of CHD (in the highest fifth of the Leeds MSOAs). This would be expected as the MSOA has an elderly population and CHD is more prevalent in older people. Directly age standardised rates show how many people (in most cases per 100,000) would be expected to have CHD in Wetherby West if the population had the same structure as the European Standard Age Profile. (This has an even distribution between age groups up until 55 before gradually decreasing in older ages). Age standardised rates for CHD in Wetherby West are well below average, in the lowest fifth of the Leeds MSOAs. This shows that, while there are a lot of people with CHD in Wetherby West, it is the age of the population which is a large factor rather than other possible contributing factors.” Ethnicity ‐ The annual school census provides information on the ethnicity and first language of pupils who live in and go to school in Leeds. In total, there are 24 ethnic categories and over 170 different first languages. This profile summarises the top five of each in the area 8 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
and compares these to the city averages (N.B. the “top five” has been set as a threshold because in most areas the numbers below this are very small). While this data is specific to school children it is representative of the wider population and provides valuable additional information on the make‐up of the area and complements the population profile derived from analysis with Origins software of the GP registered population. Faith is calculated by Origins software. Origins software analyses forename and surname of every GP registered patient in Leeds and gives what is considered to be an indication of an individual’s most likely heritage and faith according to geography. This is not necessarily how they might describe themselves. Health Acorn ‐ An extension to the Acorn classification system. The classification groups the population of Great Britain into 4 groups, 25 types and 60 sub‐types for more in‐depth analysis. By analysing diet, illness and exercise characteristics as well as demographic attributes, Health Acorn provides an in‐depth understanding of different communities in every part of the country. The classification names and descriptions have been chosen to be simple and non‐judgemental. For more information about Acorn, including the characteristics of the categories, groups and types listed here, visit http://www.caci.co.uk/acorn‐classification.aspx Health Data ‐ The Primary Care Trust (PCT) runs a quarterly collection of data from GP systems, forming a picture over time of how conditions are recorded by GPs across Leeds. The automated data collections note the most recent occurrences of specific disease codes in each patient’s record as defined by the Quality Outcomes Framework (QOF). This gives Leeds a much greater level of detail than standard QOF data and is a benefit of the trusting relationship we have developed with practices. The cancer audit is defined by QOF codes but reads all new diagnosis recorded in the current population. Prevalence is calculated against the date‐relevant GP registered populations for those practices which partook in the data collection. Some practices opted not to submit data for certain audits and therefore their populations are not part of specific prevalence calculations. Index ‐ An index of 100 for this MSOA means this MSOA has the same proportion of its population recorded with a condition as Leeds does. An index of 200 means the MSOA has twice the proportion that Leeds has. Index scores below 100 mean the MSOA has a lower proportion than Leeds. Index attempts to illustrate how closely the MSOA matches Leeds. IMD ‐ Index of Multiple Deprivation Measures relative levels of deprivation in small areas of England called Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs). The English Indices of Deprivation are a continuous measure of relative deprivation, therefore there is no definitive point on the scale below which areas are considered to be deprived and above which they are not. IMD scores and ranks have been produced for all LSOA in England in 2004, 2007 and 2010. LSOA ‐ Lower Super Output Area These are geographic areas designed nationally to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England. LSOAs when originally generated had between 1000 and 3000 people living in them with an average population of 1500 people. 9 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
MSOA ‐ Middle Super Output Area These are geographic areas designed nationally to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales. MSOAs are built from groups of Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs). The minimum population of an MSOA is 5,000 and the mean is 7,200 (when originally generated). There are 108 MSOA in Leeds. NEET ‐ not in education, employment, or training NWPHO ‐ North West Public Health Observatory Origins software ‐ Analyses forename and surname of every GP registered patient in Leeds and gives a calculated 'ethnicity' for each patient. This is considered to be an indication of 'country of origin' and not actual ethnicity. These 'countries of origin' are grouped up into geography levels and this is what is displayed here. The same software gives a likely faith for each patient. Population Data ‐ the population data is from medical practices and consists of the number of patients registered at practices in the 2 MSOAs. Prevalence ‐ The number of cases divided by the population. In this report it can be thought of as the proportion of the relevant population with diabetes / CHD etc. Prevalence is expressed as a percentage. However an elderly population can be expected to have more cases (a higher prevalence) of certain conditions than a younger population. To compensate for variations in population ages, data can be directly age standardised (see above). Rank ‐ MSOA are often ranked in this report. This simply puts them in logical order from largest to smallest. Index ‐ The number of cases that would be expected in a population sized 100,000. DSR (see above) usually produces rates per 100,000. In this report the MSOA possibly has a population of around 5,000 people. Rates per 5,000 would be too small to consider and would not allow comparison with another MSOA of different population size. By producing rates per 100,000 for all areas they can be directly compared. Q1 or Qtr1, 2, 3, 4 ‐ Quarters in this report are financial year quarters. So Q1 data is from April – June with Q4 running from January to March. Tobacco and Alcohol Spend are calculated from data from the Expenditure and Food Survey (EFS) conducted by the Office for National Statistics. The analyses report are carried out by CACI and those who carried out the original collection and analysis of the data bear no responsibility for their further analysis or interpretation. The spend figures are based on current prices for the year stated. The Classification of Individual Consumption by Purpose (COICOP) is published by the UN Statistics Division to provide an international standard for the reporting of expenditure. Totals are controlled to national figures supplied by ONS Consumer Trends. 10 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Population profile Population of Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: Population of Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: The population shown in the chart is what is commonly referred to as a population pyramid. Traditionally, the chart is shaped like a pyramid in that the base is wide and each level above becomes slightly narrower as the population in the increasing age groups becomes a smaller percentage of the total. 11 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
12 Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherland and Nowells In modern western societies the pyramids are now typically narrower at the base due to a decline in the birth rate. The Leeds profile is shown in outline and follows the expected pattern for a modern western population with an increase in the proportion of people in the university student age groups. The population in the parish has a number of differences to the standard profile for Leeds. The proportion of under 5s is much higher than the norm for Leeds. Young people and student age young adults are a smaller proportion than would be expected, especially males. Few of the residents of this area attend either of the two universities in Leeds. There is an unusually high proportion of people in the 25 to 44 age group, especially males. Older age groups are a lower proportion than expected for Leeds. St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 13 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 14 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Ethnicity Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 15 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells 16 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
17 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
18 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Crime 19 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
2010 Population Acorn Profile Acorn is a nationwide population segmentation tool. It combines geography with demographics and lifestyle information, and places where people live with their underlying characteristics and behaviour, to create a tool for understanding the different types of people in different areas throughout the country. Over 400 variables were used to define the different Acorn types. Of these variables, 30% were sourced from the 2001 Census. The remainder were derived from CACI’s consumer lifestyle databases, which cover all of the UK’s 49 million adults and 25 million households. 20 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 21 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 22 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 23 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 24 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 25 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 26 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
The Neighbourhood Index: St Agnes and St Stephen's Parish Profile The Leeds Neighbourhood Index is a tool which brings together a wealth of information to paint a broad picture of an area and help describe local conditions. It is produced annually and this profile provides a summary of the changes over the first three years. How to interpret this profile For each year of the Index, the following tables show the data (individual indicators only) and then the Neighbourhood Index scores. The tables have been coloured in two ways: i) to help set the area in context and ii) to illustrate the mathematical significance of any change. i) Setting the area in context: this is achieved by colouring the score columns and uses the same colouring system that has been applied throughout the Index with shades of purple (and at the very extreme red) showing that the area significantly under‐performs when compared to the notional City score and shades of beige showing areas that significantly outperforms. ii) Understanding the importance of changes in the data: this is achieved by colouring the data columns and it highlights the statistical importance of the change since the previous year (therefore there is no colouration for 2009). Please note that that although the colouring is applied to the data column it is actually based on the change in score rather than the change in data (but since the score is directly related to the data this is an acceptable methodology). Changes are considered “significant” within the context of the indicator or domain, so, across the city: 
if areas are usually changing by small amounts then for any area which is showing only a slightly bigger change it may be considered significant, and 
if areas are usually changing by large amounts even quite large changes may not be considered to be significant because such changes would be “usual” within the domain. The changes are coloured so that shades of purple show a significant deterioration, whilst shades of green show a significant improvement and white indicates no significant change. The same colouration has also been applied to the domain score changes. N.B. It is important to note that significant change in the domain scores does not necessarily reflect underlying conditions. An area may have seen a significant deterioration in score but may still be performing well in comparison and conversely an area showing significant improvement may still be performing poorly. 27 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
28 Combined Index This parish consistently performs well below the City average, and although there was a notable improvement in within the western area in 2010 this was reversed again in 2011. There has been a significant deterioration in the Neighbourhood Index score of the eastern area currently making this area the most deprived in the City. Leeds Index ‐ Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens 2009 Combined Leeds Index – Harehills – Comptons
etc
Combined
2010 3.52 2009
2011 6.50 2010
11.76
4.87 2011
5.80
-2.05
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
29 Community Safety Community Safety – Lincoln Green and
Ebor Gardens
Domain
Acquisitive Property Crime
Environmental Crimes
Crimes Against Individuals
Community Disorders
Community Safety – Harehills –
Comptons etc
Domain
Acquisitive Property Crime
Environmental Crimes
Crimes Against Individuals
Community Disorders
2009
2010
47.51
47.16
43.60
37.77
58.14
800
283
549
788
53.07
52.06
65.10
50.02
41.32
734
182
447
1058
2010
46.11
60.91
45.52
29.12
45.62
615
274
621
989
55.62
52.81
66.37
54.71
44.62
724
176
408
1005
2009
2011
2011
54.15
61.80
57.86
51.82
41.26
603
216
432
1059
49.41
52.59
51.26
40.29
49.98
727
247
528
919
This parish consistently performs well below the City average, and although there were notable improvements for the western area in 2010 for three of the four indicators these were generally not sustained in 2011. There was a very significant increase in the number of community disorders in 2010 and the number has continued to rise in 2011, currently making it the second worst area in the City. There was a notable overall improvement in the eastern area in 2010 with significant reductions in the numbers of environmental crimes and crimes against individuals. These reductions were not sustained in 2011 and performance dropped again (numbering environmental crimes as the third worst in the City), despite a significant fall in the number of community disorders in that year. Economic Activity – Lincoln Green and
Ebor Gardens
Domain
Job Seekers Allowance
Incapacity Benefit
Lone Parents in receipt of Income Support
2009
11.76%
12.00%
4.16%
2010
13.03
0.00
13.51
45.25
13.88%
13.34%
3.96%
2011
2.80
-20.03
3.02
47.94
12.56%
12.01%
3.41%
13.85
-7.57
13.41
55.17
Economic Activity Economic Activity – Harehills –
Comptons etc
Domain
Job Seekers Allowance
Incapacity Benefit
Lone Parents in receipt of Income Support
2009
8.60%
10.60%
6.07%
2010
18.79
29.82
24.44
20.16
11.16%
10.97%
6.05%
2011
8.96
5.69
21.53
20.45
10.52%
11.19%
5.49%
This parish consistently performs well below the City average. There was a very significant dip in performance in the western area in 2010 due in part to significant increases in the claimant rates for both Job Seekers Allowance and Incapacity Benefit. This has largely been reversed in 2011 with significant falls in the claimant rates for all three indicators although 13.25
11.71
19.83
27.82
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
30 the JSA claim rate is still the second highest in the City. In the eastern area there was a significant drop in performance in 2010, with significant increases in the claimant rates for both Job Seekers Allowance and Incapacity Benefits. Overall performance has begun to improve again in 2011 with a reduction in the JSA claimant rate and a fall in the rate for lone parents in receipt of Income Support. Education Education – Lincoln Green and Ebor
Gardens
Domain
Persistent Absenteeism
Foundation Stage
Key Stage 2
Key Stage 4
NEET
Education – Harehills – Comptons etc
Domain
Persistent Absenteeism
Foundation Stage
Key Stage 2
Key Stage 4
NEET
2009
13.56%
16.67%
62.50%
25.00%
13.21%
2010
16.54
33.79
9.09
43.81
14.71
60.38
2009
13.54%
17.82%
56.52%
28.57%
13.70%
8.50%
42.11%
65.28%
29.03%
8.73%
2011
35.82
59.66
43.78
48.74
20.46
47.58
2010
15.21
33.86
10.67
33.22
19.80
58.90
15.85%
30.34%
49.32%
25.76%
10.00%
12.05%
35.79%
58.57%
37.29%
15.17%
2011
9.33
22.08
27.73
20.45
15.79
39.80
16.93%
30.43%
62.32%
29.49%
9.99%
N.B. In 2010 changes were made in the way NEET (16‐18 year olds Not in Education, Employment or Training) data was collected so the raw numbers for 2009 and 2010 cannot be directly compared. The Neighbourhood Index scoring system does partly remove this restriction so there is some validity in comparing scores between those two years, the colours indicating significant changes are all based on the index and domain scores so the colouration of the data values for 2010 NEET is not an error. This parish consistently performs below the City average (the only exception being persistent absenteeism in 2010). In the western half of the parish there was a notable overall improvement in 2010 with a significant reduction in persistent absenteeism and a significant improvement in Foundation Stage attainment. The improvements were not generally sustained in 2011, although the Key Stage 4 attainment rate did improve in that year. It must however be remembered that within this domain the overall numbers may be low and therefore have a marked impact on the rates. In the eastern half of the parish there was a notable dip in performance in 2010 with the Foundation Stage indicator being the only one to show any improvement in that year. Overall performance improved again in 2011, with a significant improvement in the Key Stage 2 attainment rate. Persistent absenteeism is currently rated as the third worst in the City. It must however be remembered that within this domain the overall numbers may be low and therefore have a marked impact on the rates. 22.72
41.50
35.17
36.85
32.22
7.90
16.09
16.56
27.86
43.50
21.11
39.83
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
31 Environment Domain This parish consistently performs at or below the City average. In the western half of the parish there was a notable overall improvement in 2010 with significant reductions in the number of graffiti and waste clearances, these were not however sustained in 2011 and overall performance dropped again. In the eastern area overall performance improved in 2010 but dropped very significantly again in 2011 with a massive increase in the number of waste clearances, currently numbered as the third worst in the City. Health Domain Environment – Lincoln Green and Ebor
Gardens
Domain
2009
2010
66.01
2011
84.40
65.24
Fly Tipping
54
89.15
65
86.66
68
85.98
Graffiti
Waste
38
119
71.04
63.80
20
31
84.76
91.03
53
77
59.61
76.80
Environment - Harehills – Comptons
etc
Domain
2009
2010
67.00
2011
72.72
26.43
Fly Tipping
50
90.05
76
84.17
49
90.28
Graffiti
Waste
32
130
75.62
60.40
22
97
83.24
70.61
34
400
74.09
-23.13
N.B. It must be remembered that Adult Social Care indicator is a measure of demand rather than need so smaller numbers must be considered with caution as it may just mean that residents are unaware that the service exists or not know how to ask for assistance. For the Health – Lincoln Green and Ebor
Gardens
Domain
Circulatory Disease Mortality
Cancer Mortality
Low Birthweight
Adult Social Care
Health - Harehills – Comptons etc
Domain
Circulatory Disease Mortality
Cancer Mortality
Low Birthweight
Adult Social Care
2009
165.83
152.06
9.97
118
2010
24.16
26.92
41.11
32.27
56.98
2009
110.06
143.36
8.41
133
156.10
145.17
9.50
137
2011
28.22
31.81
45.00
36.80
46.37
115.34
154.76
8.25
117
2010
42.91
54.95
46.02
47.38
48.60
87.60
146.17
9.30
136
2011
43.12
66.24
44.43
38.74
46.93
133.42
168.23
8.86
111
purpose of the Index success is typified by a lower number. This parish consistently performs at or below the City average, although there has been continual and significant overall improvement in the western half of the parish. The indicators relating to circulatory disease mortality and low birthweight have both shown continued significant improvement. Performance in respect of the other two indicators has 41.02
52.29
39.58
48.93
57.54
32.12
43.21
31.97
43.02
60.89
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
32 been more variable. In the eastern area there has been a notable dip in performance in 2011 with significant increases in the circulatory disease and cancer mortality rates. Housing Domain N.B. It must be remembered that for the purpose of the Index low house prices have been deemed to represent a less successful neighbourhood and while a lower price to income Low Income – Lincoln Green and Ebor
Gardens
Domain
Children in Workless Households
Working Households
60+ Households
Liability Orders
Low Income – Harehills – Comptons
etc
Domain
Children in Workless Households
Working Households
60+ Households
Liability Orders
2009
2010
8.53
22.88
0.37
21.14
23.09
591
281
487
441
2011
11.08
4.58
28.04
35.85
23.47
731
206
407
439
-1.33
31.90
37.64
28.13
-3.05
522
384
449
578
2010
19.87
16.60
30.26
34.19
44.66
639
200
416
328
7.12
32.94
-9.59
24.63
-10.31
514
308
468
616
2009
2011
4.16
12.42
-3.32
37.50
17.18
671
291
398
472
ratio represents a more affordable area it is deemed to represent a less successful Housing Lincoln Green and Ebor
Gardens
Domain
Purchase Price
Price to Income Ratio
Housing Turnover
Empty Properties (90 days+)
Housing – Harehills – Comptons etc
Domain
Purchase Price
Price to Income Ratio
Housing Turnover
Empty Properties (90 days+)
2009
£83,800
4.40
20.62%
9.94%
2010
36.35
1.46
17.91
54.78
58.65
2009
£87,700
4.00
19.16%
7.88%
£77,079
4.01
25.61%
12.66%
2011
24.70
-0.43
12.09
41.01
44.05
2010
39.60
2.56
11.94
58.62
69.96
£74,577
4.41
25.07%
8.32%
£65,809
4.45
24.14%
8.27%
2011
34.74
-1.13
18.06
42.47
67.58
£75,231
4.41
24.47%
8.65%
neighbourhood. This parish consistently performs below the City average. There was a significant dip in performance in the western area in 2010 which has largely been reversed in 2011, although house prices have continued to fall and are currently the second lowest in the City. In the eastern area there was a notable dip in performance in 2010, due in part to a significant drop in house prices and a significant increase in turnover. Performance has steadied between 2010 and 2011. Low Income Domain This parish generally performs well below the City average (the domain is currently scored the second and third worst in the City) and there has been a deterioration in the domain score over the three years, with increasing numbers of working households that are claiming 35.35
-3.60
18.66
45.01
67.85
34.73
-0.95
18.06
44.12
65.79
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
benefit (the second highest in the City) and the increasing number of liability orders that have been issued. Despite a significant improvement in 2011 the number of children in workless households in the eastern area is currently the third highest in the City. 33 Indices of Multiple Deprivation The Department for Community and Local Government produces the Indices of Multiple Deprivation on a three year basis to help government priorities public resources. The indices combines a wide range of statistics and ranks the deprivation of a neighbourhood based on seven domains (Income [including Child Income and Pensioner Income], Employment, Health and Disability, Education, Barriers to Housing & Services, Crime and Living Environment) explained in greater details in Appendix 1. The neighbourhood units ranked are called Lower Super Output Areas (LSOA) and are made up of approximately 1500 people. Below is a table of the overall index and a breakdown of the different domains for the five LSOAs that are within easy walking distance of St Agnes's Church (as explained in the definition section). The table shows the national ranking for the areas for 2007 and 2010 as well as the change from 2004 and between 2007 and 2010. The LSOA are named as neighbourhoods as well as quoting their official reference number. The rankings in the most deprived 10% and 3% are highlighted and the ranking number is included. Living Environment Crime Barriers to Housing & Services Education Health & Disability Employment Pensioner Income Child Income Income Overall Index Area Name Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 2007 Change 2004‐07 2010 Change 2007‐10 ↑
622 ↓
1248 ↑
698 ↓
2508 ↓
1338 ↓
1697 ↑
2673 ↑
519 ↑
541 ↑
1761 ↑
1817 ↑
3250 ↑
5199 ↑
17433 ↑
7968 ↓
721 ↓
2748 ↑
3720 ↑
2535 ↓
Mabgate to St James’s hospital – Leeds 064C (E01011675) 913 ↑
514 ↓
3064 ↑
1335 ↓
4317 ↑
1710 ↓
2610 ↓
1791 ↓
587 ↑
499 ↓
2021 ↑
1437 ↓
2259 ↑
1974 ↓
21581 ↑
1043
6 ↓
1018 ↑
2982 ↑
849 ↓
1292 ↑
St Agnes and Shakespeare Towers – Leeds 064D (E01011677) 3056 ↑
2475 ↓
4261 ↑
3363 ↓
4152 ↑
4584 ↑
3236 ↓
2111 ↓
2849 ↓
2276 ↓
2923 ↑
2276 ↑
5390 ↑
6722 ↑
17536 ↑
9271 ↓
6947 ↑
7186 ↑
713 ↓
1443 ↑
1232 ↑
1599 ↑
1433 ↑
2295 ↑
2044 ↑
1609 ↓
3765 ↑
5225 ↑
2565 ↓
4517 ↑
5126 ↑
6465 ↑
484 ↑
887 ↑
21393 ↑
9717 ↓
2224 ↑
882 ↓
952 ↑
1033 ↑
2052 ↓
2007 ↓
4409 ↑
3977 ↓
7033 ↑
4667 ↓
2696 ↑
3447 ↑
1170 ↓
996 ↓
1450 ↓
1404 ↓
1749 ↓
3713 ↑
17248 ↑
9837 ↓
7548 ↓
11483 ↑
4578 ↓
4120 ↓
Torre Road South – Leeds 064A (E01011338) Torres and Ford Dealership ‐ Leeds 065C (E01011348) Scargill and Lydgate Estate – Leeds 065D (E01011349) 2007 2007 712 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Key for ward deprivation map: Area name – Created by the Oastler Centre to illustrate the area covered 913 In most‐deprived 3% 3064 In most‐deprived 10% (but outside most‐deprived 3%) 3333 Outside most‐deprived 10% ↑ Deprivation improved relative to all other LSOAs ↓ Deprivation worsened relative to all other LSOAs = LSOA’s ranking did not change 35 Health and Wellbeing Profile of St Agnes & St Stephen's Parish St Agnes and St Stephens Parish is made up of parts of the Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens and Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells Middle Super Output Areas. In the parish there are: 3 GP practice locations (this includes branches and main practices) SOOLTAN AR B86638 SHAKESPEARE MEDICAL PRACTICE Y02494 BOONIN AS AND PARTNERS B86081 Why produce a neighbourhood profile? Addressing the health and social care needs of a population as large and diverse as Leeds presents many challenges. Unequal outcomes and unequal access to services are averaged out over a population of over 750,000. The rich diversity of our communities makes Leeds a very vibrant city. But we need to understand the details of this diversity to know how best to target services effectively. Neighbourhood profiles are a means to improve our understanding of the needs of people living in each part of Leeds, how each area differs from the next and how they differ from Leeds overall. There is a profile for each of the 108 Middle Layer Super Output Areas that make up the Leeds metropolitan area. What’s in the profile? NHS Leeds and Leeds City Council have worked together on the content. Each profile has: 
a detailed map of the area and a reference map of Leeds 
information about different sections of the population 
a neighbourhood Index – this summarises information on employment, education, health, safety, the environment and housing for the area and shows how it compares to other areas and Leeds as a whole 
GP registered prevalence of people with cancer, heart disease and lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) 
GP reported prevalence of smoking and obesity 
rates of attendance at A&E and admission to hospital (including admissions for alcohol related harm) 
death rates 
data on adult social care provision and referrals 
data on the safeguarding of vulnerable adults 
a summary of the types of households and likely present or future health problems, using Acorn segmentation St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit

a map of health and care facilities such as GP surgeries and care homes. These profiles combine information and analysis from both organisations in new ways. They also make new use of patient data collected by local GPs to give us fresh insights into the needs of people living in each area. 37 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Health Data 38 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Cancer Prevalence Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: Prevalence of cancer is the amount of cancer in a population at a point in time. The main risk factors for cancer are: growing older, smoking, sun, ionising radiation and chemicals, some viruses, family history of cancer, alcohol, poor diet, lack of physical activity, or being overweight. Behaviours like smoking, poor diet, alcohol and lack of physical activity are likely to be higher in more deprived communities. As educational attainment is lower in these communities, some people may be less familiar with early signs of cancer and less able to use a complicated system of care to their benefit. As a result some cancer patients present late and are less likely to have curative treatment. Life expectancy for people with cancer is lower in more deprived communities. The range of risk factors suggests many cancers are potentially preventable. In the parish cancer prevalence is lower compared to the Leeds average, this may be due to the young population. However when this figure is age standardised the rate is similar to the Leeds average. 39 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 40 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: CHD prevalence is identified via the GP systems. This is often under recorded compared to the real prevalence in an area. The modelled prevalence for Leeds overall is 5.3% compared to a recorded prevalence of 3.5%. CHD has a close association with deprivation as well as key lifestyle factors such as smoking, being overweight and excessive alcohol use. There is now a focus on systematic early diagnosis, via the NHS Health Check, for all those between the ages of 40 and 74. This will ensure that those people who are at high risk of CHD are managed appropriately. From a recent CVD mortality audit within Leeds we know that being on a register has a positive effective on increasing both life expectancy and quality of life. Within the parish the prevalence of CHD is lower than the Leeds average but the directly age standardised rate (which eliminates the effect of different population structures) is slightly higher than Leeds. This area has high levels of deprivation. Smoking rates for this MSOA are high, obesity rates are slightly higher than Leeds, and admissions for alcohol related conditions are high. 41 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 42 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: COPD is a disease of the lungs and is a key cause of premature mortality in Leeds. It is associated with deprivation and smoking. COPD is often identified late, reducing options for management to improve quality of life or to slow down the progression of the disease. Prevalence is identified from the GP systems, and is often under recorded. The modelled prevalence for Leeds is 4.5% compared to a recorded prevalence of 1.7%. For this parish the recorded prevalence is higher than that for Leeds overall which could be due to effective identification by primary care, but is still lower than predicted by modelling. The age standardised rate is very high compared to the Leeds average. These figures reflect the high percentage of GP recorded smokers in this area. Smoking status is strongly linked to deprivation. 43 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells 44 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Diabetes Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: Diabetes consists of type 1 and 2. Type 2 is the most common and is strongly associated with obesity, other lifestyle factors, particular population groups and deprivation. From modelled estimates from the APHO the prevalence in Leeds would be around 6.7% (within a range of 4.8 ‐ 10%). The recorded prevalence on GP systems for Leeds overall shows 3.6 ‐ 3.9%. The NHS Health Check (a vascular risk assessment and identification programme) is a systematic way of identifying people with diabetes and other vascular disease. For this parish prevalence is similar to the Leeds overall figure, but the age standardised rate is higher than Leeds. The obesity rate is also higher in the parish compared with the Leeds average. 45 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 46 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Smoking status (16+ years old) Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: The use of tobacco is the primary cause of preventable disease and premature death. It is not only harmful to smokers but also to the people around them through the damaging effects of second‐hand smoke. Smoking rates are much higher in some social groups, including those with the lowest incomes. These groups suffer the highest burden of smoking‐related illness and death. This is the single biggest cause of inequalities in death rates between the richest and poorest in our communities. Levels of smoking have fallen since the 1960s. However, this decline in smoking rates has stopped and may be reversing and there are still 24% of adults living in Leeds who smoke. The prevalence of smoking is higher in the parish compared to the Leeds average. .
47 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 48 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Obesity Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: The latest Health Survey for England (HSE) data shows that nearly 1 in 4 adults, and over 1 in 10 children aged 2‐10, are obese and the trend is set to increase. Obesity can have a severe impact on people’s health. Around 10% of all cancer deaths among non‐smokers are related to obesity. The risk of coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes directly increases with increasing levels of obesity e.g. levels of type 2 diabetes are about 20 times greater for people who are very obese. These diseases can shorten life expectancy. Excess weight is caused by an imbalance between energy in – what is consumed through eating – and energy expenditure – what is used by the body, over a prolonged period. It is an individual’s eating and physical activity habits that are primarily responsible for maintaining a healthy body weight. However, there are also significant external influences such as environmental and social factors (e.g. changes in food production, motorised transport and work/home lifestyle patterns) that contribute to body weight. In this parish Obesity prevalence is slightly higher than the Leeds average when the age profile of the population is taken into account. 49 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 50 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Alcohol admissions 2009‐10 Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens The misuse of alcohol is associated with a wide range of chronic health conditions such as liver disease, hypertension, some cancers, impotence and mental health problems. It has a direct association with accidents, criminal offending, domestic violence and risky sexual behaviour. It also has hidden impacts on educational attainment and workplace productivity. Within the parish, both alcohol specific and attributable admissions are higher than the Leeds average. 51 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 52 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Accident and Emergency Admissions Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: The parish has high rates of admission per 100,000 population compared to Leeds overall with obstetrics and gynaecology being the highest. The top emergency admissions are similar to Leeds overall with injuries and gastrointestinal conditions high, as well as cardiac and respiratory conditions. There are also a number of emergency admissions for psychiatric conditions. 53 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 54 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Mortality rates, under 75s 2006‐8 Mortality rates per hundred thousand for the two MSOAs is listed below for all causes and three major sub headings ‐ cancer mortality, circulatory disease mortality, and respiratory disease mortality. A rate is shown for Males, Females, and All. The charts display this information alongside that for Leeds and Deprived Leeds. 55 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
56 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Adult Social Care Adults who may be in need of social care are referred to their local authority for advice or assessment of their needs. These referrals come from a range of sources including the individual, their family and friends or from other agencies. Not surprisingly, the highest number of referrals are made by health agencies that become aware that a person may be in need of practical support following an accident or illness. These referrals are distinguished in this data by those which come following an admission to hospital (secondary health care) and those which are made through GP practices (primary health care). Early intervention can often promote independence and prevent emergencies which can lead to admissions to care homes or hospital. In some areas referrals to the local authority about people with adult social care needs come from a broad range of community and family sources. This suggests strong local support for people with social care needs. Areas where there are higher proportions of referrals from sources other than secondary care are likely to be identifying potential need at earlier stages than those where the highest proportion of referrals comes from secondary health care. Referrals are signposted i.e. directed to other agencies when other agencies are identified as being more appropriate to respond to the individual's need. As it is best to identify the most appropriate sources of meeting people's needs at the earliest opportunity, it is generally better for levels of signposting to be low. If a person has been identified as potentially requiring a social care service, the individual is assessed to see if they have substantial or critical care needs. In general, we would expect areas to be performing at city wide averages in terms of the proportion of assessments that lead to services being provided. Areas where high levels of services are provided following an assessment are areas where high levels of adult social care need are identified. Domiciliary care is practical, personal care provided in a person's own home. Care home support includes residential and nursing care for older people. Data referring to these services includes only those people who require support from the local authority to receive their care. It does not include people who have elected to purchase these services with their own resources. Areas with high levels of support reflect high levels of social care need which are requiring support from the local authority. In general, most people would prefer to receive their social care in their own homes. Areas where there are higher proportions of people receiving domiciliary care and lower proportions receiving residential care are likely to be more effectively meeting community aspirations for independent living. Overall the number of referrals to Adult Social Care for the western part of the parish (Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens) is average for the city. Most referrals come from secondary health care sources. Referrals from this source and self referrals are higher than average. The proportion of referrals from primary care and family and friends are significantly below city wide average. 57 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: For the eastern part of the parish (Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells) a higher proportion of referrals are re‐referred to other agencies for assistance than the city average. The area has a very low proportion of the total Adult Social Care provision in the city in comparison with the referral rate. 58 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 59 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Domiciliary care and care home provision are two of the largest services commissioned by Adult Social Care. The area activity in these services is significantly higher than overall levels of provision but is broadly in line with Leeds referral rates. Adult Social Care supported residential and nursing care admissions in Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens Adult Social Care supported residential and nursing care admissions in Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells 60 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Domiciliary care and safeguarding referrals in Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: Domiciliary care and safeguarding referrals in Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 61 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Health Acorn Profile 2010: HealthAcorn is an extension to the Acorn classification system. The classification groups the population of Great Britain into 4 groups, 25 types and 60 sub‐types for more in‐depth analysis. By analysing diet, illness and exercise characteristics as well as demographic attributes, Health Acorn provides an in‐depth understanding of different communities in every part of the country. The classification names and descriptions have been chosen to be simple and non‐judgemental. Health Acorn is shown here as background to our locally recorded GP data. Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 62 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens: 63 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 64 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells: 65 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens MSOA ranking summary: The data for Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens is summarised here by putting individual themes into ranked order (ignoring the sometimes large differences between MSOAs). A blue box at the very left of the chart means this MSOA is last among all MSOAs in Leeds for that theme. Likewise, a blue box at the right of the chart means this MSOA is first among all MSOAs in Leeds. MSOAs sharing identical results are shown as larger blue boxes. A healthy MSOA can be expected to show boxes mostly at the right side of the chart (doesn't apply to age ranking section). IMD 2010 scores are shown for the LSOAs which constitute the MSOA. 66 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Harehills ‐ Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells MSOA ranking summary: 67 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Children Leeds Cluster Profile of the Inner East Area of Leeds 68 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
69 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
70 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
71 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Group defined needs The groups interviewed during the community audit were: a) Ebor Gardens Primary School ‐ 27/01/12 b) One Community Centre (Leeds Refugee Centre) ‐ 30/01/12 c) Leeds Civic Trust / Friends of Beckett Street Cemetery ‐ 31/01/12 d) Shakespeare School ‐ 31/01/12 e) Shakespeare Sure Start ‐ 31/01/12 f)
Co‐operative Academy ‐ 06/02/12 g) Brownhills School ‐ 24/02/12 h) Ebor Gardens Advice Centre and Burmantofts Senior Action – 18/07/12 i)
West Yorkshire Police – 25/07/12 Other groups identified through the consultation process that were not able to be interviewed: 1. Nearest Christian Community Facility is the Teen Challenge Leeds Outreach Centre ‐ http://www.teenchallenge.org.uk/index.php?option=com_contact&view=contact&i
d=9&Itemid=99 – other side of the A61 2. Community Centres – Compton Centre 3. Doctor – Lincoln Green 4. St James’s Hospital ‐ chaplain 5. Burmantofts History Group 6. Family Centres – Brownhill – Torre Road 7. Churches – St Patrick’s – John Kay; Bridge Street; Nigerian Church 8. Residential Care/Sheltered Accommodation – Green Acres and Stoney Rock 9. Sports Clubs – Boxing 10. Social Clubs – WMC 11. Shops Interviews EBOR GARDENS PRIMARY SCHOOL, RIGTON DRIVE Amos and Alice met with Mrs Depledge (Head teacher) on 27.01.2012 at Ebor Gardens Primary School Background Information Ebor Gardens Primary School is located in Ebor Gardens, a large housing estate to the west of Torre Road and is home to a few high‐rise apartments. The green area in the centre helps 72 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
provide a sense of space to an area that feels rather unexciting. Ebor Gardens Primary school is one of the hopeful centres in the area that provides some form of focus for the community. Mrs Depledge was a teacher at the school before she became Headteacher and says the school’s performance has improved a lot over the last ten years largely due to the children of immigrants, mostly African, whose parents have high aspirations for their children in terms of educational achievement. The school has many extra‐curricular activities and organises events such as Drop in Sessions where trained volunteers provide help in filling forms; after school clubs, holiday clubs, moms and tots group, Share Programme (parents enabled to know what children are doing). Opportunities for St Agnes’ Mrs Depledge pointed out that one of the advantages of St Agnes is that the minister actually lives in the area. The minister should use this opportunity and be seen to be visible in the community, for example by going into the school and attending school open days. Schools want to engage with cultural and religious diversity. As part of this they visit places of worship: Gurdwara (Sikh Temple), Mosque, and Church (at Christmas). The Headteacher has this to say, “Muslim children go to the mosque. White kids don’t go to church because parents don’t. So bring the church to us”. Mrs Depledge stressed the need for increased publicity for the church so that the school and people in the area know what the church is doing and what activities are taking place there. St Agnes could help with the equality and diversity agenda of the school as it has common interests that it shares with the school in this area. THE ONE COMMUNITY CENTRE, CROMWELL STREET (LINCOLN GREEN) Amos and Alice met with Rachel Pilling on 30.01.2012 at the One Community Centre Background Information The One Community Centre in Lincoln Green is home to the Leeds Refugee Forum (LRF), a voluntary refugee forum established in 2003 to act as an umbrella for Refugee Community Organisations (RCOs) in Leeds. It aims to offer structure and collective voice to these organisations and to cater for their welfare. It is supported by Leeds Asylum Seekers Support Network (LASSN) and Refugee Action. Lincoln Green is located outside the boundaries of the parish, but is so intertwined with Burmantofts that they are almost co‐extensive. Similar issues and problems exist in both places. Like Burmantofts, Lincoln Green has a large proportion of recent immigrants, some of them refugees and asylum seekers who share similar experiences. The work of the One Community Centre revolves around support, information, integration, and empowerment. 73 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Opportunities for St Agnes’ Some members of St Agnes’ will either be recent immigrants to the UK or may know someone who is an immigrant or asylum seekers. The church can be used as a space to talk about issues about immigration and immigrants. The church can create awareness about immigration and asylum seekers and provide a counter‐narrative to one that stigmatises them and presents them as scroungers, terrorists or criminals. The One Community Centre often lack adequate space and facilities when organising an event with big numbers. They would be happy to use St Agnes’ church hall for some of these events. Recently, they have borrowed chairs from the church hall for use at events. FRIENDS OF BECKETT ST CEMETERY Amos and Alice met with Lynda Kitching and Alun Pugh on 10.02.2012 at St Agnes’ Vicarage Background Information Beckett Street Cemetery is situated about a hundred yards north of St Agnes’ United Church between Stoney Rock Lane to the east and Beckett Street to the west opposite the Thackray Museum. It was established in 1845 and funded by the City of Leeds as a public cemetery for different religious groups at the time and had different chapels for different religious persuasions. Its original name was the Leeds City Cemetery. The Friends of Beckett Street Cemetery came together in 1984 to campaign against its demotion by the Council and to ensure that this important history of Leeds city and the unique green space where it is located were preserved. Amos and Alice met with Lynda Kitching, Secretary, and Alyun Pugh (Chairperson) on 10.02.2012 at St Agnes’ Vicarage to find out more about the Friends of the Beckett Street Cemetery, to hear their concerns, and to exchange ideas as people whose respective sights have historical and abiding significance for Burmantofts. Opportunities for St Agnes’ The presence of the Beckett Street Cemetery close to St Agnes’ Church may explain why the Church does not have a graveyard. But members of St Agnes’ have some of their loved one buried at the Cemetery. Along with the Beckett Street Cemetery and the Thackray Museum, St Agnes’ Church being a Grade II listed building that is still being used as a place of worship provides potential for learning about this part of Leeds, especially by schools in the parish and by other groups. Some of the visitors to the Thackray Museum during the English Heritage Open Days have also visited St Agnes’ Church by reason of its historic importance, its architectural design, and Burmantofts pottery 74 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
SHAKESPEARE PRIMARY SCHOOL, STONEY ROCK LANE Amos and Alice met with Mr Julian Gorton (Head teacher) on 24.01.2012 at Shakespeare Primary School Background Information Shakespeare Primary School is located about one hundred yards from St Agnes United Church along Stoney Rock Lane and is next to the Co‐operative Academy. Also located at Shakespeare School and sharing a common entrance is the Shakespeare Children’s Centre. Opportunities for St Agnes’ Shakespeare Primary School has always had a relationship with St Agnes’ church. A former priest in charge at St Agnes was one of its governors. The school use the church at Christmas and do a concert there on the topic of the Nativity which parents, teachers and children attend. The minister has been invited to speak to the children about Easter and to lead an assembly. They use the church also for demonstrations about mock baptism and weddings and have held a concert for the elderly (mostly via the Burmantofts Senior Action) at St Agnes’ Church Hall. Some five years ago, St Agnes’ church, and Shakespeare Primary School with the Pop Connection music group performed a concert at the church, which was attended by parents and other members of the community. The event is going to be repeated in October 2012. Attend Open Days at the school, meet people and inform ourselves about life in the school. THE COOPERATIVE ACADEMY, STONEY ROCK LANE Amos and Sister Jennie East met with the Principal, Mrs Eileen McCarthy and the Deputy Principal, Mr Aziz Ali on Monday 6th Feb 2012 at 9.30am. Mr Ali has special responsibility for Community relations at the Academy. We were encouraged to learn that he and his children had come to Community Fun Day in August. Mr Ali was a teacher at Primrose School before it became an academy last year and has been there for 11 years. Mrs McCarthy explained some of the major problems that the school faced before it became an academy as well as some of the problems it still faces today even after the transformation that has taken place. The ratings of the school were low both in terms of attendance and performance. Relations between the school and the community close to the school were not that good, as residents constantly complained about anti‐social behaviour 75 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
of students from the school. The causes for this state of affairs were multiple, but they include the following: high mobility (100 new intakes since September 2011); language problems (not so much the different language groups to which the pupils belong, but the fact that some come to the school with very little English); parents who are not literate and are unable to understand the needs of the school let alone be able to help with homework; some teenagers who have never attended school before; disorientation of many pupils arriving in Britain either as new immigrants or even as refugees and asylum‐seekers; low self‐esteem, and all the social problems and disadvantages associated with the Inner City. A major re‐organisation has taken place and continues to take place in the school. The re‐
org is symbolised by a new uniform for the school and the re‐decoration of the school giving the place a sense of place and an attractive ambience. This was of special interest to me as I think that the church, and not only our parish, may have to deal with the matter of re‐
organisation, of giving a new look or new face to a place of worship and/or the church hall. Another aspect of the new culture of the school is towards empowerment and democratisation through the creation of a new student support structure. This includes the creation of coaching groups (10‐12 students per group across the years and they have 50 minute coaching sessions each Tuesday morning), house guilds, and homework clubs. Names for the guilds include Mary Seacole (Black nurse from the Caribbean who served in the Crimean war alongside Florence Nightingale), Martin Luther King JR, Jane Tomlinson (from Rothwell), and Leonardo da Vinci. The names had to be names of people who have died in order to avoid disappointment should a living model fall short. The Principal said that there was a proposal to form a Student Parliament. There is a wide variety of activities as part of the wide curriculum, with Monday afternoon set aside for 70 activities which include boxing, rugby, crafts, wall climbing, learning about road safety, Amnesty International, Hospitality, models, cape decorating and water colour painting, and grow‐your‐own. Their purpose is to widen students’ vision, build aspiration and offer the opportunity for them to discover or learn new skills. The School Leadership Team has engaged in an outreach programme visiting different, mainly cultural groups and centres in the areas such as Eritrean, Somali, Bangladesh etc to find out about their expectations, attitudes to education and how the school could meet their needs and those of their children. The Principal said that the group that is harder to reach is the white indigenous population where a measure of lethargy and resignation perhaps born of many years of marginality and disadvantage in an urban environment. The Sixth Form is an international centre for this area. A parents and Community Forum is held once a term. Disparity in age and experience and a wide variety of languages spoken at the school or in which the different students feel comfortable are still a challenge. The students come from 66 language groups. Of course some are bi‐lingual or might even multi‐lingual. Other languages besides English or European languages are taught at the school. All in all, the Academy aims not only to be a centre of educational excellence, but wants to provide education and skills based on individual needs as well as being a key player in the 76 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
community – a hub of activity for members of the community near the school. So, the Academy runs ESOL classes on a Wednesday (24 parents attend). It also works with Business to train adults in both interview skills and writing applications among other things. There 1500 pupils and about 140 members of staff, 72 of them teaching staff. Opportunities for St Agnes: • The Principal and Vice Principal demonstrated that they are happy to engage with us as stakeholders in the community. They showed real interest in our visit to the Academy. • It was a good sign that the Vice Principal who was not shy to mention that he was a Muslim actually attended our Community Fun Day in August last year with his children. He confessed however that they had not reached out to us, and presumably this was due to the fact that they wanted to connect with the rather hard to engage groups some of whom had children in the school or were potential sources of students to the school. But we have taken the initiative and the Vice Principal wants to work with us to discover ways in which we can participate towards community building. Mr Ali was particularly interested when I mentioned my previous experience in inter‐faith engagement in Leicester. • As Alice and I found out from the visit to Ebor Gardens Primary School and One Community in Lincoln Green a major challenge in the area is thin community bonds or that feeling that there is a community as opposed to dispersed cultural and language groups that mix but do not really engage at a social level. • It is also interesting from both visits to Ebor Gardens Primary School and the Academy how the school is undertaking the role or roles that were centred in the church in the past. This raises the question whether and to what extent the church – in this case St Agnes – is or can be central or at least play an activity part in community building initiatives in the area. BROWNHILL PRIMARY SCHOOL, TORRE DRIVE Amos and Alice met with Mrs Winterburn (Head teacher) on 24.02.2012 at Brownhill Primary School Background Information Brownhill Primary School is located in the Torres area of Burmantofts and is situated between Hudson road to the north, Torre Road to the west and Lupton Avenue to the east. It is one of three primary schools in Burmantofts, the others being Shakespeare Primary School, Ebor Gardens Primary Schools and St Patrick’s Catholic Primary School. The latter is also located in the Torres close to Brownhill School. 77 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Like all schools in Burmantofts, Brownhill is culturally and ethnically diverse. A significant number of the pupils are children of recent immigrants. The social problems of the catchment area impact on the school. The school is doing its best to raise aspiration and encourage learning and a sense of community. Opportunities for St Agnes’ Visits to the school on open days and interacting with staff and parents on such days Leading assemblies at the school albeit occasionally and talking to the children about Christian festivals such as Christmas and Easter. EBOR GARDENS ADVICE CENTRE (EGAC) & BURMANTOFTS SENIOR ACTION (BSA) (Burmantofts Community Projects) Amos and Alice met with Wendy Davies (Project Manager, BSA) and Sylvia Simpson (Project Manager EGAC) on 18.07.2012 at EGAC Background Information EGAC and BSA are two community projects which have close links with St Agnes’ church. Now independent of the church, both were originally founded by members of St Agnes’ church (BSA by a former Vicar, Chris Burch, and EGAC by Roz Burch, social worker and wife of Chris Burch) over 17 years ago. This is evidence of the value that the church can or does bring to the community, namely its social vision. BSA is concerned mainly with giving support to the elderly in Burmantofts while EGAC gives debt advice to a large clientele in the area. Wendy has worked for BSA for 15 years while Sylvia has been in post for one year. The issues they highlighted are similar. They identified the biggest issues to be: • poverty • isolation (especially in the high rise flats in both the Burmantofts and Lincoln Green areas) • deprivation • housing The above factors described as multiple deprivation might and do lead people to turn to crime in order to survive, and may also lead to alcoholism. In some of the houses, the Council charges occupants £10 per week owing to what is called “under‐occupancy” (having a Council house that is considered to be too big for one!). There 78 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
are many “lodgers” who pay a small rent to the legal Council House occupier, but may not be known to the Council. Another concern in the area is the lack of facilities for children and young people. There is a Community Centre in Ebor Gardens, but it is not used much. In the past, kids kept within their own gangs, although that is now on the wane. There is a Social Worker in Ebor Gardens, but seems to be more reactive than proactive. Ebor Gardens is not considered to be a safe area to live and residents think it’s particularly risky to walk in the evening or at night. Opportunities for St Agnes’ Both Wendy and Sylvia observed that many people have little or no connection with the church and that they want to stay clear of religion because it’s perceived as controlling or attaching stigma to their life style. But they pointed out that once the church overcame that barrier, it can make a positive contribution to the community. The church itself is part of the community, and the people look to it for support at certain moments in their lives – examples are christening (baptism), weddings and funerals. The church can be a partner with other actors in the community. For this constructive engagement to take place, members of St Agnes will carry out teaching and preaching that is orientated to community involvement and concern. St Agnes’ Church Hall is a facility that is of use to the community as different social and communal events take place there. WEST YORKSHIRE POLICE (Burmantofts & Richmond Hill) Amos met with Inspector Jackie Hawkes, leader of the police team for Burmantofts and Richmond Hill area, on 25.07.2012 at St Agnes’ Vicarage. The police in Burmantofts and the neighbourhood (Lincoln Green, Harehills) are very visible in the area, and are very community conscious. They often show up at events organised by the church and do attend the occasional church service. They have also come to St Agnes’ Church café on a Friday morning. The meeting with Inspector Jackie and other members of the police team we have encountered highlighted the usual problems of multiple deprivation and unemployment on the negative side and the need to build community on the positive side. Although the area is culturally and ethnically diverse and while many of these cultural, religious and ethnic groups meet in various places, especially the schools, the different ethnic, cultural and religious groups are not integrated. There is tension between them or at least between some of them. There is need to build trust recent immigrants and the indigenous white population. Inspector Jackie pointed out some positive developments in Burmantofts and Lincoln Green. For example Burmantofts has improved a lot over the last ten years and the level of crime 79 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
has gone down tremendously. She highlighted the need for members of the community to take part in fighting crime and building community. Inspector Jackie mentioned the need to educate and influence the children in the direction of integration and saw hope along these lines in children and young people. Opportunities for St Agnes The church and church hall can be or provide a space where matters affecting the community can be discussed. The police are happy to be invited to speak or give advice on a number of issues ranging from personal safety to a healthy environment. Consider ways in which St Agnes can engage with children and youth. Already St Agnes has up to 16 children attending Sunday worship. 80 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Individual Defined Needs St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts, Consultation Responses The following are the responses to questions asked at a community consultation day at the church on Saturday 20th August 2012. For those who could not attend that day the questionnaires and posters were available in the church for a further 2 weeks. What do you like about living in Burmantofts? What do you like about living in Burmantofts?
Close to amenities / city centre
2
1
1
10
2
Friendly People / Community
Spirit
Not Much
2
Good Schools
Nice place to live
Employment
14
Increasing diversity of people
Individual Comments “Close to many amenities – shops etc. Close knit spirit in some areas (undefeated mentally)” “Not much – Riddled with crime and drugs” “Nice place to live. People very Nice” “Want to move to a different place” 81 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
What do you think is the biggest issue Burmantofts faces? What is the biggest issue Burmantofts faces?
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Individual Comments “Lack of Amenities; shops, green areas, play areas” “Not enough going on for families, could do with more classes e.g. flower arranging” “The area could be better looked after by the ones who live here” “Schooling – I feel there is a negative feeling towards schooling” “Lack of pride in the area from some makes it harder on others. Take pride and have respect” “More poor families coming into the area” “Overpopulated – pull of drugs, crime and anti‐social behaviour” “Nothing to do for teens” “Younger people do not have the same priorities” “A park is needed in this area” “Loss of respect for community” “Anti‐social behaviour, lack of respect for each other and the area, no chance for families to engage” 82 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
What would you change about Burmantofts? What would you change about Burmantofts?
More funding
More input from residents
Improve the church / environment
Sheltered Accomodation for the elderly
Agencies pulling together
More focus on the church
More Youth Activities
More family support
Community Spirit / Community Activities
0
2
4
6
8
10
Individual Comments “A lift in community spirit – this would encourage people to work tomorrow” “Welcome to Everybody” “More Encouragement and Building up of people who are already here” “If you change things inside what about the bricks? How long will they last?” “Close the kiln down” “Youth Club for kids and a park area built” “Clean our church steeple and brickwork up and get rid of pollution” “Make the church the focal point of the community for all” “Highlight the positive” “Close the School” “Have more community run activities” “Everyone Working Together” “More Community Development” “Things for Young People to do – places they can be occupied constructively e.g. youth programmes and centres, parks etc” “More houses with gardens for people with young children” “Needs more funds to make it look cleaner and better” “Do more for Kids” 12
83 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
84 “Grass in front of the houses to be fenced off to prevent school kids walking on it” “More community work, clean ups, try and engage people to be a community” “More green spaces and improved housing, cleaner environment” “People to care about each other and not themselves” “The crime and lack of community spirit” Are all groups or people supported in Burmantofts, and if not who do you think misses out? Single Parent Families
6%
Who do you think misses out in Burmantofts?
Asian People
3%
Poor people
3%
Future generations
3%
Older people
14%
God
3%
Drug or Alcohol Addicts
3%
Young Families and Children
56%
New Christians
6%
General Public
3%
Individual Comments “People with no issues, not on drugs and drink, not youth. Just general population left out.” “Young Children – they see things they shouldn’t and think it’s normal” “Everyone is entitled to equality. Regardless of anything.” “Community groups need bringing together” “Stop the general decline” “A united Forum” “Youth – not any facilities like youth centres, parks and other recreational facilities” “I’m not sure if there is any community transport but would be helpful to assist the elderly and disabled” St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
What do you feel about St Agnes United Church? What do you feel about St Agnes's Church?
2%
3%
5% 2%
Friendly and Welcoming
Very Beautiful / Important
10%
Caring congregation
Too serious
15%
63%
People of God
Under Utilised
Lacks Amenities – is cold etc
Individual Comments “Too serious – children very bored. Need to change the way the service is done” “People of God, who god loves and will support” “It’s brilliant” “A very caring congregation. Salt of the earth” “They should add some decorations on the outside” “A great community helps each other” “Friendly and Welcoming to Everyone” “It’s a good building but more burdensome for a few people” “Comforting a nice place to be” “More flowers” Beautiful Church, Beautiful people. Needs to service and cater for families and young people” “I love the church but it needs a congregation of some young people, happier service, more community spirit, let’s do more of today” “Important to have a Christian presence and a place to worship; Important to celebrate our heritage in this country” “Part of family, relaxing, spiritually helpful” “Very supportive and friendly, helpful community” “It should be there of the community” 85 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
86 Do you think it’s important to have a Christian church here? Is it important to have a church here?
No
Yes
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
What would you like to see happen in St Agnes church? What would you like to see happen in St Agnes' Church?
Women’s group
Family Centre
Christian Events
Advice etc
Sunday School
Mother and Toddler groups
Different Agencies
Events for the elderly
Children’s room / activities (e.g. Summer Clubs)
Youth Groups / Activities
Supported living accomodation
Drama / Dance room
Music Room / Live Music
IT
Training Kitchen to learn cooking
Crèche
Exhibition area / Art
Café / Coffee Mornings
Book Area
Meeting Rooms
Flexible Worship Area
Toilets
Church Office
Community Events
Community Room and Offices
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Individual Comments “Keep a large enough space for worship – for Sunday or for special services for people staying there regular prayer offered!” 87 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Offices hired to CAB; MacMillan nurses; quiet offices used for appraisals for St James’s hospital staff or social services; make connections with charities etc to rent space” “This could be a full care package for people with family in hospital in Leeds with support services, spiritual help, and accommodation in 1 package” “Still keep the Christian Ethos alive for future generations” “Community centre, hub, café, something for young people ‐ we need some younger families but needs to be a happier service to involve everyone. Worship can be happy and fun.” “I would like it to continue unaltered even though I know it will cost money” “I enjoy visits by the Salvation Army – maybe other Christian group visits.” “More community open days and more young people” How long have you lived in Burmantofts? How long have you lived in Burmantofts?
0 to 5
5 to 10
10 to 20
20 to 30
30 to 40
40 to 50
50+
88 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
89 Gender: Gender
Male
Female
Age: Age
Under 25
25‐30
31‐40
41‐50
51‐60
Over 60
St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Analysis Looking at the evidence for the parish as a whole the community have a range of complex needs that have multiple causes and effects. This parish consistently performs well below the City average, and although there was a notable improvement within the western part in 2010 this was reversed again in 2011. There has been a significant deterioration in the Neighbourhood Index score of the eastern part of the parish currently making this area the most deprived in the City. Income and Economy Economically this parish consistently performs well below the City average. There was a very significant dip in performance in the parish in 2010 due in part to significant increases in the claimant rates for both Job Seekers Allowance and Incapacity Benefit. This has largely been reversed in 2011 with significant falls in the claimant rates for all three indicators although the JSA claim rate is still among the highest in the City. Despite a significant improvement in 2011 the number of children in workless households in the eastern area is currently the third highest in the City. The vast majority of incomes within the parish are well below the national and city average. Over 30% have an annual income of less than £10,000 and two thirds have an annual income below £20,000. As a result 10% have difficulty paying for food and double the city average struggle paying the bills. Two thirds of households within the parish do not have a car. 50‐60% of people within the parish are classified hard‐pressed by the Acorn profile. Of these the parish is relatively evenly divided between struggling families, burdened singles and those in high rise hardship. Those who are of more moderate means are mainly from blue collar roots. Making up more than 10% of the population in either of the 2 MSOAs are old people in high rise (9.2%‐16%); older people in rented terraces (13.4%‐23.4%); flats, single parents and pensioners in council terraces (12.3%); singles and sharers in multi‐ethnic areas (10.7%); Home‐owning families, terraces (3.1%‐16.9%); low‐income families, terraced estates (2.3%‐
14.8%). Employment In the cluster 28% are out of work (on Jobseekers Allowance, Incapacity Benefit or Lone Parent Benefit) in comparison to 12.1% for Leeds as a whole. Health The overall health statistics of the area reflect the population. For example, incidence of cancer, coronary heart disease (CHD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is lower than the city as a whole. However, when the figures are adjusted for age they often compare badly with the rest of the city. Once adjusted CHD, COPD and diabetes are higher than the rest of the city due to high smoking rates, obesity and the abuse of alcohol. This 90 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
leads to the parish having one of the highest mortality rates for the city and as a whole a higher rate than the other deprived parts of Leeds. For health this parish consistently performs at or below the City average, although there has been continual and significant overall improvement in the western half of the parish. The indicators relating to circulatory disease mortality and low birthweight have both shown continued significant improvement. Performance in respect of the other two indicators has been more variable. In the eastern area there has been a notable dip in performance in 2011 with significant increases in the circulatory disease and cancer mortality rates. 30%of 3‐5 year olds in the Inner East schools cluster are obese or overweight, rising to 40% in 10‐12 year olds. This is approximately 5 percentage points higher than the city average. A slightly lower number of children are immunised in the cluster in comparison to the city as a whole. The teenage pregnancy rate is twice the city average. According to the Health Acorn data 13.8%‐22.1% have existing problems in the parish with a further three quarters likely to have future problems. The predominant health types in the parish are multi‐ethnic, high smoking, high fast food consumption (32.5% in Lincoln Green and Ebor Gardens); urban estates with sedentary lifestyles and low fruit and vegetable consumption (20.4%‐23.2%); disadvantaged multi‐
ethnic younger adults, with high levels of smoking (11.8%‐19.6%); deprived multi‐ethnic estates, smokers and overweight (23.9% Harehills – Comptons, Sutherlands and Nowells). Health indicators that are worse than for Leeds as a whole are high smoking rate, high body mass index, inactivity, arthritis, asthma and depression. The spend on cigarettes in the parish is much higher (£7.25 per person per week compared to £4.80 city average) than the city average even though incomes are far lower. Even though alcohol problems are more prevalent in the parish than the city as a whole weekly alcohol spend is less, probably reflecting a reliance on cheap alcohol. Education Within the field of Education this parish consistently performs below the City average (the only exception being persistent absenteeism in 2010). In the western half of the parish there was a notable overall improvement in 2010 with a significant reduction in persistent absenteeism and a significant improvement in Foundation Stage attainment. The improvements were not generally sustained in 2011, although the Key Stage 4 attainment rate did improve in that year. It must however be remembered that within this domain the overall numbers may be low and therefore have a marked impact on the rates. In the eastern half of the parish there was a notable dip in performance in 2010 with the Foundation Stage indicator being the only one to show any improvement in that year. Overall performance improved again in 2011, with a significant improvement in the Key Stage 2 attainment rate. Persistent absenteeism is currently rated as the third worst in the City. It must however be remembered that within this domain the overall numbers may be low and therefore have a marked impact on the rates. 91 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
15% of households have nobody with any qualifications and less than 10% have someone with a degree or higher level qualifications. 45% of children in the cluster are eligible for free school meals and over 30% have special educational needs. The unauthorised absence and persistent absence rate of secondary school pupils is over double the total city rate. Within the cluster over 10% of 16‐18 year olds are not in employment, education or training, which is 30% more than the rest of Leeds as a whole. At GCSE or equivalent level schools achieve half the national average for the percentage of A*‐C grades including English and Maths. Those resident within the cluster are twice as likely gain no qualifications at 16 than other pupils in the city. The impact of the creation of the Co‐operative Academy is yet to be seen as it is too new to be included in the statistics. The signs were positive when they were interviewed as part of the community audit. Crime and Anti‐Social Behaviour This parish consistently performs well below the City average, and although there were notable improvements for the western area in 2010 for three of the four indicators these were generally not sustained in 2011. There was a very significant increase in the number of community disorders in 2010 and the number has continued to rise in 2011, currently making it the second worst area in the City. There was a notable overall improvement in the eastern area in 2010 with significant reductions in the numbers of environmental crimes and crimes against individuals. These reductions were not sustained in 2011 and performance dropped again (numbering environmental crimes as the third worst in the City), despite a significant fall in the number of community disorders in that year. Property crime has reduced within the Inner East schools cluster in the last year, especially that against vehicles. However, personal crime has been on the rise including drug offences, personal theft and violent crime. There is a particularly high incidence of domestic violence. The number of youth offences has reduced in the last 5 years. Crime was noted as the single biggest issue for people at the Community Consultation day at St Agnes’, followed by drug and alcohol abuse and anti‐social behaviour. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Statistics for alcohol admissions within the parish are among the worst in the city. Anecdotal evidence suggests there are also high levels of drug abuse which might well be some of the causes behind the high levels of property crime in the area. Domestic Violence High levels of domestic violence are recorded in police statistics for the area. Almost every interview we conducted with schools and support groups suggested that the rates for the area were particularly high and that it was having a significant effect on children and adults within the parish. Living Environment and Housing 92 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
This parish consistently performs at or below the City average in terms of living environment. In the western half of the parish there was a notable overall improvement in 2010 with significant reductions in the number of graffiti and waste clearances, these were not however sustained in 2011 and overall performance dropped again. In the eastern area overall performance improved in 2010 but dropped very significantly again in 2011 with a massive increase in the number of waste clearances, currently numbered as the third worst in the City. For housing this parish consistently performs below the City average. There was a significant dip in performance in the western area in 2010 which had largely been reversed in 2011, although house prices have continued to fall and are currently the second lowest in the City. In the eastern area there was a notable dip in performance in 2010, due in part to a significant drop in house prices and a significant increase in turnover. Performance has steadied between 2010 and 2011. Just fewer than 30% of properties are owner occupied and the majority are rented council properties. At the Community Consultation Day at St Agnes’ living environment was a recurring theme with people noting that there is a lack of respect and care for community areas. They also noted a lack of green space. Loneliness and Isolation Most (nearly 30%) of referrals for adult social care come from secondary health services, such as hospitals, followed by other agencies, such as primary healthcare providers (e.g. GPs) or housing associations. A smaller proportion are referred by friends families and neighbours than the rest of the city. This suggests there are a number of elderly and vulnerable adults living in isolation in the parish where there needs are met at the point of crisis rather than being recognised early by friends, family or neighbours. In some parts there are high levels of self‐referral. Community Facilities There are a number of community facilities within the area. Most significant is probbaly the newly built facility at the Compton Centre. It is a joint services centre where people can get advice and support from a number of different agencies, such as for health, housing, benefits, debt. There is also a library and self help centre where people can use computer facilities. St Agnes's Church is approximately 15 minutes walk from the centre so would not be in direct competition if it provided some of the same facilities within the church. For example, the church could have a computer room where older people could learn to use computers trained by volunteers from the church. For those to the south of the church this would be the nearest of this type of facility within walking distance. The church provides space to rent within its Church Hall. This facility is well used by the community and rooms within the hall are also used for the offices of Senior Action Burmantofts. Community Cohesion, Cultural Mix and Racism 93 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
The parish is characterised by a mixed population that is in some parts predominantly BME – mainly south Asian, Middle Eastern and African reflecting the use of the area as a dispersal centre for refugees and asylum seekers from 2002. 15‐25% of children at school are from Black African households and 20‐50% are from White British households. In the Inner East school cluster as a whole two thirds of children are from BME groups and for just under half English is an additional language. In the Inner East schools cluster 9% have been resident for less than a year and nearly 30% have been in the area less than 5 years. This supports anecdotal evidence than suggests that the area has a transient population and that people move in and out of the area on a regular basis. Although the area is culturally and ethnically diverse and while many of these cultural, religious and ethnic groups meet in various places, especially the schools, the different ethnic, cultural and religious groups are not integrated. There is tension between them or at least between some of them. There is need to build trust recent immigrants and the indigenous white population. Neutral spaces and community events where all are welcome would help to build community cohesion. 94 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
Gaps and barriers At the Community Consultation day at St Agnes’ people felt that young families and children and older people missed out. People also felt there was nowhere that people from different communities can meet and come together. One of the biggest gaps appeared to be support for isolated elderly and vulnerable people within the parish. To a certain extent Burmantofts Senior Action have been valiantly combatting the problem, however, there is still a very large amount of referrals to social care at the point of crisis suggesting that people do not have the friends, family or neighbours to help identify issues early. Another concern in the area is the lack of facilities for children and young people. There is a Community Centre in Ebor Gardens, but it is not used much. In the past, kids kept within their own gangs, although that is now on the wane. There is a Social Worker in Ebor Gardens, but seems to be more reactive than proactive. Barriers for the improvement are multiple and complex and include the lack of skills, education and aspirations. The educational results in the audit area are some of the lowest in the city. There are also cultural barriers to cohesion as the area is one of the most diverse in the city. Ways to break down those barriers might be if there was a place different people from different cultures could meet within the community. One way the church could facilitate this would be to provide a space for activities, for example, a big eat could happen in the church hall where different people could bring in different food that express their culture. This happens in a project called The Feast that has been active for a number of years in Birmingham and Bradford ( www.thefeast.org.uk). Opportunities for St Agnes’ 1. Reducing isolation of people in Burmantofts 
Providing a place for people to meet and get involved in the community 
Providing Information and Support 
Providing Social Activities for groups The benefits include happier people, reduced reliance on the social care system and helping to improve early intervention and therefore finding easier solutions in the health and care system and reducing anxiety and hardship. Why is St Agnes in a good position to offer these facilities? St Agnes' is already an integral part of the community and already provides pastoral care to those within the parish. It also has the space to be able to run community facilities. Problems facing the church 95 St Agnes’s United Church, Burmantofts Community Audit
At present the facilities within the church and church hall are not fit for purpose to be able to really help address people's problems. Demand for Services Nearly 20% of those asked considered thought the lack of community facilities and isolation are the biggest issues that face Burmantofts. 55% of people felt that young children and families and 15% felt that older people miss out on services and facilities. Nearly 60% of people would like to see community facilities within St Agnes's Church for different ages groups. As the individuals questioned would be those using the facilities it suggests that there would be demand. This needs to be explored in the development of the project. Conclusions The community of Burmantofts faces many complex issues as reflected in its status as one of the most deprived wards within Leeds. St Agnes's Church want to serve the needs of this community and shall devise a plan with partners and the community to help address the needs. The community audit has steered the church to look at how it can provide community facilities (space, events and activities). The next steps are to test these conclusions in the development of a project at the church. Next Steps 
St Agnes's Church need to consider carefully the options for projects that came out of the community audit 
There needs to be research about the demand for the services suggested within the community audit 
Funding for the development of the project should be sought 
The preferred option should be investigated with partners, the community and professionals, such as architects and the DAC 
A funding strategy should be devised to deliver the preferred option 96