July 19, 2016 - The Sheridan Press

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July 19, 2016 - The Sheridan Press
TUESDAY
July 19, 2016
131st Year, No. 50
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
THE SHERIDAN
Press
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
Troopers host
alumni game. B1
Cheney dominates fundraising in US House race
BY MEAD GRUVER
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHEYENNE (AP) — Liz Cheney
continues to dominate fundraising
among the nine Republican candidates for Wyoming’s seat in the
U.S. House, bringing in several
times more money than her rivals
and frequently collecting cash
BLM, EPA
EFFIGIES
from far beyond the Cowboy State.
Cheney raised more than
$1.2 million over the first six
months of the year. She still had
more than $640,000 left at the
end of June, Federal Election
Commission records due last
Friday showed.
She was in roughly the same
financial position as in early 2014,
when she abandoned her race
against Sen. Mike Enzi in the
Republican primary. This time,
there is no incumbent.
Cheney’s donations have come
from Bellevue, Washington, to
North Miami, Florida, and dozens of points between. She’s also
raised more money from Wyoming
than her competitors, according
to her campaign manager, Bill
Novotny.
“The contributions she has
received from individuals around
the country prove that she has
the ability to bring a national
spotlight to Wyoming’s issues,”
Novotny said by email.
Cheney also dominated fundraising in the first quarter with
help from her father, former Vice
President Dick Cheney; mother,
Lynne Cheney; former President
George W. Bush; and former first
lady Laura Bush. Each gave the
maximum amount allowed by law:
$5,400, or $2,700 each for the primary and general elections.
SEE RACE, PAGE 3
More underage drinking, DUIs during Rodeo Week this year
Candidate’s
parade
float causes
controversy
BY PHOEBE TOLLEFSON
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Rex
Rammell, a candidate for
U.S. Congress, participated
in the Sheridan WYO Rodeo
parade Friday with a campaign float he said wins him
cheers wherever he goes.
‘It wouldn’t surprise
me that a federal
employee wouldn’t like
it, but I don’t think they’re
real popular throughout
Wyoming right now.’
Rex Rammell
U.S. House candidate
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
The Gillette Republican’s
entry consisted of two horses
carrying two effigies of federal agencies: the Bureau of
Land Management and the
Environmental Protection
Agency. The BLM and EPA
dolls were draped over horses, which Rammell led on his
own horse carrying a campaign sign. The candidate
said he’s run the entry in
parades in Casper, Gillette
and Lovell.
“My take on the parade
was that all through the
parade thought I heard nothing but cheers, thumbs-up
and smiles,” Rammell said.
Rammell said his campaign’s chief issue is the
transfer of federal lands to
the states.
“So if the land were transferred back, it would literally be the death of those agencies,” he said.
But some parade-goers did
not like the joke.
Dominic Jandrain, a
hydrologic technician for the
BLM office in Buffalo, said
he felt threatened seeing a
caricature of himself hung
out for dead.
SEE EFFIGIES, PAGE 2
Revelers mingle during the street dance Saturday on Main Street. Police said despite an increase in underage drinking and drunken driving, rodeo revelers were
pretty well-behaved.
Crime during weekend keeps law enforcement busy
of activity was mostly on par
with past years, although
this year the department
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
saw more minors in possesturned a bit Wild West this
sion of alcohol and driving
weekend as festivities from
under the influence. Folks in
the Sheridan WYO Rodeo
Sheridan racked up a whoptook over the city.
ping 21 MIPs on Friday and
Sheridan Police Department Saturday. Ringley said some
Lt. Tom Ringley said the level of these came from single
BY PHOEBE TOLLEFSON
[email protected]
incidents where multiple
minors were involved.
“And it’s also just an indication that the officers were
out in the crowd enforcing
the underage drinking statutes,” he said.
SEE CRIME, PAGE 3
Crime this weekend also
included the following:
• 9 DUIs
• 8 public intoxication/drunk pedestrian arrests
• 6 citations for urinating in public
• 4 warrant arrests
• 3 open container citations
• 3 instances of interference with a peace officer
• 1 citation for fake identification
City to expand South Park with purchase
aside to pay for improvements to public
rights of way, pathways or to purchase
new park space. The money cannot be
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan City Council spent on other types of purchases.
moved to purchase a 2-acre parcel of land
adjacent to South Park at its meeting
SEE EXPAND, PAGE 3
Monday night.
The city will buy the plot on West
Brundage Lane for $100,000. It was original- The property on Brundage Lane west of South
Park will be purchased by the city to be used for
ly marketed at $150,000.
park purposes.
City officials stressed Monday that the
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
purchase comes from funds specifically set
BY PHOEBE TOLLEFSON
[email protected]
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The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Betty Kalb
of Story
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
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SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
LEGAL NOTICES
B1
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A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
County applauds budget work, looks ahead to more tough times
BY PHOEBE TOLLEFSON
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Around
this time last year, the coun- had to permanently pick up
ty was telling eight people
extra work, as six vacant
their jobs would be cut,
positions went unfilled.
while remaining employees
This year in preparing
its budget for the 2016-2017
fiscal year, the county made
zero cuts.
Commissioners planned
to approve the $14.7 million
budget at their regular
meeting Tuesday morning.
Last year’s budget was $15.3
million.
It was the first time in
Administrative Director
Reneé Obermueller’s 12
years with the county that
it did not have to dip into
unexpended cash from the
previous year to cover the
new budget and instead
was able to put that money
into reserves.
One reason the county
did not need to cut jobs this
year is that it saved money
on employee health insurance by switching to a new
third party administrator,
which helps ensure the
county is meeting federal
regulations, among other
things.
County employees will
also chip in an additional 2
percent to their retirement
savings than before.
Finally, Sheridan County
received more money from
the federal and state governments this year than it
budgeted for. For instance,
the county received $1.2
million from the state this
year, compared to $935,000
last year.
Commissioner Tom
Ringley said the county had
more money come in than
budgeted for because commissioners took a conservative approach when trying
to anticipate funding.
The commissioners all
stressed that although the
budget process went well
this year, local tax revenues
continue to decline, and
next year could bring more
cuts from the state and a
different story.
“In some quarters it’s
being said that, you know,
things are looking pretty
good in Sheridan,” Ringley
said. “But it’s important to
make the distinction that
just because things are looking good in the local economy doesn’t necessarily take
away the funding challenges for an operational budget
for the county.”
Obermueller added that
while some county departments are shouldering cuts
well, others are struggling,
and that county staff should
be commended for putting
in extra work as a result of
the cuts.
“And I think they’re probably overworked, and you
know I think that’s just a
sign of the times,” she said.
“We’re doing the best that
we can with less and I don’t
think the public has seen
a huge difference in what
we’re producing in terms of
services.”
Western Wyoming fire closes route to Jackson Hole
CHEYENNE (AP) — Firefighters are
working to protect rural homes and businesses threatened by a wildfire burning in
the Bridger-Teton National Forest in western Wyoming.
U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Nan
Stinson said about 20 summer homes and a
commercial hot springs operation in Teton
County were evacuated on Monday.
The fire started on Sunday about 5 miles
north of the rural community of Bonderant
in Sublette County and has burned about
six square miles.
A 40-mile stretch of U.S. 191/189 from
Daniel Junction to Hoback Junction is
closed. The highway is heavily used by
travelers heading to Jackson Hole.
Elsewhere, a small wildfire burning
northeast of Dubois in a remote section of
neighboring Shoshone National Forest is
expected to continue growing because of
hot, dry weather.
Man dies in rafting
accident on Yellowstone River
BILLINGS (AP) —
Authorities have released
the name of a man who
drowned after a rafting
accident on the Yellowstone
River west of Columbus.
Stillwater County Sheriff
Cliff Brophy identified the
victim Monday as 47-year-
old Lorne Speakerworth, of
the Worden and Lockwood
areas.
Officials received a 911
call Sunday afternoon from
a second man who was in
the raft but was able to get
to shore after the boat overturned.
Brophy said someone
found Speakerworth’s body
about a mile and a half
downriver about half an
hour later. The man was not
wearing a life jacket.
Speakerworth’s death has
been ruled an accidental
drowning.
SHAWNIE DETAVERNIER | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Rex Rammell, candidate for Congress, walks with his parade entry Friday at the Sheridan WYO
Rodeo parade.
EFFIGIES : Has run for office in Idaho
Rammell said the dolls
were intended to represent
“It’s upsetting to me,
federal agencies and not the
even if it is to no one else,”
employees of those agencies.
Jandrain said.
“It wouldn’t surprise me
Jandrain acknowledged
that a federal employee
Rammell’s right to speak his wouldn’t like it,” he said,
mind but said he thought
“but I don’t think they’re
the presentation promoted a real popular throughout
“creepy agenda.”
Wyoming right now.”
FROM 1
Rammell has run unsuccessfully for governor,
U.S. Senate and U.S. House
in Idaho, his home state.
Rammell, a veterinarian,
made headlines as a gubernatorial candidate in 2009
for joking about wanting to
purchase a hunting tag for
President Barack Obama.
Tanker truck accident spills oil in Carbon County
CHEYENNE (AP) — An
accident involving a commercial tanker resulted in
about 10,000 gallons of crude
oil spilling along Interstate
80 in Carbon County.
The Wyoming Highway
Patrol id the accident
occurred about 7:30 a.m.
Saturday when the truck
tipped over while turning
onto the I-80 westbound
on-ramp near Walcott
Junction, about 20 miles
east of Rawlins.
The truck driver was not
hurt but was cited by troopers for taking the turn at a
speed that was too fast.
Crews were still cleaning
up the oil on Monday.
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
Montana
signs deal
with federal
government
on forests
BY MATT VOLZ
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HELENA, Mont. (AP) —
Montana Gov. Steve Bullock
signed an agreement with
the U.S. Forest Service on
Monday for the state to play a
bigger role in forest management on federal lands, which
officials say will speed up
backlogged logging projects.
Forest management and the
declining timber industry
have emerged as major issues
in this year’s governor’s race,
with Weyerhaeuser announcing last month that it would
close a Columbia Falls lumber and plywood mill.
The closure will put about
100 people out of work in
addition to 100 administrative jobs that are being
eliminated or moved with
Weyerhaeuser’s purchase of
Plum Creek Timber.
With the Chessman
Reservoir as a backdrop,
Bullock, Forest Service
Regional Forester Leanne
Marten and Montana
Department of Natural
Resources and Conservation
Director John Tubbs signed
the Good Neighbor Authority
agreement, which was authorized under the 2014 federal
Farm Bill.
The agreement will allow
the state to work on behalf of
the Forest Service on federal land, such as conducting
environmental analyses for
logging projects. Forest management, including logging
trees for fuel reduction, is
important as fire seasons
grow longer and more
intense, U.S. Agriculture
Undersecretary Robert
Bonnie said.
But most of the Forest
Service’s budget is being
spent fighting fires, and the
number of non-fire Forest
Service employees has
dropped 39 percent since the
1990s, Bonnie said.
“This allows us to get more
work done more quickly,”
Bonnie said of the agreement.
Two logging and restoration projects in the
Flathead National Forest and
the Beaverhead-Deerlodge
National Forest will be
the first conducted under
the signed agreement, but
Bullock said two other projects have been undertaken
without a formal deal.
The Chessman Reservoir
project, which logged more
than 400 acres of trees killed
by the recent mountain
pine beetle outbreak from
Helena’s main water source,
was the first example of a
federal-state logging and restoration partnership, Tubbs
said.
“We’re already out there
doing this,” Tubbs said.
Greg Gianforte, Bullock’s
Republican opponent in the
November election, criticized
Bullock for waiting so long
to sign the agreement after
it was authorized in 2014.
At least 18 other states have
already entered into similar
agreements, the Bozeman
businessman said.
SpaceX launches space
station docking port for NASA
at the space station before Americans
can fly there in crew capsules set to
debut next year. SpaceX is building
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP)
astronaut-worthy versions of its
— SpaceX successfully launched a
Dragon cargo ships, while Boeing —
critical space station docking port for which makes these docking ports — is
astronauts early Monday, along with
working on a crew capsule called
a DNA decoder for high-flying genetic Starliner. The pair would dock to this
research.
ring and another due to fly in a year.
As an extra treat, the company
The Dragon and its latest shipment
brought its leftover first-stage boostare due Wednesday at the 250-mileer back to Cape Canaveral Air Force
high outpost.
Station for a vertical touchdown —
NASA’s space station program manonly the second such land landing for
ager Kirk Shireman expected to be
an orbital mission and the ultimate in “sweating bullets without a doubt” at
recycling. Twin sonic booms rocked
liftoff, as always. He said all the cargo
the moonlit night, old shuttle landis precious, but really wants this docking-style.
ing port “up there safe and sound.”
“A really good day,” observed Hans
SpaceX, meanwhile, had its sights
Koenigsmann, vice president of flight not only on orbit, but also on the
reliability for SpaceX.
ground.
The cosmic double-header got
SpaceX brought its leftover firstunderway as the unmanned Falcon
stage booster back just a couple miles
rocket streaked upward through the
from where it lifted off eight minutes
middle-of-the-night darkness, carryearlier. The company has now pulled
ing 5,000 pounds of food, experiments
off five vertical booster landings since
and equipment for the International
December, three on an ocean platSpace Station. The orbiting outpost
form and two on land. Employees at
was soaring over the North Atlantic at company headquarters in Hawthorne,
liftoff.
California, cheered loudly and
It was SpaceX’s second shot at deliv- applauded when the 15-story booster
ering a new-style docking port for
touched down smoothly.
NASA. The last one went up in smoke
Koenigsmann said the booster
over the Atlantic last year, a rocket
looked to be in “excellent shape and
accident casualty.
probably pretty soon ready to fly
NASA needs this new docking setup again.”
BY MARCIA DUNN
AP AEROSPACE WRITER
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
EXPAND: MOU approved
the Northeast Wyoming
Growth Alliance, a joint
economic development venMayor John Heath said
ture involving Sheridan,
expanding parks and public Buffalo and Gillette. The
spaces adds to the quality of memo calls for more targetlife in Sheridan.
ed marketing of northeast
“Is money tight? Yes it is,” Wyoming to national busihe said. “But we’ve been
nesses and the creation of a
prudent, and we have put
council and election of local
these things and these funds officers to help oversee the
together for these very reawork.
sons.”
The venture aims to perFunds for the purchase
suade companies to set up
come from franchise fees
shop in northeast Wyoming
that utility companies pay
and began more than two
the city when they use
years ago in response to the
public infrastructure like
risks facing the energy-relipower lines, gas and teleant regional economy.
communications lines.
Councilor Thayer Shafer
said the purchase would
help protect wetlands in
the area, because the city
must maintain the area as
park space, according to
the terms of the purchase.
If another entity bought it,
there is a possibility the
space would be used for
residential development,
since it is currently zoned
residential.
City officials said the land
includes a water well, storage facility and has had a
garden plot on it in the past.
In other news, councilors
approved a memo of understanding that supports
FROM 1
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
©COPYRIGHT 2016 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Volunteers hang out by the Sheridan Police Department setup downtown Saturday night during the Sheridan WYO Rodeo
street dance. SPD offered water and free rides home during the event on Main Street.
CRIME:Despite plenty of booze, revelers well-behaved
FROM 1
Crime this weekend also included the following:
• 9 DUIs
• 8 public intoxication/drunk pedestrian arrests
• 6 citations for urinating in public
• 4 warrant arrests
• 3 open container citations
• 3 instances of interference with a peace officer
• 1 citation for fake identification
Saturday was a particularly busy day for the police
department. Officers reported a car with slashed tires
and a broken passenger window on the 400 block of
Sumner Street at noon. At 4 p.m. officers broke up a
fight at the fairgrounds that resulted in three arrests.
Later that evening one driver near the fairgrounds
purposely bumped into a pedestrian with his or her
vehicle, and at night, two men were given trespass
warnings at the street dance after provoking a fight.
Meanwhile the Sheridan County Sheriff’s Office
stayed busy responding to an attempted break-in
RACE : Stubson raised just under $140,000
FROM 1
Through June, Liz Cheney raised more
than eight times more money and had
almost eight times more money left than
state Rep. Tim Stubson, the fundraising
runner-up. Stubson raised just under
$140,000 and has made a $60,000 loan to his
campaign. He had almost $83,000 left.
“We’ve got money in hand for the final
push, and we’re working really hard on
fundraising to supplement that,” Stubson
said Monday. “We feel very confident that
we’re in a really good position to finish
strong.”
State Sen. Leland Christensen, who
raised about $107,000 and still had about
$64,000 left, ranked third in the money race.
“Leland hasn’t been collecting checks
from wealthy donors in New York, Chicago
and D.C. He’s been buying coffee for folks
in Wheatland, Worland and Gillette,”
Christensen spokeswoman Kristin Walker
said by email.
Cheyenne attorney Darin Smith had
about $9,400 left after raising about $33,000
and lending himself $6,000. The other five
candidates raised $15,000 or less.
U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis, a Republican,
isn’t seeking a fifth term.
in Ranchester and a stolen motorhome from a campground in Story.
Sheriff’s Office Lt. Allen Thompson said he had not
reviewed the specifics of the case but in general, most
auto thefts in the area occur when owners simply leave
the car unlocked and the keys inside.
Despite the numbers of arrests and citations over the
weekend, Ringley said that the street dances, which
bring out hordes of revelers and plenty of booze, went
smoothly.
“The general impression of the police department in
regards to the street dance was despite the high number of MIPs and arrest activity in general, the crowd
appeared to be very well behaved and cordial,” he said.
The police department gave 203 free rides home from
the weekend street dances and handed out 2,800 servings of water to help keep people hydrated.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Becky Martini
Chad Riegler
Marketing Director
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Notes, quotes
anecdotes
M
oney can’t buy happiness.
Everyone knows that.
Still, it’s more comfortable
crying in a Lexus than a
used Yugo.
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
thesheridanpress.com
1. Dayton mayor rushed to hospital
2. How to die in Yellowstone: Ranchester man publishes satirical
coloring book on Yellowstone deaths
3. Four appear in district court on drug charges
4. A sport steeped in tradition
5. Rodeo royalty: Not your average pageant contestants
6. Make the most of your Rodeo Week: Well-seasoned or your first
go, 5 ways to do it right
7. Behind the scenes: WYO Rodeo board members organize
high-quality event
8. Dayton mayor recovering after health scare
9. Food truck business on the move
10. Festive last night for rodeo crowd, poignant ride for Indian
relay champ
••••••
My. What a time it is.
The Sheridan WYO Rodeo,
last week and all of its ancillary
activities. The Wyoming Theater
Festival kicked off yesterday for
the next two weeks. And recently south of us, it was “Longmire
Days” and the Big
Horn Mountain
Festival.
A high school
class reunion is
this weekend;
a big golf tournament at the
Powder Horn, too.
of families
PUBLISHER’S Plenty
welcoming family.
NOTEBOOK
Certainly a busy
city. Good stuff,
|
this.
Stephen Woody
••••••
The Sheridan Press’ Rodeo Week
parade float didn’t win the gold
medal last Friday, but we were
done proud. Our rodeo “committee” put together our best float to
date in keeping with the parade
theme: Hitch Your Wagon to the
WYO. They were: Phil Ashley, Lisa
Marosok, Janea LaMeres, Amber
Ringeisen, Nicole Scofield, Irene
Nettles, Tami Starbuck, Yvonne
Cossel, Sheree Cossel, Phoebe
Tollefson.
Two of the star attractions:
Zander LaMeres, the 4-year-old
son of Janea and Nolan LaMeres.
Zander waved heartily from the
float as we gave away free copies
of the Press. (Think he might have
a career in politics, or something
related to charisma.) And “Tony
the Pony.” He’s a class B miniature
horse belonging to Ms. Ringeisen.
••••••
Dept. of incidental info…..
• The Financial Times reports
how the U.S. holds more recoverable oil reserves these days
than rivals. The oil intelligence
company, Rystad Energy, reports
how there are 264 billion barrels
of oil that are economically and
technologically accessible — more
than Russia (256 billion) and Saudi
Arabia (212 billion). More than
half of the U.S. reserves, the Times
reports, are the reserves situated in
shale oil.
• Newt Gingich, on camera a lot
these days, has more than $4.6
million in debt from his 2012 presidential campaign, according to
TheDailyBeast.com. The debts are
from private jet transportation,
polling, staff, private security and
so forth. Earlier this year, Gingrich
began fundraising to retire the
debt. To date, he’s raised $57.
••••••
Quotable
“A true friend knows your
weaknesses but shows you your
strengths; feels your fears but fortifies your faith; sees your anxieties
but frees your spirit; recognizes
your disabilities but emphasizes
your possibilities.”
— William Arthur Ward,
American author, clergyman, 19211994.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen
Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Chad Riegler
Production
Manager
GOP Convention — the coronation of a charlatan
Y
ears from now, bright-eyed children will
look up at Grandma or Grandpa and
ask, “Where were you when they nominated Donald Trump?” Far too many
prominent Republicans will have to hang their
heads in shame.
As the garish imperial coronation in
Cleveland reaches its climax, there will be
much commentary — some, no doubt, from
me — about fleeting events. Did So-and-so’s
speech help Trump or
hurt him? Did one line
of attack against Hillary
Clinton seem more or less
promising than another?
All of this is news, but we
must not lose sight of the
big picture: The “Party of
Lincoln” is about to nomEUGENE
inate for president a man
who is dangerously unfit
ROBINSON
for the office.
|
Trump is a brilliant
showman, no question
about that. His life’s
work has been self-aggrandizement, not
real estate, and all those years of practice
served him well when he turned to politics.
He knows how to work a crowd. He understands television and social media. He dominated and vanquished a field of experienced
campaigners as if they were mere apprentices.
But he lacks the knowledge, curiosity,
temperament, wisdom, compassion and
resolve to be president. The GOP is about to
formally endorse a charlatan for the most
important job in the world.
Great political parties do not do this. They
might nominate a candidate who is too
conservative or too liberal, too wooden or
too glib, too inexperienced or too much of a
DROP US A LINE |
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the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
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that we deem libelous, obscene or in
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the Press works best and have the best
chance of being published.
Letters should not exceed 400 words.
warhorse. They do not nominate the likes of
Trump.
The shameful thing is that so many of
those scheduled to speak at Trump’s convention know full well that he should not
be allowed anywhere near the Oval Office.
Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry said that
Trump’s candidacy was “a cancer on conservatism, and it must be clearly diagnosed,
excised and discarded.” Sen. Marco Rubio,
set to appear by video, called Trump a
“con artist” and an “erratic individual”
who should not be trusted with the nuclear
codes. House Speaker Paul Ryan reluctantly
endorsed Trump and since then has spent
more time criticizing the loudmouthed
mogul than praising him.
Explain yourselves, Republican officials.
You know that Trump should not be president. Do you secretly assume he will inevitably lose to Clinton? In that case, perhaps
you think your support makes sense as a
way to promote party unity or self-interest. (I’m being redundant; most politicians
believe party unity and self-interest are the
same thing.)
But what if Trump wins? Surely you are
not under the illusion that Trump would
follow the advice of more experienced
hands and allow himself to be molded into
a statesman. Anyone clinging to that fairy
tale paid no attention to the final months of
the primaries, when Trump would give a
conventional teleprompter-aided speech and
the very next day go back to raving like a
madman.
Anyone wondering just how bad a Trump
presidency would be got a preview from
the joint interview he did Sunday with his
vice-presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike
Pence, on “60 Minutes.” It was unintentionally hilarious — but also chilling.
It appeared that the candidates had spent
all of five minutes preparing for the encounter, since they fumbled when correspondent Lesley Stahl asked obvious questions
they should have known were coming. If
Clinton’s vote for the Iraq War showed bad
judgment, as Trump claims, what about
the fact that Pence voted the same way? “I
don’t care,” Trump declared. When pressed,
Trump said that Pence was “entitled to
make a mistake every once in a while” but
Clinton was not.
Asked whether Trump “went too far”
when he criticized Sen. John McCain as
“not a war hero” because he was shot down
over Vietnam, poor Pence hemmed and
hawed until Trump gave him permission
to speak freely. “That one, you could say
yes,” Trump told his running mate. “I mean,
you’re not — it’s fine. Hey, look, I like John
McCain. But we have to take care of our
vets.”
When Trump first came out with his proposed Muslim ban, Pence called it unconstitutional. Now he loyally says he supports
Trump’s idea, which seems to have morphed into something Trump calls “extreme
vetting” and applies only to Muslims from
“territories and terror states and terror
nations.” When Trump went on about how
he would declare war against the Islamic
State but without dispatching U.S. troops,
Pence said that “this is the kind of leadership that America needs.”
It is not leadership. It is gibberish. And
Republicans in Cleveland will pretend the
emperor is wearing clothes.
EUGENE ROBINSON has been city hall reporter, city editor, foreign
correspondent, foreign editor and assistant managing editor in charge of the
The Washington Post’s Style section. He is the author of three books.
IN WASHINGTON |
The best-read letters are those that stay
on a single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
com
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
Wyoming
4-H’ers
target bee
decline
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Registration open for conference for violence prevention, response
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Registration
is now open for the Wyoming
Conference for Violence
Prevention and Response.
Cost to attend is $75 and the
event will be held in Casper from
Sept. 12-15 at the Ramkota Hotel.
The conference is a two-day
event that provides training, dialogue and connections to prevent
and respond to violence.
To register see http://www.wyocvpr.net.
For more information, contact
Kandice Hansen at 777-7200 or
[email protected]
The Ramkota hotel is located at
800 N. Poplar St. in Casper.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Wyoming
4-H’ers targeted the decline
in bee population in a
plan formed on a trip to
Washington, D.C., recently.
On a visit east, Wyoming
4-H’ers applied their heads,
hands, hearts and health to
solve declining bee numbers
in their home state.
The group of 12 from five
Wyoming counties won
$500 at the Citizenship
Washington Focus for a plan
to create a beekeeping curriculum and offer $250 to a
Wyoming 4-H’er whose bees
produced the best honey.
That 4-H’er could then use
the money to expand her or
his beehive.
One of the 4-H’ers, Emma
Balstad, is from Sheridan
County.
Bee numbers in the U.S.
have decreased more than
50 percent since the ‘90s
and the 4-H’ers want to
help increase numbers in
Wyoming by encouraging
other 4-H’ers to become
involved in beekeeping.
“We will use half of the
$500 to help get the bee project started so 4-H’ers can
have their own bee habitat
and hives,” said Balstad, a
member of the Tongue River
Roundup 4-H Club in a press
release.
Balstad and others introduced the beekeeping project during the Showcase
Showdown in Laramie last
month and will work with
the state 4-H office to develop
a curriculum for next year.
Those 4-H’ers in the project
will bring their honey to the
annual Showcase Showdown
for judging.
The Wyoming group has a
chance to win another $500.
An overall winner from all
the groups attending CWF
will be selected at the end of
summer.
SHAWNIE DETAVERNIER| THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Picking through pancakes during Rodeo Week
From left, 6-year-old Gabby Koval and 4-year-old Izzy Coval eat breakfast during the Kiwanis pancake breakfast on Friday. The event serves more than 2,000 annually in
downtown Sheridan.
www.thesheridanpress.com
Bighorn Native Plant Society’s
wildflower trip set for Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Bighorn Native
Plant Society will host the final wildflower exploration of the year on
Saturday.
The event will start at Shopko in
Buffalo at 9 a.m. to look for flowers
in the southern part of the Bighorn
Mountains.
Ami Erickson will lead the tour.
Attendees are encouraged to bring
water, snacks, bug spray and sunblock.
For more information contact Ami
Erickson at 683-3412 or [email protected]
gmail.com.
Special Olympics torch run set for Thursday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
law enforcement agencies
will carry the “Flame of
Hope” in their leg of the
Wyoming Law Enforcement
Torch Run on Thursday
to raise awareness and
funds for Special Olympics
Wyoming athletes.
The event will begin at 8
a.m. at the Sheridan County
Sheriff’s Office and travel
through town ending at
Whitney Commons Park.
For more information see
www.specialolympics.org
or call 235-3062. The SCSO is
located at 54 W. 13th St.
Maher challenges conventions with ‘Real Time’ specials
will include a monologue as well as
Maher’s signature “New Rules” commentary and, in between, discourse
NEW YORK (AP) — When did Bill
led by Maher with his in-studio
Maher hatch the idea for special “Real guests (on Wednesday, documentary
Time” broadcasts during the political
filmmaker Michael Moore, political
conventions?
correspondent Joy Reid and advice
“Maybe when Donald Trump began
columnist Dan Savage; on Thursday,
talking about riots,” Maher replies
economic equality advocate Heather
with a puckish grin.
McGhee, California Lt. Gov. Gavin
That was way back in March, when
Newsom and economist Robert Reich).
the now-presumptive GOP presidenEach program is scheduled to air
tial nominee warned of riots at the
live at 11 p.m. EDT — that is, unless
convention if any efforts arose to
significant stuff is still happening:
snatch the nomination from him.
“You can’t interrupt a riot,” Maher
Such a thing now seems unlikely,
cracks.
but this week’s Republican convention
He isn’t the only observer who will
in Cleveland, followed by next week’s
cast a special comic eye on the proDemocratic shindig in Philadelphia,
ceedings.
still promise to be “crazier and more
— Comedy Central’s Trevor Noah
outrageous and more interesting than will originate “The Daily Show” from
ever,” says Maher, almost smacking
Cleveland’s Breen Center for the
his lips.
Performing Arts this Tuesday through
No wonder he’s supplementing his
Friday at 11 p.m. EDT and next week
weekly “Real Time” hour (Fridays at
from the Annenberg Center for the
10 p.m. EDT on HBO) with half-hour
Performing Arts at the University of
pop-ups this Wednesday and Thursday Pennsylvania.
as well as July 27 and 28 for a rapid
— CBS’ “The Late Show with
response to each night’s goings-on.
Stephen Colbert” (11:35 p.m. EDT) will
Also available to non-HBO subscrib- broadcast live from its New York stuers by live-streaming on the “Real
dio with teams on-site at each convenTime” YouTube channel, each edition tion delivering reports. (Each week of
BY FRAZIER MOORE
AP TELEVISION WRITER
live shows will be specially themed:
“The 2016 Trumpublican Donational
Conventrump” and “The 2016
Democratic National Convincing.”)
— NBC’s “Late Night with Seth
Meyers” (12:35 a.m. EDT) will go live
this Thursday, following the presidential nominee’s acceptance speech.
— TBS’ “Full Frontal with Samantha
Bee” (Mondays at 10:30 p.m. EDT)
presents a road-to-Cleveland special
interviewing regular Americans along
the way. It airs Wednesday at 10:30
p.m. EDT, with hopes for another special pegged to the Democrats’ convention.
— On MSNBC, “Saturday Night
Live” co-anchors Colin Jost and
Michael Che will host special editions
of “Weekend Update” this Wednesday
and July 27 at approximately midnight. They’ll also be seen on NBC’s
“Today” show “reporting” on the
Republican and Democratic conventions.
“I think the Democrats will be interesting,” Maher says. Despite Bernie
Sanders’ endorsement of presumptive
nominee Hillary Clinton last week,
“it’s not a united party. I just don’t
think it will be the convention Hillary
would like it to be.”
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FORM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at
late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. WHAT SOUNDS SIMILAR
TO 2008
Melania Trump’s speech
to the Republican National
Convention contains two
passages that match nearly
word-for-word the address
that first lady Michelle
Obama delivered at the
Democratic convention.
2. TRUMP’S FUNDRAISING
SHIFT NOT FAZING
SUPPORTERS
An AP poll finds that backers of the billionaire presidential candidate are mostly
in favor of him raising
money just like the rivals he
once disparaged as the “puppets” of big donors.
3. ISLAMIC STATE GROUP
TAKES RESPONSIBILITY FOR
GERMAN TRAIN ATTACK
The extremists’ claim comes
just hours after a 17-yearold Afghan asylum seeker
attacked passengers with
an ax and knife, injuring at
least five people.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Praying for a good ride
4. TURKISH LEADER
RECOUNTS NIGHT OF COUP
Recep Tayyip Erdogan discloses dramatic details of his
survival on the night of the
failed government takeover
and suggests reintroducing
the death penalty to punish
conspirators.
5. U.S. POLICE
DEPARTMENTS HAVING
OFFICERS PAIR UP
In response to deadly
ambushes in Texas and
Louisiana, the safety precaution could slow response
times for low-level crimes
and drive up overtime for
already exhausted officers.
6. BALTIMORE NOT
QUITTING FREDDIE GRAY
CASES
After three straight
acquittals, prosecutors in
Maryland’s largest city
seem to be willing to try
the remaining three cases
against police officers amid
mounting pressure to call it
quits.
7. PITFALL FOR
SELF-DRIVING CARS: THE
HUMAN BRAIN
Experts say the development
of vehicles which rely on
automation depends on an
unreliable assumption: that
the humans in them will be
ready to step in and take
control if the car’s systems
fail.
8. WHO WILL WEIGH
CHANGING FUEL
STANDARDS
The U.S. government issues
a report on fuel economy
and greenhouse gas standards for U.S. cars and
trucks, and will review
whether to leave the standards in place through 2025.
9. HOW SERIOUS STOMACH
PROBLEMS COULD BE FIXED
If your child has swallowed
a small battery, a tiny,
ingestible “origami” robot
could be a new tool for
extracting it.
10. RUSSIANS ESCAPE
TOTAL BAN FOR RIO GAMES
Summer Olympic sports federations say they are ready
to deal with “individual
cases” of Russian doping,
rather than endorse a total
ban on the Russian team.
Bull rider Jordan Spears of Redding, California, pauses for a moment behind the bucking chutes during the final night of
Sheridan WYO Rodeo Saturday at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Chamber’s Business After Hours
set for Wednesday
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan County Chamber
of Commerce will hold its monthly social and networking event from 5-7 p.m. Wednesday. There is
no cost to attend.
Four businesses have teamed up for one great
event: Sheridan Custom Stone, Sheridan Meat
Market, Rooster’s Marketplace and Powder River
Heating and Air Conditioning.
The event will take place at the new retail spaces at 1745-1765 S. Sheridan Ave. and will give an
opportunity for people to see the new retail spaces,
visit with the owners and check out all the businesses have to offer.
For more information call the Chamber at 6722485.
Free yoga offered on July 22
SHERIDAN — A Place of Wholeness Yoga
Studio recently welcomed yoga teacher Amanda
Reichenbach.
She will be teaching beginning yoga, Yoga
for Lunch and Vinyasa Flow. For a full list of
Amanda’s schedule of classes see aplaceofwholeness.com.
Reichenbach will teach a free yoga session
Friday from 9-10:30 a.m. To register email Amanda
at [email protected]
A Place of Wholeness is located at 645 E. Fifth St.
City to host Kendrick Park public
workshop
SHERIDAN — Public workshops will be held
this week in the Kendrick Park amphitheater.
Workshop topics include park elements/locations,
design character, overall design alternatives, parking and circulation.
On Tuesday, from 5-7 p.m. a public meeting to
review site analysis and conceptual alternative
diagrams will take place.
On Wednesday, a public meeting to review two
alternative designs will take place from 5-7 p.m. at
the park.
On Thursday, from 5-7 p.m. a public meeting will
review preferred design.
For more information contact Mathers Heuck at
620-2753 or email [email protected]
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
• All day, Wyoming Theater Festival, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
• 10 a.m., Wyoming Wednesday “Bighorn Mountains” lecture, Wyoming Welcome Center, 1517 E. Fifth
St.
• 5-7 p.m., Chamber’s Business After Hours
• 7:30-9 p.m., “The New Vaudevillians” Variety Show, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
• 5-7 p.m., public meeting on Kendrick Park, Kendrick Park amphitheater
NATIONAL OBITUARY |
Wendell Anderson, Minnesota’s
former governor, dies at 83
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Wendell Anderson
loved being Minnesota’s governor so much that
he couldn’t wait to get to work in the morning.
But when he abandoned the Capitol in a slippery
move to get to Washington, voters never forgave
the youthful Democrat who just three years
earlier won statewide accolades for embodying
Minnesota’s strengths on an iconic Time magazine
cover.
Anderson, a handsome Olympic silver medalist
in hockey, gave up the job he loved in 1976, resigning so that second-in-command Rudy Perpich
could become governor and name him to fill the
U.S. Senate seat vacated by newly elected Vice
President Walter Mondale. The move was deeply
unpopular and voters decisively ousted Anderson
two years later in favor of Republican Rudy
Boschwitz.
Anderson, who died Sunday at 83, was never
elected again, though friends said he longed to
return to public life.
Gov. Mark Dayton’s office said Anderson died at
Our Lady of Peace hospice care in St. Paul.
Anderson’s family issued a statement, calling the
former governor many things: “A kid from East St.
Paul. A Gopher. An Olympian. An elected public
servant of the highest order. But above all else he
was a Minnesotan. His love for the state and its citizens was second only to his love for his family.”
Anderson reached the summit of Minnesota politics in 1970 when he won the governor’s office at
age 37.
The next year, he pushed through an overhaul
of school aid and taxes that became known as the
“Minnesota miracle.”
In a special legislative session that stretched
more than five months past normal deadlines,
Anderson outmaneuvered the conservative-dominated Legislature by rejecting an alternate tax plan
he called “the old way of doing things.” The victory
gave him latitude to pursue Democratic priorities
such as environmental safeguards, a minimum
wage increase and programs for housing, seniors
and drug abuse.
The outdoorsy governor familiarly known as
“Wendy” landed on the cover of the Aug. 13, 1973
issue of Time, shown hoisting a trophy fish over
the headline “The Good Life in Minnesota.” The
story inside called Anderson a “Midwestern
Kennedy.”
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On July 19, 1941, Britain
launched its “V for Victory”
campaign during World
War II with Prime Minister
Winston Churchill calling
the V-sign hand gesture “the
symbol of the unconquerable
will of the people of the occupied territories and a portent
of the fate awaiting the Nazi
tyranny.”
On this date:
In 1553, King Henry VIII’s
daughter Mary was proclaimed Queen of England
after pretender Lady Jane
Grey was deposed.
In 1848, a pioneering women’s rights convention convened in Seneca Falls, New
York.
In 1903, the first Tour de
France was won by Maurice
Garin.
In 1944, the Democratic
national convention convened
in Chicago with the nomination of President Franklin D.
Roosevelt considered a certainty.
In 1952, the Summer
Olympics opened in Helsinki,
Finland.
In 1961, TWA became the
first airline to begin showing
regularly scheduled in-flight
movies as it presented “By
Love Possessed” to first-class
passengers on a flight from
New York to Los Angeles.
In 1979, the Nicaraguan
capital of Managua fell to
Sandinista guerrillas, two
days after President Anastasio
Somoza fled the country.
In 1980, the Moscow
Summer Olympics began,
minus dozens of nations that
were boycotting the games
because of the Soviet military
intervention in Afghanistan.
In 1986, Caroline Kennedy,
daughter of President John
F. Kennedy, married Edwin
A. Schlossberg in Centerville,
Massachusetts.
In 1989, 111 people were
killed when United Air Lines
Flight 232, a DC-10 which suffered the uncontained failure
of its tail engine and the loss
of hydraulic systems, crashed
while making an emergency
landing at Sioux City, Iowa;
185 other people survived.
In 1990, President George
H.W. Bush joined former presidents Ronald Reagan, Gerald
R. Ford and Richard M. Nixon
at ceremonies dedicating the
Nixon Library and Birthplace
(since re-designated the
Richard Nixon Presidential
Library and Museum) in
Yorba Linda, California.
In 1996, opening ceremonies were held in Atlanta for
the 26th Summer Olympic
Games.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush issued his
first presidential veto, rejecting a bill that could have
multiplied federal money for
embryonic stem cell research;
a few hours later, the House
voted 235-193 to overturn
Bush’s veto, 51 short of the
required two-thirds majority.
Five years ago: Summoned
by British lawmakers to
answer for a phone hacking
and bribery scandal at one
of his tabloids, media mogul
Rupert Murdoch told a parliamentary committee hearing
he was humbled and ashamed,
but accepted no responsibility
for wrongdoing.
One year ago: Saying they
felt a “deep sense of ethical
responsibility for a past tragedy,” executives from Japan’s
Mitsubishi Materials Corp.
offered an unprecedented
apology to a 94-year-old former U.S. prisoner of war for
using American POWs as
forced labor during World
War II; James Murphy of
Santa Maria, California,
accepted the apology during
a solemn ceremony hosted by
the Museum of Tolerance at
the Simon Wiesenthal Center
in Los Angeles.
Thought for Today:
“Where there is unity, there is
always victory.” — Publilius
Syrus, Latin writer during the
first century B.C.
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
GOOSE VALLEY FIRE
DEPARTMENT
Monday
• Medical, 5600 block Big
Horn Avenue, 4:30 a.m.
• Medical, Metz Road, 3:33
p.m.
• Grass fire, PK Lane, 9:15
p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• No reports available at
press time.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Saturday
• Admissions — Anna L
Holder, Sheridan; Lisette
Michelle Holder, Sheridan
• No dismissals reported.
Sunday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
Monday
• Admissions — Chelsey L
Keegan, Sheridan; baby girl
Keegan, Sheridan
• Dismissals — Anna L
Holder, Sheridan; Lisette
Michelle Holder, Sheridan
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Alarm, Coffeen Avenue,
1:54 a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, East
Brundage Lane, 2:19 a.m.
• Gas theft, North Main
Street, 2:26 a.m.
• Welfare check, East
Sixth Street, 2:33 a.m.
• Citizen assist, West
Burkitt Street, 5:51 a.m.
• Threats (cold), North
Main Street, 6:34 a.m.
• Runaway, Crook Street,
8:13 a.m.
• Filthy premises, Custer
Street, 8:50 a.m.
• Hit and run, Martin
Avenue, 9:02 a.m.
• Animal welfare, Avoca
Place, 10:22 a.m.
• Accident, Brooks Street,
11:11 a.m.
• Careless driver,
Sheridan area, 11:25 a.m.
• Dog at large, Sheridan
area, 12:35 p.m.
• Illegal parking, North
Brooks Street, 12:54 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, Crooks
Street, 1:03 p.m.
• Accident delayed,
Coffeen Avenue, 1:20 p.m.
• Animal incident, Birch
Street, 2:22 p.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 2:28 p.m.
• Prescription, Coffeen
Avenue, 2:38 p.m.
• Welfare check, West
Fourth Street, 2:48 p.m.
• Counterfeiting, South
Main Street, 3:37 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
Crook Street, 3:48 p.m.
• Careless driver, Fifth
Street, 3:51 p.m.
• Animal cruelty, North
Jefferson Street, 5:06 p.m.
• Welfare check, Wyoming
Avenue, 5:35 p.m.
• Dispute all others, North
Main Street, 5:54 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
Coffeen Avenue, 7:07 p.m.
• Welfare check, Avon
Street, 7:52 p.m.
• Removal of subject,
North Main Street, 8:41 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 9:23 p.m.
• Careless driver, Yonkee
Avenue, 9:46 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:10 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:40 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, Eagle
Drive, 11:13 p.m.
• Bar check, Sugarland
Drive, 11:22 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
North Main Street, 11:37
p.m.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Monday
• DWUI, Johnson Street,
Big Horn, 1:25 a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, West
15th Street, 4:37 a.m.
• Assist Wyoming
Highway Patrol, mile marker 16, Interstate 90 westbound, 5:41 a.m.
• Welfare check, Big Goose
Road, 5:53 a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Country Estates Drive, 8:06
a.m.
• Trespass (cold), Hidden
Hills Road, 12:36 p.m.
• Accident, mile marker
11, Red Grade Road, Story,
2:22 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, West 13th Street, 4:12
p.m.
• Accident with injury,
Highway 335, Big Horn, 7:32
p.m.
• Open door, Dayton
Street, Ranchester, 11:07
p.m.
• Warrant service, mile
marker 1.5, Kleenburn
Road, Ranchester, 11:53 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until the
individuals have appeared
in court.
Monday
• Phillip James Turkey,
22, Sheridan, bench warrant
(contempt of court), municipal court, arrested by SPD
• Cody Allen Christie,
37, Banner, bench warrant
(contempt of court), circuit
court, bench warrant x2
(contempt of court), out of
county court, probation violation/revocation, circuit
court, arrested by SCSO
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 67
Female inmate count: 13
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 5
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 3
Number of releases for the
previous day: 13
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
WEDNESDAY
Dancers step to the beat during
the powwow Wednesday at
the Sheridan Inn.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SERVICE NOTICE |
OBITUARIES |
THURSDAY
59
Partly sunny
99
Partly sunny and
very warm
57
97
Almanac
Temperature
High/low .........................................................96/53
Normal high/low ............................................88/54
Record high ...........................................104 in 1998
Record low ...............................................43 in 1982
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.16"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.72"
Year to date .................................................... 8.01"
Normal year to date ....................................... 8.89"
63
A t-storm
around in the
p.m.
Sunlit and not
as hot
98
86
58
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
5:40 a.m.
5:41 a.m.
5:42 a.m.
8:48 p.m.
8:47 p.m.
8:46 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
8:29 p.m.
9:10 p.m.
9:48 p.m.
5:32 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
7:39 a.m.
Full
Last
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
July 26
Aug 2
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Hardin
58/96
Broadus
64/101
Parkman
59/97
Dayton
58/99
Lovell
62/94
Cody
61/92
Ranchester
60/97
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
64/99
Basin
58/100
59/99
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
Clearmont
60/99
Story
63/93
Gillette
63/100
Buffalo
66/97
Worland
57/101
Wright
66/97
Kaycee
61/97
First
Aug 10
Quarter
Pounder
Here are the results
of Monday’s
Cowboy Draw
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
23-28-33-36-37;
Estimated jackpot:
$400,000
Next drawing:
July 21
National Weather for Wednesday, July 20
Thermopolis
53/99
July 19
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
www.thesheridanpress.com
53
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
A celebration of life for Randy Silbernagel, a 49-yearold lifelong Buffalo resident, who died Saturday morning at Johnson County Memorial Hospital in Buffalo,
will be held by his family at a later date. Donations in
Silbernagel’s memory may be made to the Jim Gatchell
Museum in care of the Harness Funeral Home at 351
Adams in Buffalo. Online condolences may be left at
www.harnessfuneralhome.com
SATURDAY
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.00"
October 17, 1956 - July 16, 2016
Online now: Destination
Sheridan magazine
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
Randy J. Silbernagel
Rachel Marie Dietz Dahlin was born
in Edmore, ND on October 17, 1956. She
went to be with Jesus, July 16th 2016
after a long and challenging illness. She
always projected a kind, cheerful and
loving soul, even in times of her illness.
Her love and the love for her continue
Rachel Marie forever intertwined with whomever she
crossed paths with. Her presence has a
Dietz Dahlin
permanent home etched into our minds
like a granite statue accompanied with
her beautiful smile and great sense of humor.
She is survived by her husband Bill Dahlin whom she
and he held a deep and caring love; step daughter Kaydee
Dahlin, son in law Lucas Winter, and her step grandchildren Flora and Leo; step son Tanner Dahlin; mother Violet
Dietz, sisters - Blanche (Glen) Ewert, Dawn (JD) Carrier,
Marlene (Kevin) Useldinger – all from North Dakota;
brothers Dean (LyTanya) Dietz, and Herby Dietz - all from
California; many loving nieces and nephews and grand
nieces and grand nephews; extended family; great friends
from around the country and different parts of the world.
Not to mention, she would want all to go forward being
happy, have fun and love life – it is fleeting.
She is preceded in death by her father Ed Dietz and other
family members eternal in the Kingdom of Belief where
she has proven holds a spot for her too.
During her short stay on this planet, Rachel was very
accomplished. She attended culinary school, collected
and was knowledgeable with antiques, enjoyed skiing –
downhill and cross country, loved to walk and ride her
bicycle, loved cats and dogs, did professional style needle
point work, loved her homes, she especially loved fishing
and entertaining family and friends at her lake home in
Minnesota.
She had no fear of hard work, having to pick rocks by
hand from the family farm fields in order to gain a higher
yield and butcher chickens for Sunday dinner. Her work
ethic was applied to all subsequent tasks she took on in
life.
She would want a special thanks and appreciation to
be acknowledged for all her angelic staff friends, who
she told them she loved and thanked on a daily basis at
Greenhouse Living, for taking great care of her and loving her back. They are truly special for what they do. She
considered them all close friends.
No flowers or gifts requested. Donations can be made
in her name to The National Stroke Foundation at 9707
East Easter Lane, Building B, Centennial, CO 80112, and
or, The Sheridan Dog and Cat Shelter, 84 East Ridge Road,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com. Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with
arrangements.
Billings
63/93
Partly cloudy
Rachel Marie Dietz Dahlin
Regional Weather
FRIDAY
A7
Stepping to
the beat
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Assist Goose Valley Fire
Department, grass fire, PK
Lane and Beckton Road, 9:41
p.m.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
93/62/pc
97/54/pc
89/62/t
92/57/pc
87/57/pc
100/59/pc
90/55/pc
86/43/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
95/67/s
95/60/pc
91/62/pc
90/65/pc
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96/66/s
90/58/t
87/50/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
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95/54/t
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84/44/t
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
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87/54/pc
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77/37/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
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Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
83/53/t
94/61/s
88/55/t
94/58/t
88/56/t
99/66/s
90/58/s
75/35/t
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
Trump campaign dismisses criticism of Melania Trump speech
CLEVELAND (AP) —
The Trump campaign on
Tuesday dismissed criticism
that Melania Trump directly
lifted two passages nearly
word-for-word from the
speech that first
lady Michelle
Obama delivered in 2008 at
the Democratic
National
Convention,
Trump
calling the complaints “just
absurd.”
Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort insisted
no mistakes had been made
with the speech and said the
issue was “totally blown out
of proportion.”
“There were a few words
on it, but they’re not words
that were unique words,” he
told The Associated Press.
“Ninety-nine percent of that
speech talked about her
being an immigrant and
love of country and love of
family and everything else.”
Mrs. Trump’s star turn
at the Republican National
Convention Monday night
captivated a GOP crowd that
had rarely heard from the
wife of Donald Trump. The
passages in question focused
on lessons that Trump’s
wife says she learned from
her parents and the relevance of their lessons in her
experience as a mother.
Manafort told CNN Mrs.
Trump was aware of “how
her speech was going to be
scrutinized” and said any
notion that she picked up
portions of Mrs. Obama’s
convention talk was “just
absurd.” He also tried to
blame Hillary Clinton.
“I mean, this is, once
again, an example of when
a woman threatens Hillary
Clinton, how she seeks out
to demean her and take her
down,” Manafort said. “It’s
not going to work.”
The White House declined
to comment on similarities
between the two prime-time
speeches, but the issue is
likely to arise at the daily
White House briefing.
The passages in question
came near the beginning
of Mrs. Trump’s roughly 10-minute speech. Her
address was otherwise
distinct from the address
that Mrs. Obama gave when
then-Sen. Barack Obama
was being nominated for
president.
In Mrs. Trump’s speech in
Cleveland, she said: “From
a young age, my parents
impressed on me the values
that you work hard for what
you want in life, that your
word is your bond and you
do what you say and keep
your promise, that you
treat people with respect.
They taught and showed me
values and morals in their
daily life.”
In Mrs. Obama’s 2008
speech in Denver, she said:
“And Barack and I were
raised with so many of the
same values: like, you work
hard for what you want in
life, that your word is your
bond, that you do what you
say you’re going to do, that
you treat people with dignity and respect, even if you
don’t know them and even if
you don’t agree with them.”
Republican National
Committee chairman
Reince Priebus said he
would “probably” fire his
speechwriters if they lifted
passages from someone
else’s remarks. Priebus told
reporters at a Bloomberg
breakfast that the controversy was a “distraction” but
said he expected the convention to get back on message
Tuesday.
Asked about Priebus’
comments, Manafort told
the AP, “Frankly, if I knew
somebody did it I would fire
them too.”
New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie tried to tamp down
the controversy, saying
“93 percent of the speech is
completely different” from
the speech Mrs. Obama
delivered. Christie said on
NBC’s “Today” show that
the women “expressed some
common thoughts.” He did
not explain how he arrived
at the 93 percent figure.
Another passage in Mrs.
Trump’s speech with notable similarities to Mrs.
Obama’s remarks addresses
her attempts to instill those
values in her son.
‘I mean, this is, once
again, an example
of when a woman
threatens Hillary
Clinton, how she seeks
out to demean her and
take her down.’
Paul Manafort
Trump campaign chairman
“We need to pass those lessons on to the many generations to follow,” Mrs. Trump
said. “Because we want our
children in this nation to
know that the only limit to
your achievements is the
strength of your dreams and
your willingness to work for
them.”
In the first lady’s 2008
speech, she said, “Barack
and I set out to build lives
guided by these values and
to pass them onto the next
generation, because we
want our children — and
all children in this nation
— to know that the only
limit to the height of your
achievements is the reach
of your dreams and your
willingness to work hard for
them.”
Trump’s campaign initially responded that Mrs.
Trump’s “immigrant
experience and love for
America shone through in
her speech.” The statement
didn’t mention Mrs. Obama.
“In writing her beautiful
speech, Melania’s team of
writers took notes on her
life’s inspirations, and in
some instances included
fragments that reflected
her own thinking,” Trump
spokesman Jason Miller
said.
In an interview with NBC
News taped ahead of her
convention appearance and
posted online early Tuesday,
Mrs. Trump said of her
speech, “I wrote it.” She
added that she had “a little
help.”
Administration asks new immigration review with 9 justices
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Obama administration
says the Supreme Court
should seek to break its
recent tie over plans to protect millions of immigrants,
when a ninth justice is on
the bench.
The Justice Department
request filed Monday argues
that the court should not let
the 4-4 tie in late June that
effectively killed the White
House’s plans be the last
word on an issue of such
importance.
The court has been
shorthanded since Justice
Antonin Scalia died in
February.
The filing also highlights
the Republican-controlled
Senate’s refusal to con-
sider President Barack
Obama’s nomination of
Judge Merrick Garland to
take Scalia’s place. Until
now, Justice Louis Brandeis
endured the longest wait
before a Senate vote, 125
days. Tuesday marks 125
days since Garland’s nomination.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Taking it all in
Seven-year-old Max Howarth watches the action from the grandstands during the second night of Sheridan WYO Rodeo Thursday at
the Sheridan County Fairgrounds arena.
IMF says Brexit will drag
down world economic growth
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Britain’s decision to leave
the European Union will
reduce global economic
growth this year and next,
the International Monetary
Fund says.
The IMF said Tuesday that
it is shaving its estimate for
worldwide growth to 3.1 percent this year and 3.4 percent in 2017. Both estimates
are 0.1 percentage points
lower than the bank’s previous forecast in April.
IMF chief economist
Maurice Obstfeld said the
bank was prepared “as of
June 22” — the day before
Britain’s vote — to slightly
mark up its global forecast,
citing unexpectedly strong
growth in Europe and Japan
and a partial rebound in
global commodity prices.
“But Brexit has thrown
a spanner in the works,”
Obstfeld said.
Britain must now renegotiate its trade relationship with Europe, creating
uncertainty that could erode
consumer and business confidence and freeze investment.
The world’s two biggest
economies — the United
States and China — are
unlikely to sustain much
damage from the tumult in
Europe, the IMF said.
The IMF earlier downgraded its forecast for U.S.
growth this year to 2.2 percent, after the American
economy got off to a slow
start this year, partly
because a strong dollar
pinched exports.
The fund has raised its
forecast for Chinese growth
this year to 6.6 percent
(from an April forecast of 6.5
percent).
SPORTS
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
LOCAL SPORTS BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Wyoming strong in
opening days of NHSFR
SHERIDAN — It’s been a
strong first couple of days for
Wyoming high school cowboys
and cowgirls at the National
High School Finals Rodeo in
Gillette.
Wyoming sits in sixth in the
overall team standings after
three performances at the competition, which began Sunday.
Locally, Emmy Ilgen and
Makenna Balkenbush led the
way in the first two days for
Wyoming.
Ilgen currently sits fifth in
girls cutting with a score of
145, just five points behind the
leader.
Balkenbush is right in the
mix in barrel racing, as well.
Her ride of 17.838 seconds has
her in 22nd place, and she’s less
than a half a second from the
top time of the week.
Gillette’s Shyann Russell
(17.624) and Sheyenne Jacobson
(17.738) sit just ahead of
Balkenbush at fifth and 14th,
respectively, contributing a big
chunk of the Wyoming girls’ 520
points, which has them ninth in
the girls team standings.
Casper team ropers Kellan
and Carson Johnson are in
seventh with their time of 7.27
seconds. Big Horn’s Wheaton
Williams and partner Jerren
Johnson were neck-and-neck
with Kellan and Carson in the
Wyoming state standings all
year. They have yet to ride at
the NHSFR.
As of Tuesday morning, the
Wyoming boys were in sixth
place with 715 total points.
The NHSFR will continue all
week in Gillette.
Locals earn 19
medals at Big Sky
State Games
SHERIDAN — A number of
local athletes competed in the
Big Sky State Games over the
weekend in Billings, Montana,
and there were plenty of medals
to go around for the group.
Collectively, the Sheridan
County athletes earned 11 gold
medals, five silver medals and
three bronze medals at the competition.
The Sheridan Ping Pong Club
made a name for itself in the
table tennis competition, earning nine of the 19 medals on the
weekend.
Noelle Cullison earned a gold
medal in the female 11-and-under division and a bronze in the
female 16-and-under division.
Sawyer Trahan took silver in
the 11-and-under division, and
Decker Trahan took gold in the
male 16-and-under bracket.
Rod Trahan and Brad Balmer
took gold medals in the adult
divisions — Trahan in the
male 40-and-under division and
Balmer in the male 50-and-under division. Balmer also took
gold in the hard bat open division.
Nicole Cullison took bronze
in the hard bat open division
and added a silver in the open B
division to round out the weekend’s table tennis awards.
In regular tennis, Ella Bree
took bronze in 16-and-under
singles, while Robert and Sam
Morton took gold in the fatherson doubles bracket.
Lyle Brice dominated the
trapshooting competition, twice
a champion in the doubles and
A handicap divisions. He also
took silver in the A singles competition.
Casey Prior took a silver
and gold in 17-and-under horse
jumping events, and Dayton’s
Matt Conrad took gold in the
50-54 age group of cycling with
a time of 1 hour, 9:46.89 minutes.
Jodi Damm and Paul Phillips
concluded the list of local medal-winners with a gold and
silver, respectively, in the 5K
road race. Damm finished with
a time of 26:07.72 in the female
35-39 division, and Phillips finished with a time of 22:57.28 in
the male 40-44 division.
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Former Cardinals exec sentenced to prison
BY JUAN A. LOZANO
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON (AP) — A federal judge sentenced the former scouting director of the St.
Louis Cardinals to nearly four years in prison Monday for hacking the Houston Astros’
player personnel database and email system
in an unusual case of high-tech cheating
involving two Major League Baseball clubs.
Christopher Correa had pleaded guilty
in January to five counts of unauthorized
access of a protected computer from 2013 to
at least 2014, the same year he was promoted
to director of baseball development in St.
Louis. He was fired last summer and now
faces 46 months behind bars and a court
order to pay $279,038 in restitution. He had
faced up to five years in prison on each
count. Correa will remain free on bond until
he reports to federal prison within about six
weeks.
Correa read a letter in court before he was
sentenced by U.S. District Judge Lynn N.
Hughes and he said he was “overwhelmed
with remorse and regret for my actions” that
cost him his career and his home.
“I violated my values and it was wrong. I
behaved shamefully,” he said. “The whole
episode represents the worst thing I’ve done
in my life by far.”
The judge scolded Correa for his continued
blaming of the Astros for his actions, saying
Correa was acting like he was in middle
school. Hughes did not elaborate on this
information — part of a sealed presentencing report — but when he pleaded guilty in
January, Correa had maintained he found
proprietary Cardinals’ information in the
Astros’ database.
SEE HACKING, PAGE B8
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Kris Clark, right, bumps knuckles with Bryan Martini after Clark blasted a home run over the left field fence during the Troopers alumni game Saturday at Thorne-Rider
Stadium. Clark and the alumni won the game 21-6.
WISDOM
PREVAILS
Alumni beat current
Troopers 21-6 in annual
Rodeo Week battle
Brothers Connor, left, and Nolan McCafferty share a laugh at third base
during the Sheridan Troopers alumni game Saturday at Thorne-Rider
Stadium. The annual contest takes place on the Saturday of Rodeo
Week and pairs former Troopers players against the current squad.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Story, bullpen help Rockies to 7-4 win over Tampa Bay
BY PAT GRAHAM
AP SPORTS WRITER
DENVER (AP) — Jason Motte
smacked his glove and then
screamed into it as he walked off
the mound chomping his gum.
“This was fun,” he said.
Only a reliever would think
that after escaping a major jam.
Trevor Story hit a two-run
homer in the fifth, Colorado’s
bullpen stranded the tying run
on third in two straight innings
and the Rockies held off Tampa
Bay 7-4 on Monday night, extending the Rays’ road skid to 11 in
a row. Story’s 22nd homer of the
season gave the Rockies a 5-1
lead. The bullpen made it hold
up to make a winner out of Tyler
Anderson (2-3), who ran into
trouble in the seventh and surrendered three of his four runs.
Reliever Adam Ottavino got
two outs in the seventh with the
tying run on third. Motte allowed
a leadoff triple to Evan Longoria
in the eighth before striking out
the side.
“Adrenaline is kind of what
drives me,” Motte said. “I love
those situations, not that I want
to go out there and do it every
single time.”
Ottavino looked like his old
self in his most meaningful performance since being activated
from the 60-day DL on July 5. He
missed most of last season after
Tommy John surgery.
“We were able to do a good
job,” Ottavino said. “Motte did
a great job behind me. That was
the story of the game.”
No arguments from the Rays.
“We’ve got to find a way to get
those guys in,” Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said. “The guys
know that. They’re doing everything they could to get the big
hit, the big fly ball, it just didn’t
happen. I think you saw Motte
dial it up there.”
The Rockies added two runs
in the eighth and Carlos Estevez
closed it out in the ninth for his
sixth save.
SEE PITCHING, PAGE B8
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
IOC seeks legal advice on banning Russia from Rio Olympics
summer sports as being part of
systematic cheating in Russia,
and confirmed the manipulation
LONDON (AP) — International
of Russian doping samples at the
Olympic officials will “explore the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi.
legal options’” for a potential total
The IOC “will explore the legal
ban on Russia from the games in
options with regard to a collective
Rio de Janeiro, and are taking
ban of all Russian athletes for the
measures to punish athletes and
Olympic Games 2016 versus the
officials involved in the state-run
right to individual justice,” the
doping conspiracy.
15-member ruling executive board
The IOC executive board
said in a statement following a
announced steps on Tuesday
meeting by teleconference.
following a scathing report by
The IOC noted that it will have
a World Anti-Doping Agency
to take into account a decision
investigator who accused Russia’s coming on Thursday from the
sports ministry of overseeing dop- Court of Arbitration for Sport,
ing of the country’s athletes across which will rule on Russia’s appeal
28 Olympic sports.
against the ban on its track and
WADA and other anti-doping
field athletes from Rio. That ban
officials urged the IOC to consider was imposed in November by the
the unprecedented step of excludIAAF and upheld last month.
ing the entire Russian contingent
Meantime, the IOC said it
from the Rio Games.
has started disciplinary action
The International Olympic
against Russian sports ministry
Committee stopped short of supofficials and others implicated
porting such a move, but didn’t
in McLaren’s report, including
rule it out either.
denial of accreditation for the Rio
First, the IOC said, it will “care- Games.
fully evaluate” the report issued
The IOC also:
on Monday by Canadian lawyer
— said it will not organize “or
Richard McLaren, who listed 20
give patronage” to any sports
BY STEPHEN WILSON
AP SPORTS WRITER
event or meetings in Russia,
including plans to hold the
European Games in the country
in 2019.
— will launch retesting, including forensic analysis, of doping
samples from the Sochi Games.
Moscow’s former doping lab director, Grigory Rodchenkov, said
dirty samples of Russian athletes
— including gold medalists —
were swapped out in the middle of
the night for clean samples, with
the help of Russian intelligence
service officials.
— set up a commission to carry
out a “full inquiry” into all of the
Russian athletes who competed in
Sochi, along with their coaches,
officials, and support staff.
— asked WADA to extend
McLaren’s mandate to disclose the
names of Russian athletes whose
positive doping samples were covered up, and whose samples were
manipulated in Sochi.
— called on all international winter sports federations to
“freeze” their plans for holding
major events in Russia, including
world championships and World
Cups, and to seek alternative ven-
ues in other countries.
The IOC said the “provisional
measures” would apply until Dec.
31, and be reviewed by the IOC
that month.
Earlier Tuesday, summer
Olympic sports federations made
clear they do not support a blanket ban on Russia for Rio, and
prefer doping was handled on an
individual basis.
The Association of Summer
Olympic International Federation
asked WADA “to immediately provide all the detailed information
to the 20 international federations
concerned so that they may begin
processing the individual cases
under their own separate rules
and regulations as soon as possible, and in line with the WADA
Code and the Olympic Charter.
“It is important to focus on the
need for individual justice in all
these cases.”
The association said it endorses
all federation decisions, “including those that take into account
collective responsibility of organizations under the IFs’ governance.”
That means, rather than apply-
ing a total ban, federations could
suspend individual Russian
sports. That’s already the case
with the IAAF, which barred
Russia’s track athletes from
the games following previous
WADA-commissioned reports into
Russian doping.
The summer association’s position falls in line with recent comments by IOC President Thomas
Bach, who has cited the need to
strike a balance between “individual justice and collective punishment.” He said last week that, if
summer sports were implicated in
the McLaren report, the international federations would have to
decide on the eligibility of Russian
athletes “on an individual basis.”
McLaren’s report uncovered
a state-run doping scheme that
ensnared 28 sports, both summer
and winter, and ran from 2011 to
2015.
The investigation told of 312
positive tests that Russia’s deputy minister of sport directed lab
workers not to report to WADA.
Russia’s intelligence service, the
FSB, was also involved, the report
said.
Golfer
Camilo
Villegas
pulls out of
Olympics
BY DOUG FERGUSON
AP GOLF WRITER
TROON, Scotland (AP) —
Camilo Villegas of Colombia
pulled out of the Olympics
on Monday because he is
trying to keep his job on the
PGA Tour.
Villegas had indicated for
the last two weeks that he
wanted to be in Rio for golf’s
return to the Olympics for
the first time since 1904.
While he considered the
Zika virus — Villegas and
his wife are trying to start a
family — his main concern
was work.
Having pulled out the
Barbasol Championship last
week with a thumb injury,
he is No. 146 in the FedEx
Cup standings. Only the
top 125 advance to the playoffs and keep full cards for
the following season, and
Villegas has only four tournaments left. He is playing
the RBC Canadian Open this
week.
“This is an incredibly
difficult decision for me,
but ultimately I have to do
what’s best for my career,”
Villegas said.
He is the 21st male golfer to withdraw from the
Olympics, and he joins
Brendon de Jonge of
Zimbabwe in citing his job
security for pulling out.
“Right now, I have not
secured my PGA Tour card
for next season and I have
several opportunities to
improve my FedEx Cup
standing, one of which overlaps with the Olympics,” he
said. “I have waited until
the last minute to withdraw
as I have been working hard
to secure my playing privileges so I can continue to
represent Colombia on the
PGA Tour.”
By withdrawing, Colombia
will not have a male golfer
in the Olympics next month.
Villegas would be replaced
by Jose-Felipe Lima of
Portugal, which now will
have two players in the
60-man field. The 21 players
who have pulled out include
the top four in the world —
Jason Day, Dustin Johnson,
Jordan Spieth and Rory
McIlroy.
The Olympics at least
will have two of the major
champions from this year
in Masters winner Danny
Willett of England and
British Open champion
Henrik Stenson of Sweden.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Running as a team
Tyson Emborg, center, runs down Main Street with Kali Jenson, left, and Tabor Jenson during the Sneakers and Spurs race Friday in downtown Sheridan.
New Baylor AD Rhoades sees opportunities, not challenges
firm that accused football coaches and staff
of interfering with investigations into sexual
assault complaints against players, and even
DALLAS (AP) — Mack Rhoades doesn’t preimpeding potential criminal proceedings.
tend to fully understand the mistakes Baylor
Big 12 board members already have a copy of
has made. The school’s new athletic director is the 13-page findings of fact prepared by Pepper
just intent on doing his part to make sure they Hamilton, the only written report about the
don’t happen again.
investigation. Baylor regents were also given a
Rhoades was formally introduced Monday
more extensive oral report.
by Baylor, a program reeling from
Rhoades, who won’t start full-time at Baylor
allegations that it didn’t properuntil Aug. 15, said the best thing is for the
ly handle sexual assault claims
school to be transparent and forthright.
against some football players.
“I want a culture where we understand that
“There are just certain things
there is no one entity, anything bigger than
that we won’t tolerate and moving Baylor University itself,” Rhoades said.
forward, you know, everybody will
At least three lawsuits have been brought
be on that same page,” Rhoades
against Baylor by women who claim the school
Rhoades
said. “And when I say everybody,
was indifferent to or ignored claims of sexual
that’s the university, that’s the
assault and didn’t enforce federal gender disathletics department, that’s our coaches, our
crimination protections under Title IX.
student-athletes. Everyone.”
When Baylor released the Pepper Hamilton
His introduction came on the first day of Big report in May, football coach Art Briles was
12 football media days, and a day before interimmediately suspended and was gone a month
im president David Garland and two Baylor
later after reaching a mutual agreement with
regents make a presentation to the league’s
the school. Baylor president Ken Starr was
board of directors and answer questions. That
demoted and AD Ian McCaw later resigned.
board, made up of league presidents and chan“Sexual violence is a topic throughout our
cellors, could possibly levy sanctions against
country and it certainly happens on other camBaylor.
puses, and this is an opportunity for Baylor
Garland said Baylor officials will tell board
University, and certainly the athletics departmembers all they know from the external inde- ment, to be a leader in how we deal and handle
pendent review by the Pepper Hamilton law
sexual violence,” Rhoades said. “I’ve got three
BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP SPORTS WRITER
unbelievably beautiful daughters that I love,
and if you ask what’s your motivation, there’s
my motivation.”
Rhoades then pointed out his daughters,
ranging in age from 18 to 22, sitting in the
front row.
The 50-year-old Rhoades had been Missouri’s
athletic director for 15 months.
Before that, he was AD for nearly six years
at Houston, where he hired former Ohio State
offensive coordinator Tom Herman as head
coach of the Cougars. He was the athletic
director at Akron from 2005-09 and worked in
the athletic departments at UTEP, Marquette
and Yale.
“Much has been written about my motivations for coming to Waco. Let me be clear: This
is an opportunity,” he said. “An opportunity to
help lead one of the world’s leading Christian
universities in our familiar Texas. A state
where we came to love many, many years ago.
A state where my grandfather, my hero, was
born and raised.”
Garland called Rhoades a relationship builder who cares about people campus-wide and
strives to know them.
“I’m confident that he’s going to build the
kind of partnerships that we need to make the
improvements that Baylor is committed to
make,” Garland said. “Mack is a man of faith
and he believes in and is excited about the mission of Baylor University that is 170 years old.”
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 5:05 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Boston, 5:10 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 6:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 6:40 p.m.
Toronto at Arizona, 7:40 p.m.
Wednesday
Atlanta (Harrell 1-1) at Cincinnati (DeSclafani 4-0),
10:35 a.m.
N.Y. Mets (Colon 8-4) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks
8-6), 12:20 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 4-13) at Colorado (De La Rosa
6-6), 1:10 p.m.
Toronto (Stroman 7-4) at Arizona (Corbin 4-8), 1:40
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 0-1) at Washington (Gonzalez
5-8), 5:05 p.m.
Miami (Chen 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hellickson 6-7),
5:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Anderson 4-10) at Pittsburgh (Locke
8-5), 5:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 1-5) at Boston (Pomeranz
8-7), 5:10 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 4-7) at St. Louis (Garcia 6-6),
6:15 p.m.
Thursday
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 10:05 a.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Atlanta at Colorado, 6:40 p.m.
WYO RODEO |
86th Sheridan WYO Rodeo
World Champion Indian Relay Races
July 13-16 at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds
Final Results
Wednesday
(heat; winning team; tribe; hometown)
1. Starr School; Black Foot; Browning, Montana
2. Red Bone Relay; Crow; Crow Agency, Montana
3. Brew Crew; Oglala Sioux; Pine Ridge, South
Dakota
4. Medicine Tail; Crow; Crow Agency, Montana
Thursday
1. Brew Crew; Oglala Sioux; Pine Ridge, South
Dakota
2. Mountain River; Assiniboine-GrosVentre; Hays,
Montana
3. Lakota War Path; Oglala Lakota; Oglala, South
Dakota
4. River Road; Crow; Crow Agency, Montana
Friday:
1. Starr School; Black Foot; Browning, Montana
2. War Man; Crow; Hardin, Montana
3. Red Bone; Crow; Crow Agency, Montana
4. Mountain Timber; Shoshone-Bannock; Fort Hall,
Idaho
Saturday Consolation
(heat; winning team)
1. Old Elk Relay
2. Red Bone Relay
3. Mountain Timber
Saturday Championship
(place; team)
1. Brew Crew
2. Starr School
3. River Road
4. War Man
5. Blanket Bull
TRANSACTIONS |
PRO RODEO |
Through July 17
All-around
1. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. $69,029
2. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $65,174
3. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $63,680
4. Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. $61,628
5. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas $58,645
6. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $57,718
7. Shay Carroll, Prineville, Ore. $51,842
8. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $51,037
9. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. $50,510
10. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $45,146
11. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. $35,809
12. Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. $35,522
13. Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta $34,759
14. Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D. $32,317
15. Kyle Lucas, Carstairs, Alberta $32,277
16. Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. $27,517
17. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $26,604
18. Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. $23,113
19. Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. $22,366
20. Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. $20,898
Bareback Riding
1. Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $87,681
2. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah $83,630
3. Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $76,823
4. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. $75,656
5. R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $68,579
6. Jake Brown, Hillsboro, Texas $68,164
7. Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. $60,205
8. Evan Jayne, Marseille, France $55,107
9. Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta $52,623
10. Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. $46,670
11. Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. $45,283
12. Ty Taypotat, Regina, Saskatchewan $43,227
13. Teddy Athan, Livermore, Calif. $38,785
14. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas $37,383
15. J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. $32,714
16. Casey Breuer, Mandan, N.D. $32,145
17. Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah $31,370
18. Colin Adams, Deloraine, Manitoba $30,970
19. Luke Creasy, Denton, Texas $30,838
20. Anthony Thomas, Kimberly, Australia $30,129
Steer Wrestling
1. Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. $57,588
2. Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $56,406
3. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas $52,321
4. Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. $50,847
5. Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas $46,850
6. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $42,938
7. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. $39,983
8. Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. $39,768
9. Jake Rinehart, Highmore, S.D. $36,678
10. Clayton Moore, Pouce Coupe, British Columbia
$36,171
11. Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah $35,065
12. Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La. $34,789
13. Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb. $33,283
14. Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan. $31,731
15. Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho $31,645
16. Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore. $29,170
17. Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii $28,654
18. Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla. $27,185
19. Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev. $27,102
20. K.C. Jones, Decatur, Texas $27,063
Team Roping (header)
1. Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas $71,142
2. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. $64,477
3. Kolton Schmidt, Barrhead, Alberta $63,115
4. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $54,876
5. Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. $54,546
6. Zac Small, Welch, Okla. $53,930
7. Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $52,873
8. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas $52,160
9. Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. $44,714
10. Aaron Tsinigine, Tuba City, Ariz. $40,296
11. Spencer Mitchell, Williams, Calif. $38,094
12. Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. $36,722
13. Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta $35,759
14. Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. $34,710
15. Adam Rose, Willard, Mo. $33,407
16. Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. $32,536
17. John Alley, Adams, Tenn. $31,877
18. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $30,455
19. Shane Philipp, Washington, Texas $29,964
20. Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. $29,691
Team Roping (heeler)
1. Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. $67,797
2. Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. $65,766
3. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $54,613
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Chaotic exchange
Team Medicine Tail has a rough exchange in the World Champion Indian Relay Races during the first night of the Sheridan
WYO Rodeo Wednesday at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
4. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $53,368
5. Wesley Thorp, Stephenville, Texas $53,275
6. Junior Nogueira, Burleson, Texas $52,873
7. Shay Carroll, Prineville, Ore. $47,650
8. Quinn Kesler, Holden, Utah $44,683
9. Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. $39,261
10. Jeremy Buhler, Abbotsford, British Columbia
$38,153
11. Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $37,325
12. Justin Davis, Cottonwood, Calif. $36,507
13. Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas $36,030
14. Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. $35,779
15. Dugan Kelly, Paso Robles, Calif. $35,766
16. Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas $35,058
17. Walt Woodard, Stephenville, Texas $33,777
18. Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn. $31,877
19. Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $30,704
20. John Philipp, Washington, Texas $29,964
Saddle Bronc Riding
1. Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $99,913
2. Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah $87,695
3. CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $82,069
4. Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah $61,225
5. Jake Wright, Milford, Utah $60,809
6. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. $49,421
7. Jake Watson, Hudsons Hope, British Columbia
$49,002
8. Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta $46,588
/LP[O+L4VZZ/LÅPU3H
10. Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta $45,159
11. Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. $42,397
12. Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta $39,251
13. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas $37,185
14. Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla. $36,748
15. Cody Wright, Milford, Utah $36,012
16. Tyrel Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $34,450
17. Chet Johnson, Douglas, Wyo. $32,255
18. Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah $31,720
19. Samuel Kelts, Millarville, Alberta $30,237
20. Ben Londo, San Luis Obispo, Calif. $28,824
Tie-down Roping
1. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. $74,134
2. Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas $62,550
3. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas $60,394
4. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. $53,207
5. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. $51,897
6. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $47,757
7. Riley Pruitt, Gering, Neb. $46,719
8. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. $44,786
9. Reese Riemer, Stinnett, Texas $43,231
10. Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas $41,417
11. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $36,276
12. Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas $35,807
13. Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $35,371
14. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas $34,414
15. Michael Otero, Lowndesboro, Ala. $33,522
16. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho $33,042
17. Stetson Vest, Childress, Texas $31,720
18. Blair Burk, Durant, Okla. $30,106
19. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas $29,978
20. Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. $29,608
Steer Roping
1. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas $49,757
2. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. $48,320
3. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $36,880
4. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $34,783
5. Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas $34,103
6. Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas $33,929
7. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas $32,216
8. Marty Jones, Hobbs, N.M. $30,199
9. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D. $29,188
10. Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. $26,527
11. Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. $25,983
12. Guy Allen, Santa Anna, Texas $25,863
13. Shay Good, Midland, Texas $25,339
14. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. $22,295
15. Lawson Plemons, Axtell, Texas $19,764
16. Dan Fisher, Andrews, Texas $19,396
17. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $19,302
18. Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas $14,794
19. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $14,278
20. Thomas Smith, Barnsdall, Okla. $13,621
Bull Riding
1. Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $88,882
2. Scottie Knapp, Albuquerque, N.M. $66,880
3. Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah $62,869
4. Jeff Askey, Athens, Texas $62,686
5. Cody Rostockyj, Lorena, Texas $59,863
6. Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash. $57,555
7. Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla. $56,398
8. Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. $54,975
9. Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah $53,149
10. Tyler Smith, Fruita, Colo. $51,555
11. Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla. $50,367
12. Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas $48,023
13. Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho $46,653
14. Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas $46,380
15. Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. $43,652
16. Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho, $42,651
17. Rorey Maier, Timber Lake, S.D. $42,242
18. Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas $40,878
19. Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $38,708
20. Riker Carter, Stone, Idaho $38,252
Barrel Racing
1. Mary Burger, Pauls Valley, Okla. $170,979
2. Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. $89,921
3. Mary Walker, Ennis, Texas $87,158
4. Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas $84,751
5. Michele McLeod, Whitesboro, Texas $77,302
6. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. $73,760
7. Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Utah $70,176
8. Sarah Rose McDonald, Brunswick, Ga. $65,022
9. Taylor Jacob, Carmine, Texas $63,528
10. Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas $57,237
11. Cayla Melby, Burneyville, Okla. $56,119
12. Cassidy Kruse, Gillette, Wyo. $48,941
13. Pamela Capper, Cheney, Wash. $48,893
14. Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas $46,359
15. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz. $41,191
16. Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas $40,860
17. Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $40,725
18. Taylor Langdon, Aubrey, Texas $39,393
19. Rachel Dice, Byron, Calif. $37,430
20. Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas $37,218
MLB |
American League
East Division
Baltimore
Boston
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay
Central Division
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
West Division
Texas
Houston
W
53
51
52
46
35
L Pct GB
38 .582
—
39 .567 1½
42 .553 2½
46 .500 7½
57 .380 18½
W
54
49
47
45
33
L Pct
38 .587
44 .527
45 .511
47 .489
59 .359
GB
—
5½
7
9
21
W
55
50
L
39
43
GB
—
4½
Pct
.585
.538
Seattle
47 46 .505 7½
Los Angeles
41 52 .441 13½
Oakland
41 52 .441 13½
Monday
N.Y. Yankees 2, Baltimore 1
Detroit 1, Minnesota 0
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 3
Colorado 7, Tampa Bay 4
L.A. Angels 9, Texas 5
Oakland 7, Houston 4
Seattle 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Tuesday
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Boston, 5:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 6:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 6:40 p.m.
Toronto at Arizona, 7:40 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 8:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.
Wednesday
Minnesota (Santana 3-8) at Detroit (Verlander 9-6),
11:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carrasco 6-3) at Kansas City (Kennedy
6-7), 12:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 4-13) at Colorado (De La Rosa
6-6), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Fister 9-6) at Oakland (Mengden 1-4),
1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Gonzalez 2-5) at Seattle (Hernandez 4-4), 1:40 p.m.
Toronto (Stroman 7-4) at Arizona (Corbin 4-8), 1:40
p.m.
Baltimore (Gallardo 3-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Pineda
3-9), 5:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 1-5) at Boston (Pomeranz
8-7), 5:10 p.m.
Texas (Perez 7-6) at L.A. Angels (Santiago 7-4),
8:05 p.m.
Thursday
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 5:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 8:05 p.m.
National League
East Division
W
L Pct GB
Washington
56 37 .602
—
Miami
50 42 .543 5½
New York
49 43 .533 6½
Philadelphia
43 51 .457 13½
Atlanta
32 61 .344
24
Central Division
W
L Pct GB
Chicago
56 36 .609
—
St. Louis
48 44 .522
8
Pittsburgh
47 45 .511
9
Milwaukee
39 51 .433
16
Cincinnati
35 58 .376 21½
West Division
W
L Pct GB
San Francisco
57 36 .613
—
Los Angeles
52 42 .553 5½
Colorado
43 49 .467 13½
San Diego
41 52 .441
16
Arizona
40 53 .430
17
Monday
Chicago Cubs 5, N.Y. Mets 1
Miami 3, Philadelphia 2, 11 innings
Cincinnati 8, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 10, San Diego 2
Colorado 7, Tampa Bay 4
Tuesday
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent C Alex Avila to
Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed C Yan Gomes on
the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Cody Anderson to
Columbus (IL). Reinstated C Roberto Perez from
the 60-day DL. Recalled LHP Kyle Crockett from
Columbus.
DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Warwick
Saupold from the 15-day DL and optioned him to
Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Claimed RHP Nick
Tepesch off waivers from Oakland and optioned
him to Omaha (PCL). Transferred RHP Kris Medlen
to the 60-day DL.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent OF Craig
Gentry to Salt Lake (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
Selected the contract of C Juan Graterol from Salt
Lake (PCL). Placed C Geovany Soto on the 15-day
DL, retroactive to July 16. Transferred INF Cliff
Pennington to 60-day DL.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Fired general manager
Terry Ryan. Promoted assistant general manager
Rob Antony to interim general manager.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Reinstated OF Mason
Williams from the 60-day DL and optioned him to
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned LHP
Edwin Escobar to Reno (PCL).
NEW YORK METS — Optioned OF Brandon
Nimmo to Las Vegas (PCL). Recalled OF Michael
Conforto from Las Vegas.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed INF Brett Wallace
on paternity leave. Reinstated OF Melvin Upton Jr.
from the bereavement list.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Sent 2B Joe Panik
to Sacramento (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
ketball League
MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Re-signed C Miles Plumlee to a four-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CAROLINA PANTHERS — CB Charles Tillman
announced his retirement.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed LB Justin Durant
to a one-year contract.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed RB Adian Foster to a
one-year contract.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed WR Dez
Stewart.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Named Brian Sandy president of Tucson (AHL).
BOSTON BRUINS — Named Kevin Dean coach of
Providence (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Re-signed D Reece
Scarlett to a one-year, two-way contract.
NEW YORK RANGERS — Traded C Derick Brassard and a 2018 seventh-round draft pick to Ottawa for F Mika Zibanejad and a 2018 second-round
draft pick. Agreed to terms with F Robin Kovacs on
an entry-level contract.
SAN JOSE SHARKS — Signed F Matt Nieto to a
one-year contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS — Suspended Columbus D Harrison Afful
one game for the red card issued to for serious foul
play in the July 16 match against D.C. United.
PORTLAND TIMBERS — Transferred G Adam
Kwarasey to Rosenborg BK (Tippeligaen-Norway).
COLLEGE
ALABAMA — Suspended football G Alphonse
;H`SVYPUKLÄUP[LS`HM[LYOL^HZHYYLZ[LKVU+<0
CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE — Named
Amanda Shannon women’s assistant basketball
coach.
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON — Named Barb
Sherwood assistant softball coach.
NEW MEXICO — Named Ben Dunbar men’s tennis
coach.
OHIO STATE — Dismissed RB Bri’onte Dunn from
the football team for a violation of team rules.
RANDOLPH-MACON — Named Phil Nicolaides
defensive coordinator and defensive pass game
coordinator.
SAINT ELIZABETH — Named Randy Velasco
women’s soccer coach.
SOUTH CAROLINA — Named Melanie Balcomb
offensive analytics director for women’s basketball.
UTEP — Named Kris Baumann men’s assistant
basketball coach.
Rangers trade center Brassard to Senators for forward Zibanejad
NEW YORK (AP) — The New York
Rangers have traded center Derick
Brassard to the Ottawa Senators for forward Mika Zibanejad in a deal involving
players coming off career seasons.
Rangers general manager Jeff Gorton
announced the deal on Monday, one that
included draft picks.
The Rangers also will receive the
Senators’ second-round draft pick in 2018.
Ottawa will get the Rangers’ seventh-round
pick that year.
The 28-year-old Brassard had a careerhigh 27 goals and finished second on the
team with 58 points in 80 games last season.
His 31 assists were 10 fewer than the previous season.
Zibanejad, 23, skated in 81 games with
Ottawa with 21 goals and 30 assists. He
established career highs in games played,
goals, assists, points, game-winning goals
(seven), and faceoff win rate (50.5 percent).
He has scored at least 20 goals in each of the
past two seasons.
Zibanejad gives New York a player who
has had success in the shootout. He has
tallied a goal on 13 of his 28 career NHL
that sent forward Marian Gaborik to the
shootout attempts, and he has five game-de- Blue Jackets.
ciding goals in the shootout.
Zibanejad will be a restricted free agent
Zibanejad led the Senators in
game-winning goals, faceoff wins,
and faceoffs taken, ranked third
in short-handed goals (two), tied
for third in games played, tied for
fourth in assists, and ranked fifth
in points and power-play points
(11) in 2015-16. He also ranked
third among Ottawa forwards in
PICKLES
short-handed ice time per game
(1:25).
The 6-foot-2 Swede has skated in
281 NHL games over parts of five
seasons (2011-12 to 2015-16), getting
64 goals and 87 assists. He was
selected by Ottawa with the sixth
overall pick in the 2011 draft.
Brassard skated in 254 games
with the Rangers over parts of
four seasons, getting 69 goals
and 105 assists. He was acquired
by New York from Columbus in
April 2013 in a multiplayer trade
after the 2016-17 season and will earn $2.62
million. Brassard is under contract through
2018-19, earning $5 million annually.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
Be confident in your memory
Ever forget why you went
into a room or step out of
the shower with shampoo or
conditioner still in your hair?
Whether you call it a brain
fart or a senior moment, it
happens to everyone. But
when you’re older, those epi-
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
sodes can be disconcerting.
Relax. If you’re healthy, don’t
smoke and don’t eat much
processed or fried food, such
lapses shouldn’t get to you.
A study from Georgia
Institute of Technology
points out that the older you
get, the more information
you’ve taken in and stored.
So, when you can’t recall the
name of someone you know,
it’s frequently because of
what the researchers called
“memory clutter.”
Seems that as you sift
through 60-plus years of
names in order to remember
one, it takes the brain a bit
longer to ID the right one.
If that extra time is worrying, you may react with a
heightened stress response
that makes it even harder to
recall the name! Your forget-
DEAR ABBY
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
STORY OF SON’S ABUSE
TAINTS WIFE’S MEMORIES
OF HUSBAND
DEAR ABBY: I am in
shock. My grown son,
“Ryan,” recently told me
he was molested by his late
father when he was a young
boy. I had no idea, but I
believe him. Ryan is an only
child and has recently started
seeing a counselor.
I loved my husband very
much and I believed he loved
me, but I no longer know
what to think or how to feel.
If he were still alive, I would
most likely leave him. But
fulness is caused by a crisis
of confidence! So, how do you
avoid that memory-fogging
self-doubt?
Don’t stress over longer
recall times. And keep your
brain firing at top speed.
Exercise regularly to keep
oxygen-rich blood flowing
through your brain. Don’t
smoke, and drink no more
than a glass or two of wine
daily. Stay away from
artery-damaging added sugars and syrups, saturated and
trans fats. Opt for anti-inflammatory omega-3s from
walnuts and fish like salmon.
Then you can confidently
reminisce about 1971 when
coach Bill Fitch recruited
Austin Carr for the now
(finally!) champion Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
what do I do with more than
40 years of mostly good memories? When I think about my
late husband now, I just feel
numb. Please help. -- NOT A
CLUE IN INDIANA
DEAR NOT A CLUE: That
your son didn’t tell you
sooner, while you could have
intervened, is regrettable.
And that he is now seeing a
counselor about it is laudable
-- you should give him all the
love and support you can. I
don’t blame you for having
mixed emotions, but at this
point it is too late for you to
change anything. Hang onto
the good memories and let
them comfort you, because
you can’t change history.
DEAR ABBY: I saw myself
in the Jan. 15 letter from
“Diana in San Diego,” the
lifelong compulsive nail biter
who wants to stop. I was
diagnosed with trichotillomania (hair pulling and skin
picking) three years ago, and
it is closely related to nail
biting. The trichotillomania
learning center website,
www.trich.org, is worth
checking out for treatment
options such as medications,
behavioral therapy and
support groups. -- ERICA IN
MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR ERICA: Thank
you for the information. I
received a deluge of helpful,
caring responses to Diana’s
letter, and several readers
mentioned trichotillomania
in the more severe cases.
Some had taken my advice
to keep an emery board and
cuticle scissors nearby a step
further, by learning to do a
full manicure and suggested
she paint her nails a dark or
bright color to help her stop
biting.
Buffing was mentioned as a
way to smooth imperfections
that could be “triggers.” A
reader in Virginia added decorations to her nails -- decals,
stencils and rhinestones
-- that served as an impediment and cured her of the
habit.
Other readers have used
artificial (acrylic) nails as
a way to allow their natural fingernails to grow out.
James in Delaware helped
his ashamed then-fiancee
hide her bitten-off, stubby
nails when showing off her
engagement ring by suggesting she put on artificial ones.
While she proudly showed off
the ring to everyone, her own
nails grew out beautifully
and she never chewed them
again.
Additional growing-out
tips mentioned by readers
were: coating the nails with a
hardening solution, keeping
the cuticles moist with petroleum jelly, cuticle cream
-- even lip balm. A reader
reassured Diana that there
are indeed “bad-tasting”
products that successfully
work as a deterrent.
Keeping the hands busy
has helped many readers.
Breaking off a corner of one
of her front teeth stopped
Pat in Texas. Others found
addressing a vitamin deficiency did the trick for them.
Wearing a tight rubber band
around the wrist to snap
when the urge hits can give
a nail-biter the incentive
to stop. And from Sandi in
San Francisco: “A teacher
showed me an enlarged picture taken from a microscope
of what was under fingernails. Now I don’t even think
about biting!”
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
Household Goods &
Appliances
(2) METAL folding
chairs w/ covered seat
$7.00 ea
674-7270
A GOOD Working Kenmore Washing machine $50.00 672-5119
ANTIQUE LAMP w/
Colorful Shade. $50.
751-1866
CARD TABLE. $15
674-7270
COMFORTABLE
MATCHING chairs. (2)
$30 each
(307)674-7270
FOUR POSTER twin
wood bed frame $50.
752-7943
HARD COVER Explore
America series. 10
books. $25/set. 307674-4086.
MODERN GLASS coffee table 38" round.
$35.00. Janet.
307-630-6037
MODERN GLASS tv
stand. 16" wide. 58"
long. $35.00. Janet
307- 630-6037
NOVELTY OLD Fashion Ice Box. Ideal for
storage. Top opens.
20"w x 29"h x 12"d. $30
674-7270
POWER LIFT & recline
chair. Asking $300
OBO. 674-7279.
SPRING CLEANING?
NEED TO
DECLUTTER?
SELL ANY ITEM
($50 or less)
FOR FREE IN THE
SHERIDAN PRESS!
For more details,
call Amber 672-2431.
WEBER GRILL $50
752-7943
Boats
www.thesheridanpress.com
Computers-Accessories
Unfurn Apts for Rent
COMPUTER INTEL I-3
syst. 4 GB ram. 500 GB
HD. Dvd drive w/ 20"
flat screen. Canon
Copy/ fax mx320 new
cartridge. Comp. desk.
$200.00 752-3134
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
Office Machines &
Equipme
SHARP MX-2610N
Copier. Digital. Full Color. Multi-functional system; Copy. Print. Scan
& More! Asking $1500
(307)675-1919
Farm & Ranch Supplies
10" 3 Point. Post Hole
Auger. $175 obo
307-763-1004
FORD 8N tractor with
blade. Rebuilt & restored. $4000 OBO.
672-2638
HESSTON 565 Round
baler. 1000 PTO for
parts. $500 obo.
655-9067
MEN'S XL VARSITY
Jacket. Dark Green w/
black leather sleeves.
Only worn twice. $100.
307-683-6529.
Services
JOURNEY MAN
painter for hire. 35 yrs
experience. Interior &
Exterior. Excel. Work!
(307)752-4197
For Lease
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
LRG. 1 BR. apt. for rent
with walk in tub. $550 +
elec. No smoking/pets
(307)763-6000
Unfurn Apts for Rent
2 BR. No smkg/pets.
$700/mo. 1 yr lease.
752-5852
LOW INCOME
apartments for rent in
Buffalo & Wright.
Contact
Grimshaw Investments
for more information at
307-672-2810
Hardware & Tools
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY
duty 6" bench grinder in
very good condition.
$30
672-5119
EXTRA LARGE 2 BR.
Low utils. $650/mo. +
$500 dep. 1 yr. lease.
Ref's req'd. 751-2445.
1 BR. W/D. No
smk/pets. $575/m+ Util.
752-5852.
1 BR. Newly remodeled. Laundry facilities. A/C. $600/mo.
util. incl. No smoking.
751-5815.
RANCHESTER STUDIO apt., $450/mo.+
heat & dep., util. pd. No
smk. Pets? Laundry rm.
incl. 307-752-9392.
2 BR, clean, charming,
2nd flr. duplex. $650. incls gas/cbl. 1 quiet person only. No pets/smk.
Excel. ref's. req'd.
672-0077
Houses, Unfurn for Rent
COMFORTABLE 2 BR.
w/ basement sleeping
room 1.5 BA. sm.
garage/ shop.A/C.
Newly remodeled. New
windows, carpet, appliances. $1125/mo.
No pets. Ref. req.
751-3993
Office/Retail Space for
Rent
3,000-12,000 sq./ft of
executive office building for lease in an established commercial
park. Lease part or all.
Call (307)752-8112
Carroll Realty Co.
1530 SQ/ft office space
located on Coffeen Ave.
High visibility & parking.
Please call for lease
terms & rates.
(307)751-4915.
NICE 1100 sq/ft office.
Easy access. Close to
down town. 673-5555
15' X 30' storage unit for
rent. 673-5555
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Avoca
Apartments
Accepting applications for 1
and 2 bedroom apartments.
Rental assistance available
based on availability and
eligibility. This institution is an
equal opportunity provider.
– NO SMOKING PROPERTY –
307-674-7862
1352 Avoca Place
TDD #711
1 BEDROOM Apartment. Part. Furnished.
Washer & Dryer.
Includes all utilities No
pets/smoking. References required.
$700/mo $500 Cleaning Dep. (307)751-4883
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
MOTEL 6 &
QUALITY INN.
FT/PT maintenance
person needed for local
apartment building.
Applicant must have
experience in building &
grounds maintenance &
repairs. Salary based
on experience. Submit
resume to Human
Resources, PO Box H,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
INTERSTATE STORAGE. Multiple Sizes
avail. No deposit
req'd. 752-6111.
Equal Housing Opportunity
CEMENT MIXER.
Electric Motor. On
rubber wheels. With
hitch. Good condition.
$350 (307)655-2240
Equal Housing Opportunity
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
Pets & Supplies
TWO BATHROOM vanities (includes countertop and sinks) $50 each
752-7943
672-8681 TDD #711
Storage Space
NEW HOLLAND 7450
rotary disk bind swather. 13 ft. cut. 1000 PTO
almost new. 700 acre.
$25,000 boo 655-9067
Building Materials
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
TREE EQUIP for Sale.
1250 Vermeer Chipper.
$12,000
If interested call
751-5277
Miscellaneous for Sale
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
$
COMMERCIAL GRADE
Toledo Band Meat Saw.
Model 5201. Has 5 new
bands. $600.
(307)674-4032
HESSTON 565A Round
baler. 540 PTO double
twine arms. $3500 obo
655-9067
2 AQUARIUMS with
supplies. One 5 gal.
tank & one 10 gal. hex
tank w/ stand.
$20 ea. obo. 674-4642
1 bedroom... 460- 560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Section 8 available
depending on availability
and eligibility
Non Smoking Property
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
$
Miscellaneous
Furnished Apts for Rent
1992 DV 17C Tracker
Boat. 40HP Motor w/
trailer. $2000 of upgrades in 2016! Excellent shape $5500.00
307-751-1016
Fax: (307) 672-7950
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
ELDORADO STORAGE Helping you conquer space. 3856 Coffeen. 672-7297.
Help Wanted
COFFEEN CAR Care
center is looking for a
full time Lube Technician. Apply in person
with resume.
752 Coffeen Ave.
ONE P/T Energetic,
hardworking,
knowledgeable about
kitchenwares,
experience in retail
customer service. Gift
wrap & store display a
plus. Computer savvy a
MUST…Excel, Word,
Outlook & Quickbooks
a bonus. Must work flex
hrs Mon-Sat, includes
standing for extended
periods of time, heavy
lifting & stairs. Must be
able to drive to run
errands & take
deliveries. Submit
cover letter & resume
with 3 professional
references in person
at 129 N. Main.
Serious applicants
only.
HAVE AN ITEM you
want to sell for
$50 or more?
Advertise with us!
ONLY $20.16!!!
Run it until it sells!
Call Amber
672-2431
FULL-TIME Teller
position available at
Security State Bank –
Sheridan. Seeking
applicant with
excellent customer
service and strong
cash-handling skills,
with the ability to
organize, prioritize and
work in a team
environment as well as
independently. Starting
wage DOE. Benefits
include health/ dental/
vision/ 401K/ paid
leave. Submit resume
and references to
Security State Bank,
Attn: Kellie Arndt, 2070
Coffeen Ave.,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Closing date 7/22.
Security State Bank is
an equal opportunity
and affirmative action
employer of women,
minorities, veterans
and individuals with
disabilities.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
P/T Secretary/
Receptionist for
accounting firm.
Individual must be
self-motivated,
energetic, and
proficient in computer,
organizational & public
relation skills.
Competitive salary &
benefits. Please send
resume to P.O. Box H,
Sheridan, WY 82801
QUALITY HEDGE &
Tree is looking for
experienced landscape laborers!
Landscape
experience helpful
but will train. Pay
DOE. Call 672-2842
Leave message!
COSNER
CONSTRUCTION CO.
is seeking experienced
carpenters. Must have
basic tools, a valid
driver's license &
transportation. Local,
year round work,
excellent pay &
benefits package.
Please apply in person
at 543 North Main
Street or fax resume to
674-4211
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland Dr.
B5
LOST PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Help Wanted
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
ARBY'S is looking for
friendly enthusiastic
team members to work
all shifts.
Top starting wage
DOE & Benefits.
Please apply in person.
Delivery
problems?
Call 672-2431
PERKINS RESTAURANT is accepting
applications for all positions. Day and evening shifts available.
Apply in person at
1373 Coffeen Ave or
online at
www.please applyon
line.com/sugarlanden
terprises. EOE
THE
SHERIDAN PRESS
is looking for:
Independent
Contractors
to deliver papers.
If interested please
stop by:
The Sheridan Press
144 East Grinnell
St. Sheridan, WY
82801
Help Wanted
IT/DATA Network
Tech- Advanced
Communications
Technologies, Inc.
(ACT) Sheridan, WY.
Provides technical
support for customer
communications
networks. Installs,
programs, monitors &
supports all customer
data lines & equipment,
to include internal IT
systems & services as
well as Corporate &
Internal Network
Security. Associates
Degree & exp
equivalent to 1 year of
work on software
applications, PC &
networking equipment.
Send resume with
Cover Letter to:
ACT/Range HR.
* PO Box 127 *
Forsyth, MT 59327;
E-mail
[email protected]
www.actaccess.net
Autos & Accessories
13 SP Fuller transmission. $1600. 4 GMC 8
hole wheels 165. $100.
4 875 R165 tires. $300.
OBO. Like new. 7522887
16 K Fifth wheel swivel
hitch with rails & hardware. $225
(307)672-5119
2 LEATHER CAR SEAT
COVERS. $50. 7511866.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup Flatbeds, Krogman Bale
Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
SUBARU LEGACY.
AWD 1995 Hatchback.
117,000 Mi. $2000
751-7253
Pickups & Vans
LOST GARMIN GPS
model 600. Around the
Dayton/ Ranchester.
(406)366-3858
Hints from Heloise
Dear Readers: In a recent
column, a
reader wrote
about placing
a WASHCLOTH under
a coffee maker
so it could be easily pulled
out from under a counter.
Here are some reader responses:
Ray S. in Washington
wrote: “I had exactly the
same problems with my coffee maker. I stuck a thumbtack in each leg, and now
it slides smoothly on the
countertop.”
Betsy C. in California
wrote: “I had made coffee
under a cabinet long enough
for the steam to ruin the
bottom of the cabinet. I suggest waiting until coffee is
made before moving the pot
back under the cabinet.”
(Good hint, Betsy! -- Heloise)
Glenda in Arkansas
wrote: “I worked in a hospital, and a fire was caused
by putting a towel under a
coffee maker, causing the
appliance to overheat. The
small legs under a coffee
maker are designed to keep
air flowing underneath it so
it won’t overheat.”
Glenda, thanks for the in-
formation! The legs on our
coffee maker are REALLY
small/short, with just a tiny
amount of clearance. -- Heloise
CRAYON MARKS
Dear Heloise: My 2-yearold granddaughter colored
on the face of her popular
brand of baby doll that
comes with a book. Is there
something that will take off
the crayon without ruining
the doll’s face? -- Jean H.,
via email
Oh no! Start by using a
washcloth dampened with
lukewarm water. Next,
make a paste of baking
soda and more lukewarm
water. Now gently rub the
crayon marks with a little
of the paste in a circular
pattern, being careful not to
get water in the doll’s eyes.
Then wipe with a clean, wet
washcloth and towel-dry.
Repeat as necessary. Baking
soda is a must-have! For
more hints using baking
soda, order my six-page
pamphlet by going online
to www.Heloise.com, or
by sending $5 and a long,
self-addressed, stamped (68
cents) envelope to: Heloise/Baking Soda, P.O. Box
795001, San Antonio, TX
78279-5001. Use this same
2011 GMC Denali HD
3500, Crew Cab,
every option available,
108k highway miles,
Duramax Diesel,
Allison Transmission.
New Tires,
$33,000 752-1259
Heloise
baking-soda paste to clean
plastic toys with marks on
them. -- Heloise
SAFETY FIRST
Dear Heloise: This is a
hint I came upon accidentally. I’m obsessive about
turning off the iron, even
though it turns off automatically after a while. I
keep my iron plugged into
a power strip, and use that
to turn it off and on. I happened to plug a small lamp
into the same strip when
I needed some extra light,
and realized that when the
iron is on, the lamp is, too.
Now I just glance into the
laundry room on my way
out, and if it’s dark, I’m
good to go! -- Susan H., via
email
I used to leave the iron on,
too! No more -- I don’t iron
much! -- Heloise
REUSE BASKETS
Dear Heloise: When our
chest freezer went out, I
used the wire baskets inside
my kitchen cabinets! They
are plastic-coated. I can use
the handles to pull out the
“drawers,” making items in
the baskets easily accessible. -- J.C. in Texas
Campers, Trailers
2011 GMC Sierra
SLT 3500, Crew Cab,
103,000 highway mi.
Duramax Diesel.
Allison Transmission.
New Tires, $29,000
752-1259
BRAHMA TRUCK topper. Black. Excellent
shape. 5' wide x 7'3"
long. $200 OBO. 7634631.
SET OF re-conditioned
heads. Dodge 360 engine. Around 1999 model. $50. 672-5119.
ATV’s & Snowmobiles
6 lines of
text
1 b&w
photo
Campers, Trailers
2009 FLAGSTAFF
8528 RLWS. Classic
Super Lite. 2 Slides.
Low Retail $22,900
asking $19,000
(307)871-1560
2011 STARCRAFT Autumn Ridge. 278 BH. 29
Ft. Great Condition. Under book @ $10,300.
674-5381
2015 SUMMERLAND
by Springdale SM2670.
sleeps 6-8. Fully Contained. 1 13' slide.
$16,500 (513)235-3147
'07 CAMEO.
35' 5th wheel.
3 slides. Fireplace.
4 Season. B&W hitch.
Skirt. Lots of storage.
$25k obo
751-4206/752-6141
Go online...
www.thesheridanpress.com
existing goals and don’t
begin anything crucial.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Possessing a diploma or
a degree is an accomplishment that proves expertise.
Although a few letters after
your name is commendable
you understand that the
real proof of your skill is
putting knowledge to work.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Stick to what you know and
know the status quo. The
planetary traffic lights are
red where new financial
ventures are concerned.
You may have very good
ideas, but this is not the
time to put important ideas
into action.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): When someone rolls
out the red carpet for you it
will surely hide the cracks
in the sidewalk. Your confi-
dence in others may be misplaced. Wait to make a deal
or give assurances, as you
can’t live on compliments
alone.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Sidestep selfish concerns to
overcome inertia. Demonstrate unwavering devotion
to a cause. Wave the flag
and root for the home team.
Your lack of expertise in
business planning or financial schemes puts you at a
disadvantage.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
If you absorb knowledge
like a sponge you will be
better prepared for a final
commitment. Demonstrate
your sincerity in concrete
ways if you are truly committed to a business project,
a worthy goal or a relationship.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
$40.16
runs till it
sells
672-2431
LUXURY 2013 Komfort by Dutchman. 5
slides, w/ fireplace. Tall
ceilings. Dble fridge &
freezer. King sized bed.
Arctic pkg. cust. skirting
$55,500 obo 674-8252
1998 34' Cardinal 5th
wheel. 3 slides. Very
nice. $13,500. 6727935
2001, 1061 Lance Pickup Camper. Full Loaded, Excel. Cond. Slide
out. Satellite. In-board
Generator $16,000
751-2501 or 751-6154
2008 KAWASAKI Brute
force 750 400mi. winch
& snowplow. $5500
751-3993
ATV WAGON. All Aluminum. Suspension
System. Turf Tires. Like
New. $650.00 751-4460
Motorcycles
2008 KEYSTONE
Everest like new. 37
feet long. 3-slides. 1
1/2 baths. Sleeps 6.
4-season pkg. $24,000.
Call 672-0996
1985 HONDA Shadow.
KEYSTONE MONTANA
$700 (307)763-7621
High Country 323 RL
fifth wheel. Lots of
2006 DYNA Wide
Extras incl. W/D!!!
Glide 5k mi. screaming
3 slide outs. Stored
eagle pipes. $8500
inside. $32,000
Call 751-6723
307-763-9469
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress Diana Rigg was born
in Yorkshire, England
on this date in 1938. This
birthday gal plays the
thrice Emmy-nominated
Olenna Tyrell on “Game of
Thrones,” although she may
be better known for her role
as Emma Peel on the ‘60s
series “The Avengers.” She
also portrayed the recurring role of Sutton on “You,
Me and the Apocalypse”
and has appeared on “Doctor Who.” Her film work includes “The Painted Veil,”
“Snow White,” and “On Her
Majesty’s Secret Service.”
ARIES (March 21-April
19): You may be exhilarated
by enthusiasm. Your closest
companions, however, may
be simply trying to keep the
cogs of commerce running
smoothly. Keep focused on
Selling
your
camper?
Motor Homes & RV’s
2012 PALOMINO
TOY HAULER.
25' Bumper pull.
Outdoor kitchen.
Like New. $19,500
(307)752-4461
NEW DODGE PU
starter. Fits 1999 & other. Fits 360 or 318 engines. $35. 672-5119.
2005 CHEVY C-4500
stock full size box.
Duramax 75k miles.
Custom painted. Dual
axles. semi tires.
674-8252 $39,000 obo
Motorcycles
2008 HARLEY Davidson Road King. With
windshield. Back rest.
Custom handlebars.
7400 mi $13,000.
(307)660-2539
NEW TIRE. PI75x80
R13 $25
672-5119
Lost & Found
FOUND. N. Side of
Lake Desmet blue pale
& back pack with fishing equipment. Please
call (307)461-0994
Pickups & Vans
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
Jeraldine Saunders
Root for the home team.
Show your support for those
who are linked to you by
ties of blood, location or
community. You will find
that doors previously closed
to you will open once you
prove your sincerity.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Use elbow grease to
slide past problems. Make
big strides in your career
or business by simply doing
what is expected. If you ask
for favors from influential
people you will be expected
to repay them with interest.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The tables may
be turned. Someone may
view you in a negative light
today. Don’t trust a sudden
change of heart. A friendly
overture might not be exactly what it seems so wait
to make a commitment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Guidance might be just
what you need. Listen to the
sage advice of those who are
higher up on the food chain.
The opinions and beliefs of
people in power can have
a great deal of influence on
your future success.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Trust and truth may
undergo a trial. Agreements
made now can become muddled. Emphasis might be
placed on the wrong values
under these celestial conditions. Keep up your end of a
commitment.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): One may be the loneliest number, but you don’t
have to worry about being
alone under these stars.
You may prefer to work in
a quiet place, away from
noise and disruptions, but a
loved one will be just a hug
away.
IF JULY 20 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Good luck,
good friends and plenty of
energy help you “make hay”
throughout the next three
to four weeks, but good
times can’t last forever. In
September and October you
may be more ambitious
and may be tempted to start
something new that could
disrupt your life. Maintain
a low profile and work like
a little beaver so you don’t
lose ground. Hang out with
friends, or concentrate on
participating in group,
club, and organizational
activities in December. You
are everyone’s darling next
May so that is a good time
to look for a new job, make
important changes, or meet
Mr. or Ms. Right.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob Rolston
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that
it is working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause
by carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and
are presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
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BIZZARO
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-751-6428
Mark
Kinner
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-674-4777
B7
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest
in property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
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Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in
the event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is
not supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Proposed fiscal year 2017 budgets
for the Juvenile Justice
Joint Powers Board
Notice is hereby given that a scheduled public
hearing on the proposed Fiscal Year 2017
2015 budget
of the Juvenile Justice Joint Powers Board will be
held on July 26, 2016, 5:30pm, MDT, in the
County Commissioner's Board Room, Second
Floor, Sheridan County Courthouse. Summaries
of the proposed fiscal year budget for fiscal year
ending June 30, 2017, are as follows:
JUVENILE JUSTICE
FY 2017 ESTIMATED REVENUES
Intergovernmental Support (County, City, Towns)
$270,000
Grant Participation $61,000
Other Revenues $16,000
Interest Income $1,000
Total $348,000
FY 2017 ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES
Wages, Salaries, Benefits $211,000
Operating Expenditures $25,000
Capital Acquisitions $3,000
Contract Services $109,000
Total $348,000
DRUG COURTS
FY 2017 ESTIMATED REVENUES
Local Governmental Support (State, Juvenile
Justice) $432,000
Other Revenues $20,000
Total $452,000
FY 2017 ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES
Wages, Salaries, Benefits $294,000
Operating Expenditures $20,000
Contract Services $138,000
Total $452,000
Copies of the proposed budgets may be obtained at the Sheridan County Justice Office, 41
West Whitney, Sheridan, Wyoming.
/s/ Tom Ringley
Tom Ringley, Chair
Publish: July 19, 2016.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
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following schedule: If we receive the Legal Notice by:
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paper.
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paper.
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Friday Noon – It will be published in Wednesday’s paper.
•
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information,
descriptions
and
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information are required with each legal notice. A
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Document attached.
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an “AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION” will be issued.
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department at 672-2431 if you have questions.
Bridge
Gene Luen Yang, a writer
who used to teach high
school computer science,
said, “In my classroom, I
would start my lessons with
a quick review of an old
topic. Then, I would introduce a new topic. Finally,
I would give my students a
problem to solve on their
own, one that would reinforce what I’d just taught.”
That is an excellent pedagogic method employed
in this column -- I think!
How would you critique the
auction? (If you use twoover-one game-forcing, how
would you bid?)
After South responded
two diamonds (the higher-ranking of
two five-card
suits first), North
should have
rebid a forcing
two hearts, not
jumped to three
hearts. South’s
two-over-one
response guaranteed a second
bid (unless North
leapt to game and
South thought a
slam was impossible). Then South
sensibly rebid
three no-trump.
Now North
should have bid
four diamonds,
over which
South could
have signed off
in four no-trump
Phillip Alder
or, if nervous that partner
would have thought it was
Blackwood, raised to five
diamonds.
What should three hearts
mean? I treat it as a splinter
bid, showing four- or fivecard diamond support, a
good hand and a singleton
or void in hearts.
In two-over-one, the
auction is one spade - one
no-trump - two hearts - two
no-trump - three diamonds
(or three no-trump) - three
no-trump - pass.
Against three no-trump,
East knew from partner’s
fourth-highest club-two lead
that declarer had five clubs,
but no shift looked sensible.
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016
HACKING: Commissioner Manfred waiting for details before decision on Cardinals
FROM B1
Hughes said Correa’s actions were primarily about a loss of trust.
“The loss is that every baseball team has
much tighter security, making it harder
for honest people to go about their daily
lives ... A lot of little people whose lives
were adversely affected by the cost taken
to defend against people like you,” Hughes
said.
MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred could
discipline the Cardinals, possibly with a
fine or a loss of draft picks, but has said
only that he looked forward to getting
details on the case from federal authorities.
“Now that the criminal process has been
completed, Commissioner Manfred has
asked the Department of Investigations
to conduct a complete investigation of the
facts in this matter, including requesting
information from the appropriate law
enforcement authorities,” the league said
in a statement. “The commissioner hopes
that the investigation can be completed
promptly to put him in a position to take
appropriate action.”
Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. had
blamed the hack on “roguish behavior” by
a handful of individuals.
“As we did with the government during
its investigation, we intend to fully cooperate with the commissioner’s office in connection with its investigation so that this
matter can finally be resolved,” DeWitt said
in a statement Monday.
Kenneth Magidson, the U.S. Attorney in
Houston, said he was pleased with the sentence, which he added concludes his office’s
investigation. No one else was charged in
the case.
“This is a very serious offense and
obviously Judge Hughes saw it as well,”
Magidson said.
Giles Kibbe, the Astros’ general counsel,
called it “a sad day for baseball.” He added
that despite what Correa had claimed, the
Astros were not using any proprietary
information from the Cardinals.
“The Astros were the victim in this case,”
Kibbe said.
The data breach was first reported in
June 2014 when Astros general manager
Jeff Luhnow told reporters the team had
been the victim of hackers who accessed
servers and published online months of
internal trade talks. Luhnow had previously worked for the Cardinals.
Federal prosecutors say the hacking cost
the Astros about $1.7 million, taking into
account how Correa used the Astros’ data
to draft players. Kibbe said that in the two
years Correa was in the Astros’ system, he
accessed the team’s network about 60 times.
The FBI said Correa was able to gain
access using a password similar to that
used by a Cardinals employee who “had
to turn over his Cardinals-owned laptop
to Correa along with the laptop’s password” when he was leaving for a job with
the Astros in 2011. The employee was not
identified, though Luhnow left St. Louis
for Houston in December of that year to
become general manager.
Prosecutors have said Correa in 2013
improperly downloaded a file of the Astros’
scouting list of every eligible player for that
year’s draft. They say he also improperly
viewed notes of trade discussions as well
as a page that listed information such as
potential bonus details, statistics and notes
on recent performances and injuries by
team prospects.
The Astros rely heavily on sabermetrics
in their evaluation of players and use a
database called Ground Control to house
proprietary information.
Authorities say that after the Astros took
security precautions involving Ground
Control following a Houston Chronicle
story about the database, Correa was
able to still get into it. Authorities say he
hacked the email system and was able to
view 118 pages of confidential information,
including notes of trade discussions, player
evaluations and a 2014 team draft board
that had not yet been completed.
Luhnow was a key figure in the
Cardinals’ own database, called Redbird.
At least one former Cardinals employee —
Sig Mejdal, a former NASA employee and
analytics expert — had joined Luhnow in
Houston.
Luhnow has not commented in detail
about the case, though he’s denied using
any of the Cardinals’ intellectual property or information from Redbird to create
Houston’s database.
The Cardinals are among baseball’s most
successful franchises on and off the field.
Only the New York Yankees have more
World Series titles than the 11 won by St.
Louis. The Astros and Cardinals were
rivals in the National League Central until
Houston moved to the American League in
2013.
PITCHING: Ottavino, Motte avoid threats
Kiermaier to ground out
and end the threat.
Drew Smyly (2-11) had
Then, it was Motte’s turn.
another rough outing, surAfter Longoria lined a triple
rendering five runs in five
to the deep center, Motte
innings to remain winless
struck out former Rockies
over his last 10 starts.
outfielder Corey Dickerson
“I didn’t pitch very well
swinging, followed by Logan
today,” Smyly said.
Morrison and Steven Souza
Tampa Bay’s 11th straight Jr. on called third strikes.
road loss is the third-longest
“Unbelievable,” said
streak in team history. The
Anderson, who allowed four
club record is 13 in a row in runs in 6 1-3 innings for
2002.
his second straight win. “If
Story’s homer gave the
you want to win games, you
Rockies a four-run cushion, have a bullpen like that.
which appeared more than
“That was pretty special
enough for Anderson. The
tonight.”
lefty surrendered an RBI triTRAINER’S ROOM
ple to Longoria in the first
Rays: INF Steve Pearce
inning — after a 32-min(strained right hamstring)
ute rain delay before first
is expected to be activated
pitch — but settled in until
from the DL on Tuesday. ...
the wheels came off in the
RHP Chase Whitley threw
seventh. In the inning, Tim
a scoreless inning for Class
Beckham had an RBI triple, A Charlotte on Monday in
followed by a run-scoring
his first game since Tommy
single by Luke Maile and
John surgery early last
an RBI double from Nick
season. In the same conFranklin.
test, RHP Brad Boxberger
Exit, Anderson. Enter,
(oblique) allowed a homer
Ottavino.
in an inning of work.
With a runner on third,
Rockies: OF Gerardo
Ottavino struck out Logan
Parra’s sprained left ankle
Forsythe and got Kevin
felt “a little stiff,” after a
FROM B1
recent workout in Atlanta,
MGR Walt Weiss said. “He
didn’t have a setback, want
to make that clear,” Weiss
added.
FAMILIAR FACES
Dickerson never really
got to say goodbye to his
Colorado teammates after
he was traded to Tampa Bay
on Jan. 28 for reliever Jake
McGee. So Dickerson wandered over the Rockies’ way
Monday.
“It was pretty good to
say, ‘What’s up?’ and be
able to see old faces,” said
Dickerson, who didn’t start.
“I’m pretty close to all of
them. It will be cool to compete and play against them.”
McGee felt the same way
about his Tampa Bay buddies.
“I have a new pitch I’ll
show them,” he joked.
UP NEXT
Tampa Bay lefty Blake
Snell (1-4) makes his first
interleague start Tuesday
at Coors Field. Righty Tyler
Chatwood (8-5) will take the
mound for the third time
since returning from the DL
with a strained back.
US Basketball team opens camp
in Las Vegas with new faces
and DeMarcus Cousins for stepping up as
leaders on the opening day of camp.
“It’s a new group of guys (so) I get a
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Coach Mike
chance to go out there and kind of be a
Krzyzewski got his first glimpse at the new- leader to the team and kind of enjoy it,”
look U.S. national team, as the team opened Anthony said. “For me, it’s about going
camp at UNLV with just two players back
over there and having fun, getting that feelfrom the 2012 national team that won the
ing back, getting that fun feeling back and
gold medal in London.
try to get a gold medal.”
Carmelo Anthony returns for his fourth
As he’s done in year’s past, Krzyzewski
run at the Olympics, after winning a bronze met with the team and staff privately
medal in 2004 and gold medals in 2008 and
Sunday night, showing players video clips
2012, while Kevin Durant is looking for
from previous years and delivering a motia second gold medal after playing on the
vational speech about what it means to
championship team in 2012.
represent the United States. With the recent
And though there are 10 new faces on
unrest involving civilians and police offithe team that will represent the U.S. in
cers, the message came across even stronthe Olympics, several were a part of the
ger for this team.
2014 FIBA world championship team, and
“Whenever you get a chance to sit in that
know what is expected of them. Making
meeting and see and understand what we’re
things easier, as it was for the 2008 Beijing
doing is bigger than us, as basketball playOlympics, the 12-man roster has been set
ers, it gives you chills and puts everything
since June, giving Krzyzewski and his staff in perspective,” DeMar DeRozan said. “It
ample time to devise rotations and focus on makes your job easier to go out there and
the players they knew were coming.
do what you love to do and represent your
“It’s the angst you go through in that
country.”
week of determining from 16 to 12, (it) takes
And as the national team takes on its new
away from your preparation,” Krzyzewski
look, ushering in a new era, the 69-year-old
said. “We have had none of that. That’s a
Krzyzewski is making his final run with
huge advantage, and also for these guys,
the Olympic team. Under his watch, the
you got 12 guys (who) have been completely U.S. won two gold medals at the 2008 and
focused on being on this team. It’s really a
2012 Olympics as well as the 2007 FIBA
good advantage.”
Americas Tournament and the 2010 and
Krzyzewski said he was pleased with
2014 world championships.
Anthony taking charge the first day, being
Nonetheless, Krzyzewski said the most
a vocal leader for what he believes could
important thing is to avoid focusing on the
be one of the best defensive teams he’s ever milestones he, Anthony and Durant are
coached since becoming taking over in
headed toward, and aim toward maintain2005. He also credited Durant, Kyrie Irving
ing a united front with the entire squad.
BY W.G. RAMIREZ
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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