The Sheridan Press E-Edition Dec. 30, 2014

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The Sheridan Press E-Edition Dec. 30, 2014
TUESDAY
December 30, 2014
129th Year, No. 188
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Special
master rules
against Montana
water claims
Press
THE SHERIDAN
Goodfellow Fund
• Building 1 – Sugarview Drive, $10
• Anonymous, $200
• Eyas Foundation, $5,000
Total Contributions: $10,860
Donations will be accepted through Dec. 31.
CHEYENNE (AP) — A special
master presiding over an interstate water rights lawsuit pending before the U.S. Supreme Court
recommends denying most of
Montana’s remaining claims that
Wyoming failed to deliver enough
water on the Tongue River.
If ultimately accepted by the
Supreme Court, Monday’s report
by Barton Thompson Jr. will
resolve the bulk of the lawsuit
that Montana filed against
Wyoming in 2007 while leaving
Montana little to show for it.
‘Montana failed to use
immense amounts of water
during the drought years of the
last decade, and Wyoming
believes that the compact
requires more diligence from
Montana before it can be heard
to complain about uses in
Wyoming.’
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Catching a ride
A group of youngsters are hauled up the hill by Rose Sheeley and Brian Sheeley, right, Saturday morning at the bowl off Highway 14 West of Dayton.
Peter Michael
Wyoming Attorney General
“What this case confirms is that
the primary solution to water
issues in Montana on the Tongue
River can be found in Montana’s
operation of the Tongue River
Reservoir,” Wyoming Attorney
General Peter Michael said
Monday. He had worked on the
case for Wyoming for years before
taking over as attorney general.
SEE WATER, PAGE 3
Report: Police
gun deaths up,
still below
average
WASHINGTON (AP) — The
number of law enforcement officers killed by firearms jumped by
56 percent this year and included
15 ambush deaths. But gun-related police deaths still remain far
below historic highs and lower
than the average annual figures
in the past decade, according to a
report released Tuesday.
The annual report by the nonprofit National Law Enforcement
Officers Memorial Fund found
that 50 officers were killed by
guns this year. That’s far higher
than the 32 such deaths last year
but the same as 2012 figures.
In 2011, 73 officers were killed in
gunfire, the most in any year in
the past decade. The average
since 2004 is 55 police deaths
annually.
SEE POLICE, PAGE 3
Legislators chose Indiana-based Medicaid expansion plan
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Wyoming legislators decided Dec. 16 against implementing a Wyomingbased Medicaid expansion plan in favor of
one based in Indiana.
The Interim Joint Labor, Health and Social
Services Interim Committee rejected the
Wyoming Strategy for Health, Access,
Responsibility and Employment, or SHARE
plan after a 7-7 vote.
SHARE was developed by the Wyoming
Department of Health, which negotiated
with federal officials to create a plan that
could gain federal approval.
“The Department of Health spent months
talking to the CMS (Centers for Medicaid
and Medicare Services), the regulatory
agency to develop that plan,” Rep. Mary
Throne D-Cheyenne said. “I think it was the
better plan for Wyoming, but Sen. Scott preferred the savings plan.”
Wyoming was one of several states that
initially chose not to participate in federal
Medicaid expansion to include the “gap population,” those who do not qualify for
Medicaid but cannot afford health insurance, even under the Affordable Care Act.
That gap population in Wyoming includes
approximately about 17,600 people.
SHARE would have required eligible participants up to 100 percent of the federal
poverty level to make small co-payments for
certain health services. Those who fell
between 101 and 138 percent of the poverty
level would have also had minimal premiums between $20 and $50 based on family
size and income. There would have been no
additional state funding going into the program. WDOH director Tom Forslund said
earlier this year that with SHARE, certain
safety net programs could be discontinued.
Calls to reach Forslund for additional comment were not immediately returned.
The Indiana-based plan would establish a
savings account into which eligible participants would contribute monthly deposits of
between $3 and $25 based on family size and
income. Federal or state funds would contribute additional monies up to $2,500. Those
who fall between 100 to 138 percent of the
federal poverty level would lose their coverage if they fail to make their monthly savings contributions.
SEE MEDICAID, PAGE 2
Two-vehicle crash
closes I-90 Monday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Emergency crews responded to a
two-vehicle motor vehicle accident that closed a
portion of Interstate 90 on Monday just after 11
a.m. near mile marker 23.5.
The passing lane of the highway was closed for
approximately 45 minutes.
According to Sheridan Fire-Rescue personnel,
extrication was required as a result of the crash
caused when a semi-truck rear-ended an SUV that
was not visible due to snow dust.
Sheridan Fire-Rescue, Rocky Mountain
Ambulance, the Sheridan County Sheriff ’s Office
and Wyoming Highway Patrol responded to the
incident.
Officials said no injuries sustained in the accident were life threatening.
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
COURTESY PHOTO |
A semi-truck crashed into an SUV Monday on Interstate 90 near mile marker 23.5. While at
least one person was transported to Sheridan Memorial Hospital, officials indicated that none
of the injuries sustained in the crash were life threatening.
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Claudette Wagner
of Sheridan
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
BUSINESS
SPORTS
COMICS
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B2
B4
B7
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
MEDICAID: Wilson: We need a plan
“We need a plan, and the best plan would
be the easiest and simplest plan,” Wilson
“We have no evidence this plan is going to said. “The Indiana plan is going to be more
work,” Throne said. “It will be expensive. It expensive, harder to run, and it’s going to
will take too long to implement
have more overhead.”
and we’ve already lost two years
Part of the plan’s overhead will be the
of money without an expansion hiring of on outside agency to oversee
plan.”
nearly 18,000 individual health savings
Rep. Sue Wilson, R-Cheyenne,
accounts.
said with the change of admin“That’s really not something that the
istration coming in the next few Health Department can handle,” Wilson
years, there is a possible change said.
Wilson
in entitlement reform that
Despite the vote, though, supporters of
would change the way both the
SHARE have not given up on the plan.
SHARE plan and the Indiana plan would
“It can be brought back as an individual
work. That means a plan that takes longer
bill, but it’s hard to say,” Wilson said. “It
to implement will not be working for the
didn’t pass the labor committee and Sen.
needs of those in the state soon enough.
Scott has a lot of influence in Legislature.”
FROM 1
Ohio attorney
dies at Wyoming ski hill
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Taking on the slopes
Nine-year-old Abbie Butzin makes her way down the slopes on her snowboard Saturday morning at
the bowl off Highway 14 West of Dayton.
US Supreme Court takes case, plaintiff missing
WASHINGTON (AP) — Bobby Chen
has been fighting the city of Baltimore
over the demolition of his row house
for years, suing and acting as his own
attorney. When the U.S. Supreme Court
agreed to hear his case it seemed he’d
found relief. But now the court can’t
find Chen, something that’s unheard of
at the high court.
Dec. 22 was Chen’s deadline to mail
his main legal brief in the case. But
Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy
Arberg says the court hadn’t heard
from him as of Tuesday.
Lawyers familiar with the case say
the court has a few options. It could
wait, dismiss the case, appoint Chen a
lawyer or search for him. It also wouldn’t be unheard of for Chen to pop up at
the last minute.
JACKSON (AP) — An Ohio man who
died at a Wyoming ski resort was asphyxiated, apparently after falling head-first
into powdery snow in a steep ravine.
Teton County investigators and employees of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort
spent Monday trying to reconstruct the
accident that killed 54-year-old Marc
Krantz of the Cleveland suburb of Pepper
Pike.
Krantz was a managing partner with the
Cleveland law firm of Kohrman Jackson &
Krantz.
Deputy Dave Hodges says Krantz was on
the mountain with family, but was skiing
by himself on Sunday when the accident
happened. Skiers found Krantz upside
down “in a fairly steep ravine ... in powdery snow” at about 3:10 p.m. Sunday.
Ski patrol and a doctor performed CPR.
Krantz was pronounced dead at a Teton
Village clinic at 3:50 p.m.
Wind chills down to 50 below in parts of Rockies
DENVER (AP) — Wind
chills down to around 50
below zero are possible in
the Rockies as bitter cold
arctic air hangs over the
region.
Colorado’s Eastern
Plains, including Colorado
Springs, could see wind
chills over 25 to 35 below
zero from Tuesday night
into Wednesday. In southern Wyoming, the National
Weather Service says a few
locations in the Laramie
Valley could feel as cold as
50 below zero with the
wind. Elsewhere the temperature will feel like 20 to
35 below.
Sub-zero temperatures
covered nearly all of
Montana Tuesday morning, with a wind chill as
low as 45 below at
Monarch southeast of
Great Falls.
Temperatures are expected to rise all the way into
the 20s for New Year’s Eve.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
WATER: Decision found Wyoming liable for depriving Montana of water in ‘04, ‘06
FROM 1
Michael said he’s reviewing Thompson’s report and
may appeal on some points.
“Montana failed to use
immense amounts of water
during the drought years of
the last decade,” he said,
“and Wyoming believes that
the compact requires more
diligence from Montana
before it can be heard to
complain about uses in
Wyoming.”
Montana had launched the
litigation saying it intended
to prove that Wyoming had
been shorting it on water
deliveries at the state line
nearly every year since 1950
— the year the two states
and North Dakota entered a
formal agreement over how
to administer water on the
Tongue and Powder rivers.
Montana originally had
claimed it was improper for
Wyoming irrigators to use
sprinkler irrigation on their
fields. Compared with older
flood irrigation methods,
Montana claimed that sprinklers unfairly used more of
the water that was diverted
from the river while returning little.
The Supreme Court ruled
earlier that Wyoming irrigators could use more efficient
irrigation methods without
violating the compact.
Montana also had challenged the effect on river
flows of pumping groundwater for coal-bed methane
production in Wyoming.
However, Thompson ruled
Montana failed to prove that
CBM pumping was hurting
water deliveries at the state
line.
Thompson made a series
of rulings significantly limiting Montana’s claims
before presiding at a 25-day
trial last year.
Thompson, a law professor
at Stanford University, had
ruled before trial that
Montana couldn’t claim that
Wyoming had failed to deliver adequate water on the
Tongue River in years when
Montana hadn’t demanded
more water at the state line.
That and other rulings left
Montana with only a few
years to argue about.
Montana went into trial
claiming Wyoming had
shorted Montana farmers
about 10,000 acre-feet of
water over the last decade.
An acre-foot is the amount
of water covering an acre to
a depth of 1 foot, or about
325,000 gallons.
Thompson stated in
Mondays’ report that
although Montana suffered
shortages in many years,
the state could only prove
that it gave notice to
Wyoming seeking more
water and suffered actual
damages in 2004 and 2006.
He ruled Wyoming owes
Montana for 1,356 acre-feet
of water it failed to deliver
in those two years.
“Under my analysis,
Wyoming’s liability is relatively small,” Thompson
wrote in Monday’s report.
He recommended the
Supreme Court should
endorse further proceedings
to determine the damages
Wyoming owes for its underdelivery.
Anastasia Burton, spokeswoman for Montana
Attorney General Tim Fox,
issued a statement Monday
emphasizing that
Thompson’s report found
that Wyoming had violated
the Yellowstone River
Compact.
“The decision found
Wyoming liable for depriving Montana of water in
2004 and 2006, years in
which severe drought conditions significantly harmed
Montana farmers and
ranchers along the Tongue
River,” Burton said.
Burton said the Montana
attorney general’s office
would review the 350-page
report and make more
detailed comments later.
“For the moment, we consider this decision an
important step to ensuring
Montana irrigators will be
able to enjoy their senior
water rights on the Tongue
River,” she stated.
Wyoming claims that in
2004 and 2006, the years
when it failed to deliver
required water, there was
surplus water for sale in the
Tongue River system for $10
an acre-foot. It maintains
that damages in the case
should be capped at the
value of the water in those
years, or about $14,000.
Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead
said Monday he’s proud of
work by the Wyoming attor-
ney general’s office and
state engineer’s office on the
case. He said Michael and
Wyoming state engineer
Patrick Tyrrell had led an
extraordinary effort over
the past several years “to
demonstrate that Montana’s
claims that Wyoming was
wrongfully using massive
quantities of water were
baseless.”
Trial scheduled
for woman
charged with
burning
child’s face
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Snow dog
A friendly St. Bernard named Diesel sits in the snow on Christmas Day on Jefferson Street in Sheridan. Sheridan County received several inches of snow over the last week before frigid temperatures found their way to the area Monday.
Editor arrested
at crash
scene pleads
to disorderly
conduct
BIGFORK, Mont. (AP) — The former editor of a weekly newspaper in
northwestern Montana has pleaded
no contest to disorderly conduct for
his actions after he was arrested at
the scene of a highway crash.
The Bigfork Eagle reports Vince
Lovato entered the plea Monday to a
charge that he screamed obscenities
when he was arrested for failing to
follow an order to step behind patrol
cars while officers investigated the
Oct. 1 crash.
Lovato was fined $100 and paid $500
in court costs. Charges of obstructing
a peace officer and resisting arrest
In all, the report found that 126 federal,
local, tribal and territorial officers were
killed in the line of duty in 2014. That’s a 24
percent jump from last year’s 102 on-duty
deaths, though below the average annual
figures since 2004 and the all-time high of
156 in 1973, said Steve Groeninger, a
spokesman for the memorial fund.
Of the 126 officer deaths this year, shootings were the leading cause, followed by
traffic-related fatalities, at 49.
This year’s increase in gun-related deaths
among officers followed a dramatic dip in
2013, when the figure fell to levels not seen
since the 19th century. This year’s uptick
comes amid increased tension between
police and the public following the highprofile deaths of unarmed black men by
white police officers, including that of Eric
Garner in New York and Mike Brown in
Ferguson, Missouri.
The states that saw the most officer
deaths were California, at 14, Texas, at 11,
and New York, at nine. Florida followed
with six deaths, and Georgia had five,
according to the report.
The 15 ambush assaults on police officers
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
were dismissed. The disorderly conKristen Czaban
Managing Editor
duct charge can be removed from his
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
record if he remains law abiding for
Becky Martini
Office Manager
six months. He has stepped down as
Mark Blumenshine
Production Manager
editor and is now a reporter for the
Lake County
Leader in
Polson.
Lovato’s
attorney, Mike
Meloy of
The City of Sheridan Landfill, Recycling Center, and City Hall will be closed on
Helena, said
Wednesday, December 25th and January 1st, in observance of the
the plea agreeChristmas & New Year’s Holidays.
ment was the
If Wednesday Dec. 25th is your regular trash collection day, please set your trash can out for pickup
best for both
on Thursday by 6:00AM. New Year’s trash collection will be on it’s regular schedule.
sides.
We will close at 3:00PM on Tuesday, Dec. 24 Christmas Eve and Tuesday, Dec. 31 New Years Eve.
POLICE: 126 officers killed in 2014
FROM 1
CASPER (AP) — A February
trial has been set for a Casper
woman charged with shaking a
baby, suffocating her and burning her face with a hot
saucepan.
The Casper Star-Tribune
reports District Judge
Catherine Wilking scheduled a
Feb. 2 trial for 25-year-old
Stephanie Shirts. Shirts pleaded
not guilty in October to four
counts each of child abuse and
child endangerment with
methamphetamine and one
count of aggravated child
abuse.
Authorities also allege Shirts
shook the 14-month-old girl and
suffocated her with a blanket.
The child was treated for a
brain bleed and bleeding in the
eyes at children’s hospital in
Colorado.
The baby’s mother, Bobbi
Humphreys, is also charged in
the case along with a man who
lived at the same residence.
Three other children who lived
at the residence were placed in
foster care.
this year compares to just five in 2013, but
matched 2012 for the highest total since
1995, the report said.
“With the increasing number of ambushstyle attacks against our officers, I am
deeply concerned that a growing anti-government sentiment in America is influencing weak-minded individuals to launch violent assaults against the men and women
working to enforce our laws,” said Craig
Floyd, chairman and CEO of the memorial
fund.
He added in his statement: “We need to
tone down the rhetoric and rally in support
of law enforcement and against lawlessness.”
Among the ambush assaults were the
fatal attacks on two police officers in New
York City on Dec. 20. Officers Wenjian Liu
and Rafael Ramos were gunned down in
their patrol car by Ismaaiyl Brinsley after
Brinsley had made threatening posts online
and references to the Garner and Brown
cases.
After shooting the officers, Brinsley ran
into a subway station and killed himself.
Police said he was troubled and had shot
and wounded an ex-girlfriend in Baltimore
earlier that day.
CHRISTMAS/NEW YEAR’S HOLIDAY HOURS
th
st
For City of Sheridan Landfill and Recycling hours and other information,
visit www.sheridanwy.net or call 674-8461
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
R
www.thesheridanpress.com
LETTERS |
Random thoughts
Friendliest city in the West
Re: Trip in Story
andom thoughts on the passing scene:
Now that Barack Obama is ruling by decree, he
seems more like a king than a president. Maybe it is
time we change the way we address him. "Your
Majesty" may be a little too much, but perhaps "Your
Royal Glibness" might be appropriate.
It tells us a lot about academia that the president of
Smith College quickly apologized for saying, "All
lives matter," after being criticized by those who are
pushing the slogan, "Black lives matter." If science
could cross breed a jellyfish with a parrot, it could
create academic administrators.
Mitt Romney seems to be ready to try again to run
for president in 2016. But most defeated presidential
candidates who ran again lost again. There are much
stronger Republican candidates
available now than there were in
2012, including governors Scott
Walker of Wisconsin and Bobby
Jindal of Louisiana. At this crucial
juncture in the nation's history,
why run a retreaded candidate?
Explaining differences in achievements between groups often pits
those who attribute these differTHOMAS
ences to ability against those who
SOWELL
attribute differences to barriers.
Neither seems to pay much atten|
tion to differences in what people
want to do. Few guys from my old
neighborhood were likely to end up as violinists or
ballet dancers, simply because that was not what
they were interested in.
When Professor Jonathan Gruber of M.I.T. boasted
of fooling the "stupid" American public, that was not
just a personal quirk of his. It epitomized a smug
and arrogant attitude that is widespread among academics at elite institutions. There should be an annual "Jonathan Gruber award" for the most smug and
arrogant statement by an academic. There would be
thousands eligible every year.
Every society has some people who don't respect
the law. But, when it is the people in charge of the
law — like the President of the United States and his
Attorney General — who don't respect it, that is
when we are in big trouble.
Has anyone asked the question, "How could so
many people across the country spend so much time
at night marching, rioting and looting, if they had to
get up and go to work the next morning?"
Hillary Clinton's idea that we have to see the world
from our adversaries' point of view — and even
"empathize" with it — is not new. Back in 1938,
British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain said, "I
have realized vividly how Herr Hitler feels." Ronald
Reagan, however, made sure our adversaries understood how we felt. Reagan's approach turned out a lot
better than Chamberlain's.
Our schools and colleges are laying a guilt trip on
those young people whose parents are productive,
and who are raising them to become productive.
What is amazing is how easily this has been done,
largely just by replacing the word "achievement"
with the word "privilege."
There are few modest talents so richly rewarded —
especially in politics and the media — as the ability
to portray parasites as victims, and portray demands
for preferential treatment as struggles for equal
rights.
Republicans complain when Democrats call them
racists. But when have you ever heard a Republican
counterattack? You don't win by protesting your
innocence or whining about the unfairness of the
charge. Yet when have you heard a Republican reply
by saying, "You're a lying demagogue without a speck
of evidence. Put up or shut up!"
President Obama's establishing diplomatic relations with Cuba was not due to what the American
public wanted or even what his own party wanted. It
was a decision in defiance of both, just as his decisions about military matters ignore what generals
say and his decisions about medical matters ignore
what doctors have said. Yet pundits continue to
depict him as a helpless lame duck president.
When the political left wants to help the black community, they usually want to help the worst elements
in that community — thugs they portray as martyrs,
for example — without the slightest regard for the
negative effect this can have on the lives of the
majority of decent black people.
If anyone in the mainstream media is at a loss for
what New Year's resolution to make, try this: Stop
"spinning" or censoring stories about race, and try
telling the plain truth, if only for the novelty of it.
THOMAS SOWELL is an American economist, social theorist and Senior Fellow on Public
Policy at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is a syndicated columnist for Creators
Syndicate and has authored more than 30 books.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
On July 9, our son Jeff and family,
who were visiting from Tennessee,
and ourselves went to a favorite spot,
the Story Fish Hatchery, in their car
with Tennessee license plates.
After a lovely morning of picnic
brunch, tour of the facility and viewing of the fish in their various stages
of growth, we returned to their car.
Tucked under the windshield wiper
was a piece of mini note paper. On the
paper was printed three words,
‘Welcome to WYOMING!’
This paper passed through the
hands of all eight of us. We all smiled,
touched by this thoughtfulness.
As we are soon to enter 2015, let us
know that we all in some way can be
an ‘ambassador’ for Wyoming and our
city.
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
We could attain a future honored
title acclaiming Sheridan as “The
Friendliest City in the West.”
July 9 was also our son’s birthday.
So whoever you are, your note was a
special highlight in his day.
Donna Hunt
Sheridan
Blessed by our community
Re: Support after a loss
My kids and I have been through
rough times with losing my husband
and their dad at the end of August to
cancer.
The community of Sheridan has
been amazing to us, from the support
while Kevin was battling cancer to
helping us cope afterward.
I cannot say enough good things
about Sheridan and all the generous
support and donations that have been
given to my family. I would like to give
great big thanks to our church, First
Baptist, for everything they have done
for us.
Also thank you to the Jaycees for
taking the kids shopping, and the staff
at the VA Hospital Pharmacy and
Holy Name Catholic Church for making sure my kids had an amazing
Christmas.
The community has made a
Christmas that wasn’t that bright a
very special one for us. I cannot thank
everyone enough who has helped us
out.
I truly give my heart out to each and
every one of you involved. Thank you
and I wish everyone a very happy
New Year.
Jami Haley
Sheridan
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
tax returns next year.
“I don’t want to experience the
same thing with what happened with
Malaysia Airlines,” he said as his
wife wept. “It could be a long suffering.”
— Suyanto Puspitasari, father of
a passenger aboard the missing
AirAsia Flight 8501.
“I think President Obama made a
mistake. Cuba won’t change while the
Castros are around. There will be positive changes for the government of
Cuba, but not for the Cuban people.”
— Berta Soler, head of Cuban dissident group Ladies in White, on the
new U.S.-Cuba relationship.
“We could be looking at a real train
wreck after Feb. 15. People will file
their tax returns and learn they are
subject to a much larger penalty for
2015, and they can do absolutely nothing to avoid that.”
— Stan Dorn of Urban Institute,
on new penalties uninsured
Americans could face under the
Affordable Care Act when filing their
“This is about the continuing poverty rates, the continuing growing disparity between the wealthy and the
poor. It’s still about unemployment
issues. There are so many national
issues that have to be addressed that
it isn’t just policing, as I think we all
well know.”
— New York City Police
Commissioner William Bratton on
NBC’s “Meet the Press,” referring to
what he sees as some underlying
issues adding to tensions between
police officers and the citizens they
protect.
“We are outside, we are very cold,
the ship is full of smoke.”
— Giorgos Stiliaras, one of more
than 200 passengers awaiting rescue
from a burning ferry adrift in rough
seas between Italy and Albania.
“There was no warning at all. It was
absolutely quiet. ... (The shark) came
straight up out of the depths and got
him and took him under the water.”
— Andrew Walsh, who saw a shark
attack his friend off the Central
California coast. The victim suffered
cuts to his right hip.
QUOTABLE |
nytimes.com
1. The Obama recovery
2. Cosby team’s strategy: Hush accusers, insult them,
blame the media
3. Behind the scenes of ‘Today,’ ‘This Morning’ and
‘Good Morning America’
4. President’s test: Family vacation with teenage girls
5. In North Dakota, a tale of oil, corruption and death
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
washingtonpost.com
1. Mayan civilization collapsed because of drought
2. Nonviolence is best for toppling dictators
3. Scientists show that drunk birds ‘slur’ their songs
4. Colleges often give discounts to the rich. But here’s
one that gave up on merit aid
5. The biggest winter energy myth: That you need to idle
your car before driving
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
SMH to hold additional ACA enrollment presentations
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan Memorial
Hospital staff will hold additional public
presentations to assist individuals interested in signing up for health insurance
through the marketplace under the
Affordable Care Act.
The presentations will be held Jan. 6 at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. and Jan. 7 at 6 p.m. at the
Welch Cancer Center. On Jan. 20 at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. and Jan. 21 at 11 a.m., presentations will be held in the SMH conference
room B.
The Health Insurance Marketplace offers
a wide variety of Wyoming-based health
plans.
All plans cover prescriptions, hospital
stays, doctor visits and more. Some people
may qualify for financial help to pay premi-
ums and out-of-pocket expenses, such as
deductibles and co-pays. Depending on eligibility, the Affordable Care Act may provide a tax credit to help applicants afford
health coverage purchased through the
marketplace.
For those who already have health insurance through the marketplace, staff can
help them review their plan and decide if
they need to make changes for 2015.
Sheridan Memorial Hospital staff and
Enroll Wyoming Navigators will be available to help individuals understand how
the Health Insurance Marketplace works,
review coverage options and assist with
enrollment.
To learn more about the ACA, attend a
public presentation or contact the hospital
at 672-1010 to schedule an appointment
with a navigator.
Body found in search for
Mount Rainier snowshoer
Tenney, Burstad wed in October
MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK, Wash. (AP) —
Rescue crews on Mount Rainier have discovered a
body matching the description of a snowshoer who
vanished in a severe storm over the weekend.
National park spokeswoman Patti Wold said Monday
the body had been turned over to the Pierce County
medical examiner’s office.
The 37-year-old Puyallup, Washington, man intended
to spend Saturday night at Camp Muir, a stone shelter
nearly 10,200 feet up the 14,410-foot volcano. It wasn’t
clear if he knew the forecast called for a bad storm,
but the formidable conditions forced him to turn back.
Two other people took him into their tent and snow
cave at Panorama Point, at 6,800 feet, but the three of
them abandoned the camp when one of the walls collapsed. They descended together toward the visitor
center at Paradise, about 1,400 vertical-feet below, but
the man became separated from the others.
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.co m
COURTESY PHOTO |
Sarah Lynn Burstad and Patrick Kimball Tenney wed Oct. 1, 2014, in Pinedale.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sarah Lynn Burstad
of Rock Springs and Patrick Kimball
Tenney of Sheridan were wed Oct. 11,
2014, at the Lakeside Lodge in
Pinedale.
Bush stepping
down from
timber company
board
MIAMI (AP) — Taking another
step toward a presidential run, Jeb
Bush is resigning from the board of
timber company Rayonier Inc.
The Jacksonville, Fla.-based firm
said in a regulatory filing Monday
that the former Florida governor
would step down at the end of the
year. Bush has been a director of
Rayonier since 2008. The company,
set up as a real estate investment
trust, owns, leases or manages
about 2.6 million acres of forests in
the U.S. and New Zealand, according to its website.
Bush’s move comes as he explores
a presidential run and unwinds
some of his business commitments.
The potential Republican contender
had already confirmed plans to step
down from the board of Tenet
Healthcare Corp. and leave his
advisory role with British banking
giant Barclays by Dec. 31.
Aides say Bush is reviewing all of
his business and civic engagements
as he considers a White House bid.
According to corporate filings,
Bush sits on the boards of two
other companies — Empower
Software Solutions and CorMatrix
Cardiovascular Inc. — and is chairman and manager of Britton Hill
Holdings, a Florida-based private
equity and business advisory
group.
Opposition researchers in both
parties have already begun sifting
through his business connections
seeking fodder for attack.
Burstad has a master’s in social
work and is currently employed as a
social worker with Jackson
Elementary School in Teton County
School District 1.
She is the daughter of Gary and
Nancy Burstad of Rock Springs.
Tenney has a Bachelor of Science
and is currently employed with the
U.S. Forest Service as an assistant
engine captain.
He is the son of Scott and Judy
Tenney of Sheridan.
The couple will reside in Jackson.
Mayor’s 1st year:
Liberal victories, NYPD crisis
NEW YORK (AP) — Bill de Blasio,
New York City’s first Democratic
mayor in a generation, is winding
down his first year in office, which
saw success at fulfilling many of his
liberal campaign promises but has
at times been overshadowed by
events beyond his control, most
notably the recent killings of two
police officers amid a wave of
protests against police conduct.
De Blasio has appeared triumphant against some of those outside forces and has become a national progressive voice, but the police
shooting has pushed his young mayoralty into its biggest crisis yet. The
double slaying, which came weeks
after a grand jury declined to indict
an officer in the chokehold death of
Eric Garner, has heightened de
Blasio’s delicate efforts to support
arguably his most important city
agency, the New York Police
Department, yet also defend the
rights of the protesters who share
his liberal values.
As 2014 draws to a close, his balancing act is teetering. Twice in a
week, officers mourning their fallen
brothers turned their backs on de
Blasio, a searing display of contempt and an omen that de Blasio’s
struggle with police could cripple
his attempts to improve the fortunes
of those living at the margins of the
nation’s largest city. And he received
some boos and heckles Monday at a
police graduation at Madison
Square Garden, normally a celebratory ceremony.
“It’s extraordinarily tense and it’s
not sustainable,” said David
Birdsell, dean of the School of
Public Affairs at Baruch College. “If
the police dominate the headlines
and his political capital rather than,
say, his plan for affordable housing,
it will remain a massive problem.”
De Blasio’s problems with the
police run deep.
Unlike his predecessors, de Blasio
prioritized improving relations
between police and communities of
color.
The unions heard his campaign
promise to curb the use of stop and
frisk — a police tactic a federal
judge ruled discriminated against
minorities — not as a criticism of
strategy but rather as an assessment
of the men and women of the NYPD.
After Garner’s death, the police
unions — which are seeking a new
contract — roared against de
Blasio’s close connections to the Rev.
Al Sharpton, a noted police critic.
After the grand jury’s decision, de
Blasio spoke about cautioning his
own son, who is half-black, about
contact with police, and he permitted anti-NYPD protesters to march
freely. And when the two officers
were gunned down Dec. 20 by a man
who cited Garner as one of his motivations for violence, the unions said
de Blasio had “blood on his hands”
for fostering an atmosphere of anger
toward police.
De Blasio has sought to lower the
temperatures on both sides.
“Let’s focus on these families and
what they have lost,” he said last
week. “I think that’s the right way to
try and build toward a more unified
and decent city.”
De Blasio campaigned on a pledge
to reduce the city’s income inequality gap and worked in tandem with
City Council to pass legislation
aimed at bettering the lives of the
less fortunate.
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. OFFICIALS: BODIES
FROM LOST AIRASIA
FLIGHT FOUND IN JAVA
SEA
Indonesian authorities
spot six bodies from the
flight that went missing
off the coast of Borneo
island, and recover three
of them.
2. WHY THERE’S A PILOT
SHORTAGE IN ASIA
With a surge in air travel across the region, airlines are struggling to
hire and train enough
crews to keep up with
demand.
3. WHO WILL RESIGN
FROM CONGRESS
Days after pleading
guilty to tax evasion, U.S.
Rep. Michael Grimm, a
New York Republican,
says he will step down.
4. CHAOS FOLLOWED
FIRE ON ADRIATIC FERRY
“The jungle law prevailed,” one passenger
says, describing the scene
as people fought to be
evacuated from the vessel.
5. WHICH NATION IS
LIKELY TO DRIVE 2015
WORLD ECONOMY
As other developing
countries falter, the U.S.
continues its steady
rebound from the Great
Recession.
6. COST OF BEING
UNINSURED GOING UP
IN US
Penalties under
Obama’s health care law
will double for millions of
people next year.
7. HOW OTHER CITIES
COPY TIMES SQUARE
BALL DROP
From a New Mexico
chile pepper to a Georgia
peach, communities
model New Year’s countdowns on celebrations
surrounding New York
City’s sparkling orb.
8. ‘THE INTERVIEW’
TURNS HEADS IN
HOLLYWOOD
The film has already
earned more than $15 million from digital rentals
and downloads — suggesting that video-on-demand
revenue can be surprisingly robust.
9. OBAMA’S GOLF GAME
IN HAWAII BUMPS ARMY
COUPLE FROM WEDDING
ON 16TH HOLE
To accommodate the
vacationing president, the
couple is told to move
from the spot on the
oceanside course where
they’d planned to tie the
knot.
10. AP NAMES ITS FEMALE
ATHLETE OF YEAR
Philadelphia eighthgrader Mo’ne Davis — the
youngest ever to win the
AP honor — became an
instant celebrity as she
took the mound this summer in the Little League
World Series.
Looking for scraps
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Fifteen-year-old Anya Wobig eats a hotdog as a German Shepherd pays close attention Saturday morning at the bowl off
Highway 14 west of Dayton.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
• 6-8 p.m. Family/kids event to celebrate New Year’s Eve, Luminous Brewhouse, 201 Broadway St.
• 6 p.m. to midnight, Adult New Year’s Eve Bash including a ball drop and fireworks, Luminous
Brewhouse, 201 Broadway St.
TIPPED OVER |
Luise Rainer, first to win consecutive
acting Oscars, dies
LONDON (AP) — Luise Rainer, a star of cinema’s golden era who won back-to-back Oscars but
then walked away from a glittering Hollywood
career, has died. She was 104.
Rainer, whose roles ranged from the 1930s
German stage to television’s “The Love Boat,” died
Tuesday at her home in London from pneumonia,
said her only daughter, Francesca Knittel-Bowyer.
“She was bigger than life and can charm the
birds out of the trees,” Knittel-Bowyer said. “If
you saw her, you’d never forget her.”
The big-eyed, apple-cheeked Rainer gained
Hollywood immortality by becoming the first person to win an acting Academy Award in consecutive years, taking the best actress prize for “The
Great Ziegfeld” in 1936 in and “The Good Earth”
in 1937.
It’s a feat since achieved by only four other
actors.
Those trophies marked the peak of Rainer’s
career, which declined so rapidly that many considered her an early victim of “the curse of the
Oscars.” She fought with her studio over control of
her career, fled Hollywood for New York and suffered through a brief, unhappy marriage to the
playwright Clifford Odets. By the early 1940s, her
stardom had essentially ended.
Rainer herself described the double victory as
the worst thing that could have happened to her.
“When I got two Oscars, they thought, ‘Oh, they
can throw me into anything,’” Rainer told The
Associated Press in a 1999 interview.
Rainer was born Jan. 12, 1910 — in Vienna,
Austria, according to her entry in the reference
book “Who’s Who,” although some sources give
her birthplace as Duesseldorf, Germany. She
began her acting career as a teenager under innovative Austrian director Max Reinhardt and
appeared in several German films.
In the mid-1930s she was discovered by a talent
scout from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer — on the lookout for new European beauties to rival Greta
Garbo — and whisked to Hollywood. Her first U.S.
film was the largely forgotten “Escapade” (1935),
but her next roles made her a star.
Rainer may well have sobbed herself to her first
Oscar, playing actress Anna Held, wife of impresa-
rio Florenz Ziegfeld, in “The Great Ziegfeld.” The
film featured a classic telephone scene during
which, Anna, tears running down her face, congratulates her now ex-husband on his marriage to
another actress. Her next Oscar was for playing a
virtuous Chinese peasant in the screen adaptation
of Pearl S. Buck’s epic novel “The Good Earth.”
Suddenly Rainer — now nicknamed the
“Viennese Teardrop” — was famous, her beauty
and emotional intensity winning many fans. But
stardom, she later said, did not bring happiness.
Years later, Rainer recalled how she had just had
a fight with her husband, American playwright
Clifford Odets, when she got word that she had
won her second Oscar. In those days, winners were
announced hours before the ceremony began.
“I hadn’t even dreamed of getting another
Academy Award, and there I was unhappy in my
private life and miserable,” she told the AP in 1999.
“I remember Odets drove me three times around
the Biltmore, where the Oscars were given out,
because I was so full of tears.”
Rainer made several pictures in 1938, including
“Toy Wife” and “The Great Waltz,” but she chafed
under the studio system and clashed with MGM
chief Louis B. Mayer, and soon moved to New York
with Odets. “I had a seven-year contract that I
broke and went away,” Rainer said in 1999. “I was
a machine, practically, a tool in a big, big factory,
and I could not do anything. I wanted to film
‘Madame Curie,’ but Mayer forbade me. I wanted
to do ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls,’ but (producer
David O.) Selznick took Ingrid Bergman and
brought her to (Ernest) Hemingway and I didn’t
know Hemingway. “And so I left. I just went away. I
fled; yes, I fled.”
Rainer made one more Hollywood film —
“Hostages” in 1943 — but spent most of her later
life in England. She made occasional film and television appearances, including an episode of “The
Love Boat” in 1984.
One of her last film roles was in “The Gambler”
a 1998 adaptation of a Fyodor Dostoyevsky story,
in which she appeared with Michael Gambon and
Dominic West.
Rainer and Odets — author of “Waiting for
Lefty” and “Awake and Sing!” — married in 1937
and divorced three tempestuous years later. In
1945, she married publisher Robert Knittel, who
died in 1989. She’s survived by her daughter with
Knittel, and two granddaughters.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Dec. 30, 1922, Vladimir
I. Lenin proclaimed the establishment of the Union of
Soviet Socialist Republics,
which lasted nearly seven
decades before dissolving in
Dec. 1991.
On this date:
In 1813, British troops
burned Buffalo, New York,
during the War of 1812.
In 1853, the United States
and Mexico signed a treaty
under which the U.S. agreed to
buy some 45,000 square miles
of land from Mexico for $10
million in a deal known as the
Gadsden Purchase.
In 1903, about 600 people
died when fire broke out at
the recently opened Iroquois
Theater in Chicago.
In 1936, the United Auto
Workers union staged its first
“sit-down” strike at the
General Motors Fisher Body
Plant No. 1 in Flint, Michigan.
(The strike lasted until Feb.
11, 1937.)
In 1944, King George II of
Greece proclaimed a regency
to rule his country, virtually
renouncing the throne.
In 1954, Olympic gold
medal runner Malvin G.
Whitfield became the first
black recipient of the James
E. Sullivan Award for amateur
athletes.
In 1965, Ferdinand Marcos
was inaugurated for his first
term as president of the
Philippines.
In 1989, a Northwest
Airlines DC-10, which had
been the target of a telephoned threat, flew safely
from Paris to Detroit with 22
passengers amid extra-tight
security.
In 1994, a gunman walked
into a pair of suburban
Boston abortion clinics and
opened fire, killing two
employees. (John C. Salvi III
was later convicted of murder; he died in prison, an
apparent suicide.)
In 1999, former Beatle
George Harrison fought off a
knife-wielding intruder who
broke into his mansion west
of London and stabbed him in
the chest. (Michael Abram
was later acquitted of
attempted murder by reason
of insanity.)
In 2006, Iraqis awoke to
news that Saddam Hussein
had been hanged; victims of
his three decades of autocratic rule took to the streets to
celebrate.
Ten years ago: Democrat
Christine Gregoire was
declared victor of
Washington’s gubernatorial
election over Republican Dino
Rossi by 129 votes out of more
than 2.8 million cast. A fire
broke out during a rock concert at a nightclub in Buenos
Aires, Argentina, killing 194
people. Bandleader and clarinetist Artie Shaw died in
Thousand Oaks, California, at
age 94.
Five years ago: Seven CIA
employees and a Jordanian
intelligence officer were killed
by a suicide bomber at a U.S.
base in Khost, Afghanistan.
British contractor Peter
Moore was freed more than
two years after he was abducted outside Iraq’s Finance
Ministry. Former Indonesian
President Abdurrahman
Wahid, 69, who had ruled after
the fall of dictator Suharto,
died in Jakarta.
One year ago: Six states
were named by federal officials to develop test sites for
drones: Alaska, Nevada, New
York, North Dakota, Texas
and Virginia. Barely 12 hours
after the NFL’s regular season
ended, four more head coaches were fired: Washington’s
Mike Shanahan, Detroit’s Jim
Schwartz, Minnesota’s Leslie
Frazier and Tampa Bay’s Greg
Schiano. (Cleveland’s Rob
Chudzinski had been fired the
night before.)
Thought for Today: “I
respect faith, but doubt is
what gives you an education.”
— Wilson Mizner, American
playwright (1876-1933).
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
OBITUARIES |
Richard “Rick” Kepp
Jimmy Dean “Jim” McClure
January 16, 1949 - December 26, 2014
December 16, 2014
Derald Dean Stiles
August 7, 1939 - December 25, 2014
Richard “Rick” Kepp, 65, of Sheridan,
passed away on Friday, December 26, 2014,
at his residence.
Rick was born on January 16, 1949 in
Sheridan, WY to Raymond and Esther
(Ventling ) Kepp. He graduated from
Richard “Rick” Riverton High School in Riverton, WY. He
Kepp
married Janet Adams in 1968 and had two
daughters, Juli and Vicki. They divorced.
He then married Barbara Young in 1972 and together they had
a son, Robbi. After their divorce he married Donna Kreger on
December 18, 1983 and they shared thirty one years together.
Rick worked as a heavy equipment operator for various construction companies in Wyoming and Montana. He enjoyed
hunting, fishing, gardening, working in his yard, making outdoor log furniture, and spending time with his family and
grandchildren. He also loved their dogs, especially Katie and
KC.
Rick was preceded in death by his grandparents, his father
Raymond, his brother Raymond, and nephew Philip. He is survived by his wife Donna Kepp, his mother Esther Boyko both of
Sheridan, WY, his brothers Kenny (Patty) Kepp of Hardin, MT.,
Keith Kepp of Kemmerer, WY, his children; Juli, Vicki, and
Robbi. His step children Cindy (Dave) Shoop, Chris (Barry)
Hedrich, Chelly Fiedor, Mindy (Chip) Hamilton, niece, Christy
(Shane) Morse; several other nieces and nephews and grandchildren Kyler Kepp, Josh Springer, Kara (Tim) Crane, Alyse
(Brad) Williams, Hank and Molly Hedrich, and Adam Cherni
Donations to honor Rick can be made to the Sheridan Dog and
Cat Shelter, 84 East Ridge Road, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Private services will be held at a later date.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Jimmy Dean “Jim” McClure passed away
on December 16, 2014 from a heart attack
while doing what he loved, working outside
on a tractor at the family place outside of
Sheridan, WY.
He leaves his wife of 40 years, Erna
Jimmy Dean
(Bitters) McClure; his daughter Chara
McClure
(McClure) Blaszkowski and husband
Jason; his daughter Choni (McClure)
Bollinger and husband Nick; his son Wade McClure and wife
Tracy; his mother Beryl McClure; his sister Deana May
(McClure) LaChance and husband Robert; brother Merle
McClure and wife Vicky; his sister Lucile (McClure) Gieswein
and husband Ben; his sister Gail (McClure) DeSota and husband Thomas; four grandchildren: Zaygen and Curhan
Blaszkowski, Chloe McClure, Sydney McClure, and one more in
the oven; and many close friends.
Born in Gillette, WY and raised between Recluse and
Sheridan, WY, he was the son of Dean and Beryl McClure. In
his early years he helped farm and ranch on the family place
and joined the Army National Guard at age 19, serving six
years as a Field Wireman before leaving the service at the rank
of Specialist 6 (E-6). In his civilian capacity he began a long and
distinguished career of 46 years in the oil and gas community
and was working as a consultant for Hess Corporation when he
passed.
Jim was known for his honesty even when it wasn’t popular,
his integrity, his kindness, his humor, and his unwavering love
for his wife, Erna. Rare is it when a couple walks into a room
and you can see the love they share and the happiness they
bring with them.
Aside from his love for his soul mate, Jim loved his children,
his family, and his country. He also had a love for animals and a
passion for widgets and gizmos. As a child, he built a go-cart
from a bed frame, a lawnmower engine, and various other junkRoy M. Sharp
yard parts, to which he added a custom braking system. This
Sept. 26, 1926 - December 25, 2014
passion followed him into adulthood, leading him to leave
Wyoming with his family to continue his oil and gas career,
Roy M. Sharp passed away peacefully at where he many times designed and built gas plants from the
ground up throughout the United States. As an adult his
his home on December 25, 2014.
Roy was born on September 26, 1926 to favorite hobby was to design and build solar energy systems.
Years later, wanting to raise his children in the country, he
Leslie C. And Dorothy Sharp in Hardin,
MT, but spent almost all of his life in and bought a ranch and moved his family South of Broadus, MT
where they farmed and ranched for 14 years. After all of their
around the Sheridan area.
Roy M. Sharp
He went to work in the hay fields for his children left the nest, they moved to Sheridan, WY where Jim
great Aunt and Uncle Shreve at the age of 10 during the sum- started consulting again in the oil and gas industry.
At his request there was no funeral and cremation has taken
mer months. At the age of 16 he dropped out of school and went
to work at the Kaizer Shipyards in Vancouver, WA as a produc- place. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the
tion welder. After working there for several months he returned Sheridan Dog and Cat Shelter at 84 East Ridge Rd., Sheridan,
home and finished his schooling. After school hours and on WY 82801.
He was a loving husband, father, friend, and mentor and will
weekends he worked at Champions Funeral Home. At the age of
17 he enlisted in the army, and served in the pacific area even- greatly be missed by all.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
tually being stationed in Japan. After his return to civilian life
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
he went to work in construction for a short while, then helped
his father open the original Spring Creek coal mine near
Decker, MT.
Raymond “Ray” John Bach
When the Korean War broke out he reentered the service
October 1, 1931 - December 24, 2014
where he served 19 months in Korea always close behind the
battle lines in a MASH hospital.
After his return from Korea, he eventually went to work for
Raymond “Ray” John Bach, 83, of
the post office as a letter carrier for 27 and a half years. During
Sheridan, passed away peacefully at his
his postal service he served as the state president of the
home on Wednesday, December 24, 2014.
National Letter Carriers Assoc. of Wyoming. Once he retired
Ray was born on October 1, 1931, in
from the post office he went to work for the county sheriff as a
Canby, MN to Michael and Frances
Raymond
detention and civil process officer for ten years.
(Hausler) Bach. He worked on the family
John Bach
When he retired from the sheriffs office he worked at several
farm until the age of 16, when he left home
part time jobs until he reached the age of 82.
and went to work as a horse wrangler on
Roy was active in several organizations over the years. He the ZX Ranch in Paisley, OR. He then moved to Sheridan where
was the originator of the first search and rescue group in he met and married Mary Polito in 1952.
Sheridan. He also was one of the founders of the Jeep Herders
Ray was a faithful member of Holy Name Church. He loved
Club (a group of people with 4 wheel vehicles that traveled spending time with his family, hunting, fishing, and attending
around to old historical places and land marks), Good Sam's RV all local sports events. When Ray wasn't enjoying his favorite
Groups, Sheridan Masonic Lodge #8, and served as master pastimes he was always busy working as a ranch hand, then at
from 1973 - 1974. Plus the Kalif Shrine.
the flour mill, numerous years at Jersey Creamery, later at
Roy was well known and respected by many. He seldom said Pelesky Construction, Spring Creek Coal, and Mullinax
no to anyone who needed help.
Concrete until his retirement.
He was preceded in death by his parents, 3 wives, Margaret,
Ray was preceded in death by his parents and his wife of fifty
Florence and JoAnne. His first born son Carl L. Sharp and his years, Mary Bach. He is survived by his son, Marty and his wife
step son Herb Schroder and a sister, Donna Teini. He is sur- Karen, grandson, Tye Bach and his wife, Amanda, granddaughvived by his son, Steven D. Sharp (Merla) and their children ter, Jessica Garrelts and her husband Jeff, three brothers,
Danielle M. Dickie (Jason) and Clifton R. Sharp. Also by his Hank, Andy, Mike and one sister, Mary Smith.
adopted daughter Lisa A. Sayer (Cliff) and her three children
A Visitation with Rosary will be held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on
Natasha Sharp, Jeremiah Young, Jeffrey Morgan. Daughter in- Friday, January 2, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home. Mass of the
law Vicki Schroder and her two children Scott Schroder Christian Burial will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, January
(Rachel) and Kristi Carlquist (Kris). And thirteen great grand- 3, 2015, at Holy Name Church with Father Jim Heiser officiatchildren. Also his brother Leslie M. Sharp (Bud) and two sisters ing. Interment will be held in the Sheridan Municipal
Minnie Burton and Priscilla Hill.
Cemetery. A reception will follow in the Parish Hall.
The family will be having a memorial service sometime in the
Memorials to honor Ray may be made to the Sheridan
spring. In lieu of flowers, memorials to honor Roy can be made American Legion Post 7, Baseball Booster Club, 260 Murphy
to a charity of your choice.
Gulch Rd., Sheridan, WY 82801.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Derald Dean Stiles 75, formerly of
Sheridan passed away peacefully at home
in Billings, MT surrounded by his family
on December 25, 2014 after a lengthy illness.
Derald was born August 7, 1939 to Emmett
and Thelma Stiles in Door, North Dakota.
Derald Dean
Derald attended school at Taylor
Stiles
Elementary School, Central Junior High
School, and Sheridan High School before
graduating in 1957. He went on to serve in the Army Reserves
in Fort Leonard Wood, MO and then returned to Sheridan
where he worked at Panetta Brothers and the Wyoming State
Highway Dept. In 1961 he met Arlene Kershaw and in 1964 they
were married in Dayton, WY. While working for the State of
Wyoming the family lived in Sheridan, WY, Burgess Junction,
WY, and Newcastle, WY before returning to Sheridan in 1978.
Derald worked in the warehouse and drove truck for Decker
Coal until he retired in 2002.
Derald enjoyed hunting, fishing, and camping in the Big
Horn Mountains which he regarded as “home”, but most
important to him was his family. He and Arlene just celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary in March of 2014 in Dayton,
WY. He will be remembered as a great husband, father, grandfather, brother, and uncle to his family. He was preceded in death
by his parents, Emmett and Thelma Stiles (Partin); brother
Emmett Berdon Stiles; and sisters Maxine Doran, Joyce
Matlock, and Belinda Pihlak. Derald is survived by his wife
Arlene Stiles of Billings, MT; sons: Ken Stiles (Maggie) of
Billings, MT; Craig Stiles (Diana) of Cheyenne, WY; daughter:
Paulette Stiles of Laurel, MT; six grandchildren: Andi Jo,
Andrew, Brayden, Cameron, Max, and Cace; two great grandchildren: Sabrina and Mason; brother Leon Stiles of Sheridan,
WY; sister Myrna Bybee of Buffalo, WY; brother Lonnie Stiles
of Sheridan, WY; and several nieces and nephews.
A viewing will take place at Kane Funeral Home on Thursday
January 1, 2015 from 6-8 PM. Funeral services will be at Kane
Funeral Home on Friday January 2, 2015 at 10:00 am with Ray
Cox officiating. Interment will be in the Sheridan Municipal
Cemetery. A Reception will follow in the Kane Reception Hall.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Joey's Fly
Fishing Foundation at 109 S. Main St., Ste B, Sheridan, WY
82801 or the donor's choice.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
National Weather for Wednesday, December 31
TONIGHT
WEDNESDAY
Regional Weather
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
SATURDAY
Billings
4/27
Clear and frigid
-7
Mostly sunny
and not as cold
26
Turning cloudy
and not as cold
8
36
Almanac
16
Partly sunny
Mostly cloudy
and colder
35
25
21
14
Temperature
High/low ......................................................... 13/-4
Normal high/low ............................................35/10
Record high .............................................65 in 1956
Record low ............................................. -30 in 1990
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.05"
Month to date................................................. 0.74"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.53"
Year to date ...................................................15.09"
Normal year to date ......................................14.13"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
7:45 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
4:36 p.m.
4:37 p.m.
4:37 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
12:58 p.m.
1:36 p.m.
2:17 p.m.
2:02 a.m.
3:08 a.m.
4:12 a.m.
Full
Last
New
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
-6/25
Ranchester
-6/27
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
-21/6
Basin
-19/8
-7/26
Jan 4
Jan 13
Jan 20
Jan 26
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Clearmont
-6/27
Story
-5/27
Gillette
-8/25
Buffalo
-2/30
Worland
-21/2
Wright
-7/21
Kaycee
-5/26
Thermopolis
-15/12
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
-6/27
Dayton
-7/29
Lovell
-18/13
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.05"
Hardin
-9/27
Broadus
-9/26
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
27/20/s
20/2/s
23/-1/s
25/13/s
8/-4/s
25/10/s
9/-9/pc
14/-7/s
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
34/21/c
28/10/pc
25/5/s
34/21/pc
20/-4/s
31/17/pc
15/0/s
18/-6/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
35/24/c
29/15/s
31/13/s
33/18/s
23/7/s
34/20/s
25/6/s
20/0/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
14/-11/s
25/12/s
8/-11/s
7/-4/s
6/-8/s
14/-7/s
24/14/s
17/-6/s
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
23/-8/s
32/16/pc
16/-1/s
20/5/c
14/-1/s
24/6/s
31/18/pc
23/3/c
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
25/2/s
35/17/s
23/8/s
24/4/s
21/7/s
27/8/s
35/19/s
19/5/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
BIG
Breakfast
www.thesheridanpress.com
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Activated alarm, 1900
West Loucks, 7:08 a.m.
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 8:53 a.m.
• Extrication, Interstate 90
mile marker 24, 11:04 a.m.
• Fluid spill (HAZMAT),
Interstate 90 mile marker
25, 11:45 a.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Friday
• Trauma, 2200 block
Coffeen Avenue, 12:08 a.m.
• Medical, 2800 block
Coffeen Avenue, 1:27 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 7:09 a.m.
• Medical, 1300 block
North Gould Street, 9:24
p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:40 p.m.
• Trauma, 1400 block
Bowman Avenue, 11:35 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 1:08 p.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 2:20 p.m.
• Medical, 1200 block
North 30th Street, 2:45 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 6:35 p.m
• Medical, 1100 block Avon
Street, 7:58 p.m.
Saturday
• Medical, 700 block West
Loucks Street, 12:14 a.m.
• Trauma, 300 block East
Second Street, 3 a.m.
• Trauma, 200 block
Fourth Avenue East, 4:49
a.m.
• Medical, 800 block Main
Street, 5:42 p.m.
• Medical. 100 block West
12th Street, 8:10 p.m
• Trauma, 100 block Fish
Hatchery Road, Story, 9:02
p.m.
Sunday
• Medical, intersection of
Heald and Illinois streets,
2:15 a.m.
• Trauma, 1300 block
Avoca Place, 2:49 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90,
3:49 p.m.
• Trauma, 100 block
French Pete Drive, 5:29 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90,
7:08 p.m.
• Medical, 700 block West
Loucks Street, 7:16 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90,
7:34 p.m.
• Medical, 700 block Long
Drive, 7:57 p.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Coffeen Avenue, 11:44 p.m.
Monday
• Medical, 200 block Smith
Street, 6:46 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
7:46 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
8:51 a.m.
• Trauma, Interstate
90, 10:59 a.m.
• Trauma, Interstate
90, 10 59 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 12:50
p.m.
• Trauma, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 1:50
p.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
3:43 p.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
5 p.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
10:15 p.m.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Monday
• Admissions —
Hunter Lee Reeves of
Sheridan
• Dismissals — Alicia C.
Loden, Kjerstin Don Loden,
both of Buffalo
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Friday
• Noise complaint, South
Main Street, 1:18 a.m.
• Burglar alarm,
Sugarland Drive, 8:37 a.m.
• 911 hang up, North
Gould Street, 9:18 a.m.
• Welfare check, Esther
Lane, 9:47 a.m.
• Agency assist, Coffeen
Avenue, 10:57 a.m.
• Death investigation (suicide), Bowman Avenue,
11:34 a.m.
• Accident, Coffeen
Avenue, 12:01 p.m.
• Accident, East Works
Street, 12:42 p.m.
• Welfare check, North
Main Street, 1:02 p.m.
• Simple assault, Long
Drive, 1:13 p.m.
• Snow removal, North
Main Street, 1:49 p.m.
• Snow removal, East
Ninth Street, 1:55 p.m.
• Citizen assist, Bryant
Street, 2:23 p.m.
• Dispute, Sherman
Avenue, 4:17 p.m.
• Bar check, Broadway
Street, 7:32 p.m.
• Warrant service,
Jackson Avenue, 9:38 p.m.
• Public intoxication,
North Main Street, 11:34
p.m.
• Breach of peace, Long
Drive, 11:48 p.m.
Saturday
• Medical, West Loucks
Street, 12:10 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Sheridan Avenue,
2:32 a.m.
• Hit and run, De Smet
Avenue, 6:37 a.m.
• Welfare check, Delphi
Avenue, 7:44 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, East Colorado
Street, 7:49 a.m.
• Accident, Kroe Lane,
8:12 a.m.
• Found property,
Emerson Street, 8:13 a.m.
• Carless driver, West
Seventh Street, 10:06 a.m.
• Animal incident,
Airport Road, 10:53 a.m.
• Alarm, Airport Road,
12:22 p.m.
• Hit and run, Broadway
Street, 1:43 p.m.
• DUI, Sugarland Drive,
3:05 p.m.
• Custody dispute, North
Heights Road, 4:20 p.m.
• DUI, West Brundage
Lane, 7:44 p.m.
• Dog at large, South Scott
Street, 10:08 p.m.
• DUI, North Main Street,
11:45 p.m.
Sunday
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 12:41 a.m.
• Warrant service, Smith
Street, 12:58 a.m.
• DUI, South Main Street,
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
More of the white stuff
A man drives a ranger fitted with a snowplow on Christmas Day on Jefferson Street in Sheridan.
1:02 a.m.
• Suicidal subject, Heald
Street, 2:09 a.m.
• DUI, South Thurmond
Street, 3:04 a.m.
• Dog at large, Vista
Street, 8:07 a.m.
• Dog at large, Absaraka
Street, 8:34 a.m.
• Dog at large, Coffeen
Avenue, 1:11 p.m.
• Fraud, Clarendon
Avenue, 4:14 p.m.
• Warrant service, South
Main Street, 5:33 p.m.
• Accident, Lewis Street,
6:01 p.m.
• Accident, North Main
Street, 6:18 p.m.
• Illegal parking, North
Main Street, 6:44 p.m.
• Breach of peace, Long
Drive, 7:01 p.m.
• Accident with injury,
Interstate 90 eastbound, 7:32
p.m.
• Accident, Burkitt Street,
7:50 p.m.
• Medical, Long Drive, 7:56
p.m.
• Juvenile out of control,
Wyoming Avenue, 8:31 p.m.
• Warrant service, Coffeen
Avenue, 11:42 p.m.
Monday
• Suspicious circumstance, Steffen Court, 12:08
a.m.
• Driving under suspension, South Water Street,
1:56 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, Coffeen
Avenue, 3:41 a.m.
• Accident, South
Sheridan Avenue, 8:17 a.m.
• Citizen assist, Gladstone
Street, 8:34 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Odell
Court, 8:37 a.m.
• Lost property, North
Main Street, 9:09 a.m.
• Animal found, Shadow
Ridge Boulevard, 9:28 a.m.
• Accident, East Fifth
Street, 11:12 a.m.
• Hit and run, Long Drive,
11:15 a.m.
• Trespass warning, Long
Drive, 11:17 a.m.
• Accident, South Gould
Street, 11:23 a.m.
• Malicious destruction,
Val Vista Street, 11:35 a.m.
• Hit and run, South
Gould Street, 12:19 p.m.
• Parking complaint,
Yonkee Avenue, 12:23 p.m.
• Dog at large, Huntington
Street, 12:36 p.m.
• Motorist assist, Victoria
Street, 12:48 p.m.
• Accident (delayed
report), Loucks Street, 12:57
p.m.
• Burglar alarm, Papago
Drive, 1:02 p.m.
• Fraud, Illinois Street,
2:31 p.m.
• Bar check, Broadway
Street, 2:34 p.m.
• Animal incident, South
Linden Avenue, 3:31 p.m.
• Domestic, Sugarland
Drive, 4:22 p.m.
• Welfare check, Coffeen
Avenue, 4:28 p.m.
• Accident, Dow Street,
5:06 p.m.
• Animal welfare,
Bellevue Avenue, 6:10 p.m.
• Carless driver, 11th
Street, 6:43 p.m.
• Welfare check, South
Gould Street, 7:53 p.m.
• Noise complaint, Night
Hawk Court, 9:07 p.m.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Wednesday
• Suspicious vehicle,
Acme, 1:26 a.m.
• Alarm, Carl Street,
Ranchester, 8:18 a.m.
• Animal found, Gillette
and Dayton streets,
Ranchester, 8:39 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Higby Road, 9:29
a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 11:10 a.m.
• Custody dispute, Pintail
Road, 11:45 a.m.
• Battery (cold), Eagles
Nest Circle Drive, Gillette,
3:52 p.m.
• DUI, Pass Creek Road,
Parkman, 4:33 p.m.
• Structure fire, Swaim
Road, 8:21 p.m.
Thursday
• Domestic, Metz Road,
2:24 a.m.
• Animal welfare, South
Second Street, Big Horn,
6:42 a.m.
• Wyoming Highway
Patrol assist, 8:04 p.m.
Friday
• Accident, West 15th
Street and Parker Avenue,
7:06 a.m.
• Sex offense, Sheridan
area, 9:47 a.m.
• Motorist assist, North
Main Street, 11:47 a.m.
• Accident, North Park
Road, 3:41 p.m.
Saturday
• Suspicious vehicle,
Highway 335, Big Horn, 7:59
a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, Metz
Road, 10 a.m.
• Bond violation, Coffeen
Avenue, 10:16 a.m.
• DUI, West 16th Street,
11:33 a.m.
• Runaway, Sheridan
Area, 3:50 p.m.
Sunday
• Theft (cold), Dana
Avenue, 1:15 a.m.
• Civil dispute, Coffeen
Avenue, 1:22 a.m.
• Hit and run, Yonkee
Avenue, 7:58 a.m.
• Citizen assist, Lower
Powder River Road,
Arvada, 3:58 p.m.
• WHP assist, Interstate
90, Ranchester, 7:05 p.m.
• Agency assist, Interstate
90 eastbound, Exit 37, 7:35
p.m.
Monday
• Wyoming Highway
Patrol assist, Interstate 90
mile marker 23.5, 10:56 a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 2:34 p.m.
• Animal welfare,
Highway 335 mile marker 3,
Big Horn, 3:35 p.m.
• Suicidal subject, Fort
Road, 5:51 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Moraine Avenue,
Banner, 11:55 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Friday
• Tre Wendell Underwood,
22, Sheridan, bench warrant (contempt of court),
circuit court, speeding,
municipal court, arrested
by SPD
• Matiove Chavez Diaz, 65,
Sheridan, disorderly conduct public intoxication,
municipal court, arrested
by SPD
Saturday
• Raymond Earl Adams,
68, Sheridan, breach of
peace, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Blair David Morgan, 63,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SCSO
• Joseph Emanuel
Sullivan, 57, Sheridan,
DWUI, circuit court, arrested by SPD
Sunday
• Jimmy D. French, 52,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Nathan Gleason, 23,
Killeen, Texas, DWUI, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Ryan Bradley Beckwith,
25, Sheridan, bench warrant (contempt of court),
municipal court, arrested
by SPD
• James C. Rhodes, 33,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Natasha Nadine
Tremble, 23, warrant (failure to appear), municipal
court, DWUS, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
• Rachael Leith Clobucker,
28, Sheridan, breach of
peace, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Jacob Richard Sears, 30,
Sheridan, out of county
warrant (probation violation/revocation), out of
county court, arrested by
SPD
• David Charles Lopez, 36,
Sheridan, DWUS, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
Monday
• Elena Ann Belt, 38,
Sheridan, out of county
bench warrant (contempt of
court), out of county court,
arrested by SCSO
• Teresa Marie Pease, 52,
Sheridan, warrant, breach
of peace, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 77
Female inmate count: 12
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 4
Number of releases for
the previous day: 9
Visit us on the web ...
thesheridanpress.com or DestinationSheridan.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
BUSINESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Luminous
Brewhouse
to host New
Year’s bash
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Luminous
Brewhouse will host a New
Year’s Eve bash Wednesday
for both families and adults.
From 6-8 p.m. a familyfriendly celebration will be
held alongside an adult
party that will run from 6
p.m. to midnight.
The evening will include
live music and a DJ
throughout the evening,
games and giveaways.
In addition, a midnight
ball drop will be provided
from a crane by Fletcher
Construction Co. and Sen.
Bruce Burns, R-Sheridan,
will set off fireworks to
coincide with the ball drop.
For additional information, call the brewery at 7637489.
Luminous Brewhouse is
located at 201 Broadway St.
Chipotle
apologizes for
NY worker’s
police protest
NEW YORK (AP) — Two
Chipotle chief executives
have apologized to New York
City police officers who
were greeted by a restaurant
employee making the
“hands up, don’t shoot” gesture popular with protesters.
Co-Chief Executive
Officers Steve Ells and
Monty Moran said in a
statement Monday that the
employee’s action appeared
to be spontaneous. They
said it happened at one of
their Brooklyn restaurants
on Dec. 16 when a group of
nine police officers entered.
They said the officers were
not refused service, but
chose to leave after encountering the gesture while in
line.
The executives said appropriate actions had been
taken toward the crew member after the Denver-based
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc.
reviewed video footage from
security cameras. They said
they could not discuss what
actions were taken.
COURTESY PHOTO |
Democratic Rep. Jim Byrd is sponsoring a bill that would increase Wyoming’s minimum wage to $9 an hour.
Wyoming lawmaker proposes $9 minimum wage
CASPER (AP) — A Cheyenne
lawmaker is again sponsoring a
bill that would increase the state’s
minimum wage to $9 an hour.
The state’s current minimum
wage is $5.15, but few pay that
wage. Companies that engage in
interstate trade must pay the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an
hour.
Democratic Rep. Jim Byrd tells
the Casper Star-Tribune he is
sponsoring the bill to help work-
ers earn a livable wage. He says
people who work 40 hours a week
should not have to ask for public
assistance to make ends meet.
Byrd sponsored a similar bill
during the 2014 session, but it was
defeated. The 2015 Legislature
convenes on Jan. 13.
Republican Sen. Charlie Scott of
Casper said he doesn’t think the
bill will clear a vote of the Senate
Labor, Health and Social Services
Committee, which he chairs. He
said he believes the market
should determine hourly wages
and that increasing the minimum
wage might make businesses less
likely to hire young or inexperienced workers.
Some Republicans argue an
increased minimum wage would
increase the price of goods and
services, which will affect everyone, including minimum wage
workers.
Byrd’s bill also would increase
the wages of tipped employees
from $2.13 an hour to $5 an hour.
State law allows those who receive
tips to be paid a lower hourly
wage.
The Massachusetts Institute of
Technology has calculated the
average living wage for an adult
working full time in Wyoming at
just under $8 an hour, while an
adult caring for two children
would need to earn nearly $21 an
hour to make ends meet.
Wendy’s of Montana sold to Spokane company
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wendy’s of
Montana has been sold to another franchisee,
Wenspok Resources of Spokane, Washington.
Greg McDonald, president of the Billingsbased franchise, says the operations and
assets of 18 fast-food restaurants have been
sold to Wenspok. The sale price wasn’t disclosed.
Fifteen of the restaurants are in Montana,
two are in Wyoming and another in
Dickinson, North Dakota.
McDonald announced the sale in a statement
on Friday, adding that his family will continue
to own the land under the buildings, The
Billings Gazette reported.
Wenspok Resources now owns 44 Wendy’s
restaurants in seven states including
Washington, Idaho, Oregon and California
along with the new restaurants in Montana,
Wyoming and North Dakota.
Wendy’s of Montana has about 700 employees. Three employees in the administrative
office were laid off, but McDonald says two
have already found new jobs.
Wenspok plans to keep the Montana leadership team intact, said Jennifer Robson,
Wenspok’s vice president of real estate.
McDonald’s statement did not specifically
address the future of the Wendy’s of Montana
Foundation, which has supported schools, universities and athletics. Donations have included $1.4 million to the College of Business at
Montana State University Billings, $400,000 for
synthetic turf at Daylis Stadium in Billings
and sponsorship of the Montana State
University athletic hall of fame.
B2
SPORTS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
Blues’
Brodeur
earns NHL
record 125th
shutout
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Strunk’s super skills
Planet Hockey's Steve Strunk demonstrates a backward-skating drill during the Planet Hockey holiday super skills camp Monday at Sheridan Ice. Strunk and his staff took
campers through an array of drills to better hone their hockey skills.
Michigan gets its man in coach Jim Harbaugh
BY ERIC OLSON AND NOAH TRISTER
AP SPORTS WRITERS
Jim Harbaugh and Urban Meyer
in the Big Ten? It has a certain
ring to it, like the glory days
when Bo Schembechler and
Woody Hayes battled for control of
the league.
That day is coming.
The 51-year-old Harbaugh, a star
quarterback for the Wolverines in
the mid-1980s, has signed a deal to
become the new coach at
Michigan, a person with knowl-
edge of the discussions told The
Associated Press late Monday. The
person spoke on condition of
anonymity because there was no
announcement from the school or
Harbaugh. He arrived at the
Detroit Metropolitan Airport on
Monday night in plenty of time to
make a Tuesday midday news
conference for a “major” football
announcement.
Harbaugh coached the 49ers to
three straight NFC championship
games. San Francisco lost the 2013
Super Bowl to a Baltimore Ravens
Wiltjer helps No. 7 Gonzaga
beat San Diego 60-48
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Gonzaga
was held nearly 24 points below
its average, and it didn’t really
matter.
Kyle Wiltjer scored 10 of his 15
points in the first half and the
No. 7 Bulldogs built a big
enough lead to withstand a 7minute scoring drought in the
second half and beat San Diego
60-48 on Monday night.
‘When we play as a
team, we have a lot of talent
and we’re a tough team to
beat.’
Kevin Pangos
Gonzaga guard
“We have a lot of weapons and
we score a lot,” Wiltjer said. “On
nights when we’re not scoring
as much and the pace is like
this, we’ve just got to be able to
stop them.”
Gonzaga (13-1, 2-0 West Coast
Conference) won for the sixth
time since its only loss, a 66-63
overtime defeat at Arizona on
Dec. 6.
A year ago, the Toreros pulled
off a 69-66 home upset of the
Zags. This time, Gonzaga’s size
and athleticism were too much
for the Toreros (7-7, 0-2) to handle.
Wiltjer made a hook shot and
Byron Wesley a jumper to give
Gonzaga its biggest lead, 52-30,
with 10 minutes left.
Johnny Dee hit a 3-pointer and
Brandon Perry had a dunk for
USD.
Gonzaga’s Domantas Sabonis
made two free throws with 8:42
left for a 54-35 lead, but those
were the last points the Bulldogs
scored for 7 minutes, 5 seconds.
USD scored 10 straight points,
nine by Dee, during the next 6
1/2 minutes to pull within 10.
Dee made a 3-pointer, all three
free throws after getting fouled
while shooting from behind the
arc, one of two free throws and
then a shot off a rebound.
Gonzaga finally scored again
when Wesley made a layup with
1:37 left to make it 56-45.
SEE DROUGHT, PAGE B8
team coached by his brother,
John. After the 49ers slipped to 8-8
this season and missed the playoffs, he parted ways with the team
Sunday in what both sides called
a mutual decision. A day later, his
name was the buzz of the Big Ten.
“He’s basically Michigan royalty right now,” said former
Wolverines quarterback Denard
Robinson, now a Jacksonville
Jaguars running back. “He’s the
man right now. I think he’s going
to do a great job and help out
recruiting. He’s had success at
every school he went to. I think
it’s a great fit for Michigan.”
An expensive one, too, with
media reports saying Michigan
offered Harbaugh $48 million over
six years. Big Ten Network analyst and former college coach
Gerry DiNardo said Michigan, the
only school with more than 900
all-time wins, would be bringing
in a “rock star” capable of returning the Wolverines to elite status
in a short time.
SEE HARBAUGH, PAGE B8
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Martin
Brodeur stopped all 16 shots
he faced and recorded his
NHL-record 125th shutout
and 691st victory as the St.
Louis Blues beat the
Colorado Avalanche 3-0 on
Monday night.
Dmitrij Jaskin, Chris
Butler and Vladimir
Tarasenko scored, and Paul
Stastny had two assists for
the Blues, who snapped a
four-game losing streak (0-31) and avenged a 5-0 loss at
Colorado on Dec. 23.
Jaskin beat Semyon
Varlamov in between his
pads for his third goal of the
season 28 seconds into the
second period, and Butler
backhanded a shot over
Varlamov’s shoulder for his
first goal at 4:30 for St. Louis
(22-11-3), 13-4-1 at home.
Tarasenko scored his
team-leading 22nd goal from
the high slot with 4:35
remaining. St. Louis is 18-3
when scoring at least three
goals.
The Avalanche (13-14-8)
have dropped two straight
after going 4-0-2 in their previous six games.
The Blues will begin a
four-game road trip on
Tuesday at Nashville before
heading West. They went 02-1 on their most recent trip,
including the loss at
Colorado.
The Avalanche will open a
three-game homestand
against Philadelphia on
Wednesday.
NOTES: The Avalanche
reassigned F Dennis
Everberg and G Calvin
Pickard to Lake Erie (AHL),
leaving them with just 20
players on the active roster
for the game. . St. Louis
reassigned D Petteri
Lindbohm to Chicago
(AHL). . Blues F Chris
Porter left the game with a
lower-body injury in the second period.
Lady
Generals to
host bball
clinic
Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Frank
McCarthy and the Sheridan
College Lady Generals will
host a holiday basketball
clinic for girls in grades K-8
this weekend.
The clinic will run this
Saturday from 1-4 p.m. at the
Bruce Hoffman Golden
Dome. The cost is $50 per
participant, and each girl
will receive a free basketball
for participating.
Registrations are open
SHERIDAN PRESS FILE PHOTO |
until the start of the clinic.
Contact McCarthy at 6746446 ext. 4001 with any ques- Lady General and Australian native Sam Moodie encourages Halle Reed, 7, during
the Sheridan Generals First Whistle youth basketball camp in October at the
tions or to register your
Sheridan YMCA.
camper.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
18. Oklahoma St.
9-1
299 18
19. Georgia
12-1
241 14
20. Iowa
10-2
159 23
21. Syracuse
9-3
148 22
22. Arizona St.
11-1
115 25
23. Seton Hall
12-1
73 —
24. Michigan St.
8-4
64 20
25. DePaul
9-4
61 —
Others receiving votes: Northwestern 53, Princeton
52, West Virginia 25, Chattanooga 20, W. Kentucky
20, California 15, James Madison 14, Washington
13, Florida St. 12, Washington St. 12, Green Bay 8,
Arkansas 5, St. John’s 5, Dayton 1, Indiana St. 1.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Toronto
24
7
.774
—
Brooklyn
14
16
.467
9½
Boston
10
18
.357
12½
New York
5
28
.152
20
Philadelphia
4
25
.138
19
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Atlanta
22
8
.733
—
22
8
.733
—
Washington
Miami
14
18
.438
9
13
21
.382
11
Orlando
Charlotte
10
22
.313
13
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Chicago
22
9
.710
—
Cleveland
18
12
.600
3½
Milwaukee
16
16
.500
6½
Indiana
11
21
.344
11½
Detroit
7
23
.233
14½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Memphis
22
8
.733
—
Houston
21
9
.700
1
Dallas
22
10
.688
1
San Antonio
19
13
.594
4
New Orleans 15
15
.500
7
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
25
7
.781
—
Oklahoma City 15
17
.469
10
Denver
13
18
.419
11½
Utah
10
21
.323
14½
Minnesota
5
24
.172
18½
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State 24
5
.828
—
L.A. Clippers 21
11
.656
4½
Phoenix
18
14
.563
7½
Sacramento
13
18
.419
12
L.A. Lakers
9
22
.290
16
___
Sunday’s Games
Detroit 103, Cleveland 80
San Antonio 110, Houston 106
Dallas 112, Oklahoma City 107
Portland 101, New York 79
Toronto 116, Denver 102
Phoenix 116, L.A. Lakers 107
Monday’s Games
Chicago 92, Indiana 90
Milwaukee 104, Charlotte 94, OT
Orlando 102, Miami 101
Brooklyn 107, Sacramento 99
Washington 104, Houston 103
L.A. Clippers 101, Utah 97
Tuesday’s Games
Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Portland, 10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Sacramento at Boston, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indiana, 3 p.m.
New York at L.A. Clippers, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
AHL |
NHL |
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Carving the ice
Steve Tobi pushes off the ice during the Planet Hockey holiday super skills camp
Monday at Sheridan Ice.
NCAAM |
The Top Twenty Five
By The Associated Press
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 28, total points based on
25 points for a first-place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking:
Record
Pts Prv
1. Kentucky (65)
13-0
1,625
1
2. Duke
10-0
1,559
2
3. Virginia
11-0
1,457
5
4. Wisconsin
12-1
1,395
6
5. Louisville
11-1
1,327
4
6. Villanova
12-0
1,316
7
7. Gonzaga
12-1
1,249
8
8. Arizona
12-1
1,243
3
9. Iowa St.
9-1
1,005 12
10. Utah
9-2
956 14
11. Texas
10-2
903
9
12. Maryland
12-1
869 15
13. Kansas
9-2
775 10
14. Notre Dame
12-1
709 16
15. St. John’s
11-1
690 17
16. Wichita St.
10-2
630 11
17. West Virginia
11-1
584 18
18. Oklahoma
8-3
530 19
19. North Carolina
9-3
483 20
20. Ohio St.
11-2
435 21
21. Washington
11-1
253 13
22. Baylor
10-1
238 22
23. N. Iowa
11-1
216 23
24. Colorado St.
13-0
194 24
25. Georgetown
8-3
140 —
Others receiving votes: TCU 132, VCU 101, San
Diego St. 40, Arkansas 27, George Washington 7,
LSU 7, Old Dominion 7, Penn St. 5, UNLV 5,
Indiana 4, Florida 2, Minnesota 2, Stanford 2, Army
1, California 1, Davidson 1.
NCAAW |
The Women’s Top Twenty Five
By The Associated Press
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’
women’s college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 28, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week’s ranking:
Record
Pts Prv
1. South Carolina (24)
12-0
864
1
2. UConn (7)
9-1
835
2
3. Texas (4)
10-0
814
3
4. Notre Dame
12-1
757
4
5. Texas A&M
11-1
732
5
6. Baylor
10-1
666
6
7. Louisville
11-1
632
7
8. Tennessee
10-2
625
8
9. North Carolina
11-1
586
9
10. Duke
8-3
542 10
11. Kentucky
11-2
504 12
12. Nebraska
10-1
497 12
13. Oregon St.
10-1
480 10
14. Maryland
9-2
428 15
15. Stanford
8-4
359 16
16. Rutgers
10-2
327 17
17. Mississippi St.
14-0
311 19
Davis wins AP Female
Athlete of the Year honors
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — No one in the
sports world had heard of the 2014
Associated Press Female Athlete of the
Year until August.
That's when 13-year-old Mo'ne Davis
became an instant celebrity as she took
the mound in the Little League World
Series and mowed down batter after batter, giving "throw like a girl" a whole new
meaning.
She was the first girl to win a Little
League World Series game, and her performance dazzled fans young and old. Her
steely gaze and demeanor on the mound
were intimidating, while off-the-field, she
shined in interviews. She told admirers
that if they thought she was good at baseball, they should see her play hoops. Only
in eighth grade, Davis already plays for
her school's high school varsity basketball
team.
Davis appeared on the cover of Sports
Illustrated, has her jersey displayed in
baseball's Hall of Fame and was named
Sports Kid of the Year by Sports
Illustrated Kids.
She met the Obamas at the White House,
starred in a Spike Lee-directed car commercial (the NCAA said it wouldn't hurt
her eligibility), marched in the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade along with her
Taney Dragons teammates and presented
Pharrell Williams with Soul Train's "Song
of the Year" award.
The talented three-sport star — she also
plays soccer — and honor student from
South Philadelphia handled all the attention with poise, modesty and maturity.
"A lot of adults around me help out,
taught me to be respectful, to be calm during everything and not let anything get to
you," Davis said after learning of her latest honor.
A vote by U.S. editors and news directors
selected Davis as The Associated Press
2014 Female Athlete of the Year.
The youngest winner in history, Davis
beat out Mt. St. Joseph freshman Lauren
Hill — who played her first college basketball game while battling terminal brain
cancer — and three-time winner Serena
Williams. The selection was announced
Monday.
Davis tossed a two-hitter to help
Philadelphia beat Nashville 4-0 in the
Little League World Series opener for both
teams.
Davis, the first girl to appear for a U.S.
team in South Williamsport since 2004,
had eight strikeouts and didn't walk a batter.
Her team was eventually eliminated
after losing to teams from Las Vegas and
Chicago. Davis gave up three runs in the
Las Vegas game, and could not take the
mound against Chicago because of pitch
limits.
After the tournament, Davis was everywhere.
She threw whiffle balls to Jimmy Fallon
on NBC's Tonight Show, threw out the first
pitch at Game 4 of the World Series and
signed a book deal.
"It's been really fun, got to do a lot of
things, meet a lot of cool people," Davis
said. "My favorite thing to do was playing
in Williamsport or going to the White
House. (The Obamas) just seemed like a
regular couple, no different from anyone
else."
While others are still talking about her
Little League performance, Davis, a point
guard, is concentrating on basketball.
"It's making me a lot better, helping me
make decisions," Davis said of playing
varsity. "In middle school, I can get away
with small things. The girls now are a lot
taller so I'm working on my jump shot and
ball handling a lot."
Davis aspires to play for the University
of Connecticut and reach the WNBA.
She plays midfielder on her soccer team
and hopes to play three sports in high
school, though she's not sure about baseball.
"I know the boys will be much stronger
so that depends," she said. "Hopefully, I
can continue playing as long as I can."
Davis isn't just a jock. She excels academically despite such a great demand for
her time.
"It's all about time management, how
you plan your projects and not waiting
until the last minute," she said.
Steve Bandura, a recreation leader for
the Philadelphia Parks and Recreation
Department and director of the Anderson
Monarchs sports programs, has helped
coach Davis since she started playing
sports. His son, Scott, was the catcher for
Taney. Bandura said Davis has maintained
her "natural personality" no matter how
many cameras or microphones are in her
face.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Chicago vs. Washington at Washington, DC, 1 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
Tampa Bay
38
23
11
Montreal
36
23
11
Detroit
37
19
9
37
20
14
Toronto
Boston
37
19
15
Florida
33
16
9
36
15
14
Ottawa
Buffalo
37
14
20
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
36
22
9
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Islanders 36
24
11
Washington
36
18
11
N.Y. Rangers 34
19
11
Philadelphia
36
14
16
Columbus
34
15
16
New Jersey
38
13
18
Carolina
36
10
22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
Chicago
37
25
10
Nashville
35
23
9
St. Louis
36
22
11
Winnipeg
37
19
11
Minnesota
34
17
13
Dallas
35
16
14
Colorado
36
13
15
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
Anaheim
38
24
8
Vancouver
34
20
11
San Jose
36
19
12
Los Angeles 37
18
12
Calgary
38
20
15
Arizona
36
14
18
Edmonton
36
7
22
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
Monday’s Games
Chicago 5, Nashville 4, SO
Boston 5, Detroit 2
New Jersey 3, Pittsburgh 1
N.Y. Islanders 4, Washington 3, OT
Montreal 3, Carolina 1
Ottawa 5, Buffalo 2
Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 2
St. Louis 3, Colorado 0
Minnesota 3, Winnipeg 2
Dallas 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Calgary 2, Los Angeles 1
Arizona 4, Philadelphia 2
Tuesday’s Games
Montreal at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 5 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 6 p.m.
OT
4
2
9
3
3
8
7
3
Pts
50
48
47
43
41
40
37
31
OT
5
1
7
4
6
3
7
4
Pts
49
49
43
42
34
33
33
24
OT
2
3
3
7
4
5
8
Pts
52
49
47
45
38
37
34
OT Pts
6 54
3 43
5 43
7 43
3 43
4 32
7 21
for overtime
American Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L OL
Manchester
31
22
7
1
Providence
31
15
13
3
Portland
32
16
15
1
St. John’s
32
12
14
5
Worcester
29
12
13
3
East Division
GP
W
L OL
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton33
18
12
1
Hershey
31
15
11
4
Lehigh Valley
30
14
11
4
Binghamton
30
14
13
2
Norfolk
31
12
18
0
Northeast Division
GP
W
L OL
Springfield
33
22
9
2
Syracuse
32
20
8
4
Hartford
31
17
10
2
Bridgeport
30
15
11
3
Albany
30
14
10
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
W
L OL
Rockford
33
19
10
3
Chicago
32
17
12
3
Milwaukee
30
15
11
1
Grand Rapids
29
15
11
3
Lake Erie
30
13
12
2
North Division
GP
W
L OL
Utica
31
21
5
5
Adirondack
34
19
13
1
32
14
13
5
Hamilton
Toronto
32
13
15
4
Rochester
32
12
19
1
West Division
GP
W
L OL
Oklahoma City
31
20
7
2
San Antonio
30
17
10
3
Texas
31
13
10
8
Charlotte
31
11
16
3
Iowa
32
11
19
1
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Monday’s Games
Iowa 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Tuesday’s Games
Bridgeport at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Hershey, 7 p.m.
Providence at Albany, 7 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Lake Erie at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Hamilton at Rockford, 8 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Syracuse at Rochester, 3:05 p.m.
Hershey at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 3:05 p.m.
Toronto at Adirondack, 5:30 p.m.
Hartford at Portland, 5:30 p.m.
Rockford at Grand Rapids, 6 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Binghamton, 6:05 p.m.
St. John’s at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Lions Suh suspended for one game
NEW YORK (AP) — Ndamukong Suh is
in trouble with the NFL again.
The Detroit defensive tackle was suspended for this Sunday's wild-card playoff game against Dallas for a violation of
safety-related playing rules against
Green Bay in the season finale.
The league announced Monday that
Suh was suspended for stepping on
Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers' left
leg twice, once with each foot. Suh also
applied pressure and pushed off Rodgers'
unprotected leg with his left foot, violating unnecessary roughness rules, the
league said in a statement.
Suh, who will be reinstated next
Monday, can appeal the suspension within three days. He can ask for an expedited appeal, which would be heard by Ted
Cottrell, a hearing officer employed by
the NFL and the players' union. No hearing is scheduled, but one could happen as
soon as Tuesday.
Rodgers had an agitated look after the
incident, and coach Mike McCarthy said
after the game: "There's no place for that.
I don't understand it, frankly."
On Monday, McCarthy backed off a bit,
saying: "I was hoping this wouldn't go
this way. That was a hell of a football
game played yesterday, and that's what I
really came here to talk about. I'm not
here to talk about behavior (of) players
on other teams."
Suh did not speak with reporters at the
Lions practice facility.
Lions center Dominic Raiola, coming
off his own one-game ban for a similar
incident, was enraged by the suspension.
"The play ... he wasn't even looking at
(Rodgers)." Raiola said. "He was getting
pushed back a little bit. It was ridiculous
what Fox did right after it. It was crazy,
watching it. I couldn't even listen to those
guys after he did it.
"There is no way, at that point in the
game, that he did something like that on
purpose. No way."
Added teammate Larry Warford: "It's
part of what has been happening around
here. Obviously, they're going to be
stricter on us. That is just a fact of what
happened a week before.
"They're obviously a lot stricter with
our team," Warford continued, referring
to the NFL. "It's something we have to
fight through. A little adversity. We'll
make it through."
Suh is a repeat offender with a long list
of fines and one previous suspension, for
two games in 2011 for stepping on the
right arm of Packers lineman Evan
Dietrich-Smith. Suh has been fined seven
times in his career, but this is the first in
2014.
Suh was fined $100,000 for an illegal
block on Vikings center John Sullivan in
Week 1 of 2013 during an interception
return. That was the largest fine in NFL
history for on-field conduct, not counting
suspensions. The suspension was
imposed by Merton Hanks, the NFL's
vice president of football operations.
Hanks ruled that Suh engaged in a nonfootball act which placed his opponent at
unnecessary risk of injury.
In his letter to Suh, Hanks wrote, "You
did not respond in the manner of someone who had lost his balance and accidentally contacted another player who
was lying on the ground. This illegal contact, specifically the second step and
push off with your left foot, clearly could
have been avoided."
Hanks further noted "you unnecessarily stepped on your opponent's unprotected leg as he lay on the ground unable to
protect himself."
Suh will not be permitted to attend
team meetings and functions, attend or
watch practices, appear at the club's facilities for any reason, or have contact with
any club personnel except to arrange offsite medical treatment or rehabilitation.
NEW YEAR’S HOLIDAY HOURS &
TRASH COLLECTION
The City of Sheridan Landfill, Recycle Center and City Hall will be closed
Thursday, January 1st, in observance of the New Year’s Holiday.
New Year’s trash collection will be on its regular schedule.
If Thursday is your regular trash day, please set your can out as usual.
We will close at 3:00 PM on New Year’s Eve. Wednesday, December 31st
For City of Sheridan Landfill and Recycling hours and other
information, visit www.sheridanwy.net or call 674-8461
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
"Warning Sign," a 1985
movie with Sam Waterston
about a secret germ warfare
lab in Utah, was mostly
ignored by critics. Now, they
may have had good reason,
but ignoring warning signs
can be risky business.
Research out of the U.K.
reveals that in one study, out
of all folks (50 and older) who
experienced a potential cancer-warning symptom, such
as a change in a mole or
unexplained pain, only 2 percent thought the cause might
be cancer. Even when folks
acknowledged that the symptom might be "serious," they
didn't think it indicated cancer, and only around 59 percent of those people had it
checked out by a doctor.
Even though most potential
cancer symptoms do NOT
end up being cancer, failing
to see a doc to rule them out
is still risky business.
Remember: Getting checked
out leads to early detection,
and that leads to better treat-
ment and better chance of
cure. Stage 1 breast cancer's
five-year survival rate is 100
percent; stage IV is just 22
percent. Non-small-cell lung
cancer's five-year survival
rate for stage 1A is 49 percent; stage IV is 1 percent. So
here's a list of potential
symptoms that you should
make sure to ask your doctor
about:
--Unexplained thickening or
lump in breast or elsewhere
--Unexplained pain
--Change in bowel or bladder habits
--Chronic cough or hoarseness
--Change in the appearance
of a mole or wart
--A sore that won't heal
--Unexplained bleeding
--Unexplained weight loss
--Indigestion or difficulty
swallowing.
If you act today, you'll have
a better tomorrow!
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: "Left Out in
Florida" (Sept. 2) feels it is
inconsiderate of her daughter-in-law to speak only her
native language (not English)
with her children in front of
their grandparents. You
advised that the mother
should speak English in this
situation.
My son attends a bilingual
immersion school, and I have
experience with this issue. I
have attended lectures about
raising bilingual children.
It is extremely difficult to
pass on a language other
than English to kids living in
America. As the children
grow, they will be increasingly drawn to English. The
most successful families are
those who do exactly what
the mom in the letter is
doing. They speak only their
native language with their
children and are very persistent about it. This is the recommendation of the experts
in the field.
What should also be happening is translation for others when necessary. Ideally,
there is a level of support
from family and friends who
understand what a worthwhile, yet difficult, task this
is. Grandparents don't need
to understand everything
that is said, and their job is
to speak English with the
youngsters so they become
truly bilingual.
Bilingualism is an incredible gift to give a child. It goes
beyond just learning another
language. It broadens mental
development, thought patterns and world perspective.
It must be done during childhood while the brain is still
pliable, and continue until
adulthood or the language
will be lost.
These parents obviously
understand the value of what
they are doing. I hope the
grandparents will support it.
-- BILINGUAL MOM IN OREGON
DEAR BILINGUAL MOM:
Thank you for lending your
insight. I heard from others
who, like you, have firsthand
knowledge on this issue:
DEAR ABBY: My son also
married a woman from
another country. She has spoken only her native tongue to
my granddaughter from day
one. My son speaks English
to his daughter. My daughterin-law speaks English to me.
I care for the little girl
three days a week. She's 4
and completely bilingual. I
thank my lucky stars that
she has this opportunity. And
I'm glad for her other grandparents, who do not live in
this country or speak
English, but can communicate with her. I don't worry
that they're secretly talking
about me. "Left Out" should
be grateful her grandkids
have this huge advantage. -JEAN IN MILLERSVILLE,
MD.
DEAR ABBY: I wish you
had suggested to "Left Out"
that she and her husband try
to learn the language of
their grandchildren. It's not
difficult to learn a few foreign conversational phrases,
or even be able to carry on a
coherent conversation using
free or inexpensive tools
available at the library or
online.
Of course, in order to do
that, they have to want to
reach out and make the
effort. Perhaps if they did,
the daughter-in-law might
feel a little more welcoming
and less distant.
Ever since my grandkids
started attending a bilingual
school, I have been studying
to try to keep up with them,
and so have the other grandparents. Communication is a
two-way street! -- JUDI IN
ELGIN, S.C.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
To receive a collection of
Abby's most memorable -and most frequently requested -- poems and essays, send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby -- Keepers
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447.
Shipping and handling are
included in the price.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
B5
Hudler sets up Flames in 2-1 win over Kings
A&M student assistant
hits WVU players on sideline
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) —
Texas A&M student assistant
Michael Richardson was ordered off the sideline by Aggies coach Kevin Sumlin for
the second half of the Liberty
Bowl after videos showed him
hitting West Virginia players
out of bounds.
Videos appearing on Twitter
late in the first half showed
Richardson using his elbow to
strike one West Virginia
player in the back of the head
and shoving another Mountaineer in a separate incident
Monday afternoon.
Athletic department
spokesman Brad Marquardt
issued a statement during the
game saying that "when Texas
A&M head coach Kevin Sumlin was made aware of student
assistant Michael Richard-
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
CALGARY, Alberta (AP) — Jiri
Hudler had a pair of beautiful setups Monday night as the Calgary
Flames scored twice in the first period and then hung on for a 2-1 victory over the Los Angeles Kings.
Curtis Glencross and Markus
Granlund had the goals for Calgary. The Flames have won three
in a row since a seven-game losing
streak.
Calgary pulled even with Los Angeles, San Jose and Vancouver in
the Pacific Division. However, the
Kings hold a game in hand, San
Jose has two in hand and the
Canucks have four.
Tyler Toffoli scored for Los Angeles, which began a three-game
road trip through Western Canada
that continues Tuesday night in
Edmonton.
With the teams meeting for the
second time in a week, Calgary
took a 1-0 lead at 12:13 of the first
period on the eighth goal of the
season for Glencross, who was set
up on a slick play by Hudler.
Carrying the puck with speed
son's actions on the sideline,
he was told to remain in the
locker room for the remainder
of the game."
"I was made aware of the situation at halftime," Sumlin
said after the Aggies' 45-37 victory. "He did not return to the
field, and he's already been
sent home. That's nothing that
we condone. There's nothing
about that whole situation
that's a part of who we are and
what we believe in."
Richardson is a former
Texas A&M player who has
been working as a student assistant. Richardson was a
freshman linebacker in 2012
when he underwent surgery
for a cervical spine injury
that occurred in a November
victory over Sam Houston
State.
into the Kings end, Hudler curled
sharply toward the sideboards,
drawing lone defenseman Jake
Muzzin toward him. With the middle of the ice now opened up,
Hudler then slid a perfect pass to
Glencross racing in all alone and
he wristed a shot into the top corner past Jonathan Quick.
The Flames made it 2-0 just more
than a minute later on another
pretty goal involving Hudler.
Skating up the wing, Johnny
Gaudreau made a nice play to
evade defenseman Matt Greene at
the Los Angeles blue line, then
drew the Kings’ other defenseman,
Alec Martinez, to the ice before
saucering a pass across to Hudler.
The instant the puck landed on
Hudler’s stick, he sent a touch pass
back into the slot and with Quick
fooled and caught way out of position, Granlund had an empty net to
fire in his fifth goal of the season.
Hudler’s two assists gave him 36
points (13 goals, 23 assists). He
moved ahead of Mark Giordano for
the team scoring lead.
Trailing 2-0, the Kings got a goal
in the final minute of the second
period. Toffoli got behind the
Flames’ top defense pairing of
Giordano and TJ Brodie, was fed a
perfect pass by Dustin Brown, and
in alone on Jonas Hiller showed
terrific hands in zipping a perfect
backhander under the crossbar.
Toffoli had another great chance
from the side of the net with less
than 10 seconds to go in the second
but was robbed by Hiller, who
jabbed out his pad to deny the
Kings’ leading scorer.
Hiller also robbed Dwight King
at the buzzer in the third period
and finished with 26 saves to improve to 12-10-2. After giving up
two or more goals in 15 straight
starts, the Swiss goalie has allowed
two goals total in his last two
games.
Quick had 13 stops in falling to
15-9-6.
NOTES: Los Angeles forward
Marian Gaborik (flu-like symptoms) did not play. He is on a sixgame scoring streak.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TO PLACE YOUR AD
Fax: (307) 672-7950
DEADLINES
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Run Day
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Entertainment
Rooms for Rent
HAPPY NEW Year!
Whizz Bangs
Fireworks Open Sat
12/27 thru Wed
12/31. 11-5 daily.
Next to KMart behind
Pizza Hut.
MOTEL 6
Winter Weekly Rates.
Indoor Pool. Modern
rooms. 307-673-9500.
Pets & Supplies
Furnished Apts for Rent
1 BR. No smk/pets.
$650 + elec. Coin-Op
W/D. 307-674-5838.
FOR SALE to GOOD ROCKTRIM $600/MO.
HOME! 6 yr old male
Wi-Fi/Cable 752-8783
crossbred
Japanese
Shin & Shitzu. House WKLY FR $210. Mnthly
trained & all shots fr $630 Americas Best
current. PREFER a Value Inn 672-9757
home with older couple.
Unfurnished Apts for
$100. 763-7651.
Miscellaneous
HAPPY NEW Year!
Whizz Bangs
Fireworks Open Sat
12/27 thru Wed
12/31. 11-5 daily.
Next to KMart behind
Pizza Hut.
Firewood
FIREWOOD
LODGEPOLE PINE
C/S/D. 655-9417.
For Lease
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Rent
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
SHERIDAN APARTMENTS
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Taking Applications
for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments. Coin-op
laundry facility & play area.
$450 Deposit
Rental assistance depending
on availability and eligibility
Non-Smoking
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
307-672-0854
TDD#711
1917 N. Main Street
Sheridan, WY
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
PICKLES
LGE 3 BR/2 Ba. in Big
Horn. Carport, storage,
RV
Parking.
W/D
hooks. Like new cond.
$1275/mo. incl. W/S/G
&
lawn
care.
No
smoking/ pets. 307-6747718.
3 BR/2 Ba. $950/mo +
util. No smoking/pets.
673-2571 or 751-2198.
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
‘14 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$ 42,495
‘09 GMC SIERRA SLT
$ 28,895
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE
$ 38,495
'12 CHEVY TRAVERSE
$ 20,995
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
‘10 CHEVY TAHOE LTZ
$ 34,995
'10 CHEVY CREW
$ 19,995
672-8681
‘14 CHEVY 1500 CREW
$ 34,495
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$ 18,995
‘11 BMW X50I
$ 32,995
'07 HUMMER H3X
$ 17,495
‘13 CHEVY 2500 CREW
$ 32,995
'14 CHEVY CAPTIVA
$ 17,495
‘12 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
$ 30,995
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN
$ 14,995
‘09 CADILLAC ESCALADE
$ 29,995
'05 FORD EXPLORER XLT ST
$ 10,495
‘12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
$ 29,995
'06 SUBARU OUTBACK I
$ 9,995
‘12 CHEVY 1500 LT
$ 28,995
'94 GMC 3500 DURAMAX
$ 6,995
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer.
TDD #711
2BR. FRONT door prkg.
On site W/D. $600
+dep. Lease/ref's. Call
afternoon for appt.
752-4735.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2 BR/1 Ba.
$750.00/mo. Water
paid. Central A/C.
220 S. Sheridan Ave.
752-7704
3 BR 2 BA 1 car att.
gar. in Dayton. Nice
neighborhood.
No
smok/pets. $1250 + ulit
& dep. 751-0253
NEWER 2 BR.
$950/mo Water &
heat paid. 1000 SF.
818 E. 7th St. Avail.
12/1. 752-7704
3BR/1BA. LRG fenced
yard. W/D hooks. $950
+ util, lease & deposit.
Pet negotiable.
307-631-6024
CARS
CARS
‘10 CHEVY CAMERO SS
$ 25,995
‘10 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX $ 19,995
‘14 CHEVY CRUZE
$ 17,495
‘12 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
$ 16,995
‘14 CHEVY IMPALA
$ 16,995
‘13 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
$ 14,995
Forars!
e
y
8
7
‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
$ 14,995
‘09 TOYOTA CAMRY
$ 12,995
‘08 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
$ 9,995
‘07 CHEVY IMPALA LT
$ 9,995
‘05 HONDA ACCORD
$ 8,595
‘09 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$ 7,495
107 E. ALGER
307.674.6419
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
$
38,495
2014 CHEVY TRAVERSE
$
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
34,495
2014 CHEVY 1500 CREW
on facebook at www.facebook.com/hammerchevy
www.hammerchevy.com
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
Now online...
www.DestinationSheridan.co m
Help Wanted
Autos-Accessories
4 BR 2 BA.
Nice neighborhood.
Close to school.
$1800/mo. 673-5555.
FT TELLER. Please
bring resumes to
Sunlight Federal
Credit Union.
Storage Space
Help Wanted, Medical
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave E. 752-9114.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane 674-9819.
JOIN A team that
supports you –
professionally and
personally.
Correctional Healthcare
Companies is currently
seeking top-notch
Healthcare
professionals to join our
team at our Sheridan
County Detention
Facility in Sheridan,
WY. Healthcare
Opportunities Include:
Licensed Practical
Nurse – Full Time. We
invite you to take a look
at our career
opportunities and the
benefits of working at
CHC. Please apply
online at
www.correctcaresolutio
ns.com Careers/current
openings/Correctional
Healthcare openings
(CHC) or Contact
[email protected]
olutions.com
CHC is an EEO
Employer
PRIME RATE
MOTORS Installs
B&W GN Hitches, 5th
Wheel Hitches, CM
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bail Beds, We're also
buying
Vehicles of all ages!
Stop by 2305 Coffeen
Ave. or Call 674-6677.
INTERSTATE
STORAGE.
Multiple Sizes avail.
No deposit req'd.
752-6111.
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
Help Wanted
MANAGEMENT
POSITIONS open at
Subways in local area.
Call for phone interview.
307-217-1998.
Help Wanted
GREAT
RESTAURANTS
BEGIN WITH
GREAT
EMPLOYEES!
The Open Range
NOW HIRING!
Line Cooks
Dishwashers
Bartenders
Host/Hostess
Wait Staff
Bussers
Applications available
at the Sheridan Inn
front desk Mon - Fri.
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland
Drive.
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: SILVER
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Solution to 12/29/14
Help Wanted
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING Front
Desk, Housekeeping,
Breakfast Attendant.
Exp. Preferred.
Apply in person
at Motel 6 &
Hampton Inn.
RECEPTIONIST/
ASSISTANT
for law/real estate
office. Send resumes
to: Greg Von Krosigk,
PO Box 602, Sheridan
82801.
SHERIDAN MANOR
is now hiring CNA's.
Call Donna at
307-674-4416. Also
hiring RN's & LPN's.
Call Brenda at
307-674-4416.
SUNLIGHT FEDERAL
Credit
Union
is
seeking an Office
Manager.
For more information
contact Cindy Bennett
at 307-587-4915.
Email resume to
cindybt
@sunlightfcu.org or
mail to Cindy Bennett
c/o Sunlight Federal
Credit Union, Box 190,
Cody, WY 82414
Real Estate
HOME/3
AC.
Irg.
Horses OK. $300K 7636610
Autos-Accessories
FOR
SALE
2009
Polaris ATV. Accepting
bids until January 2.
Sunlight Federal Credit
Union.
NON SEQUITUR
12/30/14
Hints from Heloise
Dear Heloise: Before plastic
water bottles go in the recycling bin, I loosen the cap and
SQUEEZE all the air I can out
of them and then tighten the
cap. This can be done with milk
cartons and other items as well.
-- John P., via email
John, thanks for recycling.
Every little bit helps. Some recycling centers want you to
leave the caps on; others don't.
It can get confusing for the consumer, can't it? Readers, please
call to find out what your recycling center wants you to do.
The bottles and caps are made
from different plastics, and
some centers are able to
process them both; others are
unable to, and the tops should
be separated from the bottle.
If you are doing this to compact items and save space in
the recycling bin, here's a hint
from me: Take the tops off, be
sure there's no liquid left, and
stomp on it. This works on
cans, also. You'll be happy with
how much more you can stuff
into the bin! -- Heloise
RENTERS INSURANCE
Dear Readers: Are you a
Heloise
renter of a home or apartment?
If so, do you have renters insurance to protect valuable belongings? If not, you should -- and
it's not as expensive as you
think. Here are some important
hints:
* There are two types of
renters insurance. One pays
the cash value of belongings
(minus depreciation). The
other pays replacement cost,
which means today's actual
cost of the belongings. Check
the policy closely for the monetary limits.
* Not everyone needs renters
insurance. College students
and some other dependents
may be covered under a parent's policy. Check with your
policy.
* Renters insurance can
cover expenses if you can't live
in the home or apartment because the damage is extensive.
It can cover hotel bills, another
rental and meals while displaced.
* If you have an expensive
collection or jewelry, you
should add a floater to the policy to cover these specific
items. Do check the limit on
your policy for jewelry or artwork. It might be a blanket
amount, like $500 or so.
* Landlords insurance covers
ONLY the structure, not anything in your home or apartment.
* It's not as costly as you
think. Try to guess? It can be as
low as around $200 a year.
That's only about $17 a month!
Hey, that's a bargain.
-- Heloise
TAKE PICTURES
Dear Heloise: After I decorated my house for Christmas a
couple of years ago, I wanted it
the same way each year. I took
a picture of my front-door
decor, Christmas tree, different
rooms with Christmas decor,
the nativity set, dining-room
table, etc. My friend helped me
decorate, and all we had to do
was look at the pictures and
find the matching decor in
boxes I had labeled. -- B. Robertson, Little Rock, Ark.
This is one of those "Why didn't I think of that?" hints. -Heloise
Bridge
Phillip Alder
IF YOU
BID SIX,
COUNT TO
12
Ronnie
Shakes, a
stand-up comedian who
died in 1987, said, "After
12 years of therapy my
psychiatrist said something that brought tears
to my eyes. He said, 'No
hablo ingles.'"
After declarer went
down in this small slam,
he might have said, "No
contaba con doce" -- I did
not count to 12.
What should declarer
have done to try to make
six spades after West led
the diamond king?
North was right to
raise his partner's onespade response to two
spades. Then, though,
South should have temporized with a threeclub rebid. North would
probably have continued
with three no-trump,
denying four-card spade
support and promising a
diamond stopper. After
that, South should have
invited a slam with four
no-trump. Note, however, that six spades is
the only small slam that
can be made -- although
it is very lucky.
At the table, declarer was so bothered by the lack of
a fourth trump in
the dummy that he
never gave the contract any thought
and drifted down.
If he had asked
himself which 12
tricks he could
have won, he
would have seen
four top spades (he
needed trumps 3-3),
two hearts, two diamonds, three clubs
and a club ruff in
the dummy.
South takes the
first trick with his
diamond ace, leads
a spade to dummy's
queen, returns a
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Lance Reddick was born in
Baltimore, Md., on this date
in 1962. This birthday guy
starred as Phillip Broyles
on "Fringe" and Lt. Cedric
Daniels on "The Wire." He
played the recurring role of
Papa Legba on "American
Horror Story: Coven" and
has appeared on episodes of
"The Blacklist," "Intelligence" and "Lost." Reddick's
film resume includes "The
Siege," "White House Down"
and "John Wick."
ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19):
Extra energy allows for
multi-tasking. You're able
to simultaneously run several burners on your
proverbial stove at once
with ease. Others will have
complete faith in your reliability. When a job needs
doing, you'll be just the one
to do it.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20):
Get in with the "in" crowd.
The holiday gives you
ample excuse to meet the
right sort of people at a
community gathering or the
local pub. Whatever social
situation you find yourself
in, you're likely to make
new friends or meet valuable contacts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Unravel a mystery. Be it
getting to know the passions and priorities of an attractive new acquaintance
or exploring uncharted locations with friends, the unknown will hold appeal for
you. Gossip sessions at a
party may yield all sorts of
juicy information.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Make the most of quality time. Tonight you'll have
the rare opportunity to create lasting memories with
good friends and family.
Share good times and high
spirits with everyone you
encounter and welcome the
New Year with a bang.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Wipe the slate clean. Start
the New Year by putting
past animosities behind you
and moving forward with a
fresh new outlook. Resolve
to change the things that
have hampered your
progress and there's no
limit to what you can
achieve.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
A little digging could yield
some gold. A probing conversation could reveal what
tickles the fancy of that special someone. As the New
Year looms, it will take little effort to kindle the fires
of passion.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
Old acquaintances shouldn't be forgotten. You may receive an unexpected blast
from the past as an old
club to his jack, ruffs his
low club in the dummy,
cashes the spade ace,
plays a heart to his king,
cashes the spade king
(drawing trumps), and
leads a diamond toward
dummy's jack. Whew!
Jeraldine Saunders
friend, neighbor or flame
crosses your path on those
holiday rounds. Reminisce
about the good old days as
the New Year dawns.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Home is where the
heart is. Welcome in the
New Year as you surround
yourself with those who you
love and trust most. Someone near and dear may
want to elevate your relationship to a higher level.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): When you talk,
people listen, so don't be
afraid to toot your own
horn. You can liven up any
holiday gathering with a little noisemaking and exuberance. No one who knows
you will doubt your sincerity when you make a promise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Let your significant
other do the driving. Your
path to holiday fun lies in
following the lead of someone who knows how to liven
up the evening. Consider
making New Year's goals
that focus on improving
your financial situation.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): End the old year memorably. Make sure you're
close to the object of your
affection as the clock
strikes midnight and resolve to make your relationship last. Someone whose
good opinion counts can
provide valuable support.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
Out with the old, in with the
new. The New Year's resolution that counts will be the
one that centers on making
a dynamic change for the
better. Anything you can
see clearly in your mind
can eventually become reality.
IF DECEMBER 31 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: You
may be inspired to climb a
bit higher on the ladder of
success during the next 5-6
weeks. This is an excellent
time to make shrewd business decisions, focus on financial planning, or pursue
worthy career objectives.
You may be tempted to
make key investments, take
on added debt, or change
jobs in March, but might do
better to wait a bit. If at all
possible, hold off until September to start new initiatives or make crucial
changes that could affect
your future. In September,
you may receive a golden
opportunity or benefit from
the support and sound advice of well-wishers.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS:
Dick Anderson Construction Inc. & Northern
Wyoming Community College District (Sheridan
College) request subcontractor bids for work on the
WHITNEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS Bid Phase One –
Demolition & Utilities, Sheridan, Wyoming. Sealed bids
will be accepted at Sheridan College, 3059 Coffeen Ave,
Sheridan, WY until 2:00 p.m. (local time), on January
8th, 2015. All bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud at Sheridan College following the closing time of
receipt of bids. Bidders are instructed to reference the
Invitation to Bid for bid submittal requirements.
Five percent preference is hereby given to
subcontractors, materials, supplies, agricultural
products, equipment, machinery and provisions
produced, manufactured or grown in Wyoming, or
supplied by a resident of the State, quality being equal
to articles offered by competitors outside the State as
provided in W.S. 16-6-101 through 16-6-107.
The work includes the following Bid
Packages: 2B – Structure Demolition, 2C – Selective
Demolition and 31A- Utilities.
A pre-bid meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m.,
meet in front of the Whitney Presentation Hall, located
within the Whitney Building, Sheridan College, 3059
Coffeeen Ave., Sheridan, WY on December 18, 2014.
Contract Documents can be obtained from
Dick Anderson Construction, Inc., 2675 Heartland Drive,
Sheridan, WY, phone (307)672-0418 on December 12,
2014 for refundable deposit of $100.00. Contract
Documents will also be available at the following plan
centers: Wyoming Plans Service (Casper), Northeast
Wyoming Plan Service (Gillette), Cheyenne Plan
Service, Billings Builders Exchange and the Construction
Industry Center (Rapid City)
Technical information concerning these bid
packages, please contact Dick Anderson Construction,
Inc., Brian Bolton at (307)672-0418.
Dick Anderson Construction is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Publish: December 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL
DISTRICT
WITHIN AND FOR SHERIDAN COUNTY, STATE OF
WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM D. WILLEY,
Deceased.
Probate No. PR2014-143
NOTICE OF PROBATE
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that on the 8th day
of December, 2014, the estate of the above named
decedent was admitted to probate by the above named
Court, and that John D. Willey and James S. Willey was
appointed Co-Personal Representatives thereof.
Notice is further given that all persons
indebted to the decedent or to decedent’s estate are
requested to make immediate payment to the
undersigned at Kinnaird Law Office, P.C., P.O. Box 627,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Creditors having claims against the
decedent or the estate are required to file them in
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
duplicate with the necessary vouchers, in the office of
the Clerk of said Court, on or before three (3) months
after the date of the first publication of this notice, and
if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed
or paid, they will be forever barred.
DATED this 8 day of December, 2014.
/s/John D. Willey Co-Personal
Representative
/s/James S. Willey Co-Personal
Representative
Publish: December 16, 23, 30, 2014.
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL SETTLEMENT
FOR THE
SHERIDAN ARMORY KITCHEN AND LATRINE REMODEL
CONSTRUCTION
AT
SHERIDAN, SHERIDAN COUNTY, WYOMING
Notice is hereby given that the State of Wyoming,
Wyoming Military Department has accepted as
complete, according to plans, specifications, and rules
governing the same, the work performed under that
certain Service Contract 05SC0075665 between the
State of Wyoming, Wyoming Military Department and
KWN Construction, LLC whose address is 2675
Heartland Drive, Sheridan, Wyoming 82801, for the
work performed, materials, equipment, or tools
furnished or used and services rendered for the
substantial completion of the Sheridan Armory Kitchen
and Latrine Remodel Construction, Bid No. 0109-Y, at
Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyoming and the
contractor is entitled to final settlement therefore; that
the Department of Administration and Information will
cause said Contractor to be paid the full amount due
him under said contract on February 9, 2014. The date
of the first publication is December 30, 2014.
Publish: December 30, 2014 and
January 6, 13, 2015.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL
DISTRICT
IN THE COUNTY OF SHERIDAN, STATE OF WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE
OF NAME OF
File No. CV2014-397
EILEEN ANNE GALLAGHER
NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME
TO ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE NAME OF EILEEN
ANNE GALLAGHER:
You are hereby notified that on the 2nd day of
December, 2014, Eileen Anne Gallagher filed a Petition
in the above-entitled cause to change her name from
Eileen Anne Gallagher to Aileen Anne Ullman. Anyone
having any objection must file the same with this Court
and send a copy to the attorney named below on or
before the 30th day after the final publication of this
notice or the Petition will be granted as prayed for.
Clerk of the District Court
/s/By: Lela F. Chapman, Deputy Clerk
Timothy S. Tarver
Attorney at Law
P. O. Box 6284
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Publish : December 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
Your Right
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
To Know
and be informed of
government legal
proceedings is
embodied in public
notices. This
newspaper urges
every
citizen to read and
study these notices.
We strongly advise
those seeking
further information
to exercise their
right of access to
public records and
public meetings.
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
before
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at 6722431 if you have questions.
The caption on this photo reads "A bunch of our lambs crossing Willow Creek in the Big Horn mountains". These were
probably Walt Peters' lambs as the photos were found in the
old Walt Peters stone house East of Sheridan, now owned by
Dwight and Lorrie Layton. The photo is from the Layton collection in the Sheridan County Museum's Memory Book Project. Walt Peters served as Sheridan County Commissioner
for 30 years, and was responsible for many major improvements throughout the county.
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
B7
P U B LI C N O T I C ES
I
ti
s the publi
c’
s ri
ght to know .
I
ndependent new spapers,li
ke The S herid a n P res s ,publi
sh governm ental
proceedi
ngs to foster a greater trust betw een governm ent and i
t’
s ci
ti
zens.
New spapers have long had the experi
ence,experti
se,and credi
bi
li
ty i
n publi
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ng
publi
c noti
ces and have done so si
nce the R evoluti
on.Today,they are an establi
shed
li
nk enabli
ng the publi
c to understand how thei
r resources are bei
ng used i
n the m ost
effi
ci
ent and effecti
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I
t’
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d and m i
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ng the pages from the back ofthe
new spaper to the front secti
on.The pages
i
nclude the nam es and contact
i
nform ati
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c offi
ci
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O ur publi
c noti
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Content matters.
144 G ri
nnell•Sheri
dan,W Y •672-2431
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Okafor scores
27, No. 2
Duke beats
pesky Toledo
www.thesheridanpress.com
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Freshman center
Jahlil Okafor scored a season-high 27
points and No. 2 Duke beat pesky Toledo
86-69 on Monday night.
Quinn Cook added a season-best 20 points
and Tyus Jones had 15 for Duke (11-0),
which was playing its first game since Dec.
18.
The Blue Devils raced out to a big early
lead, then allowed Toledo to shoot itself
back into the game before eventually
pulling away.
Okafor was 12 of 15 from the field while
reaching the 20-point mark for the fourth
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2014
time in six games.
Julius Brown scored 19 for Toledo (7-5),
which erased most of a 14-point deficit by
making 13 of 15 shots over a 9½-minute
stretch. Brown’s 3-pointer about 90 seconds
into the second half cut Duke’s lead to 4744. Okafor then reeled off seven straight
points to start the decisive 21-9 spurt.
Okafor’s personal run included transition dunks 20 seconds apart and a stickback of Justise Winslow’s missed 3 to put
the Blue Devils up 54-44 with 16 minutes
left. Jones capped the run with the play
that finally allowed Duke to exhale: a four-
point play in which he swished a 3 through
contact from Jonathan Williams, then hit
the free throw that followed to make it 68-53
with 9:10 to play.
Toledo — which missed eight of its next
11 shots after Brown’s 3 — never got closer
than 11 the rest of the way.
Justin Drummond and J.D. Weatherspoon
added 14 points apiece and Williams had 10
for the Mid-American Conference favorite
Rockets. They return four starters from a
team that won a school-record 27 games in
2013-14 and stuck around until late in a loss
at Kansas.
HARBAUGH: 58-27 record as college coach
FROM B2
“This gives Michigan a chance to catch
up,” DiNardo said.
Still, Michigan’s new coach has his work
cut out for him in a Big Ten East Division
that’s only getting tougher.
Meyer is preparing the Buckeyes for this
week’s semifinal against Alabama in the
inaugural College Football Playoff.
Michigan State’s Mark Dantonio has built a
program that has staying power. Penn
State’s James Franklin is a celebrated
recruiter who looks to have the Nittany
Lions on the rise.
Under Brady Hoke, Michigan dipped to 57 this season and was among only four Big
Teams to not earn a bowl bid. The
Wolverines were 31-20 in Hoke’s four seasons and declined steadily after an 11-2
mark in his first year.
Harbaugh went 58-27 overall as a college
coach at San Diego and Stanford, including
a 29-21 record in four seasons with the
Cardinal. He took over a 1-11 team when he
was hired in December 2006 and quickly
turned the program back into a winner and
bowl contender.
Harbaugh’s first Stanford team went 4-8
in a season highlighted by a 24-23 win over
No. 1 Southern California, a game in which
the Cardinal was a 41-point underdog.
Stanford was 5-7 the following season, then
improved to 8-5 and earned a Sun Bowl
berth in 2009 — the school’s first bowl
appearance since 2001. They won the
Orange Bowl with quarterback Andrew
Luck his final season.
The 49ers hired Harbaugh four days after
the bowl, and he went 44-19-1 with two NFC
West titles in four seasons.
Harbaugh is now being looked to as the
coach who can finally return Michigan to
prominence.
“I think it gives the Big Ten great credibility,” said Lou Holtz, the former coach
and an ESPN analyst. “I’ve always felt the
real evaluation of a conference is strength
of coaches. When you look at the SEC,
there’s Nick Saban, there was Urban Meyer
(at Florida), Steve Spurrier, Mark Richt,
Les Miles. Now in the Big Ten you’ve got an
Urban Meyer, a Jim Harbaugh, a Mark
Dantonio.”
Harbaugh’s leadership showed up during
his playing days in Ann Arbor. The starting
quarterback for three seasons under
Schembechler, he is well remembered for
delivering a victory he guaranteed over
Ohio State in 1986, the same season he was
Big Ten player of the year and finished
third in Heisman Trophy voting.
He played 15 years in the NFL, earning
the nickname “Captain Comeback” for
leading fourth-quarter playoff rallies for
the Indianapolis Colts. Harbaugh later
coached quarterbacks for the Oakland
Raiders in 2002-03 before returning to the
college ranks.
DiNardo, whose coaching resume
includes stops at LSU, Indiana and
Vanderbilt, said he doubted Harbaugh
would have taken the job if he weren’t
promised to have full autonomy in running
the program.
“You don’t pay someone millions of dollars and tell him what jersey number the
quarterback should wear,” DiNardo said.
“This coach has to be left alone, whether
that’s the size of the recruiting staff or
facilities or non-conference schedule. All
those decisions have to be Jim Harbaugh’s.
No one told Bo Schembechler what to do.
He sees the big picture.”
DROUGHT: Zags average 83.9 points a game
FROM B2
“That’s a huge key of
ours. If we’re not scoring
we’ve just got to be able to
lock down defensively,”
Wiltjer said. “It was a pretty
low-scoring game, so that
was good for our defense to
know that we can trust it.”
Wesley scored 12 points
and Kevin Pangos had 10 for
the Zags, who came in averaging 83.9 points per game.
“If you had told me a couple hours before the game
we were going to hold them
to 60 points, I’d say we’ll
take it and we’ll have a
great shot,” San Diego
coach Bill Grier said. “But
we just couldn’t get anything going offensively.
They’re a really good defensive team and they made it
a struggle for us.”
Dee scored 20 points to
push his career total to
1,784, seven shy of breaking
the school record set by
Brandon Johnson from
2005-10.
“Definitely a tough loss,”
Dee said. “I think it goes
out on me and Chris
(Anderson). The senior
leaders on this team, we
came out and didn’t play
the way we should have to
start that game and got
down to a pretty bad deficit
and down 15 at halftime.
That’s a lot of pressure on
your team to have to come
back. As seniors we’ve got
to pick it up and be better at
the start of a game.”
Wiltjer scored eight points
in the first 5 minutes to
help Gonzaga to a 12-3 lead.
Gonzaga closed the first
half on a 15-6 run to take a
35-20 lead. The Zags scored
10 straight at one point,
with Sabonis making two
baskets, Wesley converting
a three-point play and
Pangos hitting a 3-pointer.
“I thought we played great
as a unit today, especially at
the start of the game and
the middle of the game,”
Pangos said. “When we play
as a team, we have a lot of
talent and we’re a tough
team to beat.”
Brett Bailey made a 3
with 38 seconds left for the
Toreros, who had just 10
points in the last 9 minutes
of the first half.
___
UP NEXT
Gonzaga visits Portland
on Saturday night.
San Diego is at San
Francisco on Thursday.