The Sheridan Press E-Edition June 17, 2014

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The Sheridan Press E-Edition June 17, 2014
Press
THE SHERIDAN
TUESDAY
June 17, 2014
129th Year, No. 24
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
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Locals competing
in Special Olympics
in NJ. Sports, B2
New mine could create more than 200 jobs
BY TRACEE DAVIS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Last month, the Kentucky-based
Ramaco, LLC, announced plans to open a coal mine
between Sheridan and Ranchester. The endeavor represents an economic opportunity for the local economy, but also a pioneer effort to bring Appalachian
mining techniques to Wyoming.
Initial mining plans for the proposed Brook Mine,
which will be located in an area near the existing
Acme exit of Interstate 90, are to use a "highwall"
mining technique to excavate coal. Ramaco CEO
Randall Atkins said he hopes to create between 200
and 225 high-paying jobs — foremen, engineers, etc.
— when the mine opens in a few years.
The proposed mine encompasses approximately
15,000 acres of mostly private land acquired by
Ramaco in 2011. The proposed site also includes a
swath of land that will remain undisturbed because
it contains a historic floodplain. With environmental
considerations aside, Atkins said he aims to mine 6-8
million tons of coal per year.
"It turns out there's a whole lot of coal here,"
Atkins said, suggesting the previous land owner may
have underestimated the fossil fuel resources on the
land. "We've got almost 1.1 billion tons of coal."
The vast majority of the mine land — 90 percent —
is privately owned by Ramaco.
Ramaco's business plan's profitability hinges on
both a relatively low-cost mining technique and the
fact that the mine will not be required to pay federal
bonuses or royalties.
COURTESY GRAPHIC |
SEE MINE, PAGE 8
20
years
Negotiations
City, firefighters still can’t
agree on new contract
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Tandem
Productions
celebrating
decades of theater
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Spend 20
years doing anything you
enjoy and the time will fly
past. Just ask Richard and
Tami Davis of Tandem
Productions this month as
they celebrate two decades
of children’s theater.
“We never dreamed we’d
be doing it this long,” Tami
Davis told The Sheridan
Press on Monday.
She had codirected a production for the Civic
Theater Guild for children
21 years ago, but the following summer the group
decided to stop offering the
program for children.
“We had just gotten a
bunch of kids interested, so
we thought ‘What a
shame,’” Davis said. “So we
thought ‘We could start a
nonprofit and do that.’”
Davis said she and her
husband have always supported theater in the community, so they moved forward with creating the nonprofit Tandem Productions.
When the group first
started, approximately 20-30
kids would tryout for the
play and each got a part.
This year, Davis said, 97
kids auditioned and 68 will
participate in the production of “Annie Jr.” set to
open Wednesday night at
the WYO Theater and run
through Saturday.
“We’ve done this play
twice before,” Davis said.
“We’re having an alumni
reunion for any kids who
were ever in Tandem, so we
have some coming in from
out of town.
“We thought it would be a
fun way to celebrate and
feel old when they all come
back with their kids,” Davis
laughed.
Current and former Tandem Production participants, from left, Danielle
Burgess Law, Ava Johannesmeyer and Melissa Brackley each played or
will play the role of Miss Hannigan in productions of "Annie Jr." Law
played the role in 2004, while Johannesmeyer will play the role this year
and Brackley played the role in 1999.
SEE CONTRACTS, PAGE 2
City adopts two year
budget for first time
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Tom Sachse, SCSD2 Assistant Superintendent Terry Burgess,
FMHS teacher Mick Wiest, Sheridan College President Paul
Young, SC Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Sue
Belish and FMHS parents and students.
Some members of the committee visited charter schools in
Montana and learned best practices from Big Picture High
School in Durango, Colorado, and the San Diego Met in
California.
The district requested funding through the School
Improvement Grant for travel, study and implementation
costs.
SHERIDAN — The city of Sheridan, for the
first time, adopted a two-year budget Monday,
signaling hope for economic recovery by planning for slight increases in the general fund
budget compared to the current fiscal year.
For FY2015, which begins July 1, the city
budgetted for $11.2 million in general fund revenues, compared to the $10.7 million budgetted
for the current year. In FY2016, the general
fund budget revenues were projected at $11.3
million.
Sheridan City Clerk Scott Badley said the
city adopted a five-year plan in April, and by
adopting the two-year budget Monday, they put
the first part of that plan into place. He added
that the slight increase in the general fund
budget can be attributed to sales and use taxes,
building permit fees, gasoline tax collections
and the earlier than expected lottery proceeds.
“The economic outlook is improving and bolstered by the recent announcements that the
Decker Coal mine has rehired personnel and
the pending new RAMACO coal mine are indicators of sustained modest growth,” Badley
said in a budget message to the Sheridan City
Council.
SEE TARGET, PAGE 3
SEE BUDGET, PAGE 2
COURTESY PHOTOS |
SEE TANDEM, PAGE 8
Tami, right, and Richard Davis pause for a photo at a 2011 rehearsal of
"Alice in Wonderland" at the WYO Theater. The pair founded the children's theater nonprofit 20 years ago and will celebrate with a participant reunion Sunday.
SCSD2 to submit plan for Ft. Mackenzie restructuring
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Fort Mackenzie High School missed the
Adequate Yearly Progress target for graduation rates for the
sixth consecutive year and as a result they are now labeled a
“School in Improvement” under the requirements of No
Child Left Behind.
As such, the school is now required to submit a restructuring plan for consideration to the Wyoming State Board of
Education.
A restructuring plan committee was formed and included
FMHS Principal Sean Wells, Sheridan County School District
2 Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction
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SHERIDAN — IAFF Local 276 representative
George Neeson continues to butt heads with
the Sheridan City Council in negotiations to
establish a new contract for the firefighters
union. Neeson and the council spent nearly an
hour Monday discussing proposed contracts
and counter offers, to no avail.
The city has boiled down a nearly 20 page
contract to about a half-dozen pages, but
Neeson said the language that was cut had
been built up over many years for a reason.
“Every part that of that contract that I
haven’t erased or crossed out and red-lined out
is important to us. That’s why I bring the
whole thing,” Neeson said. “It’s not that its 40
years old, because in those 40 years we’ve dealt
with the issues that have occurred and we
added that language into that contract to deal
with issues so they don’t come up again. So it
saves all of us some time, it saves grievances
that would be based on subjective behavior. So
I believe that every word that I put in there at
this point in time is important to us.”
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Lori Jenson
of Sheridan
OPINION
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TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
CONTRACTS: No common ground found
make changes and counterproposals to
what has been laid out thus far. If something of importance from the old contract
He added that he is frustrated that the
is missing, the council asked Neeson to put
union’s proposal hasn’t been redlined or
on paper what those things are so they can
edited, but essentially thrown out so the
be addressed.
city could start from scratch.
Neeson has yet to do that, asking that the
“Your wholesale changes to the contract,
city redline his proposal instead. He did
in our opinion, are not acceptable,” Neeson offer to go through the more drastic
said. “They eliminate all the language that changes proposed by the city for next year’s
we’ve worked on getting for probably 40
negotiations.
years.”
City Council members expressed frustraThe council, though, has expressed reluc- tion with Neeson — appearing before them
tance to continue forward with a contract
in cargo shorts and a T-shirt — for his
that has been added to and modified over a seeming unwillingness to compromise.
40-year period. It has, they said, become
Councilman Robert Webster acknowlconvoluted and muddied.
edged that language had been added to the
The contract proposed by the city was
contract over the years to address issues,
amended Monday to include some concesbut noted that those items may not be relesions to the firefighters union. The city has vant anymore.
agreed to merit increases based on satisfacCouncilwoman Kristin Kelly said the
tory performance evaluations — an issue
union seemed “stuck” on the old contract
that has created tension and Wyoming
and not flexible enough to begin anew.
Supreme Court cases between the two parNeeson stood his ground, saying that the
ties in the past. But the terms of the conunion and the city were not far apart on
tract will only be good for one year, not
the old contract and could have met
“evergreen” as has been past practice. City halfway. But the city’s new contract isn’t
attorney Greg Von Krosigk said that
halfway, it’s the city’s way, he said.
change was made because current councils
Kinskey closed by saying he feels there is
cannot bind future councils, though Neeson a fair offer on the table that deserves a
disagreed.
straight up-or-down vote from union memThe city repeatedly asked Neeson to go
bership. A contract is supposed to be
through the city’s proposed contract and
approved by July 1.
FROM 1
Mixing it up
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | ALISA BRANTZ
Local DJ Brayden Drell covered his gear and played through the rain Friday night to entertain crowds at
Kendrick Park during Sheridan’s first Paint Party, an event he helped organize.
BUDGET: Approved unanimously
FROM 1
Highlights of the FY2015 budget, as outlined by Badley, are:
• the placement into general fund
reserves a minimum of $140,000 of unassigned fund balance, which is cash available from the general fund, increasing
reserves to 27 percent of general fund
expenditures.
• a projected 3 percent increase in
Optional One Cent Sales Tax and Capital
Facilities Tax funds.
• the restriction on use for personnel of
appropriated state direct distributions,
which are projected at about $1.9 million.
• that building activity is expected to
grow.
• that city employee pay increases during
the current fiscal year carried forward,
reflecting the first increase since October
2008.
The $11.2 million general fund budget is
about 29 percent of the city’s total FY2015
budget of $38.6 million. The total budget
includes the general fund, One-Cent Sales
Tax fund, Special Revenue fund, Capital
Facilities Tax fund, Water/Sewer fund,
Sanitation fund, the golf course, mosquito
fund and debt service.
The Sheridan City Council approved the
budget unanimously Monday night after a
public hearing.
In other business, the council approved
on third and final reading changes to the
city’s planned unit development codes.
Density has been a focus of discussions
in past meetings — an attempt to ensure
new developments are compatible with and
have limited impact on surrounding developments.
A portion of the revised code included
the phrase, “minimize the impact on adjacent properties by limiting building
heights, providing screening and/or other
buffers and establishing a density that is
compatible with the surrounding area.”
Councilwoman Shelleen Smith raised the
question of whether the word “density” is
the best fit there, arguing that making a
new development compatible with agricultural land around it could hinder the
process.
Mayor Dave Kinskey agreed, adding that
the phrase sets up “impossible circumstances” in the planning department. He
noted that the inevitability of infill development is that density has to go up for
costs to go down, and the city has tried
multiple affordable housing initiatives
such as the former Sheridan Housing
Action Committee but still has an affordable housing problem.
Eventually, the council voted to eliminate
the phrase completely after reassurances
that the ordinance as a whole spells out
what the city expects of PUD developers.
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
SCSD2 renews contract
with ACE program
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Since the fall
of 2007 the Volunteers of
America Northern Rockies
have partnered with Sheridan
County School District 2 to provide services to suspended students via the ACE program.
Accountability Change in
Education houses students
instead of participating in outof-school suspensions and VOA
Division Director Todd Richins
said this ensures a safe situation for the students while providing goals and structure.
Richins said the program is
divided in concentration with
40 percent of the time spent
identifying the behaviors
which landed the student in
suspension and working to
change those behaviors, 50 percent of the time focused on
substitute teacher-led academics and 10 percent spent performing acts of community
service or exercise.
In response to board requests
and expectations set by the district prior to this year’s contract renewal, the ACE directors implemented a few
changes and performed a more
thorough examination of the
effectiveness of the program.
Two staff members attended
the Boys Town training offered
recently and principals of Boys
Town will be implemented into
the elementary level ACE program. Concepts included in the
Code of the West were also
analyzed and implemented.
The program has added a
computer lab to their facilities,
has held regular meetings with
district representatives and
has experienced no staff
turnover, all areas identified as
ways to improve the effectiveness of the program.
During the SCSD2 Board of
Trustees meeting Monday
night, Richins presented figures showing the effectiveness
of the program in terms of
how many students receive
another suspension assignment to ACE following their
initial completion of the program.
ACE served 530 students in
the 2013-2014 school year
including 97 elementary students, 129 junior high students
and 304 high school students
districtwide.
Of those students, 136 repeated their enrollment in ACE —
26 elementary, 24 junior high
and 86 high school students.
Though the 530 served were a
small percentage of students
compared to the 2,996 students
who did not access ACE,
Richins said the students who
were placed there did need the
service and showed marked
improvements as a result of
completing the program.
After the presentation, the
board voted unanimously to
approve the contract renewal
at a cost of $17,915 per month
for the 2014-2015 academic year.
In other business:
• The Early Building roof
replacement has begun and it
will necessistate the closure of
the back parking lot for a construction staging site.
Materials will begin arriving
next week and tear down can
commence at that time. The
extent of the damage has yet to
be determined and will be identified as tear down continues.
• A project completion ceremony and time capsule dedication will be held for the new
Coffeen School on Aug. 9 at 3
p.m. The Grand Lodge of
Ancient Free and Accepted
Masons of Wyoming will conduct a ceremony and local dignitaries will be in attendance.
The public will be invited and
more information will be
advertised shortly.
• Director of Elementary
Education Scott Stults presented a recap of Parent Teacher
Organization and Board of
Trustees Focus Group meetings. There were many praises
and concerns shared among
the schools including praising
music programs and facility
enhancements and concerns
about capacity and technology.
• The district is applying for
$2,637,674 from the
Consolidated Grant fund to add
25.2 positions next school year.
• An updated version of the
board goals was approved and
Trustee Wayne Schatz suggested that a copy be posted for
public review throughout the
year.
• Donations from the community were accepted including
nine trees from Landon’s
Greenhouse and Nursery and
several donations made to the
Destination Imagination team.
• Mitch Craft presented an
update on the Graduation
Counts Committee meetings.
Approximately 25 committee
members are working on a
variety of aspects affecting
graduation rates in subcommittees with a common shortterm goal of identifying critical aspects within the community and identifying common
trends of students who drop
out of school.
• A revised personnel action
report and a profession and
non-exempt salary and benefits
package were approved following executive session.
• District Business Manager
Roxie Taft was recognized for
receiving a certificate from the
Association of School Business
Officials International naming
her a Certified Administrator
of School Finance and
Operations.
• SHS Activities Director Don
Julian presented the spring
activity report and noted that
following the annual Blue
Ribbon Art Symposium a statue made by Becky Blommel
will be on display in the
Governor’s Mansion for the
next year.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Churches back science standards teaching evolution
CASPER (AP) — A group of Wyoming churches
say they support science education standards that
the state Legislature rejected over concerns that students would be expected to know about global climate change and evolution.
The Wyoming Association of Churches said
recently that science should be taught openly and
not be based on any belief system and that it supports teaching students at K-12 public schools concepts in line with the Next Generation Science
Standards, the Casper Star-Tribune reported
Monday.
“It’s just a historical statement,” said the Rev.
Warren Murphy, a Cody-based Episcopalian minister
and environmental projects coordinator for the
church group that represents about 10 Protestant
denominations statewide. “None of us have any
problems with understanding evolution, and it does
not interfere with faith.”
Others in Wyoming oppose the standards for
endorsing the mainstream scientific theories of biological evolution and man-made climate change.
While a literal or fundamentalist interpretation of
the Bible suggests that the Earth is about 6,000 years
old, Murphy said, the next-generation standards say
the Earth is 4.6 billion years old.
“Science is important, peer-proven,” he said.
“Faith is something else. It shouldn’t interfere with
what science is doing.”
Schools and teachers use the standards developed
by 26 states and several national science education
groups in choosing their textbooks and lesson plans.
To date, nine states and the District of Columbia
have adopted the standards.
Wyoming education officials have been developing
a different set of standards since the Legislature
rejected the standards last winter with Gov. Matt
Mead’s approval. A statement to the Board of
Education published by the nonprofit Wyoming
Citizens Opposing the Common Core called the standards “opinionated” and asserted that they will present an atheistic worldview. The statement questioned whether the origins and nature of life are
appropriate questions to ask in a science classroom.
Letting it rip
Ryan Nelson colors the crowd
Friday night at Kendrick Park as he
fires a paint cannon at dancers
during Sheridan’s first Paint Party.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | ALISA BRANTZ
4th arrest in vandalized
grave of NH businessman
COLEBROOK, N.H. (AP) — A fourth person has been accused of taking part
in ransacking the grave of a New Hampshire businessman who died in 2004.
The cement vault of Eddie Nash was found last month cracked, the casket
opened and the remains searched. The body was left intact at the Colebrook
Village Cemetery.
The Caledonian Record reports 53-year-old David Grey, who recently moved
to Colebrook from Rhode Island, turned himself in to police on Friday and
was charged with interference with a cemetery.
“I think this will probably do it,” Colebrook Police Lt. Paul Rella said of the
arrests.
TARGET: Internships, project-based education to be implemented
One example he provided the board of what
project-based learning looks like came from a
The committee identified three main ideas to
student at the Durango school who was
implement at FMHS and presented them via a
employed at a coffee shop and completed her
restructuring plan for approval at the SCSD2
project at her place of employment.
Board of Trustees meeting Monday night.
The student identified a need for drinks marThe first part of the plan is to implement an
keted to teenagers and completed a series of
internship program at the school, including the
steps to add such drinks to the menu.
addition of personnel to oversee it, focused on
After completeing a survey of customers’
student interest and skills as measured by acainterests, analyzing profit expectations and
demic and skill assessments.
costs, developing a recipe and a price and makThe pilot program will function as a sevening presentations to the company, two drinks
week program where students earn credit for job were added to the menu and the student then folskills. Based on best practice learned at the
lowed their profit margins at the end of each
other charter schools, Burgess said, “(The
month for six months.
internship program) has made education for a
Completion of the project earned the student
lot of these kids authentic. They believe strongly five language arts standards and two mathematit has kept kids in school who were on the way
ics standards, which are the units needed to
to dropping.”
graduate.
The second area of interest to implement is
The project used by each student will be proproject-based learning.
posed by them and approved, then overseen by
Burgess said the school district has put togeth- the school.
er a pilot of what they would like to see happen
The final aspect to be implemented via the
for this program as well and intend to implerestructuring plan is to require college credit
ment it during fifth block, the final period of the before graduation.
day, with a group of seniors and two juniors.
Based on learnings from San Diego Met, the
FROM 1
A3
school will foster relationships with Sheridan
College to increase dual-enrollment courses next
year with six FMHS students for its pilot.
In addition, the college registrar will make visits to the school to teach the students about
grant and scholarship application forms and
other aspects of college to show them that a college education is a realistic opportunity for
which to strive.
One concern the committee identified with the
changes is the ability to maintain the academic
rigor present at the school while implementing
these new programs.
“We felt good about a lot of things if they
could be done with a Sheridan twist through a
pilot program and the academic rigor could stay
where it is at,” Burgess said. “They do not have
the ACT scores that we do, but their completion
rate is better.”
Last year the students at FMHS had the highest composite ACT score in the state, but a low
graduation rate.
The board voted unanimously to approve the
plan as presented and it will now be presented to
the Wyoming State Board of Education for
approval on July 1.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
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Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Maine, Red Sox:
People talk ‘funny’
S
ometimes, you just
can’t beat being a
tourist.
Susan, Ryann and I
have recently returned
from a trip to Great
Diamond Island, Maine,
and a side trip to Boston,
PUBLISHER’S firsts on both accounts.
Older brother Paul, a
NOTEBOOK
CPA and tax law
|
expert/consultant, and
Stephen Woody
his lovely spouse, Linda,
have a home on the
island, accessible by ferry only and then
via bicycles and golf carts. Life is on
“island time” and centered around the
Portland ferry schedule and where to get
the “freshest” lobster. Some notes from
that trip:
• Great Diamond Island was once the
home to Fort McKinley, an active military
base dating from 1891. It was decommissioned after WWII but you can still see air
raid bunkers and concrete coastal
artillery batteries throughout the island.
At one time, during the Spanish-American
War, it was deemed essential to defend
Casco Bay shipping and nearby Portland.
Barracks and officer’s quarters, similar to
the red-brick architecture and style of
what you see at our VA hospital, are now
private homes with a magnificent parade
ground in the center. Great Diamond has
77 full-time residents.
• Portland is a city of about 70,000 and
once a year the city hosts a three-day Old
Port Festival with a slew of activities. At
one time, downtown Portland was a tough
place with dive bars and worse. But today,
the Victorian-era buildings and bricklined streets make way for trendy restaurants, a few chic boutiques and neighborhood grocery stores which are a delight. A
good place to celebrate an older brother’s
birthday. Portland also has a minor league
baseball team, the SeaDogs, the Double-A
affiliate of the Boston Red Sox. Hadlock
Field is a cozy old ballpark that seats 7,300
just a few blocks from the water. Its team
has a flat-out cool logo.
• President George H.W. Bush celebrated
his 90th birthday while we were in Maine
by jumping from a perfectly good aircraft
with a member of the Army’s sky-diving
team.
Our 41st president has done so on his
75th, 80th and 85th birthdays as well.
Some wondered why President Bush, who
is now mostly confined to a wheelchair
and was hospitalized last year for seven
weeks for respiratory issues, would do
this. The explanation from family and
friends: his positive attitude about life,
that a good attitude leads to adventure and
joy despite age or infirmity.
Most know that president Bush survived
being shot down as a pilot in WWII in the
Pacific. Some also said he was sending a
message, too, to those WWII survivors that
he was thinking of them and to keep their
chin up. It seemed like all of Maine was
cheering for him. (What’s more: he
jumped in red socks and in L.L. Bean boat
shoes.)
• Our side trip was to Boston, primarily
to see the defending World Champions, the
Boston Rex Sox. Oh, we also saw some historical sites, too — the Old North Church,
Paul Revere’s House, Faneuil Hall — but
hey, my older bother, Susan and I caught
the Sox and Cleveland in baseball’s hallowed ground of Fenway Park, built in
1912. The fans were polite and friendly, but
they sure talked funny. The hometown
team won that night, 10-3, and Hall of
Famer Carlton Fisk threw out the first
pitch.
It was one more game sitting alongside
my older brother who taught me baseball
and encouraged me to become a lifelong
fan.
We’ve watched many games together, in
some of the best ballparks, and this one
was particularly special.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
LETTER |
Local VA caring
Re: Husband’s experience
We are privileged to have the Sheridan
VA. I am writing this on behalf of my
husband, Dale Dean, who was a patient
for 20 plus years. My concern is that all
VAs might be judged by the din and outcry blasted, heard and seen in various
press and TV.
Our VA (and it really is our VA) is one I
know extremely well. Through the years,
every appointment requested was granted, every call answered with concern and
advice, follow-up part of the process after
a hospital stay.
We were out of state when he was suddenly very ill and I called Sheridan. They
advised he be admitted to a VA in the
state but Dale insisted I take him back to
Sheridan “because he trusted them.” I
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
drove 825 miles after alerting them I was
coming. I was met at the ambulance
entrance by two nurses with wheelchairs.
In 45 minutes he had been X-rayed,
blood drawn, admitted, respiratory therapies starting IVs. That was how “our” VA
responded to a veteran in need.
Dale had countless other admissions. It
did not matter the time — be it day, midnight or wee hours of the morning. He
was always treated with concern, dignity
and respect and that treatment included
the admitting on-call doctor, X-ray personnel and lab specialists.
He had several admissions when the
construction closed down the regular
facility. It was moved to a small section of
the nursing home and that meant a transition to very cramped quarters. Yet,
somehow, under extremely difficult conditions, the wonderful nursing staff man-
aged to continue their exemplary work in
a “broom closet” space that rivaled the
VIP suite at Massachusetts General
Hospital. All without complaints from
staff or patients.
The day of Dale’s last discharge to
home primary care, I was called four different times to be sure I would be able to
care for him at home and I answered
them I would. They were always concerned not only for the veteran, but for
his caregiver too.
One week after his discharge, Dale lost
his “good fight” at home, as he wanted.
“Our” VA made all those additional years
of his life possible by their care and professionalism. They also added those same
years to our marriage of 67 years.
I will be forever grateful.
Jacqueline Deam
Banner
QUOTABLES |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“More than half of the
town is gone — absolutely
gone.”
— Stanton County
Commissioner Jerry
Weatherholt after massive
tornadoes swept through
northeast Nebraska,
destroying more than half
of the town of Pilger.
“What I can say is it was a
very tough game. Playing at
this level any little mistake
can cost you dearly. We
didn’t deserve to get the
first goal against us.”
— Ghana coach Kwesi
Appiah whose team lost 1-2
to the U.S. team in their
World Cup opener game
Monday.
I
The old days at Dow school
n the old days of rural Sheridan County,
children didn’t trek to town to attend
school. That was impossible because of
the bad roads and lack of transportation.
Instead, schools were formed where
they were needed. As a result, by 1920
Sheridan County had 47 school districts.
One of them was School District 18, established in 1891, which included the S.R,
Verona, Bell and Dow schools, all in the
Prairie Dog creek area. To some, those old
country school days bring back fond
memories.
Big Horn artist Joel Ostlind’s mother,
Lois Stockhouse Ostlind, and his uncle,
Robert Stockhouse, certainly had vivid
memories of the Dow school in the early
1930s in the depths of the Great
Depression.
Lois was the daughter of Erland and
Francis Stockhouse. Erland emigrated
from Sweden to the Sheridan area and
met a “young school marm,” Frances
Gillette, who taught him English. She also
married him.
Frances wasn’t allowed to teach in town
because at that time married women were
restricted from doing so. But they were
allowed to teach in the country, so
Frances was hired as the teacher for the
Dow school. She needed the work because
her husband, Erland, was laid off from
his job as a fireman with the CB&Q railroad. So Erland stayed at their house in
town (276 Lewis Street) and watched over
their two sons, Bob and Burton, and fed
the bears in the Sheridan Zoo while
Frances commuted to work at Dow school.
One of her first-grade students in 1932
was her 5-year-old daughter, Lois.
This was not an ordinary commute; it
was more like a continuous adventure.
Dow school was about 15 miles from town.
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
Thirteen miles of the
road was gravel and the
last two miles was just
mud and dirt. The
Stackhouses’ 1925 Buick
could only negotiate the
gravel road when it was
frozen and the mud and
dirt part not at all. So
Frances drove to the
TOM
end of the gravel and
RINGLEY
parked the car in some|
one’s farm yard and she
and Lois trudged
through the mud for the
last two miles. They carried the supplies
they would need for a week because once
they got to the school early Monday morning they stayed there until Friday evening
when the road froze and they could go
home for the weekend.
Living in the school room for a week
was a challenge. Lois recalled that: “Our
bed folded out of a bookcase (Murphy
bed) — heat was a potbellied stove.” The
kitchenette was in a closet with just a
kerosene stove — no sink.
The teaching part of the excursion was
interesting too. For starters, Lois’s mother insisted that her daughter call her
“Mrs. Stockhouse” to avoid any appearance of favoritism. And the children
learned by recitation. Robert Stockhouse,
Lois’ brother, who attended the school in
1930, remembered that: “Each grade level
would have to go to the front of the school
to recite, spell, or whatever and the other
students learned from the recitations.”
Lois and her brother shared stories of
their days at the Dow school. For
instance, some of the children rode their
horses to school and the school had a
barn and some feed for the horses. Also,
there were rattlesnakes around the school
and the boys caught them with a forked
stick and killed them. Then they decorated their belts with the trophy snakeskins.
Lois also remembered a “…family with
12 children near the school. They had no
shoes so were not going to come to school
— but mother found shoes for all of them
so they came to school. She probably
found them through the churches. They
were so poor they didn’t have a lunch box.
Mother would have the school boys go out
at recess and kill rabbits (the school had a
gun) which she fried at noon to feed them
(and probably us too).” Could this have
been one of the first school lunch programs?
At the isolated school the children were
always game for some diversion. So, it
was a welcome event in the fall when the
hornets were thick and the children were
allowed to swat them with their rulers.
As Lois wrote, “It was great to be able to
make noise.” In those days it didn’t take
much to amuse the children.
Eventually, the railroad hired Erland
back and Frances stopped teaching at
Dow school. After that, the children
attended school in Sheridan. But they
would always remember those days at
Dow school and their intrepid mother and
teacher, Frances Stockhouse.
Not sure they make them like that anymore.
(Note: Thank you to Joel Ostlind for
sharing some interesting family oral and
written history.)
TOM RINGLEY was re-elected as a county commissioner in 2012. He is the
author of four books. Ringley grew up in Sheridan and returned home in
1990 after 27 years as an Air Force officer. He has been involved with the
local hospital foundation, the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo and has been the
facilities director at the county fairgrounds.
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
Next ‘Birding at The Brinton’ to be held Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Brinton Museum, Science Kids and
the Big Horn Audubon will present the next monthly
“Birding at The Brinton” on Saturday with a special guest.
Regular instructor Dr. Jackie Canterbury will be joined
by renowned ornithologist and author Dr. Paul A.
Johnsgard for the event.
This free morning of bird watching will run from 8-10
a.m at The Brinton Museum.
All ages and abilities are welcome to join.
Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars if they
have them.
For more information see www.thebrintonmuseum.org
or contact Sarah at 763-0976 or [email protected]
The museum is located at 239 Brinton Road in Big Horn.
Drive, Chip,
Putt
qualifier Sun.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — A local
qualifier for the 2015 Drive,
Chip, Putt National
Championship will be held
Sunday at the Powder Horn
Golf Course.
Preceeding next year’s
Masters Golf Tournament,
the nationals will be held at
Augusta National Golf Club.
The qualifier is free with
the top three finishers in
eight categories advancing
to sub-regionals in Draper,
Utah.
Divisions are ages 7-9, 1011, 12-13 and 14-15.
The tournament will run
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
reservations are requested
by today.
For more information
including the rules and to
register see www.drivechipandputt.com.
The Powder Horn is located at 23 Country Club Lane.
Official: hoarder
died of accidental
asphyxia
Birdhouse building
COURTESY PHOTO |
Recently the Wyoming Association for Career and Technical Education was in Sheridan to promote
career and technical education. As part of the program young students gathered at Sheridan College
to learn how to build a birdhouse. Pictured here, Earl Smith, right, an automotive instructor from
Campbell County High School and president of the WACTE works with a student.
Edwards to celebrate 70th wedding anniversary
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Mickey and Irene
Edwards will celebrate 70 years of marriage next week.
The couple was married June 26, 1944,
in Kansas.
The couple are both retired.
They have two children, Ernest
(Glenda) Edwards of Sheridan and the
late Janice (Rich) O’Brien of Arizona.
They have six grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
A celebration will be hosted in their
honor by their children and grandchildren on Saturday.
An open house, members of the community are invited to join from 1-4 p.m.
at Cornerstone Church, located at 4351
Big Horn Ave.
Tornadoes flatten tiny rural Nebraska town; 2 dead
PILGER, Neb. (AP) — A storm packing
rare dual tornadoes tore through a tiny
farming town in northeast Nebraska,
killing two people, crumpling grain bins
like discarded soda cans and flattening
dozens of homes.
Pilger’s 350 residents evacuated their
homes after the powerful twisters
slammed the area Monday afternoon.
Nebraska State Patrol closed all roads
into town.
“More than half of the town is gone —
absolutely gone,” Stanton County
Commissioner Jerry Weatherholt said.
“The co-op is gone, the grain bins are
gone, and it looks like almost every
house in town has some damage. It’s a
complete mess.”
Larry Nelson, 73, has lived in Pilger,
about 80 miles northwest of Omaha, for
23 years. He rode out the storm in his
neighbor’s basement, emerging later to
find his home completely gone.
“I’m grateful I was over there,” Nelson
said. Another resident, Trey
Wisniewski, said first his weather radio
alerted him, then the power went out
and the tornado sirens started to sound.
The sky went black and he and his wife
took their pets into the basement.
“My wife was holding our animals and
I was holding on to my wife. We could
feel the suction try to pull us out of
there,” said Wisniewski, 43. “It wasn’t
raining. It was raining debris.”
Stanton County Sheriff Mike Unger
estimated that 50 to 75 percent of Pilger
was heavily damaged or destroyed and
the school was likely beyond repair.
The storm was part of a larger system
that tracked across the nation’s midsection Monday. More storms are forecast
for Tuesday, stretching from eastern
Montana to New York, but the system
likely won’t be as powerful as on
Monday, said Steve Corfidi, lead forecaster at the Storm Prediction Center in
Norman, Oklahoma.
The greatest risk for tornadoes will be
in the Dakotas, eastern Montana and
northeastern Wyoming. Hail is expected
west of the Mississippi River, while damaging winds could down some trees in
upstate New York, Corfidi said.
CHESHIRE, Conn. (AP) —
Medical examiners in
Connecticut say an apparent
hoarder died of accidental
and traumatic asphyxia
after a floor piled high with
debris collapsed into her
basement.
The chief medical examiner’s office released the cause
of death of 66-year-old
Beverly Mitchell on
Tuesday.
Her body was found
Saturday as crews were
using a backhoe to remove
debris from her home in
Cheshire.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Summer lecture
scheduled at
Spear-O Sunday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Northwest Community College
District will host a series of summer lectures at
their Spear-O-Wigwam Mountain Campus.
The first lecture will be held Sunday from 1-3 p.m.
Randy Stout will discuss “The Solitude Trail
Experience.”
Attendees are encouraged to come early, bring a
lunch to enjoy at a creekside picnic table and take a
tour of the campus.
Reservations are not necessary to attend the lectures, which are free and open to everyone.
For more information contact Director of
Recreation and Outdoor Education Julie Davidson at
674-6446 extension 8350 or [email protected]
Spear-o-Wigwam is located in the heart of the
Bighorn Mountains on the southeast edge of Park
Reservoir.
For detailed directions see
www.sheridan.edu/site/spearowigwam/location.
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
1. WHICH OPTIONS
OBAMA IS EXAMINING TO
DEAL WITH IRAQ
The president is sending
300 American troops to
secure U.S. assets. Airstrikes,
a special force contingent and
cooperation with Iran are
also on the table.
2. HOW FAMILIES OF THE
MALAYSIAN JET’S
PASSENGERS ARE COPING
Relatives of the 239 people
on the missing plane find no
solace in lives that have been
upended by uncertainty and
sorrow.
3. AFTER 7 WEEKS,
EXECUTIONS MAY RESUME
Three convicted killers are
scheduled to die this week,
the first since an Oklahoma
inmate died of a heart attack
following a botched lethal
injection.
4. WHY SOME FOODS MAY
BECOME LESS SALTY
The Food and Drug
Administration is preparing
to issue voluntary guidelines
asking the food industry to
lower sodium levels, FDA
Commissioner Margaret
Hamburg tells The
Associated Press.
5. GM RECALLING ANOTHER
3.4 MILLION CARS
A defective key can cause
the engine to shut off and
disable the vehicle’s power
steering. A similar problem
led to an earlier massive
recall.
6. NEBRASKA TORNADOES
KILL TWO, INJURE 19
Dual twisters touch down
within a mile of each other,
destroying more than half of
the tiny town of Pilger.
7. CALL ME BROOKLYN
The New York City borough’s moniker is now one of
the nation’s most popular
baby names. At least, for
babies who don’t live there,
or even anywhere close by.
8. CANCER STUDY
LAUNCHED AT HUNDREDS
OF US HOSPITALS
It’s akin to medical speed
dating: Doctors will sort
through multiple experimental drugs and find the one
most likely to succeed based
on each patient’s gene profile.
9. US WINS WORLD CUP
OPENER
The Americans down
Ghana 2-1 as Clint Dempsey
scores the sixth-quickest goal
ever in the tournament.
10. BASEBALL SAYS
GOODBYE TO ONE OF ITS
GREATEST HITTERS
Hall of Famer Tony
Gwynn, who compiled a
career .338 average and won
eight NL batting titles, dies of
cancer at age 54.
Paint party
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | ALISA BRANTZ
Cody Jenkins, left, and Chadron Newton feel the groove Friday night as DJs perform and paint cannons blast at Sheridan’s first
Paint party.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Artists’ reception
Thursday at library
SHERIDAN — Local artist Mark
Morel’s artwork is currently on
display in the mezzanine area of
Sheridan County Fulmer Public
Library and his show features the
art of friends Marv Roussan and
Mara Schasteen.
A public artists’ reception will
be held Thursday for Morel and
friends from 5-7 p.m.
All members of the community
are invited to attend this free
event.
For more information call 6748585 extension 29.
The library is located at 335 W.
Alger St.
Big Horn Woman’s Club
meeting Friday
SHERIDAN — The Big Horn
Woman’s Club will hold a meet-
ing on Friday.
Meeting at the BHWC clubhouse at 9:15 a.m. the day will
begin with a tour of the Wallick
Gardens followed by a picnic at
the home of Ann Custis at 11:30
a.m. The meeting is free and open
to anyone who is interested in
joining. Attendees are asked to
bring a dish to share.
For more information call
Kathy Hosford at 674-7656.
The clubhouse is located at 314
S. Second St. in Big Horn.
Artist’s reception
Saturday at Ucross
SHERIDAN — A new exhibit at
the Ucross Foundation Art
Gallery is opening Saturday and a
public reception will be held.
“John Catterall: Wyoming
Dialogues” will feature work
spanning more than 30 years of
the local artist’s career.
The reception is free and open
to everyone from 3-5 p.m.
For more information contact
the foundation at 752-0888.
Ucross is located at 30 Big Red
Lane in Clearmont.
Wilderness hike
Saturday
SHERIDAN — For the next
event in a series of outings celebrating the 50th anniversary of
the Wilderness Act of 1964 and
the 30th anniversary of the
Wyoming Wilderness Act of 1984,
the Wyoming Wilderness
Association will host a hike
Saturday.
A difficult and intense hike,
WWA staff member Jared
Oakleaf will lead a 10-mile day
hike of Sweetwater Rocks
Wilderness Study Area.
Hikers will explore the rock formations, wildlife and historic
sites in this isolated, wild and
rarely visited landscape.
For more information or to register for the hike call the WWA at
672-2751 or email [email protected]
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
• 9 a.m. to noon, girls basketball camp, Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome, Sheridan College, 3059 Coffeen Ave.,
$100 for the week.
• 10 a.m. Wyoming Wednesday, Wyoming Welcome Center, Interstate 90, Fifth Street exit.
• 12:10-12:50 p.m. Walking with Nature, ParkFit, Kendrick Park.
• 7:30 p.m. Dayton Town Council meeting, Dayton Town Hall, 608 Broadway St., Dayton.
• 7:30 p.m. “Annie Jr.,” WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St., $12 adults, $10 seniors, $9 students.
TIPPED OVER |
Baseball star
Tony Gwynn dies at 54
SAN DIEGO (AP) — There were
two certainties about Tony
Gwynn: He could hit a baseball
like few other major leaguers,
and he was going to laugh.
Gwynn was a craftsman at the
plate, whose sweet left-handed
swing made him one of baseball’s
greatest hitters.
The Hall of Famer died Monday
of oral cancer, a disease he attributed to years of chewing tobacco.
He was 54. Any knowledgeable
fan can recite Gwynn’s key stats.
He had 3,141 hits — 18th on the
all-time list — a career .338 average and won eight batting titles
to tie Honus Wagner’s NL record.
There was far more to the man.
In a rarity in pro sports,
Gwynn played his whole career
with the Padres, choosing to stay
in the city where he was a twosport college star rather than
leaving for bigger paychecks elsewhere.
He was loyal, generous and
approachable. He smiled a lot. It
didn’t take much to get him to
laugh his hearty laugh.
Gwynn loved San Diego. San
Diego loved “Mr. Padre” right
back. His death left even casual
fans grieving.
“Our city is a little darker today
without him, but immeasurably
better because of him,” Mayor
Kevin Faulconer said in a state-
ment. Five things to remember
about Gwynn:
HIS CRAFT: After spending
parts of just two seasons in the
minors, he made his big league
debut on July 19, 1982. Gwynn
had two hits that night. After
Gwynn doubled, career hits
leader Pete Rose, who been trailing the play, said to him: “Hey,
kid, what are you trying to do,
catch me in one night?”
On Monday, Rose recalled
Gwynn’s work ethic and his pioneering use of video to study his
at-bats after every game.
“Every day you went to the ballpark in San Diego and we used to
go 2:30 or 3 o’clock, Tony would
be out there hitting, religiously,
every day,” Rose said.
Send us your photos of
community happenings!
Email them to
[email protected]
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On June 17, 1789, during
the French Revolution, the
Third Estate declared itself
a national assembly, and
undertook to frame a constitution. (This gathering gave
rise to the political terms
“left wing” and “right
wing,” with deputies representing commoners sitting
to the left of the assembly
president, and nobles sitting
to the right.)
On this date:
In 1397, the Treaty of
Kalmar was signed, creating
a union between the kingdoms of Sweden, Denmark
and Norway.
In 1775, the
Revolutionary War Battle of
Bunker Hill resulted in a
costly victory for the
British, who suffered heavy
losses.
In 1928, Amelia Earhart
embarked on a transAtlantic flight from
Newfoundland to Wales
with pilots Wilmer Stultz
and Louis Gordon, becoming the first woman to make
the trip as a passenger.
In 1930, President
Herbert Hoover signed the
Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act,
which boosted U.S. tariffs to
historically high levels,
prompting foreign retaliation.
In 1944, the Republic of
Iceland was established.
In 1953, U.S. Supreme
Court Justice William O.
Douglas stayed the execution of Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg, originally set for
the next day, the couple’s
14th wedding anniversary.
(They were put to death
June 19.)
In 1961, Soviet ballet
dancer Rudolf Nureyev
defected to the West while
his troupe was in Paris.
In 1972, President
Richard M. Nixon’s eventual
downfall began with the
arrest of five burglars
inside Democratic national
headquarters in
Washington, D.C.’s
Watergate complex.
In 1987, Charles Glass, a
journalist on leave from
ABC News, was kidnapped
in Lebanon. (Glass escaped
his captors in August 1987.)
In 1992, President George
H.W. Bush and Russian
President Boris Yeltsin
signed a breakthrough
arms-reduction agreement.
In 1994, after leading
police on a slow-speed chase
on Southern California freeways, O.J. Simpson was
arrested and charged with
murder in the slayings of
his ex-wife, Nicole, and her
friend, Ronald Goldman.
(Simpson was later acquitted in a criminal trial, but
held liable in a civil trial.)
Ten years ago: A bipartisan report found that officials, blindsided by terrorists and beset by poor communications, were so slow
to react on Sept. 11, 2001,
that the last of four hijacked
planes had crashed by the
time Vice President Dick
Cheney ordered hostile aircraft shot down.
Thought for Today: “A
consensus means that everyone agrees to say collectively what no one believes individually.” — Abba Eban,
Israeli statesman (1915-2002).
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
OBITUARY |
SERVICE NOTICE |
Merle W. Judes
Making their way
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | MIKE PRUDEN
Austin Moreland, 15, guides his horse in between the poles during the pole bending competition Saturday at
the Young Riders Rodeo at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Structure fire (canceled
en route), Ladore Street,
Story, 3:43 a.m.
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 500 block
East Brundage Street, 8:23
p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Medical, 400 block
Falcon Ridge Court, 2:44
• Standby, 100 block
Ladore Avenue, 3:41 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
Airport Road, 5:31 a.m.
• Medical, 600 block South
Thurmond Street, 8:19 a.m.
• Medical, 300 block South
Main Street, 9:06 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
Fifth Street, 9:48 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 11:50 a.m.
• Trauma, Trish Drive,
12:21 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 2:59 p.m.
• Medical, 500 block East
Brundage Street, 8:22 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Monday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Noise complaint, West
Seventh Street, 4:52 a.m.
• Malicious destruction,
West Seventh Street, 5:11
a.m.
• Suicidal subject, Airport
Road, 5:16 a.m.
• Dog at large, South
Thurmond Street, 7:56 a.m.
• Warrant service, West
12th Street, 9:48 a.m.
• Reckless driver, West
Fifth Street, 9:53 a.m.
• Tree/shrub violation,
West Brundage Street, 10:13
a.m.
• Weed violation, East
Woodland Park, 10:14 a.m.
• Alarm, South Gould
Street, 11:38 a.m.
• Accident, Brundage
Street, 11:53 a.m.
• Dispute, Broadway
Street, 12:08 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstances, Smith Street, 12:16
p.m.
• Runaway, Frackleton
Street, 12:27 p.m.
• Tree/shrub violation,
Martin Avenue, 12:40 p.m.
• Citizen assist, Spaulding
Street, 2:01 p.m.
• Assist agency, Arlington
Boulevard, 2:06 p.m.
• Lost property, West 12th
Street, 2:21 p.m.
• Animal incident, North
Gould Street, 3:57 p.m.
• 911 hang up, Florence
Avenue, 4:19 p.m.
• Hit and run, Odell Court,
4:50 p.m.
• Suicidal subject, East
Burkitt Street, 5:19 p.m.
• Welfare check, North
Brooks Street, 5:33 p.m.
• Malicious mischief,
Beaver Street, 6:33 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Monday
• Welfare check, West
17th Street, 9:09 p.m.
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
45
Mostly cloudy
with a shower
Partly sunny
65
71
40
Almanac
Temperature
High/low .........................................................77/46
Normal high/low ............................................77/47
Record high .............................................94 in 1988
Record low ...............................................34 in 1966
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.77"
Normal month to date .................................... 1.30"
Year to date .................................................... 7.58"
Normal year to date ....................................... 7.33"
Clouds and sun
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Baby daughter, Kynsi Lea, of Chris and Jenna Lawler, and
sister of Jayden, passed away at Sheridan Memorial Hospital
on June 13, 2014.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
See these and past obituaries online at
www.thesheridanpress.com
National Weather for Wednesday, June 18
48
79
48
82
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
5:21 a.m.
5:22 a.m.
5:22 a.m.
8:56 p.m.
8:56 p.m.
8:57 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
none
12:14 a.m.
12:46 a.m.
10:52 a.m.
12:04 p.m.
1:14 p.m.
New
Hardin
50/70
Broadus
54/74
50
The Sun
Last
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Partly sunny
First
Parkman
45/65
Dayton
46/67
Lovell
47/66
Cody
43/60
Ranchester
45/66
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
48/67
Basin
48/68
45/65
June 27
July 5
July 12
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Gillette
45/67
Buffalo
44/64
Worland
46/67
Wright
47/68
Kaycee
45/67
Thermopolis
44/67
June 19
Clearmont
48/68
Story
42/60
Full
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Kynsi Lea
SATURDAY
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.00"
DEATH NOTICE |
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 55
Female inmate count: 6
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate total): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate total): 1
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 2
Number of releases for
the previous day: 5
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
Quarter
Pounder
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Monday
• Tawnie Marie Dobson,
35, Sheridan, bench warrant (contempt of court),
Municipal Court, arrested
by SCSO.
Billings
48/64
Periods of rain
and a t-storm
John Key McKinley
John Key McKinley, 94, died
April 13, 1923 - June 14, 2014
on June 12, 2014.
John, and his wife Helen,
Merle W. Judes, age 91 of Sauk Centre, enjoyed their homes in
died peacefully surrounded by family Darien, Connecticut and
Saturday, June 14, 2014 at CentraCare Tuscaloosa, Alabama, but
Health Nursing Home in Sauk Centre, their most cherished memories were always at the
Minnesota.
Merle W. Judes
A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Steerhead Ranch in Buffalo,
Tuesday, June 17 at Trinity Lutheran Wyoming.
A memorial service is schedChurch in Grove Lake. Rev. Jack Baumgarn will officiate with
uled for Wednesday, June 18,
interment following in Grove Lake Cemetery.
Merle William Judes was born April 13, 1923 in Raymond 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the
Township, Stearns County, Minnesota to Carl Henry and Steerhead Ranch in Buffalo,
Dorothea (Bruns) Judes. He attended St. Paul Ag School Wyoming.
The family requests for
where he was on the wrestling team with Vern Gagne. On
September 23, 1945 he married Myrtle Olson at Zion Lutheran all friends to send their
Church in Sauk Centre. The couple was married for over 68 photos and memories to
years and farmed nearly all of their married life near Padua Rememberingjohnkeymckinley
in Raymond Township. He and Myrtle enjoyed dancing @mkresources.com.
In lieu of flowers, donations
together. He retired in 2005 and had been a resident of
may
be
made
to
the
CentraCare Health Nursing Home for the past three years.
Merle was known for his registered Jersey dairy herd and M e r r y m a c - M c K i n l e y
was very active in the Jersey Cattle Club, which he served as Foundation Gift Fund at The
president for many years. He also had Belgian draft horses University of Alabama; the
and other livestock. He loved to participate in showing cattle McKinley Award Fund at Troy
at county and state fairs and various dairy shows across the University, or the Tip of The
state. He took such great joy in watching his children and Spear Foundation. For additional information, please
grandchildren show cattle also.
He was also an active member of the Farmer’s Union serv- check websites, or call Vickie
ing on the board and as president. He was a long time member Smith at 214-922-9033.
of the Stearns County Fair Board and a 4-H leader. He served
on the Lyman Prairie School Board until the school closed in
1970. He was also a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in
Grove Lake.
Survivors include his wife, Myrtle Judes of Sauk Centre;
five children, Dale (Gladys) Judes of Eagle Bend, Ken
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
(Bonnie) Judes of Gillette, Wyoming, Carol (Larry) Stuckey of
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Lancaster, Wisconsin, Daniel (Darla) Judes of Sheridan,
Wyoming, and Carl (Sandy) Judes of Meire Grove; 13 grandchildren; 26 great-grandchildren; and twin sister, Marcella
Halstead of Sherwood, Oregon.
He was preceded in death by his parents; son, Jeffrey Judes;
and brothers, Marvin and Darwin Judes.
Serving as casket bearers will be Shawn, Austin, Brian,
Greg Judes, James and Patrick Larson. Honorary bearers will
be Jennifer Peterson, Tim Larson, Sister John Paul (Angela
Judes), Crystle Miller, Ashley and Tony Judes, Mark Stuckey
and all of his great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were made with Patton-Schad Funeral &
Cremation Services of Sauk Centre, Minnesota.
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
• Abandoned vehicle,
Frackleton Street, 7:25 p.m.
• Custody dispute,
Mydland Road, 8:13 p.m.
• Welfare check, West
Seventh Street, 8:45 p.m.
• Mental subject, West
12th Street, 8:52 p.m.
• Citizen assist, North
Main Street, 11:40 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstances, North Main Street,
11:57 p.m.
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
64/48/sh
67/43/t
74/42/t
60/45/sh
53/38/sh
67/41/t
60/39/sh
49/34/sh
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
73/54/t
74/46/pc
76/47/pc
70/50/pc
66/45/s
71/49/pc
73/48/s
64/36/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
83/53/pc
82/47/pc
84/51/pc
78/50/pc
75/49/pc
81/49/pc
81/54/pc
73/40/pc
A7
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
63/36/t
72/44/t
60/40/t
65/44/sh
57/40/sh
80/45/t
68/44/t
44/30/sh
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
70/40/pc
73/49/pc
72/44/pc
75/51/pc
70/45/s
81/51/pc
69/51/pc
55/31/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
78/45/pc
83/54/pc
80/48/pc
82/50/pc
79/50/pc
87/50/pc
78/49/pc
64/33/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
TANDEM: Reunion
on Sunday at park
US stock
futures little
changed
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock
futures are little changed, as the
Federal Reserve begins its twoday meeting. A government
report out Tuesday said the pace
of new home construction eased
slightly last month.
KEEPING SCORE: Thirty
minutes before the start of regular trading, Dow Jones industrial
average futures are down 30
points to 16,671. Standard &
Poor’s 500 index futures are up
three points to 1,926, while
Nasdaq 100 futures are two points
lower at 3,770.
Investors nudged the stock market to slight gains Monday,
thanks in part to another round
of corporate deals.
HOUSING: The Commerce
Department said builders started
work at an annual rate on 1.01
million homes in May. That was
down 6.5 percent from 1.07 million in April.
FED: The central bank meets
Tuesday and Wednesday with Fed
officials widely expected to keep
a key short-term rate near zero.
Economists don’t expect the Fed
to begin increasing that rate for
another year.
The Fed will also update its economic forecasts. That could
result in the Fed trimming its
estimate of 2014 growth after the
government said last month that
the economy shrank in the first
three months of the year.
OIL: The price of crude fell 47
cents to $106.43 a barrel.
FROM 1
Tandem Productions is open to any children
between 8 and 15 years old, so some of those
original young actors could be 35 by now.
As Tandem Productions has grown, so have
other theater opportunities for youth in the
community. In 1998, Davis began helping with
theater camps at the YMCA, giving those who
maybe didn’t get a part in the annual Tandem
production a shot on stage. She now helps run
two theater camps through the YMCA that
typically fill up on the first day of registration.
In addition to theater, Davis said Tandem
productions started the Youth and Children’s
Chorales in Sheridan County. The Children’s
Chorale includes children in grade three
through five, while the youth chorale features
sixth- through eighth-graders.
Davis said it has been fun to watch the children make their way through the Tandem
program, learning confidence and making
friends. She noted that as kids moved from
the elementary schools to middle schools,
they felt more confident knowing some of
their Tandem friends would be at the new
school.
“It just wasn’t as scary for them,” Davis
said. “It’s been fun to watch them grow up
and I’m shocked we’ve been doing it this
long.”
Upcoming production
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | ALISA BRANTZ
Painted up
Spattered in paint, Jonnie Zullig dances with friends Friday night at Kendrick Park during the first Paint
Party.
For the 20th anniversary of the nonprofit
Tandem Productions, youth from the community will perform “Annie Jr.” at the
WYO Theater this Wednesday through
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. each day. Tickets can
be purchased through the theater. In addition, on Sunday, the nonprofit will hold a
reunion for any past participants. The
reunion will be at Kendrick Park from
noon to 4 p.m
MINE: Hope to begin mining north of Sheridan by 2017, creating 200-225 jobs
FROM 1
"This is 20 years' worth of mining just on the first mining plan we've done," he said. "And, as we start poking
holes and find more coal, we may expand to more areas.
This could probably go on for several decades."
The proposed new mine land is bisected by both
Interstate 90 and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe, LLC,
rail line.
Highwall mining
The technique of highwall
mining entails digging a
shelved trench into terrain
and then using a HWM
machine to excavate coal.
The machine consists of an
auger, or drill, that burrows
as far as 2,000-feet into the
hillside. An accompanying
conveyer belt then transports the coal backward
through the drilled hole to
be transported.
In this case, Atkins said
plans are to truck the coal to
a rail yard that will be situated near what is now
known as the Taylor Quarry.
HWM is considered a variation of surface mining, as
people do not physically go
underground to recover the
coal. The HWM technique is
a distinct departure from
the conventional approach
to western mining, but is
used extensively in the eastern United States.
"A lot of the type of mining done out in Wyoming is
what I call 'moon scaping',"
Atkins explained. "Some
people call it an ‘open pit’ or
‘truck and shovel,’ where
you remove all the topsoil
and keep going down.
"That works in places like
Gillette that have huge
seams. Coal seams here
aren't that thick. They're
more shallow," he said,
adding that HWM is a perfect fit for the coal seams
found near Sheridan.
The aftermath of a highwall mining operation is a
hillside with multiple holes
drilled side-by-side, creating
a "honeycomb" appearance.
Marketing
Atkins said coal from the
Northern Powder River
Basin represents a unique
economic opportunity for
Ramaco.
"In terms of thermal coal,
we felt this is probably the
strongest or one of the
strongest regions in the
country to mine," Atkins
said, explaining that coal
found near Sheridan contains a relatively high
British Thermal Unit (BTU)
ratio and lower sodium than other coal mined in the
region.
Atkins remained optimistic that the "war on coal" raging
on a national level will not have a long-term effect on profits from the new local mine.
"I think that as that is implemented, things will change
because I think it will be shaped by regulatory change,
legal change and things like that," he said. "Having said
that, the utilities we sell to will likely be in the Midwest,
and they will not be as badly impacted. Our coal fits very
well with what their burning requirements would be."
New stipulations from the Environmental Protection
Agency have dictated emissions from new coal-fired power
plants reach unprecedented low levels of carbon emissions. The constricted operability of some existing power
plants and tight regulations for new facilities has created a
cutthroat domestic market. Atkins said he's confident
Brook Mine coal will fill a niche.
"The reality is there are some coals that can be used in
the same utilities from different mines, and there are some
utilities that can only burn certain types of coal," he said,
adding that he sees the
mine's future product as
unique to that mined at
existing nearby mines,
including the Decker and
Spring Creek mines.
"It's not as much head-tohead competition as you
might suspect because even
Randall Atkins though you think of coal in
Ramaco CEO generic terms, it really has
specialized chemical properties that each coal is a little different and each utilities
boiler accepts certain types of coal and not others."
Atkins said he hopes to market two-thirds of coal mined
from the Brook Mine domestically, while the remaining
one-third would be marketed overseas using existing
North American export terminals.
"We have come up with a route to avoid the mess going
on in the Washington and Oregon area," Atkins said, indicating Ramaco has considered shipping coal to Asia via an
export terminal in Canada. Ramaco also owns a terminal
south of New Orleans.
‘This is 20 years'
worth of mining just on
the first mining
plan we've done.’
Getting started
Atkins said Ramaco is currently working with multiple
local engineering groups, to include drilling companies
and environmental consultants, to get the Brook Mine off
the ground. He’s also waiting on a finalized socioeconomic
study that would outline the potential economic impact of
the mine, which he intends to make public.
"What we hope is we'll file this summer and that process
will take a year or more than a year, and we'll start mining
in 2016," Atkins said, knocking on the wooden conference
table at Sheridan's Ramaco office on Sugarland Drive.
Atkins said the current mine plan is divided into two
phases, each encompassing its own area.
Ramaco's present goal is to have an initial Phase 1 surface mining permit application submitted by August in
hopes of having the permit issued by the end of 2015. The
Phase 2 application is expected to be submitted in the fall
of 2015 to begin mining in 2017.
"Wyoming has a reputation for trying to get things done
and move these projects forward, rather than trying to
come up with reasons not to do things," Atkins said. "We've
had the same experience and we're happy up to this point."
Atkins added that while nothing is ever "in the bag,"
Wyoming's Department of Environmental Quality and
other regulatory agencies have been accommodating to
Ramaco's development ambitions.
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
BUSINESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
B1
Climate
Corn falls to
lowest level
since
February
Shaky stats fuel
power plant debate
WASHINGTON (AP) — President
Barack Obama’s new pollution limits
for power plants have set off an avalanche of information about what the
rules will cost, how they will affect
your health and how far they will go
toward curbing climate change.
There’s just one problem: Almost
none of it is based in reality.
That’s because Obama’s proposed
rules, which aim to cut carbon dioxide
emissions from power plants 30 percent by 2030, rely on states developing
their own customized plans to meet
their targets.
Among the options are switching to
cleaner fuel sources, boosting efficiency to reduce demand for electricity
and trading pollution permits through
cap-and-trade.
At the earliest, states won’t submit
plans until mid-2016; some states could
have until 2018. So the true impact
won’t be known for years.
But that’s not stopping the White
House, environmental groups and the
energy industry from serving up speculation in heaping doses.
What we know and don’t know about
the effects of the pollution rules:
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Corn prices fell to their lowest
level in four months Monday after
the Department of Agriculture
said the majority of this year’s U.S.
harvest is in good-to-excellent condition.
Corn for July delivery fell 6
cents, or 1.3 percent, to $4.41 a
bushel, its lowest price since early
February.
The USDA said Monday that 75
percent of the United States’ corn
crop is in good or excellent condition, compared with 63 percent at
the same time a year ago. Crop
conditions have not been this good
in 20 years, according to the USDA.
Other agricultural commodities
fell. Wheat fell 5 cents, or 1 percent, to $5.81 a bushel. Soybeans
fell 4 cents, or 0.3 percent, to $14.22
a bushel.
In other commodities trading, oil
was essentially unchanged at
$106.90 a barrel. Natural gas fell 3
cents, or 0.7 percent, to $4.71 per
thousand cubic feet. Wholesale
gasoline futures rose a penny, or
0.5 percent, to $3.07 a gallon.
Heating oil rose a penny as well, or
0.3 percent, to $3 a gallon.
In metals, gold rose $1.20, or 0.1
percent, to $1,275.30 an ounce.
Silver rose 6 cents, or 0.3 percent,
to $19.72 an ounce. July copper
rose 2 cents, or 0.7 percent, to $3.05
a pound.
Platinum rose $4.10, or 0.3 percent, to $1,439.10 an ounce and palladium fell $3.25, or 0.4 percent, to
$809.35 an ounce.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
ELECTRICITY PRICES
Deep breaths
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | JUSTIN SHEELY
Hannah Maixner performs a CPR exercise on a mannequin during the “Dream Big Be a Nurse” high school
nursing camp Wednesday at the Sheridan College Wyoming Simulation Center.
Clinton: Keystone not a proxy for Canada relations
TORONTO (AP) — Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton said Monday that the proposed Keystone XL
pipeline shouldn’t be seen as a proxy for the relationship between
Canada and the United States.
Clinton gave a speech in Toronto to promote her new book
before taking questions from Frank McKenna, Canada’s former
ambassador to the U.S. McKenna said the Obama administration’s
delayed decision on whether to approve the pipeline is source of
tension and is increasingly viewed as a proxy for the relationship.
The pipeline is critical to Canada, which needs infrastructure
in place to export its growing oil sands production. Alberta has
the world’s third largest oil reserves, with 170 billion barrels of
proven reserves.
“I did not see it nor should it be a proxy for the relationship. It
is, after all, one pipeline. We already have a lot of pipelines that
cross our border,” Clinton said.
The potential 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, who
served as President Barack Obama’s top diplomat, avoided directly commenting on the merits of the pipeline.
TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline would carry more than
800,000 barrels of oil a day from Alberta and the U.S. Bakken oil
field across six U.S. states to refineries in the Texas Gulf Coast.
Republicans, the Canadian government and business and labor
groups have long urged the Obama administration to approve the
pipeline as a source of much-needed jobs and a step toward North
American energy independence. Environmental groups have been
pressuring Obama to reject the pipeline, saying it would carry
“dirty oil” that contributes to global warming. They also worry
about a spill.
Clinton said the pipeline has become a “proxy for everything”
including climate change.
“However this Keystone decision is finally made, some people
are going to be very happy, relieved and think it was the right
decision and some people are going to be distraught and even
angry and upset, thinking it was a terrible decision so I don’t
think we should put our relationship on the backs of this decision,” she said.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper was “profoundly disappointed” that Obama delayed a decision on the pipeline, and
has spoken of the need to diversify Canada’s oil exports. Ninetyseven percent of Canadian oil exports now go to the U.S.
Harper is expected to soon announce approval of a proposed
pipeline to the Pacific Coast that would allow Canada’s oil to be
shipped to Asia. Harper has staunchly expressed support for
Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline to the British
Columbia after the U.S. delayed the Keystone decision.
McKenna also told Clinton that Canada is tripling the amount of
oil that’s transported by rail because of a lack of pipelines.
Clinton said she believes the State Department is considering this
and noted the danger of it.
Oil companies have increasingly turned to rail to transport oil
but there are safety concerns.
The Obama administration says: The
proposal will shrink electricity bills
about 8 percent.
Opponents of the new rules say:
“Americans can expect to pay $200
more each year for their electricity.”
—Institute for Energy Research, a
group backed by the Koch brothers.
The reality: It depends how you
crunch the numbers. The administration acknowledges that the price per
kilowatt hour will go up a few percentage points. But the administration
says your total power bill will be lower
because the plan incentivizes efficiency and will drive down demand. In
other words, you’ll pay more for the
electricity you buy, but you’ll buy less
of it.
THE ENVIRONMENT
Environmentalists say: “This is the
biggest step we’ve ever taken for the
biggest challenge we’ve ever faced.” —
League of Conservation Voters
The coal industry says: “The proposal will have practically no effect on
global climate change.” —American
Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity
The reality: The plan would prevent
about 430 million tons of carbon from
reaching the atmosphere. It’s a 30 percent cut over the next 15 years, but
that’s compared with 2005 levels. Since
2005, power plans have cut those emissions nearly 13 percent, so they’re
already about halfway toward the goal.
But U.S. fossil-fueled plants account
for only 6 percent of global carbon
emissions, and Obama’s plan doesn’t
touch the rest of the world’s emissions.
It won’t cut as big a chunk as
Obama’s previous fuel economy rules
for cars and trucks.
B2
SPORTS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Special
Olympics
Locals head east to
compete in USA Games
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN—The torch is ablaze, and
more than 3,500 athletes are in Newark,
New Jersey, to compete in the Special
Olympics 2014 USA Games.
Three of those 3,500 are Sheridan residents.
Tahia Grosch, Khyra Maes and Ronald
Roberts are joining the 19 other athletes,
12 coaches, eight Unified Sports partners,
three Special Olympics Wyoming staff
members, and four from the Youth
Activation Committee as they represent
the state of Wyoming in the games.
Grosch, 39, is representing Team
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
Wyoming and competing in bowling.
Grosch, who works at Tongue River
Elementary School, was able to attend the
preliminary competition leading up to the
World Games in Greece in 2011.
When asked what her favorite part of
the Special Olympics is, she said,
“Everything.”
Maes is in Newark this week competing
in athletics, participating in the 200-meter
run and the running long jump.
“Special Olympics and National Games
are very important to me because it will
be a good challenge to work hard,” Maes
said. “It is also a once in a lifetime experience.”
Roberts, 36, has lived in his Sheridan his
whole life and says he knows it “like the
back of his hand.” He is competing in the
50-meter walk and the 100-meter walk.
Joining the 12-person coaching team is
another Sheridan resident, Tanna Cotton.
Cotton, who is the coordinator for the
Sheridan schools program, is in New
Jersey coaching track and field. She has
been training Wyoming athletes for the
Special Olympics Summer Games, Fall
Tournament and Winter Games for more
than a dozen years. All four of these
Sheridan residents were involved in a
lengthy selection process before being
selected to make the trip to Newark.
SEE OLYMPICS, PAGE B8
Allen,
Mavrakis win
PH MemberMember
BY STEPHEN WOODY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The team of
Bob Allen and Paul
Mavrakis posted a team
gross score of 224 to win the
annual Member-Member
Golf Championship at The
Powder Horn last weekend.
Their two-day total bested
the team of Joe Wright and
Brian Laman by one shot
(225).
The tournament format
was a best ball for the first
day and a combined gross
and net individual handicapped total for the second
round.
Wright and Laman were
declared the overall net winners of the tournament with
a 204 net total.
The team of Aaron Nash
and Anthony Spiegelberg
finished third (228), Gary
Berman and Bob Cross were
fourth at 232, and the team
of Mike Fry and John
Lannan were at 237.
Second flight gross winners were the team of Tyler
Johnson and Ryan Little at
243. Dave Engels and Rex
Arney were second at 246.
The team of Gary
Stevenson and Bud Johnson
won the net division of the
second flight with a 212
score, ahead of Bob
Eberhart and Bill Gatley at
221.
The team of Matt Ehlers
and Bill Suranyi won the
third flight competition
with a gross score of 258,
ahead of Frank Rotellini
and Jim Benepe’s 271.
Bill DeLapp and Dan
Sanders won the net title
with a score of 221, one shot
ahead of Bill Rohrbaugh
and Ed Hawkinson.
Rockies
Gordon has 4 hits
in Dodgers’ 6-1
win over Rockies
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Dee Gordon lined a pitch
from Tyler Matzek into the
corner in left field that got
past Charlie Blackmon, and
then it was off to the races.
Gordon circled the bases
on the play for the Los
Angeles Dodgers’ first run,
and they went on to beat
Colorado 6-1 on Monday
night with a 15-hit barrage
and snapped the Rockies’
season-beat five-game winning streak.
SEE ROCKIES, PAGE B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | MIKE PRUDEN
Young riders
Stetson Tillery, 2, pets a goat before the goat tying event Saturday at the Young Riders Rodeo at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
Gross score of
58 tops charity
scramble
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN—The team of Joe Mallo, Greg
Legerski, Aaron Linden and Jay Callentine took
home first place with a gross score of 58 at the
MDA-ERA Carroll Realty Charity Scramble
Fundraiser for Muscular Dystrophy over the weekend at Kendrick Golf Course.
Cory Hamstreet, Brian Bloom, Curt Macha and
Doug Estes were the overall net winners, coming in
with a 53 net total.
Tom Gilgorea, Jennifer Roe, Steve Carroll and
Bob Eberhart finished second with a 54.9 net total.
Two teams tied for third place with a net total of
55. Tom Belus, Phillip Huckins, Paul Fall and Rick
Wallach made up one foursome, while Steve
Kennedy, Jay Hardesty, Mike Hardesty and Rich
Behlow filled out the other.
Fall carded the only hole-in-one of the tournament, sinking his tee shot with his 7-iron on the
184-yard 12th hole.
Dempsey, Brooks give US 2-1 win over Ghana
NATAL, Brazil (AP) — After Clint
Dempsey’s historic early goal, the United
States spent more than an hour struggling to
hold off wave after wave of Ghana attacks. It
was no surprise when Ghana tied the game in
the 82nd minute.
Once again, the Black Stars — who had eliminated the Americans at the past two World
Cups — were poised to ruin the tournament
for the U.S.
With two starters out with injuries, the U.S.
barely threatened in the second half until a
corner kick in the 86th minute. Graham Zusi
lifted the ball into the penalty area, where fellow substitute John Brooks rose above the
defense and headed in the game winner, putting the U.S. atop the group with Germany.
“I couldn’t believe it. ...I just ran in the box
and hoped that the ball would hit my head and
it did,” said Brooks, a 6-foot-4 defender who is
brought forward for set pieces.
The loss put Ghana at the bottom of Group
G with Portugal — the Americans’ next opponent. The top two teams in the group advance.
At the final whistle, coach Jurgen
Klinsmann, the German hired to transform
the U.S. from mere World Cup participant into
a potential power, threw his arms to the sky
and roared.
“The U.S. team always has great spirit,”
Klinsmann said. “I said it to the bench minutes before we’re going to get some chances
still. So we are still in the game after the
equalizer, we just need to kind of push and
push and grind it out. That’s what they did.
Here comes a set piece we trained over and
over and over that stuff. And (Brooks) puts it
in, so well deserved.”
‘Playing at this level any little mistake
can cost you dearly. We didn’t deserve to get
the first goal against us.’
Kwesi Appiah
Ghana coach
The U.S. lost striker Jozy Altidore to an
apparent left hamstring injury in the 21st
minute and his status for the rest of the tournament wasn’t immediately known. Dempsey
had his nose bloodied with a knee to the face.
“I was coughing up blood a little bit.
Hopefully I’ll be able to breathe through my
nose again before the next game,” Dempsey
said.
Dempsey’s goal made him the first U.S. player to score in three different World Cups and
ranks as the fifth-quickest goal in World Cup
history.
Both U.S. goals were surprising. Dempsey’s
showed the kind of technical flair seldom seen
from a squad that typically scores through set
pieces. Brooks’ game winner rescued the
Americans just when the U.S. likely would
have been happy to escape with at least a
draw.
DaMarcus Beasley, who became the first
American to play in four World Cups, started
the buildup to Dempsey’s goal with a pass to
Jermaine Jones, who fed it to Dempsey inside
the penalty area.
With a nifty move to split defenders John
Boye and Sulley Muntari, Dempsey sent the
left-footed shot past goalkeeper Adam
Kwarasey, where the ball bounced off the post
and in.
SEE SOCCER, PAGE B8
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
BASEBALL |
American League
The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Toronto
41
30
New York
35
33
Baltimore
35
34
Boston
32
38
Tampa Bay
28
43
Central Division
W
L
Detroit
36
30
Kansas City
37
32
Cleveland
36
35
Chicago
33
37
Minnesota
32
36
West Division
W
L
Oakland
42
28
Los Angeles 37
32
36
34
Seattle
Texas
35
35
Houston
32
39
Pct
.577
.515
.507
.457
.394
GB
—
4½
5
8½
13
Pct
.545
.536
.507
.471
.471
GB
—
½
2½
5
5
Pct
.600
.536
.514
.500
.451
GB
—
4½
6
7
10½
Monday’s Games
Cleveland 4, L.A. Angels 3
Kansas City 11, Detroit 8
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4
Boston 1, Minnesota 0
Texas 14, Oakland 8
Seattle 5, San Diego 1
Tuesday’s Games
San Diego at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 8:10
p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Kansas City (Guthrie 3-6) at Detroit (Smyly
3-5), 1:08 p.m.
Baltimore (Gausman 2-1) at Tampa Bay
(Cobb 2-4), 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 6-5) at Boston (Lackey
8-4), 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Hudson 7-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Sale 5-1), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 2-2) at Oakland (Gray 63), 3:35 p.m.
Houston (Feldman 3-4) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 7-6) at Cleveland
(Masterson 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 10-3) at N.Y. Yankees
(Whitley 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2) at San Diego
(Cashner 2-6), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 6:40 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
National League
The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Atlanta
36
33
Washington
35
33
Miami
35
34
New York
31
39
Philadelphia
30
38
Central Division
W
L
Milwaukee
42
29
St. Louis
38
32
Pittsburgh
34
35
Cincinnati
33
35
Chicago
29
39
West Division
W
L
San Francisco 43
27
34
Los Angeles 38
Colorado
34
36
San Diego
29
41
Arizona
30
43
Pct
.522
.515
.507
.443
.441
GB
—
½
1
5½
5½
Pct
.592
.543
.493
.485
.426
GB
—
3½
7
7½
11½
Pct
.614
.528
.486
.414
.411
GB
—
6
9
14
14½
Monday’s Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 4, 13 innings
Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 1, 13 innings
St. Louis 6, N.Y. Mets 2
Milwaukee 9, Arizona 3
L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 1
Seattle 5, San Diego 1
Tuesday’s Games
San Diego at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 8:10
p.m.
N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 2-5) at Atlanta
(Harang 5-5), 12:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 2-1) at Miami
(Eovaldi 4-2), 12:40 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Colon 6-5) at St. Louis (Lynn 74), 1:45 p.m.
San Francisco (Hudson 7-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Sale 5-1), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Simon 9-3) at Pittsburgh
(Volquez 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Feldman 3-4) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Garza 4-4) at Arizona
(C.Anderson 5-1), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-5) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 6-2), 10:10 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2) at San Diego
(Cashner 2-6), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Arizona, 3:40 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 6:40 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS |
Monday’s Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S
OFFICE
—
Suspended Boston LHP Miguel Pena
(Portland-EL) 100 games a third positive
test for a drug of abuse in violation of the
Minor League Drug Prevention and
Treatment Program.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned LHP
T.J. House to Columbus (IL). Recalled RHP
Mark Lowe from Columbus.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Released OF
Jason Kubel.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned INF
Andy Parrino to Sacramento (PCL).
Reinstated INF Alberto Callaspo from
paternity leave. Assigned RHP Marcus
Walden outright to Midland (TL). Agreed to
terms with 3B Matt Chapman on a minor
league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS — Promoted Jim
Cochrane to senior vice president, partnerships and client services.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS — Designated LHP
Randy Wolf and RHP Kevin Slowey for
assignment. Placed OF Christian Yelich on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday.
Optioned INF Donovan Solano to New
Orleans (PCL). Transferred C Jarrod
Saltalamacchia to the 15-day DL and sent
him to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. Selected the contract of LHP Andrew
Heaney from New Orleans. Recalled RHP
Anthony DeSclafani, OF Jake Marisnick
and 1B Justin Bour from New Orleans.
Agreed to terms with RHPs Tyler Kolek,
Nick White, Connor Overton, Steven
Farnworth, Justin Hepner, Nick Williams,
Kyle Fischer and Gregory Greve; LHPs
Christian MacDonald, Kyle Porter, Michael
Mader, Alan Scott and James Buckelew;
Cs Blake Anderson and Brad Haynal; SS
Justin Twine; 2B Ryan Cranmer; and 1B
Austen Smith on minor league contracts.
NEW YORK METS — Optioned OF
Andrew Brown to Las Vegas (PCL).
Reinstated OF Eric Young Jr. from the 15day DL.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed OF
Tony Gwynn Jr. on the bereavement list.
Recalled OF Aaron Altherr from Reading
(EL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned
RHP George Kontos to Fresno (PCL).
Reinstated RHP Santiago Casilla from the
15-day DL. Agreed to terms with OF Daniel
Carbonell on a four-year contract.
Texas League
FRISCO ROUGHRIDERS — Entered into
a definitive agreement to sell the team to
Chuck Greenberg and Scott Sonju.
American Association
AMARILLO SOX — Signed RHP Andrew
Brooks.
Frontier League
Friday, June 13
At Natal, Brazil
Mexico 1, Cameroon 0
Tuesday, June 17
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Brazil vs. Mexico, 3 p.m.
Wednesday, June 18
At Manaus, Brazil
Croatia vs. Cameroon, 6 p.m.
Monday, June 23
At Brasilia, Brazil
Brazil vs. Cameroon, 4 p.m.
At Recife, Brazil
Croatia vs. Mexico, 4 p.m.
GROUP B
W
L
T
Netherlands
1
0
0
Chile
1
0
0
Australia
0
1
0
Spain
0
1
0
Friday, June 13
At Salvador, Brazil
Netherlands 5, Spain 1
At Cuiaba, Brazil
Chile 3, Australia 1
Wednesday, June 18
At Rio de Janeiro
Spain vs. Chile, 3 p.m.
At Porto Alegre, Brazil
Netherlands vs. Australia, Noon
Monday, June 23
At Curitiba, Brazil
Spain vs. Australia, Noon
At Sao Paulo
Netherlands vs. Chile, Noon
GROUP C
W
L
T
Colombia
1
0
0
GF
5
3
1
1
GF
3
At Manaus, Brazil
Italy 2, England 1
Thursday, June 19
At Sao Paulo
Uruguay vs. England, 3 p.m.
Friday, June 20
At Recife, Brazil
Costa Rica vs. Italy, Noon
Tuesday, June 24
At Natal, Brazil
Uruguay vs. Italy, Noon
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Costa Rica vs. England, Noon
GROUP E
W
L
T
France
1
0
0
Switzerland
1
0
0
Ecuador
0
1
0
Honduras
0
1
0
Sunday, June 15
At Brasilia, Brazil
Switzerland 2, Ecuador 1
At Porto Alegre, Brazil
France 3, Honduras 0
Friday, June 20
At Salvador, Brazil
Switzerland vs. France, 3 p.m.
At Curitiba, Brazil
Ecuador vs. Honduras, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, June 25
At Manaus, Brazil
Switzerland vs. Honduras, 4 p.m.
At Rio de Janeiro
Ecuador vs. France, 4 p.m.
GROUP F
W
L
T
Argentina
1
0
0
Iran
0
0
1
GF
3
2
1
0
GF
2
0
At Natal, Brazil
United States 2, Ghana 1
Saturday, June 21
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Germany vs. Ghana, 3 p.m.
Sunday, June 22
At Manaus, Brazil
Portugal vs. United States, 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 26
At Recife, Brazil
Germany vs. United States, Noon
At Brasilia, Brazil
Portugal vs. Ghana, Noon
GROUP H
W
L
T
Algeria
0
0
0
Belgium
0
0
0
Russia
0
0
0
South Korea
0
0
0
Tuesday, June 17
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Belgium vs. Algeria, Noon
At Cuiaba, Brazil
Russia vs. South Korea, 6 p.m.
Sunday, June 22
At Rio de Janeiro
Belgium vs. Russia, Noon
At Porto Alegre, Brazil
Algeria vs. South Korea, 3 p.m.
Thursday, June 26
At Sao Paulo
Belgium vs. South Korea, 4 p.m.
At Curitiba, Brazil
Algeria vs. Russia, 4 p.m.
SECOND ROUND
Saturday, June 28
Game 49
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
GF
0
0
0
0
Group F winner vs. Group E second place,
Noon
Game 56
At Salvador, Brazil
Group H winner vs. Group G second place,
5 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Friday, July 4
Game 57
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Game 49 winner vs. Game 50 winner, 4
p.m.
Game 58
At Rio de Janeiro
Game 53 winner vs. Game 54 winner,
Noon
Saturday, July 5
Game 59
At Salvador, Brazil
Game 51 winner vs. Game 52 winner, 5
p.m.
Game 60
At Brasilia, Brazil
Game 55 winner vs. Game 56 winner,
Noon
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday, July 8
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Game 57 winner vs. Game 58 winner, 4
p.m.
Wednesday, July 9
At Sao Paulo
Game 59 winner vs. Game 60 winner, 4
p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday, July 12
At Brasilia, Brazil
Semifinal losers, 4 p.m.
Blacktop champions
COURTESY PHOTO |
The Big Horn Rams, from left, coach Kevin Bates, Winfield Loomis, Will Huckeba, Robert Morton, Carson Bates and Sam Gregory celebrate their championship at the sixth-grade
Battle of the Blacktop three-on-three basketball tournament last weekend in Buffalo.
EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Released INF
Stephen Rodgers.
NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed INF
Michael Small.
RIVER CITY RASCALS — Sold the contract of INF Matt Reida to the Tampa Bay
Rays.
WASHINGTON WILD THINGS
—
Released 2B Nick Ratajczak.
BASKETBALL
Women’s National Basketball Association
SEATTLE STORM — Promoted Shannon
Burley to senior vice president, marketing
and business operations. Named Nate
Silverman vice president, marketing partnerships.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released
TE Kyle Auffray.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed OT Jay
Bromley and LB Terrell Manning.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released DE
Kenneth Boatright and QB Keith Price.
Signed RB Demitrius Bronson and DT
Kevin Williams.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Released
PK Brett Maher, OL Chris Kowalczuk, RB
Errol Brooks, DL Kenny Tate and WR C.J.
Tarver.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Signed
associate coach Craig Hartsburg, goaltending coach Ian Clark and development
coach Chris Clark to multi-year contract
extensions. Signed assistant coach Brad
Larsen to a multi-year contract. Named
Jared Bednar coach of Springfield (AHL).
EDMONTON OILERS — Agreed to terms
with F Iiro Pakarinen on a two-year, entrylevel contract.
NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Renewed its
affiliation with Cincinnati (ECHL).
WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Promoted
Ross Mahoney to assistant general manager.
COLLEGE
CASTLETON — Named Nicole Kondziela
women’s volleyball coach.
NOTRE DAME — Suspended RB/WR Will
Mahone indefinitely from the football team.
OKLAHOMA STATE — Announced men’s
basketball G G Anthony Hickey is transferring from LSU and has been granted eligibility by the NCAA for the upcoming season.
SAN JOSE STATE — Named Dan
Muscatell women’s assistant basketball
coach.
SOCCER |
World Cup Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
GROUP A
W
L
Brazil
1
0
Mexico
1
0
Cameroon
0
1
Croatia
0
1
Thursday, June 12
At Sao Paulo
Brazil 3, Croatia 1
T
0
0
0
0
GF
3
1
0
1
Ivory Coast
1
0
0
2
Japan
0
1
0
1
Greece
0
1
0
0
Saturday, June 14
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Colombia 3, Greece 0
At Recife, Brazil
Ivory Coast 2, Japan 1
Thursday, June 19
At Brasilia, BrazilColombia vs. Ivory Coast,
Noon
At Natal, Brazil
Greece vs. Japan, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, June 24
At Cuiaba, Brazil
Colombia vs. Japan, 4 p.m.
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Greece vs. Ivory Coast, 4 p.m.
GROUP D
W
L
T
GF
Costa Rica
1
0
0
3
Italy
1
0
0
2
England
0
1
0
1
Uruguay
0
1
0
1
Saturday, June 14
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Costa Rica 3, Uruguay 1
Nigeria
0
0
1
0
Bosnia
0
1
0
1
Sunday, June 15
At Rio de Janeiro
Argentina 2, Bosnia-Herzegovina 1
Monday, June 16
At Curitiba, Brazil
Iran 0, Nigeria 0
Saturday, June 21
At Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Argentina vs. Iran, Noon
At Cuiaba, Brazil
Bosnia-Herzegovina vs. Nigeria, Noon
Wednesday, June 25
At Porto Alegre, Brazil
Argentina vs. Nigeria, Noon
At Salvador, Brazil
Bosnia-Herzegovina vs. Iran, Noon
GROUP G
W
L
T
GF
Germany
1
0
0
4
United States
1
0
0
2
Ghana
0
1
0
1
Portugal
0
1
0
0
Monday, June 16
At Salvador, Brazil
Germany 4, Portugal 0
Group A winner vs. Group B second place,
Noon
Game 50
At Rio de Janeiro
Group C winner vs. Group D second place,
4 p.m.
Sunday, June 29
Game 51
At Fortaleza, Brazil
Group B winner vs. Group A second place,
Noon
Game 52
At Recife, Brazil
Group D winner vs. Group C second place,
4 p.m.
Monday, June 30
Game 53
At Brasilia, Brazil
Group E winner vs. Group F second place,
Noon
Game 54
At Porto Alegre, Brazil
Group G winner vs. Group H second place,
4 p.m.
Tuesday, July 1
Game 55
At Sao Paulo
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday, July 13
At Rio de Janeiro
Semifinal winners, 3 p.m.
NASCAR |
NASCAR Nationwide Money Leaders
The Associated Press
Through June 14
1. Kyle Busch,
$507,150
2. Regan Smith,
$462,998
3. Chase Elliott,
$457,653
4. Kyle Larson,
$456,814
5. Elliott Sadler,
$425,449
6. Trevor Bayne,
$398,198
7. Brian Scott,
$360,898
8. Ty Dillon,
$360,278
9. Brendan Gaughan, $332,728
10. Dylan Kwasniewski, $330,143
11. James Buescher, $327,043
12. Ryan Sieg,
$321,618
13. Ryan Reed,
$321,543
14. Landon Cassill,
$320,351
15. Mike Bliss,
$315,978
16. Dakoda Armstrong, $315,098
17. Jeffrey Earnhardt, $309,898
Carter coming back after 2 years on IR
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — As an
85,000-square-foot indoor practice
facility rises in the background of
the Denver Broncos’ training complex, fourth-year safety Quinton
Carter not so quietly goes about resurrecting his NFL career.
The two projects are intertwined.
Carter missed most of the last two
seasons after getting hurt inside the
team’s rented practice bubble during
a rainstorm two summers ago, blowing out a hamstring and a knee while
avoiding a soccer goal after defending a deep pass from Peyton
Manning to Eric Decker.
After starting 10 games as a rookie
in 2011 and intercepting Ben
Roethlisberger and Tom Brady in the
playoffs, Carter needed microfracture surgery following his injury
inside the practice bubble, which
doesn’t have regulation size fields
like the new facilities will.
The Broncos thought so much of
him that they kept him around on
injured reserve for a second straight
season last year rather than releasing him, and that trust is paying off
this offseason as Carter has returned
to form, providing depth for an
already superb secondary.
Carter has been getting
snaps at strong safety
with the first-string nickel defense, and with free
agent acquisition T.J.
Carter
Ward limited by a tight
hamstring the last two
weeks, Carter has seen plenty of
action in the base defense, as well.
“Quinton, having him back in the
rotation, letting him get snaps and
watching the way he is — instinctive
and makes plays, plays with confidence — it’ll be a great addition to
have him back at full strength,”
defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio
said.
The Broncos have several defensive
players returning from injuries that
sidelined them for the Super Bowl,
including safety Rahim Moore, who
cried when he put on a uniform this
spring and returned to practice for
the first time since November.
For Carter, it was doubly emotional.
“I’ve been out for two years,” he
said Monday as the Broncos began
their final week of offseason prac-
tices. “Man, it seems like an eternity
since I’ve played. So, I mean, I’m
ecstatic to be out here. I sit out here
and just take it all in.”
Carter is cutting sharply and running smoothly, showing no signs of
the injury.
Doubt, he said, was a constant companion during his time away from
the football field, especially when he
went home at night, away from the
meeting room and the training table.
“I mean, I was thinking, ‘Aw, geez’
every day because it’s easy to be forgotten in this league,” Carter said.
Among the veterans who lifted his
spirits was Hall of Famer Rod
Woodson, who was a guest coaching
instructor during the Broncos’ minicamp.
He approached Carter and “just
said, ‘Don’t get discouraged. You’ll
get back to exactly where you want
to be,’” Carter said. “He said he
played 14 years after his surgery. So,
that was really helpful.”
Also assuaging his fear was the
knowledge that the Broncos hadn’t
given up on him.
“It means the world, especially in
this business,” Carter said.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
In "The Nut Job," a badmannered squirrel named
Surly (he's very surly) plans a
heist of a nut store run by
gangsters. When chaos
ensues, it takes a brush with
death for the overeager cartoon character to learn that
nuts are all about goodness -to be shared with others.
That's a lesson everyone
could benefit from, because
nuts can help you stay
healthy inside and out. And
you don't have to worry about
their fat content (good fats!)
or calorie count (just stick
with a small handful a day).
Here's the top three -- and
what one serving a day can
do for you.
Walnuts (as well as
almonds) are a seed. They're
rich in gamma tocopherol,
are the only nut with an
appreciable amount of
omega-3, and have 2.5 grams
of alpha-linolenic acid per
ounce, which may promote
heart and prostate health.
Some animal studies indicate
that eating walnuts may slow
the growth of cancer cells.
Others have found that it can
protect blood vessel walls
from damage.
Pistachios are a fruit!
Eating them daily seems to
help lower LDL cholesterol
levels, improve blood sugar
control, reduce blood pressure and lower the risk of
lung and other cancers.
Almonds can help people
with Type 2 diabetes and
metabolic syndrome avoid
complications. And they act
as a pre-biotic, helping
healthful gut bacteria thrive.
That's good for your immune
system.
Rule of thumb? Don't go too
nuts -- 14 shelled walnut
halves, 49 shelled pistachios
or 24 shelled almonds equal
one serving; just what you
want daily.
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, tune into "The Dr.
Oz Show" or visit www.sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: May I sit in
your chair and give some
advice today? It's aimed at
men who place ads on dating
sites and then wonder why
they can't meet "quality"
women.
I'm an educated, decentlooking, middle-aged widow
who has dated quite a lot
through such ads and local
social groups. Yes, it can be a
jungle out there, but the
Internet is a wonderful tool
for bringing people together.
I live in a small town, and
the pool of eligible men is
smaller here than in metropolitan areas. That said,
there are few profiles that
attract my attention and that
of my divorced/widowed
friends.
Gentlemen, some pointers:
1. Smile! A dour expression
is unpleasant.
2. We may want to see you
with your shirt off after we
get to know you, but it's not
the most appealing or refined
pose for a first look.
3. Be realistic. If you are
Joe Average, we Jane
Averages would enjoy meeting you. Are you REALLY
going to hold out for a model
who is a decade or so
younger than you?
4. Be kind to the English
language. You don't have to
be a genius, but it would be
nice to know you can competently communicate in writing.
5. Consider a shave. Some
women like men with facial
hair; the majority of the ones
I know do not. About 75 percent of men over 50 have a
mustache, beard or both.
What are you hiding under
there?
6. If you're married and
miserable, for goodness sake,
go for marriage counseling
or get a divorce. But please
don't deceive women who
want to meet a nice guy to
share life with.
In case you think I'm being
too harsh, we gals welcome
any suggestions from men
who scroll through those
female profiles looking for
love. -- SURFING IN PETERSBURG, ILL.
DEAR SURFING: I'm printing your letter, and I'm sure
the reaction will be interesting. The No. 1 complaint I've
heard about Internet dating
has to do with misrepresentation on both sides of the
gender divide.
DEAR ABBY: My 83-yearold mother wants a tattoo!
She loves classical music and
has decided to have a musical note tattooed on her
shoulder. Should I institutionalize her, or chauffeur
her to the local tattoo parlor?
-- SHOCKED IN GARDEN
GROVE, CALIF.
DEAR SHOCKED: At 83,
your mother is old enough to
make this decision without
your blessing. She also
appears to be young enough
at heart that she may not
need the ride.
DEAR ABBY: I am being
divorced and my oldest son is
being married. My soon-tobe-ex-wife does not want my
girlfriend to attend. This has
put a great deal of pressure
on my son and his fiancee.
I left my wife for this
woman. I love her and would
like her to attend with me.
What is proper? -- DANNY IN
DELAWARE
DEAR DANNY: Because
your divorce is not yet final,
leave your girlfriend at home.
Her absence would be the
most thoughtful and considerate gift you could give your
son, his bride and your
almost-former wife.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
To receive a collection of
Abby's most memorable -and most frequently requested -- poems and essays, send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby -- Keepers
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447.
Shipping and handling are
included in the price.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
AKC GERMAN
Shorthaired
Pointer
puppies. Avail 6/23 2
males/2 females $650
Call Kurt 307-752-3693
Wanted to Buy
RADIO TUBES, Ham
& Antique Radio Tube
HiFi 503-999-2157
For Lease
40X60 SHOP
A finished 20x30 ofc.
Great location.
Includes yard space.
307-673-5555
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
1 BR, heat/elec., on-site
lndry, NO pets. Lease
req. $700/mo.
673-8200.
1BR/STUDIO $545
Coin laundry & cable.
Utils. incl. Pets?
673-4506
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
SHERIDAN APARTMENTS
Taking Applications
for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments. Coin-op
laundry facility & play area.
Rental assistance depending
on availability and eligibility
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
307-672-0854
TDD#711
1917 N. Main Street
Sheridan, WY
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
NICE CLEAN 2 BR,
quiet neighborhood,
ldry. hks., sm storage
unit. $650/mo + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease.
751-2445.
1
BR,
newly
remodeled,
laundry
facilities,
A/C,
$600/mo., util. incl. No
smoking. 751-5815.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2 BDRM, 1 bath. W/S/G
& Lawn care & snow
removal incl. No smk.
Pets? $1000+ elec. &
gas. Dep. & lease
required. 307-461-2151
SHERIDAN SQUARE
APARTMENTS
200 Smith Street
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR:
1 Bedroom
Income-based Rent
Utilities Included
62 & Older or
Handicapped/Disabled
All units non-smoking
(307) 672-8283
Equal Housing
Opportunity
NEWER
2
BR
Ranchester, low util.
W/D No smk $650/mo
751-1628
1 BR, heat/elec., on-site
lndry, NO pets. Lease
req. $620/mo.
673-8200.
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
$
$
1 bedroom... 460- 560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
NEWLY RENOVATED
4BR 2BA townhouse.
Includes appliances,
deck, fenced yard,
close to downtown.
No smk/pets. $1200 +
dep., utilities & lease.
674-4118.
2 BR, 2 story,
Ranchester on the
Tongue River, $750/mo.
+ util., pets neg.
752-3039
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
N
E
W
L
Y
REMODELED
1168
sq.
ft.
split-level
townhouse,
North
Heights area, 2BR
1.5BA, W/D/DW, no
smok/pets, $1100mo
+ gas & elec. Call 307672-8059 or 307-7632389 & leave msg.
Mobile Homes for Rent
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider.
TDD-1-800-877-9965
5TH WHEEL 36' Trailer
2 tip-outs, nice location,
$350/mo + elec + $100
dep 307-751-1835
NICE LG. 2 BR apt. in
quiet 4 unit bldg. Most
utils. incl. Pets neg.
$775/mo+dep 751-2105
2 BDRM mobile home,
recently
remodeled.
Private yard. Includes
lot rent. $650 mo. +
Dep. 751-2105
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
672-8681
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
Creekside
Apartments
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
2076 S. Sheridan Ave.
Sheridan, WY 82801
307-672-2737
Office Space for Rent
B E A U T I F U L
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
SPACE. Security and
janitorial. 672-8700 or
751-3828
1 Bedroom Apts
Available Now
Utilities paid except
cable & phone
BUSINESS, OFFICE
or RETAIL SPACE
54 South Main:
Must be 55 or Older to Qualify
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
Ground level:
2750sqft, lessor will
consider remodel to
accommodate lessee
Upper level: 3 indiv
offices, approx 15’x20’
each
Contact:
307-672-7491
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
Go online today!
CUTE 1BR, 1ba. NO
smk. Pets? $575mo
752-0091
www.thesheridanpress.com
Office Space for Rent
Help Wanted
COMMERCIAL
OFFICE building
w/kitchen approx 1500
sq ft close to
Courthouse 751-3828
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
752-6111.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
DOWNER ADDITION
Storage 674-1792
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Help Wanted
VISTA WEST is looking
for a self-motivated
individual to join our
Team. Position
requirements include
handling multiple tasks
for more than one
person, greeting clients,
answering phones and
general office
clerical/administrative
duties. Must be
proficient in MS Office
programs, Word,
Outlook, Excel and
Powerpoint. Full-time
position (min. 35
hours/week) with a
generous benefit
package. Applications
will be accepted
through July 1. Submit
a resume to:
[email protected]
ngr.com or drop off to:
Vista West Engineering,
1470 Sugarland Drive,
Suite 3, Sheridan, WY
82801.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGSHousekeeping,
Front
Desk,
Night
Audit,
Breakfast Attendant &
Maintenance. Top wages.
SIGN ON BONUS for
housekeeping
only.
Apply in person at Motel
6. Hampton Inn &
Wingate Inn.
NSI ACADEMY
is seeking energetic
and
positive
role
model(s)
for
the
position
of
Youth
Counselor,
Special
Education
Teacher
and Mental Health
Therapist. Make a
Difference
in
a
Teenagers Life! All
applicants must be 21
years of age, meet
e d u c a t i o n a l
requirements,
pass
background
checks
and submit to drug
prescreening. Benefit
package available for
Full Time Employees.
Apply to:
Human Resources
NSI Academy
5 Lane Ln. Sheridan,
WY 82801
Call: (307) 674-6878
Ext. 119
Fax: (888) 400-5451
[email protected]
services.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
P/T MAIL ROOM/
Newspaper Insertion
position avail.
Please pick up an
application at
The Sheridan Press.
144 Grinnell Street
SANFORD'S IS now
hiring for full time and
part
time
servers,
Cooks, host/hostess &
Kitchen
Manager.
Experience
preferred
but
not
necessary.
Apply at 1 East Alger.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Exteriors
is
immediately
hiring
experienced
Siding
Foreman & laborer,
top pay DOE. Call
751-6500.
BIG HORN DENTAL
Clinic in Gillette, WY
needs
a
PT/FT
hygenist. Must have
c u r r e n t
certifications,
familiarity
with
d i g i t a l
imaging/digital
charting, and a great
work ethic. Email
your
resume
to
[email protected]
.com
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: SILVER
Solution to 6/16/14
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Pets & Supplies
6/17/14
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
www.hammerchevy.com
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
107 E. ALGER
307.674.6419
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
For rs!
77 yea
2014 Chevy Tahoe LT
$
43,495
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
'14 CHEVY TAHOE LT
'11 CHEVY 3/4 TON LONG BOX DIESEL LTZ
'12 DODGE RAM LARAMIE LONGHORN
'13 GMC ACADIA SLT Leather/Roof
'13 CHEVY TRAVERSE LTZ
'11 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER LIMITED
'10 GMC SIERRA SLT 6.2 Liter Engine
'11 CHEVY 1500 CREW CAB LTZ Heated Seats
'12 CHEVY 1500 EXT CAB LTZ
'12 GMC 1/2 TON SLE
'12 CHEVY 1/2 TON LTZ
'11 CHEVY HD X-CAB LONG BOX
'10 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ
'10 CHEVY EQUINOX LT Only 20k miles
'08 CHEVY TAHOE LT
'05 CHEVY 2500 CREW DURAMAX
'07 CHEVY 3/4 TON DIESEL
'09 GMC ENVOY DENALI
'08 CHEVY 1500 X-CAB
'05 CHEVY TAHOE Z71
'05 FORD 5-150 KING RANCH EDITION
'07 CHEVY HHR LT 1 Owner
43,495
$
38,995
$
38,995
$
36,995
$
36,495
$
34,495
$
33,995
$
33,995
$
32,795
$
31,995
$
28,995
$
23,995
$
22,995
$
21,995
$
19,995
$
19,995
$
18,995
$
16,495
$
12,995
$
12,995
$
12,995
$
12,495
$
'06 SUBARU TRIBECA
'03 GMC YUKON X1
'00 FORD RANGER XLT X-CAB
'02 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
'95 CHEVY BLAZER S-10
$
10,995
$
7,995
$
5,995
$
5,495
$
1,995
CARS
'13 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
'14 CHEVY IMPALA LMTD LT
'13 CHEVY MALIBU 2LT
'13 CHEVY IMPALA LMTD LT
'12 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
'11 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
'09 CHEVY IMPALA LT
'01 PORSCHE BOXSTER
'06 CHRYSLER SEBERING CONVERTABLE
'05 TOYOTA CAMRY SOLARA SLE
'04 CHEVY MALIBU LT
'04 OLDSMOBILE ALERO
CARS
25,495
19,995
$
19,995
$
17,395
$
15,995
$
15,995
$
14,495
$
12,995
$
10,995
$
8,495
$
6,495
$
4,995
$
$
LIKE US ON
FACEBOOK
AT
ED HAMMER-CHEVROLET
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted, Medical
10 SERVICES
COMPANY, LLC is
currently seeking
vacuum truck drivers to
join our team in Wright,
Wyoming. We will
GUARANTEE you
hours and GREAT pay.
Must have a Class "A"
CDL with tanker
endorsement.
Insurance and housing
available upon request.
Please contact our
Operations Manager
Gilbert Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200 or email
him at g.moncibaiz
[email protected]
gmail.com.
SKILLED LABORERS
& Carpenters needed.
Pick up an app. at
O’Dell Construction or
Go online to
www.odell
construction.net
SEEKING
SEASONAL workers
to assist with water
management projects
in Sheridan County.
CDL preferred, but not
required. BeneTerra is
a growing company
offering competitive
compensation and a
challenging work
environment. Learn
more about our
company at
www.beneterra.com.
Submit resumes in
person at Cottonwood
Center, Suite 120
(1949 Sugarland
Drive), Sheridan or by
e-mail to
[email protected]
COSMETOLOGIST,
NAIL tech & massage
therapist positions avail.
Call 763-7191
THE CHILD
Development Center
in Sheridan,
Wyoming, is looking
for a Speech/
Language
Pathologist to work
in a rewarding early
childhood
environment. This
position requires a
high degree of
initiative, working
knowledge of
educational
standards and
regulations
regarding the
education of
children with
disabilities. Master’s
Degree in
Speech/Language
Pathology required
and must be eligible
for Wyoming Board
Certification or
Wyoming
Department of
Education
Certification.
Competitive salary
and benefits in a
supportive team
environment. Please
call Sandi at (307)
672-6610 x-102, stop
by CDC at 345 South
Linden, or visit our
web site at
www.cdcregion2.org
for an application.
P/T HOUSEKEEPER
needed for apartment
complex.
Duties
include housekeeping
and cleaning of the
building
common
areas for the upkeep
of the facility and deep
cleaning
of
apartments
and
appliances
upon
tenant
move
out.
Position will require
approx. 20 hours of
work each week. Must
be
honest,
dependable
and
energetic. Competitive
salary
offered
to
individuals
with
experience.
Send
resumes
with
references
to
“Housekeeper
Position” PO Box H,
Sheridan WY 82801.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District has
m u l t i p l e
coaching/extra
curricular
sponsor
opportunities
available. To view
positions
visit
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us or contact Brandi
Miller at the SCDS #1
Central office at 6559541
or
email
[email protected]
wy.us. Positions open
until filled. E.O.E.
ARE YOU looking for
a job with flexibility?
Sugarland Ridge is
looking for energetic,
loving applicants to
join our family. If you
are ready to join a
great
working
atmosphere and are
willing and able to
care
for
seniors
please apply at 1551
Sugarland Drive. We
are currently hiring for
part time positions
including LPNs and
RNs and Cook/Dining
Services staff. Please
apply in person. EOE
TAKING
APPLICATIONS
FOR:
Apprentice
Electricians to
Work for a Good
Solid Company.
Bring resume to
1851 N. Main St.
674-9710
Rig Hands: $16-$18 DOE
BARTENDERS,
SILVER Spur Bar &
Ranchester
Liquors.
Apply after 2.
P E R K I N S
RESTAURANT
now
accepting applications
for servers, line cooks,
baker, hourly manager
on duty. Apply in person
at 1373 Coffeen Ave.
TRUCK
DRIVER
WANTED
Looking
for
an
experienced
Truck
Driver for loading and
unloading
farm
equipment. Must have
a CDL.
Qualified
candidate send resume
and/or application to
Cindy George, Service
M a n a g e r
[email protected]
nt.com or stop in at
Sheridan
County
Implement 2945 West
5th Street Sheridan
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR AN
EXCITING NEW CAREER?
JOIN THE CLEARY TEAM!!
HOW HIRING FOR EXPERIENCED
CONSTRUCTION CREW
Cleary Building is seeking responsible, hard
working, energetic personnel to join our family
owned business!! Construction experience is
REQUIRED. Must have a clean driving record and
valid DL. Competitive wages and full benefits. Must
be able to travel and work some weekends!!
ADVERTISING
SALES
Representative
Established account
list, Base pay +
commission.
Full benefit package
available. Previous
sales experience
preferred.
Send resume to
Blind Box 164,
c/o The Sheridan
Press, PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EOE.
APPLY ONLINE TODAY!!
www.workforclearybuildingcorp.com
2440 Heartland Drive
Sheridan, WY 82801-3761
(307) 673-4559
PICKLES
EXPER
operator to
Douglas, WY
Must
be
savvy. Call
7420
Hints from Heloise
Ask for an Extension
Dear Heloise: I would like to
suggest to your readers that
they ask for SEAT-BELT EXTENDERS for their cars.
Most people do not know that
they are available for all makes
and models, but you have to
ask for them. They are free. If
you do not need them for yourself, you may need them for
someone who will be in your
car in the future. I think it
should be mandatory for all
cars (new or used) sold to have
them in the car for use, if
needed. -- Pamela W. in Ohio
Seat-belt extenders are an important part of a vehicle, but
unfortunately, they are NOT
AVAILABLE for all makes and
models of cars. If you want an
extender, you must contact the
car dealer. Many dealers will
give them to you for free, but
others may charge a small fee.
They also may ask you to sign a
waiver saying that you know
about the warnings related to
effectiveness and liability when
using extenders. -- Heloise
Heloise
SILICA-GEL PACKETS
Dear Heloise: When I find little packets of desiccants (silicagel packets) in boxes to keep
moisture out of the contents, I
wonder if it is safe to put one in
my cracker jar. I did try it, and
the crackers stayed just as
crisp and fresh as when I
opened it, but is this safe? -Vicki A. in Idaho
Although these packets are
nontoxic, they are not recommended for use with food (unless the packets came packaged
with that particular food item).
To keep your crackers fresh,
store them in an airtight container or even the freezer.
There are many other areas
in your home where you could
reuse silica-gel packets, but
don't use them when storing
food. -- Heloise
TELEVISION WATCHING
Dear Heloise: The other day, I
was having a hard time understanding the dialogue on a favorite TV show. When my
daughter walked into the room,
I mentioned to her how hard it
is to hear dialogue when actors
talk too fast or too quietly. She
told me she has a way to fix
that when it happens to her.
Without a second thought,
she took the TV remote from
me, turned the volume to
"mute," and the closed captioning appeared on the bottom of
the screen. (Heloise here: Some
TVs do not have this feature.) I
now do this with any program's
dialogue that I am having difficulty understanding. -- Candace
W. in New York
CLEANING SHOELACES
Dear Heloise: My problem
was washing my shoelaces in
the washing machine without
them getting tangled with the
laundry.
I thought that if I put them
both in the foot part of a pair of
socks (white laces in white
socks), that it should work, and
it did! They came out of the
laundry nice and clean, and
without tangles! -- Diane S. in
Maryland
LOADER
work at
gravel pit.
computer
307-751-
CLASS A CDL Drivers
needed. Doubles and
flatbed. Must have
two years over the road
experience. Good
pay with benefits.
Call Monday - Friday,
7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
1-800-700-6305
SHERIDAN COUNTY
School District #1 is
accepting
applications for a
Family & Consumer
Sciences teacher.
Must have Family &
Consumer Sciences
certification. Visit
www.sheridan.k12.
wy.us for an application
or contact Brandi Miller
at the SCDS#1 Central
office at 655-9541 or
email [email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us
Position open until
filled. EOE
Professional Trades
PAINTING - big or small
reasonable - much exp.
Call Steve 683-7814
Magna Energy Services:
Now Hiring
Must have a valid driver’s
license. Work is in the
Sheridan area.
Medical, dental and vision
insurance, 401K and paid
vacations.
Application located at
www.magnaes.com/jobs.
Fax application to:
307-682-4908 or email to:
[email protected]
LOOKING FOR a
housekeeper for
Candlewood Suites
Apply in person at
1709 Sugarland Drive.
LOOKING FOR
Housekeepers starting
at $8.75 hr. Also
looking for restaurant
shift supervisor,
dishwasher, servers,
banquet servers, cooks
& front desk. Apply in
person at Best WesternSheridan Center 612 N.
Main, Sheridan, EOE
LOST
PET?
Bridge
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): If you aim for home
base, you can make a home
run. Family members can
be counted upon to have
your best interests at heart,
and their happiness is a
powerful incentive.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
It's a good thing cats have
nine lives. Curiosity killed
the cat, but satisfaction
brought him back. Your
ability to judge risk is better than usual, so you can
tackle long-range planning
with ease.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Ideas that have been in
dry dock may be ready to
launch. Show enthusiasm
and eagerness if you want
to get support from others,
especially for your most im-
portant objectives.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Maintain your enthusiasm,
even when the going gets
rough, and make the most
of every situation. Others
are more likely to forgive
minor transgressions under
these stars. Learn how to do
something new or improve
your environment.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Take time to do things right
the first time. An optimistic
outlook adds positive energy to the atmosphere, especially when you're forced
to slow down mentally and
be especially thorough.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Read the instructions before you begin, not as an afterthought. In an effort to
outdo the competition or
FSBO 4 BD/3.75 BA
w/potential for rental
income. Open floor
plan,
finished
basement, new floors,
new carpet, 2800 sq
ft. PRICED TO SELL
$219,900
OPEN
HOUSE Jun 22 1-3
pm 1310 Parker Ave.
Call 307-672-0552
Autos-Accessories
PRIME
RATE
MOTORS Installs B &
W GN Hitches, 5th
Wheel Hitches, CM
Flatbeds,
Krogman
Bail Beds, We're also
Buying Vehicles of all
ages! Stop by 2305
Coffeen Ave. or Call
674-6677
ATV’s
POLARIS 1997
Magnum 6X6. New
front tires, winch,
buddy seat, windshield.
Runs great. $2500
307-684-2448
Garage Sales
Place an ad in
The Press! 672-2431
PUT YOUR GARAGE
Sale ad here. 7 lines
for 3 days $25! Map
placement and signs
included with ad.
Phillip Alder
DEDUCTIONS CAN
COME FROM THE AUCTION
Margery Allingham,
commenting on her
crime solver Albert
Campion, wrote, "He did
not arrive at this conclusion by the decent
process of quiet, logical
deduction, nor yet by the
blinding flash of glorious intuition, but by the
shoddy, untidy process
halfway between the two
by which one usually
gets to know things."
It is, of course, better
to draw conclusions
from logical deduction.
In this deal, South is in
four hearts. West leads
the spade nine. How
should East deduce the
correct defense?
North made a game-invitational limit raise,
showing four or more
hearts, 10-12 support
points (here, all high-
card points, no shortsuit points) and eight
losers (here, two in each
suit).
East knows that West
has led a singleton or
high from a doubleton -but which?
East should ask himself, "If my partner has a
singleton, how many
spades does that give declarer?" Here, the answer is five. And would
South have opened one
heart with five spades in
his hand? It would have
been most unlikely, because with 5-5 in the majors, South would have
opened one spade, not
one heart.
So East should deduce
that his partner has led
from a doubleton and
should signal encouragement with his spade
seven.
South wins, cashes the
heart ace, and plays another heart. But West
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Renee Olstead was born in
Houston, Texas, on this date
in 1989. This birthday gal
portrayed Madison on "The
Secret Life of an American
Teenager" from 2008-2013
and Lauren on "Still Standing" from 2002-2006. On the
big screen, Olstead's film
work includes "The Midnight Game," "13 Going On
30" and "End Of Days," as
well as starring in the TV
movies "The Bling Ring"
and "Point Of Entry."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't throw the toys out
of the pram. Temper
tantrums won't make life
easier for you or anyone
else. You'll get what you
want much easier if you
smile and enjoy the ride.
Real Estate
wins with his king, leads
his second spade, receives a spade ruff and
cashes the diamond ace
for down one.
Note finally that declarer does best to call
for dummy's spade king
at trick one, making it
more likely that East
will have a reflex reaction and win with his
ace.
Jeraldine Saunders
keep up with dynamic cohorts, you could jump into
projects without adequate
preparation.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Pawns seldom receive
the same appreciation as a
knight. On the chessboard
of life, you may sometimes
feel expendable, especially
when you have to lead the
way and make the first
move.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Wave your flag or
root for the home team. You
can make home runs in
business or score points
with a family member by
making a sincere and honest plea for cooperation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Make up, make it up,
and make it better. You'll go
further if you can be seen as
the soul of generosity. Make
an effort to get relationships back on track or to fix
whatever is broken.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): It's time to improve
your life by educating yourself. If history repeats itself,
then you haven't learned its
lessons. You can't expect to
get different results when
you do the same thing over
and over again.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): An unexpected change
in plans could prove fortuitous. You might stumble
into a position of prominence by being at the right
place at the right time. Accept any opportunities offered now.
IF JUNE 18 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Keep your big
ideas under wraps for a few
weeks. If you must launch a
new project, wait until late
July when your judgment is
better than usual and your
popularity peaks. July is
also a good time to pursue
romantic relationships and
an even better time for business changes, financial decisions and career moves.
You could be too wrapped
up in pursuing "the impossible dream" in September
and ruin your chances of
achieving a possible dream.
You might not be completely realistic during that
time and unprepared for
extra duties and responsibilities in November.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Councilor
307-673-1876
Dave
Kinskey
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Together with all improvements thereon situate and
all fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
First Interstate Bank
Danette Baldacci
Crowley Fleck, PLLP
101 West Brundage Street
Sheridan, WY 82801
307-673-3000
Publish: June 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014.
IN THE MATTER OF THE ROBERT H. HELMERICK AND
RUTH JOAN HELMERICK LIVING TRUST, dated
November 15, 1999, and any amendments thiseto
ROBERT H. HELMERICK, Decedent
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF INTENT TO
DISTRIBUTE AND NOTICE OF LIMITATION ON ACTION
BY CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID DECEDENT
AND/OR HIS TRUST ESTATE:
In accordance with Wyo. Stat. Ann. § 4-10-507, you are
hiseby notified as follows:
1. That Robert H. Helmerick created a living
trust on November 15, 1999, referred to as the Robert H.
and Ruth Joan Helmerick Living Trust (the “Trust”) and
any amendments thiseto.
2. That Robert H. Helmerick died on May 25,
2014 in Boulder County, Longmont, CO.
3. That the Successor Trustee of the Trust is
Ruth Ann Heald, and his address is as follows: 276
Indian Paintbrush, Casper, WY 82604. It is the intent of
the Successor Trustee to distribute the Trust property
forthwith.
4. That pursuant to Wyo. Stat. Anno. § 4-10507(a)(ii), any creditor or othis claimant receiving this
notice by publication shall make his or his claim, in
writing, to the Successor Trustee at the address listed
above within one-hundred twenty (120) days of the
date of the first publication of this notice.
5. That pursuant to Wyo. Stat. Anno. § 4-10507(a)(iii)(C), any creditor or othis claimant receiving
this notice by mail shall make his or his claim, in writing,
to the Successor Trustee at the address listed above
within one-hundred twenty (120) days of the date of
mailing of this notice.
6. That pursuant to Wyo. Stat. Anno. § 4-10507(a)(iii)(D), the time for commencing a proceeding
to contest the validity of the Trust or the proposed
distribution by the Successor Trustee is one-hundred
twenty (120) days of the date of mailing of this notice.
7. That any creditor failing to file a claim or to
commence a judicial proceeding to contest the validity
of the Trust or the proposed distribution by the
Successor Trustee within the time provided, shall be
forever prohibited from making any claim against the
assets of the Trust or commencing any judicial
proceeding against Robert H. Helmerickor the Trust.
DATED this 12th day of June, 2014.
ROBERT H. HELMERICK
AND RUTH JOAN HELMERICK
LIVING TRUST
By: /s/ Marty L. Oblasser
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
Marty L. Oblasser (Wyo. State Bar #7-4906)
SCHWARTZ, BON, WALKER & STUDER, LLC
141 South Center St., Suite 500
Casper, WY 82601
(307) 235-6681
(307) 234-5099 (fax)
Publish: June 17, 24, 2014.
INVITATION TO BID
Notice is hereby given that Sheridan County School
District No. 3, 1600 Meade Avenue, Clearmont,
Wyoming will receive sealed bids for the following up to
the date and time as stated.
CLEARMONT SCHOOL SERVER RELOCATION
BID OPENING: June 19, 2014 at 3:00 pm, local time,
Clearmont School, 1600 Meade Avenue, Clearmont, WY
82835.
PRE-BID TOUR: June 12, 2014 at 1:00 pm local time at
Clearmont School, 1600 Meade Avenue, Clearmont, WY
82835. Pre-Bid Tour is Not Mandatory.
Full sets of bidding and construction documents and
Bid Forms are available at:
Dale Buckingham Architects, LLC
45 East Loucks Street, Suite 301
Sheridan, WY 82801
Telephone: (307) 672.8270
Wyoming preference will be according to the School
Board Policy.
The Sheridan County School District reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids and to waive any
irregularities or informalities in the bidding.
Signed: Charles Auzqui – Superintendent
Publish: June 10, 17, 2014.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
REQUEST FOR GCCM PROPOSALS
The City of Sheridan is seeking qualified firms to
provide General Contractor/Construction Manager
(GCCM) Services for renovation and addition to the
existing facilities located at 932 KROE Lane in Sheridan,
WY 82801. Submittals are due no later than 2:00 p.m.,
local time June 24, 2014 at the Sheridan City Hall,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Proposing firms are required to attend A MANDATORY
pre-proposal conference to be held at 1:00 P.M., local
time June 18, 2014 at the current facility located at
KROE Lane, Sheridan, WY.
To request the Request for Qualifications and Proposals
Packet, interested firms shall contact:
Dale Buckingham Architects, LLC
45 East Loucks Street, Suite 301
Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.8270
City of Sheridan reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all proposals.
Ken Hirschman,
Utility Maintenance Superintendent
City of Sheridan
Publish: June 10, 13, 17, 2014.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
P U B LI C N O T I C ES
with each legal notice. A PDF is
I
ti
s the publi
c’
s ri
ght to know .
required if there are any signatures,
I
ndependent new spapers,li
ke The S herid a n P res s ,publi
sh governm ental
proceedi
ngs to foster a greater trust betw een governm ent and i
t’
s ci
ti
zens.
New spapers have long had the experi
ence,experti
se,and credi
bi
li
ty i
n publi
shi
ng
publi
c noti
ces and have done so si
nce the R evoluti
on.Today,they are an establi
shed
li
nk enabli
ng the publi
c to understand how thei
r resources are bei
ng used i
n the m ost
effi
ci
ent and effecti
ve w ays possi
ble.
with a Word Document attached.
I
t’
s m ore than foreclosures,requests for bi
d and m i
nutes ofm eeti
ngs.I
t’
si
nteresti
ng
readi
ng.W hen w e launched a redesi
gned S heri
dan P ress i
n July,w e i
ntended to gi
ve
publi
c noti
ce adverti
si
ng i
t’
s due by m ovi
ng the pages from the back ofthe
new spaper to the front secti
on.The pages
i
nclude the nam es and contact
i
nform ati
on ofour publi
c offi
ci
als.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
O ur publi
c noti
ces page(s)also i
nclude
valuable,i
nsi
ghtfulhi
stori
calphotos from
the S heri
dan C ounty Hi
stori
calS oci
ety.
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note ("Note") and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”).
The Mortgage dated May 6, 2011, was executed and
delivered by Richard E. Clark (“Mortgagor(s)”) to
Mortgage Electronic Registration System (MERS) as
nominee for First Interstate Bank, as security for the
Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded
on on May 11, 2011, at Reception No. 2011-688002 in
Book 798 at Page 329. in the records of the office of the
County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for
Sheridan County, State of Wyoming; and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as
follows:
To First Interstate Bank on May 9, 2014, recorded May 13,
2014 at Reception No. 2014-712048, in Book 882 Page
675.
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale
which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares
to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding
has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured
by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such
suit or proceeding been instituted and the same
discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the
Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served
upon the record owner and the party in possession of
the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to
the commencement of this publication, and the
amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first
publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of
$166,961.62 which sum consists of the unpaid principal
balance of $160,462.69 plus interest accrued to the
date of the first publication of this notice in the amount
of $3,816.62, plus other costs in the amount of
$1682.51, plus attorneys' fees, costs expended, and
accruing interest and late charges after the date of first
publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may
be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will
not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective
purchaser should research the status of title before
submitting a bid;
NOW, THEREFORE First Interstate Bank, as the
Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law
provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold
at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and
for Sheridan County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for
cash at 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon on June 27, 2014 at
the front door of the Sheridan County Courthouse
located at 224 South Main St., Sheridan, WY 82801,
Sheridan County for application on the above-described
amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged
property being described as follows, to-wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK 2, MURRAY AND MARLEY ADDITION TO
THE TOWN, NOW CITY OF SHERIDAN, SHERIDAN
COUNTY, WYOMING
which has the address of 152 W. Colorado St., Sheridan,
WY 82801.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
legal advertising department at
Content matters.
672-2431 if you have questions.
144 G ri
nnell•Sheri
dan,W Y •672-2431
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
John
Schiffer
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-738-2232
This rare and important photo from the Glenn Sweem
collection includes some of the region's most famous
historians. Pictured from the left are Joe Medicine Crow;
Howard 'Neckyoke Jones' Sinclair; Simon Old Crow; J.W.
Vaughn, and John Stands in Timber. Dr. Joseph
Medicine Crow still lives today, at his place near Lodge
Grass, Mt, and, at over 100 years of age, is the last Chief
of the Crow Tribe, the Tribal Historian, and recipient of
the President's Medal of Freedom. 'Neckyoke
Jones'Sinclair was long a syndicated columnist, with an
office in The Sheridan Press, and one of the founders of
All American Indian Days in Sheridan. J.W. Vaughn
authored a book on the 'Rosebud Battle' and 'New
Facts on Seven Encounters' including from research on
the Fetterman Fight south of Sheridan. John Stands in
Timber was interviewed by Dr. Margot Liberty for the
book Cheyenne Memories, and was the Northern
Cheyenne Tribal historian. A recent 2nd edition of the
book has been issued with a new updated bibliography
and new preface by Margot Liberty, bringing the story
of the Northern Cheyenne peoples up to date. This
photo is from the Sweem collection in the Sheridn
County Museum's Memory Book project.
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014
OLYMPICS: Weekend
includes other events
FROM B1
Allison Harker, vice president of program for
Special Olympics Wyoming, says the process
for the games began more than a year ago.
“We submit a quota for the sports that have
the highest participation,” Harker said. “The
National Games Organizing Committee then
decides on how many athletes we can take.”
Any athlete that has won a gold medal in a
state competition becomes eligible for the USA
Games, but a little luck is involved in being
selected, as well.
“We take all the winners from state competitions and put their names into a hat,” Harker
said. “We draw at random who gets to attend.
We draw one athlete and two alternates for
each sport.”
Each coach must go through an application
process before being selected, too.
“Every coach must submit an application for
the specific sport he or she wants to coach,”
Harker said. “Then we interview them and
contact their references, just to make sure they
are a good fit.”
The games are just one part of a fun-filled
weekend for the athletes. Along with the competition, athletes get to attend a Trenton
Thunder baseball game, a dinner cruise in
Manhattan Harbor, and visit Special Olympics
Town.
They also got the chance to attend the
Opening Ceremonies on Sunday.
“It’s funny because the Opening Ceremonies
involve around 18,000 people,” Harker said.
“That’s more than the population of
Sheridan.”
When it all boils down to it, though, the athletes come to the games to compete.
“The other stuff is good and great, but the
competition is my favorite part,” Harker said.
“Just seeing these athletes trying their hardest
and seeing them show off their medals, that’s
the best part.”
“It’s great representation to have for Special
Olympics Wyoming,” Harker said. “The athletes come back with a whole new perspective.
They can share their excitement with their
city, which is great for the state and the Special
Olympics.”
Grosch, Maes, Roberts and Cotton, along with
the 45 other representatives from Wyoming,
will compete throughout the week until
Closing Ceremonies on Saturday.
GO ONLINE!
Practice makes perfect
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | MIKE PRUDEN
Abagail Olson, 8, practices her roping technique Saturday at the Young Riders Rodeo at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
Mexican fans
descend on
World Cup
SAO PAULO (AP) — Some outsiders think Latin America is one
big culture, but with only a few
thousand Mexicans living in Brazil,
a tortilla can seem as exotic here as
Indian curry.
A day before Brazil took on
Mexico in the World Cup, a few
Brazilians lined up to take pictures
with a sombrero that read “Viva
Mexico!” on Monday.
Mexican tourists brought two of
the hats with them from the city of
Leon.
The Mexican fans were quite the
attraction, standing up on their
chairs while they sang “canta y no
llores.” That’s Spanish for “sing and
don’t cry,” from the popular folk
song “Cielito Lindo.”
A young Brazilian woman said she
wanted a photo with the sombrero
to prove to her friends that she had
run into a seemingly incredible
number of Mexicans, who had all
arrived for the tournament.
SOCCER: Tens of thousands of Americans in attendance
FROM B1
www.thesheridanpress.com
The Black Stars regrouped at halftime, and the U.S.
looked punchless on the attack. Ghana enjoyed 59 percent
of the possession in the game.
Ghana applied relentless pressure on U.S. goalkeeper
Tim Howard and finally drew even when captain Asamoah
Gyan flicked a backheel pass to Andre Ayew, who used the
outside of his left foot for a powerful shot.
Ghana was still pressing when Brooks scored. The 21year-old who plays for Hertha Berlin in the Bundesliga,
appeared shocked, raising his hands to his head before
falling to the ground to be mobbed by his teammates.
“It’s a special moment for the boy, he did well,”
Klinsmann said.
“What I can say is it was a very tough game,” Ghana
coach Kwesi Appiah said. “Playing at this level any little
mistake can cost you dearly. We didn’t deserve to get the
first goal against us.”
Under the slogan of “One Nation. One Team”, tens of
thousands of U.S. fans descended on this coastal city.
While the American fans’ chanted “U-S-A!,” the constant
rhythms and dancing from the smaller Ghana contingent
were soon joined by many of the locals who cheered whenever the Black Stars launched an attack.
“We managed to do the hardest part which was to equalize and push. And we take a goal on set pieces. We know
that’s one of their strong points,” Ayew aid.
ROCKIES: Poor fielding, pitching lead to loss
FROM B1
Blackmon had trouble picking up
the ball twice. First, he stumbled
while bending down for it against the
lower fence in foul ground and had to
chase it back into fair territory —
where he missed on his second
attempt to grab it. By the time he
relayed it back to the infield, it was
way too late to get Gordon, who was
credited with his major league-leading
seventh triple.
“I thought it was an inside-the-park
homer, to be honest, because I didn’t
think he touched it,” said Gordon,
who had four hits. “It just scooted
away from him. But it is what it is and
I’ll be all right with what I got.”
Matt Kemp singled home a run later
that inning and doubled home another
run on the sixth. He started in the
cleanup spot for the fifth time this season, and the Dodgers have won every
time. Regular cleanup hitter Adrian
Gonzalez got the night off while Scott
Van Slyke played first base.
“I think it’s fun, for us to have a little hit party here and there and enjoy
it.,” Kemp said. “We’ve had a tough little stretch, but that happens in baseball. Hopefully we don’t hit one of
those again and we stay consistent
and keep grinding it out.”
Hyun-Jin Ryu (8-3) allowed a run
and three hits in six innings and
struck out six in his 13th start. In his
first 13 starts last season — his first in
the major leagues — the left-hander
was 8-5 with a 2.85 ERA. This was the
ninth time this year that Ryu has
allowed fewer than three earned runs,
and he is 7-0 in those games.
“This guy’s pretty impressive in the
fact that he’s seen those guys a bunch
this year,” catcher A.J. Ellis said.
“They battled him really hard tonight.
That was probably the hottest team in
the National League right now coming
in here, but he had command of all of
his pitches and used both sides of the
plate extremely well — especially to
the left-handed hitters. It’s a dangerous team, and he did a great job staying out of the middle of the plate.”
Ellis, Hanley Ramirez and Yasiel
Puig had RBI singles. Ryu and four
relievers retired 16 of the final 17
Colorado batters after Wilin Rosario’s
two-out homer in the fourth.
Gordon, who leads the majors with
36 stolen bases, was thrown out for the
sixth time — by Rosario in the first
inning. The Rockies’ 22-year-old catcher trimmed the Dodgers’ lead to 2-1 in
the fourth with his seventh homer,
driving an 0-2 pitch into the pavilion
in left field with two outs.
But Ellis got that run back in the
fifth with just his second RBI of an
injury-plagued season in which the
Dodgers’ No. 1 catcher missed 34
games because of knee surgery and
sat out another 18 with a sprained
right ankle. Ellis’ two singles raised
his average from .196 to .222.
“Maybe a lot of that time on the DL
has been a blessing for me, to kind of
mentally kind of figure out who I am
and what my skill set should be as an
offensive player,” Ellis said. “While I
couldn’t run, I was still able to do a lot
of work in the cage these last couple
of weeks. I got back to swinging the
way I know I’m supposed to swing and
being the hitter I’ve been my whole
career — a guy who works the count,
takes a lot of pitches, uses the middle
of the field and tries to be a really
tough out.” Matzek (1-1) allowed three
runs and 10 hits through five innings
in his second big league start and did
not strike out a batter, five days after
giving up two runs over seven innings
and fanning seven in an 8-2 victory
over Atlanta at Coors Field.
“It wasn’t the same. The slider
wasn’t there as much and I was falling
behind hitters early,” Matzek said.
“Ten hits, obviously, is disappointing.
I realize that. But I thought I did a
pretty good job keeping runs off the
board.”
NOTES: A moment of silence was
observed for Hall of Famer Tony
Gwynn, who died Monday at age 54.
Gwynn’s brother Chris and son Tony
both played for the Dodgers. “He was
just a genius with the bat,” Dodgers
Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully
said. ... Perhaps the biggest of
Gwynn’s 140 career hits at Dodger
Stadium came on Sept. 28, 1996, when
his tiebreaking two-run single in the
eighth inning off Mark Guthrie
helped clinched a postseason berth for
the Padres. ... Forget about RHP Chad
Billingsley rejoining the Dodgers’ roster before the end of the season. He
has a torn flexor tendon in his right
elbow, which will require surgery next
Tuesday. Billingsley hasn’t pitched in
a major league game since April 15,
2013, nine days before he underwent
Tommy John surgery. ... The Rockies
optioned struggling RHP Juan Nicasio
to Triple-A Colorado Springs and promoted OF-1B Kyle Parker from the
Sky Sox. Parker, selected in the first
round of the 2010 draft, made his big
league debut in the eighth inning as a
pinch-hitter and struck out.