The Sheridan Press E-edition—August 10, 2016

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The Sheridan Press E-edition—August 10, 2016
WEDNESDAY
August 10, 2016
131st Year, No. 69
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
Incumbents call
Fox proposal
unethical, illegal
THE SHERIDAN
Sweet, savory
salmon on the grill.
Taste, B1
CANDIDATES VIE FOR VOTES
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — As the primary
election draws closer, one candidate
has argued that the system in which
Sheridan County voters vote for
Republican candidates is flawed.
Republican Sheridan County
Commission
candidate
Dennis Fox
has actively
protested
against the
county board
having five
commissioners, saying
that there
are too many
individuals
on the board
for its workload.
He also
said the
primaries
are unfair,
essentially
securing an
incumbent
a spot in the
Tom Ringley
general elecSheridan County commissioner
tion.
In an
information
sheet he
provided to the Sheridan County
Commission at its Aug. 2 meeting,
Fox wrote that the election is “legally rigged” and presents an unfair
advantage to the incumbents.
‘I am shocked
that someone
running for that
office would
not have a basic
idea of statutory
requirements and
responsibilities. It
is just inherently
wrong to ask anyone
to do this.’
SEE COMMISSION, PAGE 8
Crews respond to
lightning-caused
fire in Bighorns
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIGHORN MOUNTAINS —
Firefighting crews responded to a
lightning-caused fire Tuesday in the
Bighorn Mountains, about 3.5 miles
south of Dead Swede Campground.
The Duncan Fire is estimated at
about .17 acres in size and is burning in timber.
A total of eight people are working
to contain the fire.
A helicopter dropped water from
Duncan Lake and ferried firefighters to the fire. Officials said the location is inaccessible to U.S. Forest
Service fire engines.
The crew will continue water
drops and line construction around
the fire Wednesday.
Officials with the USFS said the
fire was 50 percent contained as of
Tuesday night and firefighters hope
to have it 100 percent contained
Wednesday.
There are no closures or evacuations in effect and no structures
are threatened, according to USFS
officials.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
House District 51 Rep. Rosie Berger, R-Big Horn, looks on as Democratic challenger Hollis Hackman speaks during the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce’s candidate forum Tuesday night at the Sheridan Wesleyan Church. Berger will face Republican challenger Bo Biteman in the primary set for
Tuesday. Hackman will automatically move on to the general election in November.
Challengers attack incumbents’ votes, stances on issues
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — It didn’t take
long Tuesday night for it to
become clear that this year’s
candidate forums would take a
different tone than those held in
past years.
Approximately one minute
into his opening remarks,
Republican candidate Stephen
Cain criticized his opponent,
incumbent Rep. Mark Kinner,
R-Sheridan. In the past, criticisms of opponents were few and
far between. Instead, candidates
typically chose to speak to their
own issues rather than attack
those of their opponents.
But, in each of the panels
featuring multiple candidates
for the Wyoming House, mud
was thrown by challengers. For
the most part, incumbent candidates did not respond during
their time on stage, but some
circulated written materials
clarifying their views and past
votes in the Legislature.
Here’s a rundown of questions
asked of Wyoming Legislature
candidates Tuesday at the
Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce candidate forum.
House District 29
Candidates: Incumbent Rep.
Mark Kinner, R-Sheridan,
and Stephen Cain
Cain took the microphone first
Tuesday. Introducing himself
to the residents of Sheridan
County, he spoke about his
time owning the Palace cafe in
downtown Sheridan before criti-
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
cizing Kinner for voting against
the introduction of House Bill
103 during the 2016 legislative
session. The bill would have
required committee meetings of
the Legislature to be recorded
and stored.
Kinner has said that he voted
no because it was an introductory bill.
“This means it was simply
there are privacy concerns as
well.”
In his introduction, Kinner
spoke about his experience
working with First Interstate
Bank, noting that he has taken
care of people’s money for
40 years. He said that work
has prepared him to tackle
Wyoming’s budget issues.
The first question asked of the
US House
candidates
talk energy
policies, gun
control
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
[email protected]
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Audience members listen to candidates during the Sheridan County
Chamber of Commerce’s candidate forum Tuesday night at the Sheridan
Wesleyan Church.
tabled for further discussion
and not outright voted down on
the House floor — and because
the bill wasn’t fully written
when it went for an introductory vote,” Kinner said in an
email. “The bill did not specify
how much this would cost taxpayers in equipment, additional
staff and storage. What’s more,
pair centered around the state’s
role in economic development.
Kinner noted that the state’s job
is to provide an environment in
which businesses can grow by
providing a beneficial tax environment.
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
SHERIDAN — Candidates
seeking election to
Wyoming’s lone seat in the
U.S. House took the stage
Tuesday as part of the
Sheridan County Chamber
of Commerce candidate
forum to discuss a wide
range of issues including
federal overreach and gun
control.
Each candidate was given
two minutes for an introduction, which most used to
give overviews of their qualifications and brief talking
points on the issues.
The candidates also had
the opportunity to respond
to a series of questions.
One question asked candidates to describe their
approach to federal energy
policy.
Republican Tim Stubson
noted that there isn’t a federal energy policy, but rather an anti-energy policy.
SEE LEGISLATIVE FORUM, PAGE 3
Today’s edition is published for:
Jonathan Miles
of Dayton
SEE US HOUSE, PAGE 8
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
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5
6
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TASTE
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
B1
B2
B4
B5
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
Guantanamo
Report offers details
about detainees on way out
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Following a lengthy tugof-war with Capitol Hill,
the Pentagon has given
a senator the first-ever,
unclassified report detailing the suspected militant
backgrounds of more
than 100 detainees at or
recently released from
the U.S. military prison
at Guantanamo Bay — a
report that will likely
spur more debate over
shutting it down.
The report, given to
Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.,
who shared it with The
Associated Press, tells
the story of detainees like
Karim Bostan, who once
ran a flower shop and
later was accused of running an al-Qaida affiliated
explosives cell believed
to have targeted U.S.-led
coalition forces in eastern
Afghanistan. He’s been
at Guantanamo for more
than 13 years, but has
been cleared for transfer
to a country willing to
accept him.
“While the Department
of Defense watered down
information and failed
to provide key details
regarding some detainees,
the report still provides
Americans with a consolidated, unclassified source
of information regarding
the dangerous terrorists
at Guantanamo who
the administration has
recently released or plans
to release soon,” Ayotte
said in an email response
to questions. She has
pushed the Obama administration for years to be
more transparent about
who is being transferred
out.
The remaining detainees “will no doubt” return
to the fight once released,
she said, noting that the
Defense Department
told her that 93 percent
of the detainees still at
Guantanamo as of late
last year were high risk
for re-engagement in terrorism.
The report, however,
also tells the stories
of low-level militants
released after being
detained for more than
a dozen years without
charge — cases that support those who have long
argued that indefinite
detention runs counter to
U.S. values.
In that category,
there’s Muhammad Said
Salim Bin Salman, a
Yemeni who traveled to
Afghanistan to train at an
al-Qaida camp. He says he
became a cook and never
fought because he suffers
from back pain. Deemed a
medium intelligence risk,
he was cleared for release
and transferred to Oman
in January following 14
years of detention.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Together we ride
Rich and Kathy Urbatchka ride a tandem bicycle down the path by the Trail End State Historic Site Tuesday afternoon. The Urbatchkas bought
the bike on their 20th anniversary for a fun activity to do together.
Trump slammed for comments about Clinton, Second Amendment
WILMINGTON, N.C.
(AP) — Donald Trump
suggested Tuesday that
if Hillary Clinton is able
to pick federal judges as
president, nothing could be
done to protect the right to
bear arms. He then added,
without elaboration, that
supporters of the Second
Amendment could maybe
figure out a way.
Speaking at a rally
in Wilmington, North
Carolina, the Republican
nominee incorrectly
said his general election
opponent wants to “essentially abolish the Second
Amendment.”
He continued: “By the
way, if she gets to pick her
judges, nothing you can do,
folks. Although the Second
Amendment people, maybe
there is, I don’t know.”
Within minutes, Clinton’s
campaign and an outside
group backing her candidacy denounced the celebrity
businessman’s remarks as
an attempt to incite violence.
“This is simple — what
Trump is saying is dangerous,” said Robby Mook,
Clinton’s campaign manager. “A person seeking to be
the president of the United
States should not suggest
violence in any way.”
The pro-Clinton group
Priorities USA blasted out
an email with the subject
line: “Donald Trump Just
Suggested That Someone
Shoot Hillary Clinton.”
The Trump campaign
was equally quick to dispute that interpretation
of his remarks, saying he
was simply touting the
“amazing spirit” of Second
Amendment supporters.
“It’s called the power
of unification — Second
Amendment people have
amazing spirit and are tremendously unified, which
gives them great political
power,” said Jason Miller,
Trump’s senior communications adviser. “And this
year, they will be voting
in record numbers, and
it won’t be for Hillary
Clinton, it will be for
Donald Trump.”
Catherine Milhoan, a
spokeswoman for the Secret
Service, said: “We are
aware of his comments.”
She declined to answer any
additional questions about
Trump’s remarks.
The Second Amendment
provides a constitutional
right to citizens to own
guns. Clinton supports
some new restrictions on
gun ownership, but has not
advocated overturning the
amendment.
Trump’s remarks immediately set off a firestorm of
criticism on social media
and threatened to upstage
discussion of his economic
policy speech the day before
and his swing through the
key battleground state of
North Carolina.
Trump’s comments
Tuesday also come a few
weeks after one of his campaign advisers said that
“Hillary Clinton should be
put in the firing line and
shot for treason.”
The Secret Service
is investigating those
remarks, made last month
by Al Baldasaro, a New
Hampshire state lawmaker
and an adviser to Trump
on veterans issues. Trump
spokeswoman Hope Hicks
said then that neither
Trump nor his campaign
agree with Baldasaro’s
comments.
REGIONAL BRIEFS |
Police arrest man after
hostage-taking in Wyoming
re-hire him.
Gillette police said Martin was in a hotel
room on Aug. 4, 2015, when he heard tapCASPER (AP) — A Wyoming man has
ping on the bathroom window. He told
been charged with kidnapping after police officers he looked out and saw Harlson Jr.
say he took an office worker hostage with a with a pistol. He said he walked away and
box cutter-type knife.
five shots were fired into the room. Martin
Casper police said the 35-year-old homewas not injured.
less man entered an office building Friday
Chief Deputy County Attorney Nathan
morning and held a 51-year-old man hosHenkes tells the Gillette News Record that
tage at knifepoint for nearly four hours.
he moved for dismissal because Martin
According to court documents, the hoswas no longer willing to help with the case.
tage-taker wanted files that he believed the
government was keeping about him.
Remains found in Montana
He is also charged with aggravated
assault and possession of a deadly weapon
may be those of missing hunter
with unlawful intent.
BIG TIMBER, Mont. (AP) — Sweet Grass
The defendant told the judge he has
County officials said human remains
a mental illness but did not elaborate.
found last week in south-central Montana
Prosecutors said he also has a lengthy
are those of a 38-year-old Bozeman man
criminal record.
who went missing during an elk hunt two
The victim was not seriously harmed.
years ago.
Undersheriff Alan Ronneberg said
Attempted murder charges
Tuesday dental records confirmed that
dismissed in Gillette shooting the skeletal remains that a rancher found
Friday west of Melville were those of
GILLETTE (AP) — Campbell County
Aaron Joseph Hedges. The cause of death
prosecutors have dismissed an attempted
is still under investigation.
second-degree murder charge filed after
Hedges was reported missing in 2014,
an August 2015 shooting at a Gillette hotel
when he became separated from a huntbecause the alleged victim refuses to testiing party on the western side of the Crazy
fy.
Mountains.
Prosecutors say 26-year-old Leon Harlson
That fall, searchers found a pair of boots,
Jr. and his father were angry with Paul
a water backpack and a fire spot believed
Martin, who was fired for driving a compa- to belong to Hedges on the eastern side of
ny truck to a bar and for pestering them to the mountains.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
LEGIALSTIVE FORUM : Voters have options this election
FROM 1
Cain said the state has
overreached and that that
needs to be controlled. He
noted the state needs to
keep useless spending down
and keep taxes low while
recruiting new industry.
Kinner and Cain were also
asked how long a candidate
should live in a district in
order to accurately represent constituents. Neither
candidate put a timeframe
on his answer, but noted
it is more about being
involved and understanding
people’s needs.
The pair was also asked
to speak on the Second
Amendment. Kinner noted
he received the National
Rifle Association endorsement and said he would protect the rights of Wyoming
citizens. Cain echoed the
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Democratic challenger Val Burgess, left, speaks as House District 30 incumbent Mark Jennings,
sentiment and said there is
nothing you can do to “stop middle, and Gail Symons listen during the Sheridan County of Commerce’s Candidate Forum
Tuesday night at the Sheridan Wesleyan Church.
the crazy people.”
House District 30
Candidates: Republican
Gail Symons, incumbent
Rep. Mark Jennings,
R-Sheridan, and
Democrat Val Burgess
In their introductions,
candidates for House
District 30 touted their
experience and stances on a
variety of issues including
health care, gun rights and
economic development.
The candidates were
asked about House Bill 251,
which would have required
physicians to give women
specific information and
offer an ultrasound before
an abortion were to be performed.
Jennings claimed the bill
was not a question of stopping abortion, but rather
about allowing a mother an
opportunity to see an ultrasound.
Symons said the use of an
ultrasound before an abortion has not been shown to
be medically necessary and
would only cause more trauma to a woman already in
distress. She said she does
not believe abortion should
be a first choice in family
planning, but it is legal.
Burgess noted her belief
in reproductive freedom
and said until courts decide
that abortion is not legal, it
is the law of the land.
Candidates were also
asked about fiscal responsibility, to which Burgess
noted the need for a liveable
wage in Wyoming. Symons
said there is a difference
between investment and
expense, and said the state
should continue to invest in
its future.
Jennings said the downturn in the economy has
forced the state to prioritize,
which is not necessarily
a bad thing. The state, he
said, should look at cutting
redundancies and excess to
reduce spending.
In addition, candidates
were asked about hate
crime legislation and term
limits. In regard to hate
crime legislation, Symons
and Burgess agreed hate
crime legislation should
Wyoming.
They were also asked
about their top three funding priorities.
Biteman said his would be
education, public safety and
health and human services.
Berger said she would like
to continue seeing a balanced budget that includes
setting money aside for savings, education and essential services. Hackman said
education would be his top
priority.
While Berger and
Hackman used their closing
statements to reiterate the
stance on specific issues,
Biteman reminded attendGail Symons ees that they have a choice
Republican candidate, HD30 this election season between
an “establishment insider”
and him.
He also attacked Berger
for her voting record on
In his closing, Jennings
HB251 and other legislation.
said his opponent has spoBerger has said she voted
ken for higher taxes and
bigger government, an accu- against HB251, the 2011
sation Symons denied in her abortion bill requiring doctors to give women specific
closing.
information and offer an
“I keep looking for the
ultrasound before an aboropponent for increased
tion were to be performed.
taxes and government,”
Berger has said she
Symons said. “I’m not sure
opposed the “potentialwhere they are.”
ly unconstitutional bill
that would have inserted
House District 51
government control into
Candidates: Incumbent
patient-doctor relationships,
Rep. Rosie Berger, R-Big
by mandating what doctors
Horn, Republican Bo
tell their patients.”
Biteman and Democrat
Hollis Hackman
House District 40
In their introductions,
Candidates present:
the candidates again touted
Alfred Weeden
their bonafides in terms of
Other candidates:
experience and values.
Incumbent Rep. Mike
They were asked to disMadden, R-Buffalo, and
cuss encouraging funding
Democrat Greg Haas
for finding additional clean
Weeden had the stage
coal technology.
to himself Tuesday as the
Biteman said he would
other candidates in the race
oppose federal funding for
did not appear at the forum.
clean coal technology and
Weeden gave a brief introwould rely on the free marduction outlining his expeket.
“I want to unleash the pri- rience and criticizing some
of Madden’s votes in the
vate sector and get the feds
Legislature.
off our backs,” he said.
Weeden also answered
Hackman noted that
questions regarding the
research and development
transfer of public lands to
is a good job for government, while Berger said the the state, diversification of
the economy, public unions
state is already working
and medical practices withon funding such projects
in the state.
through the University of
allow for increased punishment. Jennings said
a crime is a crime and it
should be prosecuted the
same. Regarding term limits, Jennings said individuals should stick to two or
three terms at a time, while
Symons noted that terms
limits are already in place
in the form of elections.
‘I keep looking for the
opponent for increased
taxes and government. I’m
not sure where they are.’
WY Outside Challenge
available on app, online
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — WY Outside has released
an online submission form and mobile app
for the 2016 WY Outside Challenge.
The hands-on, outdoor program provides
participants with an opportunity to complete a wide variety of outdoor activities
throughout 2016, then document and submit accomplishments on a scorecard with
photos.
The new online submission form and
mobile apps will allow participants to submit their activities and photos as they go,
making it much easier for people to do the
challenge.
All entries for the 2016 challenge are
due by Jan. 15, 2017. Every participant
who obtains 200 points will receive a certificate signed by Gov. Matt Mead and
Superintendent of Public Instruction Jillian
Balow and be entered in a drawing to
receive additional outdoor-themed prizes.
The apps are available on Google Play
and iTunes for Android and Apple devices.
Both are free downloads and can also be
accessed via the WY Outside website at
www.wyoutside.com.
To learn more about the program and
how to participate see www.wyoutside.com.
For more information, contact Ashley
Rooney, WY Outside Administrative
Coordinator, at 777-6560 or [email protected]
wyo.gov.
Weeden said he would
not support the immediate
transfer of public lands to
the state because the cost
would likely be high and
given the economic position
of the state, would not be
wise.
He noted the importance
of economic diversity and
said he was not a fan of public unions. In terms of medical practices, Weeden said
he was concerned about the
expansion of Medicaid. He
said expansion would water
down the health care system and make it worse.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Recipients of the
WYO Theater Lotus
Award selected
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Kim
Love and Lynn and Pete
Simpson were recently
selected as the recipients
of the WYO Theater’s
Lotus award.
The Lotus award is presented to individuals who
inspire passion for the
creative arts in Sheridan
by demonstrating outstanding support and
selfless dedication to
the goals of the WYO
Theater.
The three recipients
were chosen based on
their long and generous
history with the WYO
Theater.
The award will be given
at a private reception in
the Mars Theater prior to
the opening performance
of the theaters’ new season on Sept. 30.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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Sheridan, Wyoming.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Becky Martini
Chad Riegler
Marketing Director
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A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
LETTERS |
No smear ‘trick’ with Jennings
Re: Primary election
Amid all the smear campaign tactics and
mudslinging by candidates these days, I
would like to call your attention to one candidate in particular, Mark Jennings.
He is up for re-election for the Wyoming
House District 30.
Jennings is a close personal friend of mine
whom I have known for some time. I have
prayed with him, worked with him, eaten
with him and have had many long discussions with him. If Jennings gives you his
word on something, he will do it. He is a man
of integrity and principle and lives the conservative values and doesn’t put them on a
political mailing as a vote getting trick. I am
glad a man with these qualities is representing us in the state Legislature. I count it as a
privilege to be his friend.
Jennings prioritizes things in life such as
God, family, work, friends, hunting and reading. He is never too busy to talk with someone or help if he can.
Ardale O’Connell
Sheridan
Works with Jennings,
supports re-election
Re: Primary vote, Aug. 16
In the two years that I have served with
Wyoming Rep. Mark Jennings in the
Legislature and together on revenue, elections and corporations committees, we have
helped defeat bills that would have raised
taxes for the residents of Wyoming and
helped stop many bad bills from taking effect.
Jennings gives a lot of thought to each bill
that is brought up as to problems that could
arise if the bill is passed. Many times in
the discussions of the bills, even the senior
members of the committees had not thought
through some of the ideas that he brought
forth. Of the freshman class that Jennings
and I entered into, he worked well with the
other legislators.
Out of all the members in the House,
Jennings is one that I worked the best with.
He is very thought provoking in each conversation and I consider him a friend and a very
astute legislator.
Rep. Roy Edwards
R-Gillette
House District 53
Trump’s big economic speech only hurt him
D
onald Trump’s speech at the Detroit
Economic Club, if anything, only hurt
him at a time he’s plunging in the polls.
Here are seven reasons:
1. To put it bluntly, wonkish and intellectually honest Republicans of the type who
would pay attention to an economic speech
long ago figured out Trump is a fraud. They
know his numbers don’t add up and his
anti-globalism is bunk. Conservative Doug
Holtz-Eakins called it an
“incoherent mess,” blasting his “horrific ideas
(renegotiating NAFTA,
killing TPP, tariffs, and
other anti-trade initiatives)” and chiding him
for leaving out a list of
critical issues. “No menJENNIFER
tion of federal debt or
deficits. No mention of
RUBIN
entitlement reforms. No
|
mention of productivity,
innovation, the internet,
or new and online business models,” he observed. “Nothing, really, about the future. Just a call to return to
the steel and cars of the industrial past.”
So whom was Trump’s speech targeting?
Surely, no one who knows much about economics.
2. Trump managed to confuse even those
few people who liked his tax plan. The
Washington Post reported:
“Many tax experts said Trump’s latest
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen
Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Chad Riegler
Production
Manager
speech reveals an even sketchier picture of
his economic vision than previous proposals.
“‘In general, it’s less clear of a tax plan
than it was before,’ said Ryan Ellis, a senior
fellow at the Conservative Reform Network.
“First, Trump pitched new, less aggressive tax cuts and appeared to be backing
away from his pledge to end tax liability for
75 million households. Then he introduced
a proposal for an investment income loophole that could actually benefit hedge fund
managers and suggested a tax break for
child care that would do little for the lowest
income earners.
“‘He’s actually doing less for the middle
class than he originally planned,” said
Martin A. Sullivan, the chief economist at
Tax Analysts.
“Ellis, who previously served as the tax
policy director for Grover Norquist’s group
Americans for Tax Reform, said Trump’s
proposal to allow parents to deduct the
cost of child care would provide no benefit
to low income workers and single parents
who are unlikely to have any tax liability to
begin with.”
Republicans were supposed to oppose new
deductions and special giveaways.
3. Trump’s fixation on the estate tax —
which is applicable to only a tiny fraction
of estates (north of $5.4 million) — is the
sort of thing that applies to the hardcore,
Wall Street-centric GOP base, not even to
his own supporters. It’s the quintessential
DROP US A LINE |
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Letters must be signed and include an
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the Press works best and have the best
chance of being published.
Letters should not exceed 400 words.
bone to the very, very rich. It’s perfect fodder for Hillary Clinton’s argument he is no
friend of the working man.
4. Stilted reading off a teleprompter does
not give voters or donors any confidence he
has learned anything about policy. To the
contrary, it emphasizes that he can sound
mildly sane only when he is not saying
what he really thinks.
5. Trump is still fixated on the media.
Few people listen or hear a speech like this;
he expects the media to report on it to persuade voters he has gotten his act together.
The mainstream media, which is no longer
friendly territory, (rightly) takes the opportunity to fact-check him. He never seems to
have grasped that one cannot win a general
election relying on the beneficence of free
media.
6. Trump’s trade inanity only reaffirms
his ignorance about economics. He in
essence does not think the United States
can really win in the international free
market. It’s a loser’s attitude. He claims,
“Our annual trade deficit in goods with
Mexico has risen from close to zero, think
of that, in 1993 to almost $60 billion today.
Our total trade deficit in goods hit nearly
$800 billion last year. Total trade deficit.
Almost $800 billion. This is a strike at
the heart of Michigan, and our nation as
a whole.” This is nonsense, as countless
economists, businesspeople and rational
conservatives will tell you. (”It would be
foolhardy to force American businesses
and consumers to pay more and have less
freedom to choose,” writes former trade rep
Robert B. Zoellick. “Lower taxes on imports
from trade deals save the average U.S.
household about $10,000 a year, according
to the Peterson Institute for International
Economics. Yet Mr. Trump wants to impose
steep tariffs to ‘win’ on trade.”
7. He still has virtually no serious policy
ideas on issues many voters care about.
He declared, “One of my first acts as president will be to repeal and replace disastrous Obamacare, saving another 2 million
American jobs.” And replace it with what?
Don’t ask! (Moreover, The Post’s fact-checkers explain the 2 million jobs figure isn’t
what Trump thinks it is.)
In sum, Trump’s gloom-and-doom message, far from telling us how we win again,
says we cannot win. He rejects globalism,
which has lifted billions of people out of
poverty, provides a panoply of goods and
services and maximizes benefits for those
who can participate. Rather than help
Americans compete (e.g., with job training,
open markets), he’s the one ironically who
wants to “rig the system” — with tariffs
and barriers that make life tougher for
the working and middle classes and economically nonproductive giveaways to the
super-rich, people like him and his rich
panel of economic advisers.
JENNIFER RUBIN writes the Right Turn blog for The Post, offering reported
opinion from a conservative perspective.
IN WASHINGTON |
The best-read letters are those that stay
on a single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
com
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Straley, Castle
wed June 10 in the
Bighorn Mountains
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Jordan Straley and Tenille Castle wed
June 10, 2016, in the Bighorn Mountains.
Straley, originally of Flushing, Michigan, graduated
with a bachelor’s in criminal justice from Ferris State
University. He is currently employed at Montana Fish,
Wildlife and Parks. He is the son of Floyd and Sherry
Straley of Flushing, Michigan.
Castle, originally of Sheridan, graduated with a bachelor’s in political science from Southern Oregon University
and a juris doctor degree from the University of Wyoming
College of Law. She is currently employed at First Federal
Bank and Trust. She is the daughter of Franklin and
Christine Castle of Kinsman, Ohio.
Jordan Straley and Tenille Castle wed June 10, 2016, in the
Bighorn Mountains.
COURTESY PHOTO |
NEW LITTLE FACES • APRIL 2016
SCARLETT EVE MARONICK
Born: 4-3-16
7 lbs., 0 oz.
ANNABELLE LOUISE HARTBERG
Born: 4-4-16
8 lbs., 1 oz.
OWEN ANDREW EDWARDS
Born: 4-5-16
7 lbs., 1 oz.
LOGAN SHAE PALMER
Born: 4-5-16
7 lbs., 2 oz.
GRIFFIN EMERY ALLEN HARNISH
Born: 4-5-16
8 lbs., 5 oz.
DOMENICK RANSOM CATANZARITE
Born: 4-5-16
6 lbs., 1 oz.
IDA LYNN BELD
Born: 4-7-16
8 lbs., 0 oz.
NORAH RAELYNN SCHMIDT
Born: 4-7-16
7 lbs., 13 oz.
LILLIAN MOON DIETERICH
Born: 4-8-16
6 lbs., 11 oz.
CHRISTOPHER JOHN BOWEN, JR.
Born: 4-9-16
7 lbs., 12 oz.
KEATIN ANTHONY ROCKAFELLOW
Born: 4-15-16
9 lbs., 9 oz.
BENJAMIN COLE JORGENSEN
Born: 4-15-16
5 lbs., 12 oz.
BRAYLEE RENAE GREEN
Born: 4-15-16
6 lbs., 10 oz.
KADEN BOOKER PHILLIPS
Born: 4-16-16
7 lbs., 5 oz.
RILEY QUNELL REID
Born: 4-17-16
7 lbs., 5 oz.
GEORGE MARTIN STRAESSLER
Born: 4-17-16
8 lbs., 3 oz.
WITTEN RANDAL COLE
Born: 4-18-16
8 lbs., 1 oz.
ELLIOTT ELIZABETH WOLLEN
Born: 4-18-16
7 lbs., 11 oz.
BRENDAN THOMAS THUNDER
HORSE KONTZ
Born: 4-18-16
6 lbs., 13 oz.
MADELINE JEAN ROBERTSON
Born: 4-19-16
9 lbs., 10 oz.
KASHLEE MAY BADGETT
Born: 4-19-16
7 lbs., 4 oz.
MISSY MOREA HOYER
Born: 4-20-16
5 lbs., 4 oz.
ELI ALLAN LARSON
Born: 4-22-16
8 lbs., 4 oz.
HAYDEN WILLIAM TAYLOR
Born: 4-25-16
7 lbs., 1 oz.
WYATT PHIL CHRISTENSEN
Born: 4-26-16
8 lbs., 8 oz.
JASPER JULIAN JAMES TILDEN
Born: 4-27-16
8 lbs., 0 oz.
PIPER MAE HANSON
Born: 4-28-16
6 lbs., 7 oz.
TAKOTA LAYNE GARLAND
Born: 4-29-16
6 lbs., 12 oz.
Proudly Presented by
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at
late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. WHOM TRUMP FAULTS
FOR SECOND AMENDMENT
FLAP
The GOP presidential
hopeful is blaming media
bias for an uproar over his
comments about the right
to gun ownership, insisting
he never advocated violence
against Hillary Clinton.
2. TWO WORDS KEEP SICK
SAMSUNG WORKERS FROM
DATA: TRADE SECRETS
An AP investigation finds
South Korean authorities
have, at the company’s
request, withheld data
about chemicals its factory
workers were exposed to,
citing competitive reasons.
3. WHAT WILL LIKELY FUEL
DEBATE ABOUT CLOSING
GITMO
A Pentagon report details
the suspected militant
backgrounds of more than
100 detainees at or recently
released from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo
Bay.
4. TRAGEDY STRIKES
MATERNITY WARD IN
BAGHDAD HOSPITAL
Iraq’s Health Ministry
says a fire likely caused
by faulty electrical wiring
killed 12 newborn babies.
5. WHY FEDS SLAM
POLICING IN BALTIMORE
City law enforcers routinely
discriminate against black
residents, repeatedly use
excessive force and are not
adequately held accountable for misconduct, the
Justice Department says.
6. PHILLY AMTRAK
DERAILMENT
SETTLEMENTS SILENCING
CRASH VICTIMS
Lawyers say the railroad is
implementing a strict confidentiality provision that
prevents them and their clients from talking about how
they’re doing or how much
money they’ve received.
7. CITY OF GOD FAVELA
IN RIO FEELS FAR FROM
NEARBY OLYMPICS
The slum made infamous in
a film of the same name still
struggles with the poverty
and drug violence the world
saw on the big screen.
8. ANOTHER GOLDEN
NIGHT IN THE POOL FOR
PHELPS
The most decorated athlete
in Olympic history captures
two more golds, the 20th
and 21st of his record-breaking career — and 12 more
than his closest competitor.
9. AVOCADO LOVE, AT A
COST
American affinity for the
highly exportable fruit is
fueling the deforestation
of central Mexico’s pine
forests as farmers rapidly
expand their orchards to
feed demand.
10. ‘RACIALLY INSENSITIVE’
BOBBLEHEAD OF BIG PAPI
PULLED
The Boston Red Sox cancels
the promotion honoring
David Ortiz when the figurine doesn’t much resemble
the retiring slugger, team
president Sam Kennedy
says.
MIKE DUNN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Claiming victory
Manny Swamy raises his hands after his team, the Honda Hogs, finished first in the men’s pig wrestling with a time of 13.86
seconds at the Sheridan County Fair on Saturday.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Senior Center organizing
variety show, picnic
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Senior Center will
present vaudevillian type entertainment Friday
from 6-8 p.m. at Kendrick Park.
The cost to attend is $2 for picnic-style food and
a water bottle. Attendees are encouraged to bring
lawn chairs and blankets.
RSVPs are requested by Thursday. Guests can
sign up to perform in the event with a prior screening.
For more information, contact Jane Perkins at
the Senior Center at 672-2240.
Best of the West BBQ festival
set for Friday
SHERIDAN — The fourth annual Best of the
West barbecue festival, which is a KCBS sanctioned barbecue competition, will be held Saturday
from 1-6 p.m. at Whitney Plaza.
The event will include competition for chicken,
pork, pork ribs, beef brisket with people’s choice
competition for “best bite of barbecue.”
For more information, call Tye Bach at 751-1600,
see www.bestofthewestbbqfest.com or email [email protected]
bestofthewestbbqfest.com.
The Whitney Plaza parking lot is located adjacent
to the Sheridan Ice Rink at 475 E. Brundage St.
Historic barns art on display
at library
SHERIDAN — Local artist Michele Schluter will
display photographs and paintings of local historic barns in the Inner Circle at Sheridan County
Fulmer Public Library from Aug. 1-30.
Schluter grew up on a family ranch in Johnson
County and now lives near Parkman. Several
months ago she began a project photographing historic area barns and then recreating the photos as
paintings.
Schluter is hoping that visitors to the exhibit
may have knowledge about the structures that
they would be willing to share with her. Any
information people have on any of these building
or photos of other historic barns/homesteads in
the area can be shared with Schluter at [email protected]
wbaccess.net.
The Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library is
located at 335 W. Alger St.
THURSDAY EVENTS |
• 5-7 p.m., Sheridan Farmers Market, Grinnell Plaza
NATIONAL OBITUARIES |
Former NFL player, assistant
George Yarno dies from cancer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Former NFL player and coach George Yarno has died after a lengthy
battle with stomach cancer. He was 58.
The Jacksonville Jaguars, the last team Yarno
worked for, made the announcement Monday
night.
“The Jacksonville Jaguars organization is deeply
saddened by the passing of former offensive line
coach George Yarno and our condolences are with
his wife, Cindy, his daughter, Adrianne and his
sons, Josh and George,” the team said in a statement. “Yarno had courageously battled stage IV
cancer for nearly three years.
“Coach Yarno’s loyal friendship and his infectious passion for coaching football were two of the
many reasons he was so well-liked and well-respected. The entire Jaguars family was touched by
his energy and he will be missed by all that had the
pleasure of knowing him.”
Bill Dooley, former Heels, Hokies,
Deacs coach, dies at 82
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Bill Dooley, a
three-time coach of the year in the Atlantic
Coast Conference who piled up 162 wins at North
Carolina, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest, died
Tuesday. He was 82.
His wife, Marie, said Dooley died of natural causes at their home in Wilmington.
Dooley went a combined 162-125-5 in 26 seasons
as a head coach with the Tar Heels, Hokies and
Demon Deacons and took them to a combined 10
bowl games.
He was the first North Carolina coach to win 11
games, leading the 1972 Tar Heels to an 11-1 finish.
He is the only coach to lead the school to multiple
ACC championships in football.
“Coach Dooley helped change the course of college football,” said former North Carolina coach
John Bunting, a captain on Dooley’s first ACC title
team in 1971.
“He reversed the trend at UNC where he built a
winner. The ACC, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest
all benefitted from his great leadership. But most
importantly, he mentored character development
to thousands of young men.”
Dooley was the younger brother of former
Georgia coach Vince Dooley, and the uncle of
ex-Tennessee coach and current Dallas Cowboys
assistant Derek Dooley.
The Dooley brothers were going to be honorary
captains for the season-opening Chick-fil-A Kickoff
Game between North Carolina and Georgia on
Sept. 3 in Atlanta, game spokesman Matt Garvey
said. He said a moment of silence will be held in
Bill Dooley’s honor.
“Coach Dooley was a great coach and an even
better man who made a lasting impact on this university and on college football as a whole,” North
Carolina coach Larry Fedora said.
“He touched the lives of the young men who
played for him in a profound and special way. He
proved that Carolina was a program that could produce a winning tradition and his legacy is something we strive to uphold each and every day.”
He left in 1978 to become coach and athletic director at Virginia Tech and in nine seasons won 63
games — making him at the time the winningest
coach in Hokies history until that mark was broken by Frank Beamer, who succeeded him in 1987.
Dooley was hired at Wake Forest that year, and
he led the Demon Deacons to three winning seasons in six years. He earned two ACC coach of the
year awards at the school and capped his tenure
in 1992 by taking the program to its first bowl
game in 14 years, a victory over Oregon in the
Independence Bowl.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Aug. 10, 1846,
President James K. Polk
signed a measure establishing
the Smithsonian Institution.
On this date:
In 1792, during the French
Revolution, mobs in Paris
attacked the Tuileries Palace,
where King Louis XVI resided. (The king was later arrested, put on trial for treason,
and executed.)
In 1821, Missouri became
the 24th state.
In 1814, Henri Nestle,
founder of the food and beverage company bearing his
name, was born in Frankfurt,
Germany.
In 1874, Herbert Clark
Hoover, the 31st president of
the United States, was born in
West Branch, Iowa.
In 1921, Franklin D.
Roosevelt was stricken with
polio at his summer home
on the Canadian island of
Campobello.
In 1949, the National
Military Establishment was
renamed the Department of
Defense.
In 1969, Leno and
Rosemary LaBianca were
murdered in their Los
Angeles home by members of
Charles Manson’s cult, one
day after actress Sharon Tate
and four other people had
been slain.
In 1975, television personality David Frost announced
he had purchased the exclusive rights to interview former President Richard Nixon.
In 1988, President Ronald
Reagan signed a measure
providing $20,000 payments
to still-living JapaneseAmericans who’d been
interned by their government
during World War II.
In 1991, nine Buddhists
were found slain at their temple outside Phoenix, Arizona.
(Two teen-agers were later
arrested; Alessandro Garcia
was sentenced to life in prison, while Jonathan Doody
received 281 years.)
In 1995, Timothy McVeigh
and Terry Nichols were
charged with 11 counts in
the Oklahoma City bombing
(McVeigh was convicted of
murder and executed; Nichols
was convicted of conspiracy
and involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to life in
prison). Norma McCorvey,
“Jane Roe” of the 1973
Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion, announced she
had joined the anti-abortion
group Operation Rescue.
Ten years ago: British
authorities announced they
had thwarted a terrorist plot
to simultaneously blow up 10
aircraft heading to the U.S.
using explosives smuggled
in hand luggage. A suicide
bomber blew himself up
among pilgrims outside Iraq’s
holiest Shiite shrine in Najaf,
killing 35 people. Saomai,
the most powerful typhoon
to hit China in five decades,
slammed into the country’s
southeastern coast; it ultimately killed more than 440
people.
Five years ago: Marine
Corps Gen. John Allen, the
top American commander in
Afghanistan, said international forces had slain the Taliban
insurgents responsible for
shooting down a U.S. helicopter, killing 30 Americans and
seven Afghan commandos.
One year ago: A draft of
a secret study obtained by
The Associated Press found
that air traffic controllers’
work schedules often led to
chronic fatigue, making them
less alert and endangering
the safety of the country’s
air traffic system. A power
plant operator in southern
Japan restarted a nuclear
reactor, the first to begin
operating under new safety
requirements following the
Fukushima disaster.
Thought for Today:
“About the time we can make
the ends meet, somebody
moves the ends.” — President
Herbert Hoover (1874-1964).
ALMANAC
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEATH NOTICE |
SHERIDAN FIRE-RESCUE
Tuesday
• Smoke detector problem, 1500 block Spaulding
Street, 12:48 a.m.
Leif Erik Blomquist
daily inmate count): 5
Number of book-ins for the previous day: 2
Number of releases for the previous day: 0
Leif Erik Blomquist, 19, of Sheridan, died Tuesday, Aug.
9, 2016, at Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com. Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with
arrangements.
OBITUARIES |
GOOSE VALLEY FIRE DEPARTMENT
Tuesday
• No calls reported.
Gary Lynn Pudge
December 17, 1966 - July 24, 2016
Gary Lynn Pudge, 49, of College
Station, TX, passed away at his home
on July 24, 2016.
Gary was born on December 17, 1966,
in Casper, WY, to Jim Pudge and Jan
Pudge. Gary worked at Intermountain
Labs, in Sheridan until his transfer to
Gary Lynn
College Station in 1989, where he was
Pudge
later the branch manager. Gary then
became the branch manager for the
College Station Energy Lab.
Gary was an excellent cook and loved treating his
coworkers, friends and family to his special meals or
treats. He loved Texas and the home he had there and his
cats, Jacob, Laverne and Shirley.
Gary is survived by Jim and Penny Pudge of Sheridan,
WY, Jan Pudge Bedell of Battlement Mesa, CO; Sister,
Laurie Ann Geeting of Sheridan, WY and nieces Mallory
Geeting and family, Tailor, and Alexandria Geeting, all of
Sheridan, WY. Step siblings Lee Willey and Julie Willey
and their families.
A memorial service will be held at the First Baptist
Church on Saturday, August 20, 2016, at 10 AM. Cremation
has taken place.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be sent to Second
Chance Cat Shelter, P.O. Box 7254, Sheridan, WY 82801.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN AMBULANCE
Tuesday
• No reports available at press time.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Tuesday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE DEPARTMENT
Information in the police reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Tuesday
• Domestic, Avoca Place, 12:40 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, South Carlin Street, 2:11
a.m.
• Alarm, Coffeen Avenue, 5:33 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Kona Place, 8:13 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Arapahoe Street, 8:22 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Arapahoe Street, 8:34 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Arapahoe Street, 8:41 a.m.
• Filthy premises, Yonkee Avenue, 8:46 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Arapahoe Street, 8:51 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Warren Avenue, 8:58 a.m.
• Parking complaint, Navajo Street, 9:06 a.m.
• Barking dog, Park Street, 9:14 a.m.
• Parking complaint, De Smet Avenue, 9:29 a.m.
• Hit and run, Sibley Circle, 9:38 a.m.
• Careless driver, West Burkitt Street, 10:36 a.m.
• Dog at large, South Carlin Street, 11:09 a.m.
• Theft (cold), Grinnell Plaza, 12:56 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, East Ridge Road, 12:59
p.m.
• Welfare check, Fifth Avenue East, 2:02 p.m.
• Theft from vehicle, Sheridan area, 2:03 p.m.
• DUI (citizen report), Coffeen Avenue, 2:15 p.m.
• Animal dead, Gladstone Street, 2:40 p.m.
• Trespass (cold), West 12th Street, 3:09 p.m.
• Parking complaint, West Works Street, 3:54 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Delphi Avenue, 4:55 p.m.
• Animal welfare, Big Horn Avenue, 5:16 p.m.
• Dog at large, South Main Street, 5:30 p.m.
• Trespass progress, Coffeen Avenue, 5:59 p.m.
• Dog at large, South Thurmond Avenue, 6:02 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, West 10th Street, 8:01 p.m.
• Noise complaint, Emerson Street, 8:41 p.m.
• Careless driver, Beaver Street, 9:54 p.m.
• Open door, Smith Street, 10:11 p.m.
• Skateboarding, West Alger Avenue, 10:21 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, Long Drive, 10:57 p.m.
• Lost property, East Fifth Street, 11:44 p.m.
Bane T. Travis
August 11, 1921 - August 5, 2016
Our Beloved Husband, Father, and
Grandfather, Bane T. Travis, M.D.,
departed this life to be with his Lord and
Savior on August 5, 2016, in Cheyenne,
Wyoming at the age of 94.
Dr. Travis was born August 11, 1921, in
Bane T.
LaSalle, Illinois to David L. and Emma
Travis
M. (Bane) Travis. In 1945, he graduated
from the University of Illinois College
of Medicine in Chicago. Dr. Travis completed his medical
training during World War II and served his country in
the U.S. Navy until 1948. He began his medical practice
in obstetrics and gynecology in Cheyenne in 1952 where
he practiced until his retirement in 1982. In 1960 he met
Janet Niermann at DePaul Hospital where she worked as
a nurse. They were married March 27, 1961.
Dr. Travis was a private pilot and would graciously fly
his patients home after hospitalization. He was a competitive handgun marksman and won matches at Camp
Perry.
Among his avocations were wildlife photography, marble sculpting, wood carving, and watercolor painting for
which he won several awards. He also enjoyed traveling
in his motorhome with Mrs. Travis.
Dr. Travis was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church
and was a lifetime member of the Cheyenne Rifle & Pistol
Club and the National Rifle Association.
Dr. Travis is survived by his wife of 55 years, Janet
L. Travis; his children, Maria (Gerald) Messick; Jeffrey
Travis; Deborah (Jeff) Graham; and grandchildren,
Matthew, Sarah, Andrew and Mary Graham. He was
preceded in death by his sons, James Travis and David
Travis, and his parents.
A service will be held on Friday August 12, 2016 at
10:00 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Cheyenne with
military honors at the interment at Cheyenne Memorial
Gardens. Online family tributes can be sent to www.
wrcfuneral.com.
SHERIDAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Tuesday
• Accident, Dayton East Road, Steamboat Drive,
Ranchester, 7:34 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, Circle 8 Drive, 10:48 a.m.
• Custody dispute, Pleasant Valley Lane, 4:21 p.m.
• Found property, Interstate 90 westbound, 8:08 p.m.
• Records only, West 13th Street, 8:23 p.m.
• Livestock loose, mile marker 2.2, East Ridge Road,
9:16 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals arrested for domestic violence
or sexual assault will not be released until the individuals have appeared in court.
Tuesday
• Michael Andrew Jerney, 43, Gillette, bench warrant
(contempt of court), district court, arrested by SPD
• Amber Marie Evans, 36, Sheridan, criminal trespass, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Sara Jean Nelson, 25, Sheridan, failure to appear
warrant, out of county court, possession with intent to
deliver controlled substance, circuit court, arrested by
SPD
• Joshua James Onkka, 29, Gillette, possession with
intent to deliver controlled substance, circuit court,
possession of paraphernalia, municipal court, arrested
by SPD
SERVICE NOTICES |
Steven J. Cannady
Shell Valley resident, Steven J. Cannady, 71, died
Monday, Aug. 8, 2016, at his home in Shell, Wyoming,
after a brief illness.
Services will be held at the Shell Community Hall on
Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, at 11 a.m. with Reverend Michael
McMillan as officiant. Burial will follow at the Whaley
Cemetery. Immediately following the services, a luncheon for family and friends will be held at the Shell
Community Hall.
In lieu of flowers, memorials in Cannady’s name can
be sent to Security State Bank, P.O. Box 531, Basin, WY
82410-0531 with proceeds to go to Hands Across the Saddle.
Atwood Family Funeral Directors assisted the family
with the arrangements.
Ruth Truvel Searcy
Ruth Truvel Searcy died Aug. 3, 2016. A celebration of
life will be held at the Rehabilitation Enterprises of North
Eastern Wyoming Service Center on Sept. 9, 2016, at 2 p.m.
Robert A. Salveson
Robert A. Salveson, 76, died March 19, 2016.
A celebration of life will be held Aug. 16, 2016, at 1
p.m. at the Yellowstone National Cemetery, located at 55
Buffalo Trail Road in Laurel, Montana.
Memorials may be made to Robert “Bob” Salveson in
his name to Shrine’s Crippled Children Travel Fund, P.O.
Box K, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Rachel M. Dahlin
A memorial service for Rachel M. Dahlin will take place
Aug. 27, 2016, at 10 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church,
2121 Colonial Drive Sheridan, Wyoming.
Dahlin’s memorial service will be followed by a reception at the Elks Lodge at 45 W. Brundage St. in Sheridan,
Wyoming. Lunch and entertainment provided.
View these and past
obits online at
www.thesheridanpress.com
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Coffee
Here are the results
of Tuesday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
12-19-20-44-66;
Mega Ball 1
Megaplier 5X
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 63
Female inmate count: 12
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other facilities (not counted in
Estimated jackpot:
$45,000,000
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
52
A t-storm
around in the
p.m.
81
Partial sunshine
50
82
Almanac
SUNDAY
50
A t-storm
around in the
p.m.
84
Temperature
High/low .........................................................93/57
Normal high/low ............................................88/53
Record high ...........................................101 in 2006
Record low ...............................................38 in 1917
Precipitation (in inches)
51
92
Tuesday .......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.60"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.23"
Year to date .................................................... 8.67"
Normal year to date ....................................... 9.58"
Rise
Set
Today
Thursday
Friday
6:05 a.m.
6:06 a.m.
6:07 a.m.
8:21 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
8:18 p.m.
Rise
Set
1:54 p.m.
2:51 p.m.
3:47 p.m.
none
12:23 a.m.
12:58 a.m.
Today
Thursday
Friday
First
Full
Last
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
52/73
Ranchester
54/80
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
56/82
Basin
54/83
52/81
Aug 10
Aug 18
Aug 24
Sep 1
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
Clearmont
54/80
Story
51/74
Gillette
53/79
Buffalo
56/77
Worland
52/82
Wright
57/78
Kaycee
55/79
Thermopolis
50/83
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
49/79
Dayton
55/81
Lovell
53/79
New
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Tuesday ..................... 0.00"
Hardin
51/84
Broadus
51/82
55
The Sun
The Moon
Shown is Thursday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Thursday's highs.
Partly sunny and
very warm
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Tuesday
National Weather for Thursday, August 11
Regional Weather
SATURDAY
Billings
54/82
Mostly cloudy
A7
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
82/56/pc
81/47/t
80/53/t
73/51/t
74/47/pc
79/51/pc
80/49/pc
74/38/t
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
82/56/pc
82/47/pc
77/51/pc
75/51/pc
79/46/s
80/50/pc
81/50/pc
77/40/pc
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
84/58/s
80/46/t
77/50/t
78/53/s
81/49/s
81/53/pc
83/52/s
81/41/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
77/45/pc
80/54/t
80/44/t
80/51/pc
76/48/t
83/57/t
75/52/pc
66/34/t
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
73/46/pc
77/52/pc
78/42/pc
81/51/pc
77/48/pc
80/55/pc
73/51/pc
69/35/pc
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
76/43/pc
78/52/t
81/44/pc
83/52/pc
79/51/s
81/55/t
74/51/pc
73/38/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Thursday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
US HOUSE : Cheney’s failure to appear at forum draws criticism from other candidates
FROM 1
He said the federal government is inappropriately
picking winners and losers
and added that the government has been too slow in
approving new permits for
energy development.
Republican Leland
Christensen said what the
country is seeing is regulators shopping for new rules
to be used against Wyoming.
He also noted that permits
should be approved more
quickly.
Republican Darin Smith
said several federal agencies that deal with energy
development, such as the
Environmental Protection
Agency and others, have
been hijacked by environmentalists and that doesn’t
work for America. He also
touted his plan to have
Wyoming help America
become energy independent.
Constitution Party
candidate Daniel Clyde
Cummings said he would
work to abolish the
Department of Energy and
said he would vote against
any bill that has appropriation for the department
other than liquidation
expenses.
Two Democrats in
the room took different
approaches to the question.
Charlie Hardy said the
state and country need to
move more toward renewable energy sources and
noted that Wyoming struggles with that. Several members of the audience could
be heard saying “good” in
response.
Ryan Greene, who has
worked in the energy sector for years, said all of
Wyoming’s energy producers should be supported and
noted that the state should
be selling whatever the
energy market is buying.
Beyond energy policy,
candidates were also asked
if there are any effective
means of gun control to be
considered and if so, what
the right amount of regulation would be.
Hardy noted that there
are reasonable restrictions
and noted that as a teacher,
he wouldn’t want guns in
schools unless they are in
the hands of officials such
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress Ryan Greene speaks during the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce’s candidate forum Tuesday night at the Sheridan Wesleyan Church.
as police officers.
Greene agreed there are
some reasonable measures
that can be taken, but said
he fully supports the Second
Amendment. He noted that
the “no fly, no buy” rule
regarding individuals on
the no-fly list made sense to
him along with background
checks that are currently in
place.
Cummings took a harder
stance, saying the Second
Amendment leaves no place
for the federal government
to enact restrictions on
self-defense. He said the
federal government should
stay out of gun control legislation and leave the issue to
the states.
Smith, Stubson and
Christensen all expressed
their support of the Second
Amendment.
In his closing statement,
Stubson addressed what
he called the elephant in
the room — Liz Cheney’s
failure to appear at the
forum. He also criticized her
for fundraising out of the
state, pointing out that her
loyalties will not lie with
Wyoming if she’s beholden
to donors from other states.
Hardy pointed out the
lack of discussion around
women, Native Americans,
health care and other issues
during his closing, and he
said he would support a single-payer universal health
care system.
US takes aim at blasphemy laws, religious discrimination
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Obama administration
is highlighting concerns
over laws against blasphemy and apostasy that
limit religious freedom in
Muslim and other nations
where they are on the
books.
The State Department
said in its annual report
on global religious freedom released Wednesday
that these laws, notably
in Muslim countries, can
abet societal and religious
passions that often encourage death sentences for the
accused.
“Such laws conflict with
and undermine universally
recognized human rights,”
it said. “False accusations,
often lodged in pursuit of
personal vendettas or for
the personal gain of the
accuser, are not uncommon. Mob violence as a
result of such accusations
is disturbingly common.”
The report also said “courts
in many countries contin-
ued to hand down harsh
sentences for blasphemy
and apostasy, which were
used to severely curtail the
religious freedom of their
residents.”
The report noted particular problems with blasphemy laws in Afghanistan,
Mauritania, Pakistan,
Sudan and Saudi Arabia.
COMMISSION : Trying to change the rules
FROM 1
In the primary, Republican candidates
will have two votes for the two seats on the
ballot. So, at least one incumbent will move
on to the general election. But, re-election
is no guarantee. With two seats available, if a challenger makes it through the
Republican primary to the general election,
an incumbent would face the challenger
and, this year, Democrat Vicki Taylor, who
is the only Democrat running in the primary and therefore will automatically move
on to the general election.
In his information sheet, Fox proposed
a one-vote system wherein each voter gets
only one vote despite two commissioner
seats being on the ballot.
“The same criteria will remain for determining the two winners, i.e. the top two
‘vote-getters’ will still stand ... we will just
eliminate the vote-splitting that causes
the incumbent lock in the first place,” Fox
wrote.
No other election format in the primary
or general election permits only one vote
for two vacancies.
•••••
At the Aug. 2 BOCC meeting, Fox shared
his concerns with the commissioners.
During that meeting, he requested to meet
with any of the commissioners to change
the primary election format, adding that
there was still time to change.
According to the Sheridan County election office, as of Aug. 1, 463 absentee and
132 walk-in voters had already cast their
ballots.
Sheridan County Commissioner Tom
Ringley, who is seeking re-election, said
that Fox’s proposal is not only unethical
but illegal. He said Fox’s system strips voters of one of their votes. Additionally, he
said commissioners have no say over how
many votes voters can cast in an election.
“I am shocked that someone running for
that office would not have a basic idea of
statutory requirements and responsibilities,” Ringley added. “It is just inherently
wrong to ask anyone to do this.
“By altering a ballot to only allow one
vote for a county commission candidate
deprives people of their right to vote for
two candidates,” Ringley said in response
to Fox’s statement. “I find it extraordinary
that anyone would suggest that the county
commission would want to be complicit
with that kind of thought.”
According to Wyoming statutes,
“Adjacent to the title of the office shall be
printed ‘Vote for one’ or if more than one
(1) are to be voted for, ‘Vote for not more
than,’ then the appropriate words and figures designating the proper number to be
elected.”
“All we do is strike out the word ‘two,’
and write the word ‘one,’” Fox told commissioners. That change would legally
and procedurally have to be brought to
the Wyoming Legislature, though, not
addressed through the county board.
With two open seats in this year’s BOCC
race, each voter is allotted no more than
two votes, but a voter is not obligated to
use both of those votes.
“I don’t know why he asked us,” Nickel
said. “Commissioners have absolutely no
power to regulate how many votes people
can have. That is all state statutes.”
•••••
In addition, if Fox wants to change the
number of individuals who serve on the
Board of County Commissioners, he will
have to wait another two years.
In order for a reduction of commissioners
to occur, a petition must be started and the
appropriate number of signatures would
need to be gathered. Then, voters would
have to vote in favor of the measure during
the general election.
Anne Collins, a Sheridan resident
and former Sheridan County employee,
launched a petition earlier this year in
order to reduce the number of commissioners. However, Collins said Friday that she
did not have the required signatures to
place that proposal on the ballot.
In 2006, voters elected to expand the number of commissioners from three to five.
In the event that an organizer does gather
enough petition signatures, the reduction
of commissioners would not go into effect
until all sitting commissioners’ terms have
expired.
On Wednesday, the Sheridan County
Commission candidates will participate
in the candidate forums at 7 p.m. at the
Sheridan Wesleyan Church.
The primary election will take place on
Aug. 16.
TASTE
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
J
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Scoop your
lemonade
ust a small scoop of this rich, tart
and tangy dessert will make the
end of the meal the best part. And
dessert doesn’t get much easier than
this. You will need an ice cream freezer
and three simple ingredients for this simple chiller.
To mix: In a medium mixing bowl, combine 4 cups whipping
cream, one 14-ounce
can sweetened condensed milk and one
thawed 12-ounce can
of frozen lemonade
SUSAN
concentrate. Add several drops of yellow
WOODY
food coloring if you
|
want a more lemony
color.
Transfer the mixture to a 4-quart ice-cream freezer and
freeze according to the manufacturer’s
directions. Ripen in the freezer for 4
hours then serve with sliced fresh seasonal fruit or really buttery shortbread
cookies.
Makes about 8 cups ice cream.
Chive blossom vinegar
I love the look of chive blossoms. You
can slip them into anything as they
have neither a floral or onion-y taste
but a subtle reminder of both. Preserve
the flowers’ essence as well as their
season by infusing a handful in a jar of
white-wine or rice vinegar for a couple
of weeks — no cooking required. The
pretty pink results will last for months.
Wait for the buds of chive plants to
open into full flower, then snip them
off and collect them. It is best to harvest on a clear day, when the blossoms
are dry.
Pack a handful of blossoms in a clean
jar and fill with rice or white-wine vinegar. Secure lid tightly on jar and let
vinegar rest until color and flavor is
extracted from blossoms, two weeks.
Pour through a fine-mesh sieve, then
bottle. In a sealed container, vinegar
will be stable at room temperature.
(Source: The Wall Street Journal)
SUSAN WOODY has been a food writer for more than 20 years and
is a member of the Association of Food Journalists.
COURTESY PHOTO | UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Have a blast cooking and satisfy your fishy cravings with this honey-ginger salmon on the grill.
Sweet, savory salmon on the grill
FROM UNIVERSAL UCLICK
HONEY-GINGER SALMON
Servings: makes 4 servings
Preparation time: 5 minutes; refrigeration time:
30 minutes
Cooking time: less than 15 minutes
INGREDIENTS
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 green onion, chopped
1 pound salmon fillets
Mix orange juice, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic
powder and green onion in small bowl. Reserve 2
tablespoons of the marinade. Place salmon in large
resealable plastic bag or glass dish. Add remaining
marinade; turn to coat well. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Remove salmon from marinade. Discard any
remaining marinade. Grill over medium-high heat 6
to 7 minutes per side or until fish flakes easily with a
fork, basting occasionally with reserved marinade.
Per serving: 162 calories, 24 grams protein, 5
grams fat (29 percent calories from fat), 0.9 grams
saturated fat, 3 grams carbohydrate, 53 milligram
cholesterol, 282 milligrams sodium, 0 grams fiber.
Carb count: 0.
Word confusion strikes again in world of couponing
M
ost of the time, using coupons is
easy — simply read the wording on a
coupon to find out for what product
the coupon is valid. However, my
readers have been adept at spotting unusual
or questionable wording on coupons lately,
and here’s another batch of reader email sharing what they’re seeing on
their coupons:
“Dear Jill,
I have a coupon for
name brand toilet paper
that says ‘6 mega rolls
or larger.’ Am I able to
use this on a 12-pack of
regular rolls of the same
brand? Twelve rolls are
JILL
more than six rolls, and it
CATALDO
would be a better deal.”
Alicia B.
|
Single, double, triple,
mega and mega-plus — all
of these are terms used to
advertise bath tissue, and it’s understandable that some confusion can arise. In this
case, I went to the manufacturer’s website
to determine that a mega roll is equal to
four regular rolls; six mega rolls equals 24
regular rolls. A coupon for six mega rolls
“or larger” needs to be used on a package
that contains more than the equivalent
of six rolls — so, if you want to buy regular-sized rolls, you’d need to buy a package
with more than 24 of them. (Yes, I realize
that this is an awful lot to think about!)
“Dear Jill,
A popular window cleaner has a $2 coupon out right now for ‘Outdoor Glass, Patio
and More.’ The regular glass cleaner is on
sale for $1.99 at my local grocery store. I
think that because the coupon is for outdoor glass, patio and more, that ‘more’
could be just regular glass. I tried to use
this coupon on the regular glass cleaner,
but it beeped. What do I need to say to get
this to work? The glass cleaner will be free
with this coupon.”
Francie W.
Sometimes I believe people are attempting to stretch the wording on a coupon to
“create” a deal that doesn’t quite exist, and
I feel that’s the case here. The brand in
question actually has an outdoor cleaning
product called “Outdoor Glass, Patio and
More.” This product has a significantly
higher price point than the basic glass
cleaner, and the coupon for the outdoor
product should not be used on the less
expensive, indoor product.
“Is a coupon good for ‘any bread product’
good on hamburger buns from the same
brand?”
Rick A.
“A brand of frozen meals has coupons
all the time for $1 off two ‘entrées.’ I prefer
their French bread pizzas. Are these considered entrées?”
Marilyn D.
Again, in these cases, I typically refer to
the manufacturers’ websites to determine
if the products fall into the categories in
question.
In the case of the bread product, sandwich
rolls and buns are listed in the same category as breads, so I believe the coupon is
valid on all bread items from the brand.
With regard to the French bread pizzas,
this manufacturer lists all of its frozen
meals (including the pizzas) under the category of “Dishes” and doesn’t use the word
“entrée” at all! If we use the dictionary
definition of entrée, it is the main course
of a meal. Based on this, I believe that the
coupon’s use is valid here as well. (And yes,
I’m aware that “entrée” actually refers to
the appetizer in some parts of the world,
but we’re focusing on an American product
with American coupons.)
“Dear Jill,
My local grocer has a coupon for $2off of
two ‘snack items.’ The store brand includes
everything from popcorn to granola bars to
chips to mixed nuts. Shouldn’t this wording be clearer? The reason I ask is that the
store also sells bagged peeled carrots under
the store brand, and that’s the snack item I
really want to buy.”
Michael F.
I agree that “snack items” is an unusually
large category. Being that this is a store
coupon designed to boost sales of the store’s
house brand, I would advise bringing the
coupon to your store’s customer service
counter to ask if it is valid on the carrots.
JILL CATALDO is a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three.
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
T
SPORTS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
A love for
the track
here’s this picture of race car
driver Bryan Clauson. He’s
being hoisted in the air by a
group of friends — “goofball
buddies” one of them posted on
Facebook Monday.
Clauson was involved in a devastating crash Saturday at a midget
race in Kansas, and he died Sunday
from injuries sustained in the crash.
He was 27.
This is the fourth time I’ve written
about death in my column. It’s never
easy. But writing helps me place
my thoughts, and
more importantly,
it’s a way for me to
share these memories with anyone
who cares to hear
them.
If even one person learns about
the life of Bryan
MIKE
Clauson, I’ve done
PRUDEN
my job.
|
That picture
— the one with
Clauson’s goofball
buddies tossing him in the air as if
he’d won the Indianapolis 500 (we’ll
get to that) — that’s Bryan Clauson.
That’s why his death hit so hard
Monday morning.
He was the kind of kid who always
had time to snap a photo with a fan,
sign an autograph, reminisce with
former classmates and even imitate
Ricky Bobby for a high school video
project — it’s on Youtube, look it up.
Hilarious.
I honestly can’t remember a time
Clauson wasn’t smiling, and his
laugh was unique and infectious.
Clauson was a classmate of mine,
and we grew up in the same neighborhood. One of my fondest memories of Clauson was his lightning
speed and how he torched the rest of
us poor neighborhood kids in backyard football once or twice a week.
And the fact that he even made
time for a game said so much about
him.
Racing was all Clauson did. He
was absolutely in love with the sport
from the moment I met him, always
tinkering with his cars in the driveway with his dad.
That love for racing turned him
into the best midget driver in the
country. It’s the reason he was 116
races into his quest to hit an unprecedented 200 races in a season.
And maybe I just couldn’t comprehend back in the day, but his
success on the track never surprised
me.
He raced in three Indianapolis
500s, leading for three laps last
spring before finishing 23rd, his personal best. He led the 100th lap of the
100th Indy 500.
Still, as awesome as that was —
like, incredibly awesome — it wasn’t
surprising. Clauson was a race car
driver. He always had been, and
the way he treated it left no other
options besides success.
His absolute joy in racing — and
in life in general — made the success seem easy, even though his
work ethic was incredible. He’s the
definition of “love what you do, and
you’ll never work a day in your
life.”
Clauson had such an effect on way
more than just me and a few neighborhood kids, though.
The entire racing community was
shaken Monday. Tony Stewart, Dale
Earnhardt Jr., Danika Patrick and
countless other big name racers
posted kind words and tributes for
Clauson.
He made an impact on every single
person he met, and he tried to meet
as many people as he could. Mostly,
he made us — especially our town of
Noblesville, Indiana — so proud.
Clauson was also one of the biggest Indiana Pacers fans I knew, and
I’ll miss reading his tweets about the
Pacers come playoff time.
But mostly, I’ll just miss Bryan, a
classmate, a teammate, a friend and
one of the most lovable humans on
earth — the same earth he kicked up
as he cruised to thousands of finish
lines.
From one of those countless
Facebook posts, “It comes as no surprise that Bryan has beaten us to
the finish line, but I cannot express
enough how much I wish this race
was much, much longer.”
MIKE PRUDEN is the sports editor at The Sheridan Press.
FILE PHOTO | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sandis Cook skates up the ice during a high school hockey game last season at the Whitney Rink at the M&M’s Center in Sheridan. Cook recently
signed to play junior hockey with the Billings Bulls.
Cook to play junior hockey with Billings Bulls
He’s also had stints playing with Casper’s
travel team and Team Wyoming.
SHERIDAN — Sandis Cook won’t be play“We are thrilled to have Sandis joining
ing high school hockey this winter, and
our organization,” Billings Bulls head
he’s OK with that.
coach Mike Richardson said. “Since day
Cook is giving up his final two seasons
one of our recruiting process, Sandis has
with the Sheridan Hawks high school
shown the dedication and character we like
hockey team to pursue a dream of playing
to have in our players. We see Sandis havhockey at higher levels. He’s signed a coning a bright future in the game of hockey,
tract to play with the Billings Bulls junior
and we look forward to having his hockey
hockey team of the North American Tier
career start with us in Billings.”
III Hockey League.
Cook was fourth on the Hawks with 18
Cook started playing hockey at 5 years
points last season but was second in points
old and has played in Sheridan ever since.
per game. He had 11 goals and seven assists
FROM STAFF REPORTS
in 12 games for a 1.50 points-per-game average.
He helped the Hawks finish undefeated in the regular season. The team won
the division before being upset in the
opening round of the Wyoming State B
Tournament.
Cook was eager to credit his Sheridan
hockey family for playing such a large role
in his success and creating an opportunity
for him to continue his career at a higher
level.
SEE HOCKEY, PAGE B3
Kubiak holds off on naming starting QB for opener
er veteran Mark Sanchez or
Trevor Siemian will start at
Chicago on Thursday night,
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP)
with a decision now expected
— Gary Kubiak was expected
Wednesday.
to announce his starting quar“I’m holding y’all off for one
terback Tuesday morning for
more day,” Kubiak said.
Denver’s preseason opener. The
Sanchez and Siemian are
Broncos coach instead dragged
listed as co-No. 1s on the depth
out the drama another 24 hours. chart as neither has shown
The biggest question at
himself as the clear-cut starter
Broncos training camp — who
for the Super Bowl champions.
is the No. 1 quarterback — is
Kubiak said he would meet
still unanswered. Kubiak and
later Tuesday with his staff to
his staff are deliberating wheth- decide who would take the first
BY MICHAEL KELLY
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
offensive snap Thursday. He
said the game plan is to play
Sanchez and Siemian a quarter
each, and to have rookie Paxton
Lynch play the second half
against the Bears.
“What we want to do is put a
number on reps and what we
want to see from each one of
them so that from an evaluation
standpoint we’re looking at
things pretty equally,” Kubiak
said. “That’s the most important thing right now.”
Sanchez, in his eighth year,
Savoy commits to Florida State
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
College men’s basketball player PJ Savoy has committed to
Florida State University for the
2016-17 basketball season.
Savoy, who just finished his
freshman year at SC, received
added interest from high-major
universities with his play in a
couple of junior college showcases throughout the summer.
Florida State, University of
Nevada - Las Vegas, Utah and
Texas Tech were among the
schools that offered Savoy, but
an official visit to FSU resulted
in the sharp shooter signing
with the Seminoles.
Savoy averaged 16.8 points and
5.1 rebounds in his one season
with the Generals.
SEE SAVOY, PAGE B3
PJ Savoy, right, shoots a 3-pointer
against Northwest College last season at the Bruce Hoffman Golden
Dome. Savoy committed to Florida
State Tuesday.
FILE PHOTO | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
said the competition is healthy.
“I’m not worried about it,”
Sanchez said. “It’s whenever
Kubiak is ready to decide. It’s
his call all the way and we just
have to keep competing for the
whole season. It doesn’t really
matter what happens here.”
The Broncos traded for
Sanchez after Peyton Manning
retired in March and Brock
Osweiler signed with Houston
two days later.
SEE STARTER, PAGE B3
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
STARTER: Siemian 3rd string
FROM B2
Siemian, Denver’s third
quarterback for most of 2015,
impressed in offseason workouts to make training camp a
quarterback competition.
Siemian served as the backup
for six games last year when
Manning was hurt. He played
in one game without throwing
a pass. He is more familiar with
the offense this year and says
his comfort level has grown.
“I was pretty nervous last
year. I wasn’t getting a ton of
reps,” he said. “I was trying to
get a grasp of the playbooks. In
that sense, I think I’m a little
more comfortable, as in I know
my assignments. I know where
my eyes need to go. There’s
a sense of, ‘I know what I’m
doing.’”
Kubiak did say linebacker
Von Miller, cornerback Aqib
Talib and offensive tackle
Russell Okung would not play.
Defensive end DeMarcus Ware
is on the non-football injury/
illness list.
Talib returned to practice
Monday and increased his
workload Tuesday, but he is not
ready to play Thursday.
Miller said he is physically
ready to play, but his mental
conditioning is not there yet.
Miller had a busy offseason that
included tough contract negotiations and several TV and
public appearances following
his MVP performance in Super
Bowl 50.
“Whenever you take a break
from football it’s a process to
get back to the game speed that
I want to play at,” he said. “I’m
right there, I’m ready to go, but
the Von I know I can be and I
want to be, I’m not there yet.
A week or two I should be all
right.”
Kubiak isn’t worried about
Miller or the other veterans not
playing Thursday because he
said the game is about the backups and getting to hit another
team.
“We’re tired of each other,” he
said. “We’ve been going at each
other for a long time. It’s time
to go with each other.”
NOTES: Kubiak said OL Ty
Sambrailo (elbow) is working
out and being evaluated on a
week-to-week basis. ... Rookie
WR Kalif Raymond will get a
majority of the returns on special teams Thursday. ... S Ryan
Murphy (hamstring) was held
out of practice.
SAVOY: Three years remaining
ning 3-pointers in back-to-back
games against Casper and
Northwest.
He was selected to play in
the Mullen’s top-100 JUCO
Showcase last month in Kansas
City.
He will have three years of
eligibility at Florida State.
FROM B2
He shot 46 percent from the
field, including 43 percent from
beyond the arc. He was also an
86-percent free-throw shooter.
Savoy’s two standout
moments with the Generals
came when he hit game-win-
FILE PHOTO | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sandis Cook looks to make a pass during a Sheridan Hawks hockey game last winter at the Whitney Rink at the M&M’s
Center in Sheridan.
HOCKEY: Cook started gofundme to help with cost
FROM B2
“I just want to personally thank
all of my coaches from mites up
to midgets,” Cook said. “You all
helped shape me into the hockey player I am today. I would
also want to thank SAHA and
Sheridan on Skates for giving me
the opportunity to play hockey
in Sheridan for as long as I did. I
am very excited to move onto the
next level and continue my hockey career.
“I will certainly miss playing
with my teammates with whom
I have played with my entire
life,” he added. “I also want to
thank Steve Strunk and the entire
Planet Hockey organization for
coming to Sheridan and working
with us kids every year.”
To help cover the $6,500 cost of
playing with the Bulls, Cook has
set up a gofundme account for
anyone looking to support his
career.
The “Sandis Jr. Hockey Fund”
can be found at gofundme.com/2a5jv3g.
Rangers crush Rockies bullpen, rally for second-straight comeback win
BY BRENT W. NEW
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER (AP) — Adrian Beltre hit a tworun double, Elvis Andrus added a tiebreaking single and the Texas Rangers scored
four runs in the eighth inning to beat the
Colorado Rockies 7-5 on Tuesday.
The AL West leaders had five hits in the
inning and handed Colorado another tough
loss in the two-game sweep. The late-game
rally came after the Rangers scored three
times in the ninth to beat the Rockies 4-3 on
Monday night.
On Tuesday, Texas had four consecutive
hits as Carlos Beltran drove in a run with a
single and Beltre tied the game with a tworun double. Andrus gave his team the lead
when he drove in Beltre with his second hit
of the game.
Alex Claudio (3-1) threw 2 1-3 scoreless
innings of relief and Sam Dyson picked up
his 25th save in 28 chances.
The Rangers, who have won four straight
and nine of 12, finished their road trip 5-3.
The teams head to Texas to begin a twogame set Wednesday.
Tyler Chatwood allowed two runs struck
out a season-high eight for Colorado, but
Scott Oberg (0-1) allowed four runs in the
eighth.
The shaky bullpen performance comes
after Carlos Estevez blew two ninth-inning
leads in four days and was demoted earlier
in the day.
Charlie Blackmon homered and doubled,
rookie David Dahl tripled to extend his hitting streak to 15 games, and Nolan Arenado
drove in his National-League leading 90th
and 91st RBIs for the Rockies.
Colorado has lost five of six and finished
its homestand 3-5.
A.J. Griffin struggled in his start for
the Rangers, allowing five runs in 4 2/3
innings. He avoided losing his first game
since July 10 thanks to another Rangers’
late rally.
Blackmon hit Griffin’s fourth pitch of the
game over the right-center field wall for
his seventh leadoff home run of the season. Later in the inning, Dahl tripled and
Arenado brought him home with a single to
extend Colorado’s lead to 2-0.
Arenado and Gerardo Parra each added
an RBI single in the third.
Mark Reynolds came off the bench and
drove in a run with a single in the fifth to
push the lead to 5-1.
Robinson Chirinos had a sacrifice fly in
the fifth and Nomar Mazara drove in another run in the seventh.
ESTEVEZ OUT AS CLOSER
RHP Carlos Estevez was removed from
the Rockies’ closer role after blowing two
save opportunities in four days. Estevez
had five blown saves in 16 opportunities
this season.
“I’m going to get him out of that role for
a little bit just to let him catch his breath,”
Colorado manager Walt Weiss said. “He’s
made of all the right stuff. He’s going to be a
great closer in this league for a long time.”
SCOREBOARD |
MLB |
American League
East Division
Baltimore
Toronto
Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Central Division
Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
West Division
W
63
64
61
56
46
L Pct
49 .563
50 .561
50 .550
56 .500
66 .411
GB
—
—
1½
7
17
W
63
61
54
53
46
L Pct GB
47 .573
—
52 .540 3½
58 .482
10
59 .473
11
67 .407 18½
W
L Pct GB
Texas
67 47 .588
—
Seattle
59 53 .527
7
Houston
58 55 .513 8½
Oakland
50 63 .442 16½
Los Angeles
49 63 .438
17
Tuesday
Texas 7, Colorado 5
Cleveland 3, Washington 1
Tampa Bay 9, Toronto 2
Boston 5, N.Y. Yankees 3
Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Angels 1
Houston 7, Minnesota 5
Chicago White Sox 7, Kansas City 5, 10 innings
Oakland 2, Baltimore 1
Seattle 6, Detroit 5, 15 innings
Wednesday
Cleveland at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Thursday
Houston (Fister 10-7) at Minnesota (Berrios 2-2),
1:10 p.m.
Colorado (Bettis 10-6) at Texas (Harrell 3-2), 2:05
p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 14-4) at Oakland (Triggs 0-0),
3:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Skaggs 1-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 118), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pineda 6-10) at Boston (Wright 135), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Gonzalez 2-6) at Kansas City
+\Ɉ`!WT
Friday
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Arizona at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
National League
East Division
W
L Pct GB
Washington
66 46 .589
—
Miami
60 53 .531 6½
New York
57 55 .509
9
Philadelphia
52 63 .452 15½
Atlanta
43 70 .381 23½
Central Division
W
L Pct GB
Chicago
70 41 .631
—
St. Louis
59 54 .522
12
Pittsburgh
56 54 .509 13½
Milwaukee
49 62 .441
21
Cincinnati
46 66 .411 24½
West Division
W
L Pct GB
Los Angeles
64 49 .566
—
San Francisco
64 49 .566
—
Colorado
55 58 .487
9
San Diego
48 64 .429 15½
Arizona
46 66 .411 17½
Tuesday
Texas 7, Colorado 5
Cleveland 3, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 6, San Diego 4
Arizona 5, N.Y. Mets 3
Miami 2, San Francisco 0
Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Angels 1
Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 4
L.A. Dodgers 9, Philadelphia 3
Wednesday
San Francisco at Miami, 12:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 3:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Colorado at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Thursday
Arizona (Shipley 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard
9-6), 12:10 p.m.
San Diego (Friedrich 4-7) at Pittsburgh (Taillon 2-2),
12:35 p.m.
Colorado (Bettis 10-6) at Texas (Harrell 3-2), 2:05
p.m.
Atlanta (Hernandez 1-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 3-4),
2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Martinez 10-7) at Chicago Cubs (Lester
12-4), 8:05 p.m.
Friday
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Baltimore at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
OLYMPICS |
BASKETBALL
Men
Brazil 66, Spain 65
Lithuania 89, Nigeria 80
Argentina 90, Croatia 82
Women
Australia 89, France 71
Belarus 65, Brazil 63
Turkey 76, Japan 62
FIELD HOCKEY
Men
Spain 3, New Zealand 2
India 2, Argentina 1
Germany 3, Ireland 2
Netherlands 7, Canada 0
Britain 9, Brazil 1
Belgium 1, Australia 0
RUGBY
Men
France 31, Australia 14
South Africa 24, Spain 0
Britain 31, Kenya 7
Japan 14, New Zealand 12
Argentina 17, United States 14
Fiji 40, Brazil 12
Australia 26, Spain 12
South Africa 26, France 0
Britain 21, Japan 19
New Zealand 28, Kenya 5
United States 26, Brazil 0
Fiji 21, Argentina 14
SOCCER
Women
Australia 6, Zimbabwe 1
Canada 2, Germany 1
Colombia 2, United States 2
France 3, New Zealand 0
South Africa 0, Brazil 0
China 0, Sweden 0
TEAM HANDBALL
Men
France 35, Qatar 20
Germany 32, Poland 29
Denmark 31, Tunisia 23
Slovenia 31, Brazil 28
Egypt 26, Sweden 25
Croatia 27, Argentina 26
VOLLEYBALL
Men
Argentina 3, Russia 1 (25-18, 18-25, 25-18, 25-21)
France 3, Mexico 0 (25-18, 25-12, 25-22)
Italy 3, United States 1 (28-26, 20-25, 25-23,
25-23)
Poland 3, Iran 2 (25-17, 25-23, 23-25, 20-25,
18-16)
Egypt 3, Cuba 0 (25-22, 25-15, 25-22)
Brazil 3, Canada 1 (24-26, 25-18, 25-22, 25-17)
WATER POLO
Women
Hungary 13, China 11
Italy 9, Brazil 3
United States 11, Spain 4
Australia 14, Russia 4
TRANSACTIONS |
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Sent LHP T.J. McFarland to the GCL Orioles for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Placed OF/DH Avisail
Garcia on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Jason Coats
from Charlotte (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS — Placed RHP Bruce Rondon
on paternity leave. Recalled LHP Daniel Norris
from Toledo (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Extended their player
development contract with Quad Cities (MWL)
through the 2018 season.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed RHP Cam
Bedrosian on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
Thursday. Optioned RHP Tim Lincecum to Salt
3HRL7*3*SHPTLK3/7)YL[[6ILYOVS[aLYVɈ
waivers from Philadelphia. Selected the contract of
RHP A.J. Achter from Salt Lake. Assigned RHP Al
Albuquerque outright to Salt Lake.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Optioned LHP Richard
Bleier to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Claimed RHP
)SHRL7HYRLYVɈ^HP]LYZMYVT:LH[[SL(NYLLK[V
terms with LHP Tommy Layne on a one-year contract. Sent RHP Bryan Mitchell to Charleston (SAL)
for a rehab assignment.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned 1B Mike Freeman to Tacoma (PCL). Reinstated SS Ketel Marte
from the 15-day DL. Sent RHP Evan Scribner to
the AZL Mariners for a rehab assignment.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Sent OF Oswaldo Arcia to
Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Placed C Welington Castillo on paternity leave. Reinstated RHP
Zack Greinke from the 15-day DL. Recalled C
Oscar Hernandez from Mobile (SL). Sent OF A.J.
Pollock to Visalia (Cal) for a rehab assignment.
ATLANTA BRAVES — Placed RHP Chris Withrow
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Friday. Reinstated RHP Shae Simmons from the 15-day DL and
optioned him to Gwinnett (IL).
CHICAGO CUBS — Optioned RHP Justin Grimm
to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated RHP Jason Hammel
from the bereavement list. Placed INF Tommy La
Stella on the temporary inactive list.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Placed RHP Joe
Blanton on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP
Josh Ravin from Oklahoma City (PCL). Sent LHP
Brett Anderson to Oklahoma City for a rehab
assignment.
MIAMI MARLINS — Placed RHP A.J. Ramos on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Optioned
LHP Hunter Cervenka to New Orleans (PCL). Designated LHP Cody Ege for assignment. Recalled
RHP Austin Brice from New Orleans. Selected the
contract of LHP Chris Narveson from New Orleans.
NEW YORK METS — Sent RHP Jim Henderson to
Las Vegas (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Curtis
Partch to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled RHP Chad
Kuhl from Indianapolis.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Placed RHP Michael
Wacha on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of
RHP Alex Reyes from Memphis (PCL). Transferred
C Brayan Pena to the 60-day DL.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with RHP
Cesar Gonzalez on a minor league contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Named Willie
Green assistant coach/player development.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed CB Tony
McRae.
GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released LB Manoa
Pikula. Signed LS Jesse Schmitt.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed CB Chris Culliver.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed LS Kevin McDermott to a contract extension.
NEW YORK JETS — Activated DE Muhammad
Wilkerson from the PUP list.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Signed associate coach
Jim Playfair and assistant coach/video Steve
Peters to multiyear contract extensions.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Named Sean Walker
vice president of innovation and technology
services.
COLLEGE
AUSTIN PEAY — Named Brandon Romans assistant baseball coach and recruiting coordinator and
David Weber volunteer assistant baseball coach.
BARUCH — Named Angeoline Piguave-Cowan
women’s cross country coach.
BROWN — Promoted women’s volunteer assistant
basketball coach Sara Binkhorst to full-time assistant. Named Danielle Pearson women’s volunteer
assistant basketball coach.
FURMAN — Named Caronica Randle women’s
associate head basketball coach.
GEORGIA TECH — Announced the resignation of
athletic director Mike Bobinski to take the same
position at Purdue.
KENTUCKY — Announced senior G E.J. Floreal is
leaving the men’s basketball program.
MINNESOTA STATE MANKATO — Named Amy
Sander women’s associate head basketball coach.
MISSOURI — Named Jim Sterk athletic director.
N.C. STATE — Announced sophomore G Coult
Culler is leaving the football team but will remain
in school.
PRESBYTERIAN — Named Kyle Bross assistant
softball coach.
RUTGERS — Named Jay Miller associate head
softball coach.
STANFORD — Named Derek Byrnes women’s
rowing coach.
TCU — Signed football coach Gary Patterson to
a one-year contract extension through the 2021
season.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
How sleep protects your
child from obesity!
“Rock-a-bye Baby” may
seem like a harsh song to
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
sing as you put a child to
sleep (“When the bough
breaks, the cradle will fall/
and down will come baby,
cradle and all”). But millions of little ones have
dozed off contentedly to the
sweet melody that delivers
the threatening news.
Well, researchers at Ohio
State University College of
Public Health and Temple
University’s Center for
Obesity Research and
Education have their own
take on bedtime threats.
Their study, published in
The Journal of Pediatrics,
reveals that only 10 percent
of preschoolers who go to
bed before 8 p.m. become
obese as teens, while 16 percent of those with bedtimes
between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m.,
and 23 percent of those who
hit the hay after 9 p.m. do!
According to head
researcher, epidemiologist
DEAR ABBY
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
COUPLE’S SPARE
BEDROOM IS NO LONGER
OPEN FOR GUESTS
DEAR ABBY: We are a
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
Sarah Anderson, making
sure your preschooler is in
bed before 8 p.m. is something “families can do to
lower their child’s risk [of
obesity], and it’s also likely
to have positive benefits on
behavior and on social, emotional and cognitive development.”
The American Academy
of Sleep Medicine says children ages 3-5 should sleep 10
to 13 hours in every 24-hour
period (including naps). We
think you show love for your
children by getting them to
bed at the appropriate time.
So we suggest Mom and Dad
warm up their pipes around
7:30 and try singing “Golden
Slumbers” (it has much
sweeter lyrics): “Cares you
know not, therefore sleep/
While over you a watch I’ll
keep. Sleep, pretty darling,
do not cry/And I will sing a
lullaby.”
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
married couple in our 60s
and have no close family. Before retirement, we
would playfully tease each
other that when we retired,
we’d turn our spare bedroom into a “fun fantasy
adult room.” Fast forward
-- we now have our special
room, and we’re having a
blast.
Well, we got a call from
distant relatives who will
be heading our way, and
they asked to stay with us
for a few days. How do we
explain that we have no
room for them without causing problems? -- DISCREET
IN WASHINGTON
DEAR DISCREET: Be honest -- to a degree. After telling
them that you are unable to
accommodate them, explain
that because you have turned
the spare bedroom into an
“entertainment center,” it is
no longer set up for guests,
but you’d love to see them
while they’re in town and
take them OUT for dinner.
Just remember that if you
are asked, you do not have
to reveal what kind of games
you are playing in there.
DEAR ABBY: I’m curious to know your thoughts
regarding this dating situation: If a person has a
prosthetic and the device
isn’t obvious, when and how
would you recommend it be
disclosed to the dating partner? Is it “too much information” to reveal on a first
date? Would it be all right
to wait a couple of dates,
see how they go, and then
reveal the fact? Please help,
if you can. -- CURIOUS IN
LYNCHBURG
DEAR CURIOUS: I see no
reason to reveal something
like this on a first -- or even
second -- date, and certainly
not with a virtual stranger.
“Prosthetics” of various
kinds are common, but few
people are willing to discuss
the fact that their appearance has been enhanced with
false teeth, caps and veneers,
breast implants, Botox or a
hair transplant. People are
more than a prosthetic, so
new acquaintances should
get to know the person
before receiving that information.
DEAR ABBY: This politically divisive year has fueled
a debate in our family. I like
to put a political sticker on
my car (on a magnet). That
way I can remove it when
I want. One of my relatives
won’t ride in my car if I
have my sticker on. I say it’s
my car and I can put what I
want on it. He says I should
be “sensitive to others’ feelings” when they are in the
car. What do you think? -POLITICALLY STUMPED
DEAR POLITICALLY
STUMPED: You have a right
to exercise your freedom of
expression. If your relative
prefers not to ride in a car
with a bumper sticker advertising “the other” political
party, then he or she should
feel free to arrange for alternative transportation.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
Fax: (307) 672-7950
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Adoption
Farm & Ranch Supplies
Unfurn Apts for Rent
Houses, Furn for Rent
Help Wanted
ADOPTION: LOVING,
young 1st time Mom &
Dad promise your baby
a happy home. Expenses pd. Jamie &
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NEW HOLLAND 7450
rotary disk bind swather. 13 ft. cut. 1000 PTO
almost new. 700 acre.
$25,000 boo 655-9067
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heat & dep., util. pd. No
smk. Pets? Laundry rm.
incl. 307-752-9392.
Building Materials
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Apartments
HOUSES, UNFURNISHED - listing 2
Bdrm/Loft/3bth Newly
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Call Judy at Powder
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(2) METAL folding
chairs w/ covered seat
$7.00 ea
674-7270
ANTIQUE LAMP w/
Colorful Shade. $50.
751-1866
TWO BATHROOM vanities (includes countertop and sinks) $50 each
752-7943
Hardware & Tools
CARD TABLE. $15
674-7270
CEMENT MIXER.
Electric Motor. On
rubber wheels. With
hitch. Good condition.
$350 (307)655-2240
COMFORTABLE
MATCHING chairs. (2)
$30 each
(307)674-7270
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY
duty 6" bench grinder in
very good condition.
$30
672-5119
FOUR POSTER twin
wood bed frame $50.
752-7943
GLASS PUNCH bowl
w/ glass tray. $30
672-2802
GLASS TABLE.
108"x48"x1/2" Beveled
edge. 2 pedestals.
$1600 6 chairs @ $125
(720)320-8336
Office Machines &
Equipme
Miscellaneous
9 WOODEN boxes w/
handles used for carrying riffles to gun shows
or storage. $50 for all or
$10 ea. 672-2802
751-5277
Miscellaneous for Sale
12 FT JON BOAT
New, never used. Fibre- MEN'S XL VARSITY
glass with oars and elec Jacket. Dark Green w/
motor. $700. Gas mo- black leather sleeves.
tor also avail. Not in- Only worn twice. $100.
luded. Call 751-0893 307-683-6529.
Lawn & Garden
Equipment
1992 DV 17C Tracker
Boat. 40HP Motor w/
trailer. $2000 of upgrades in 2016! Excellent shape $5500.00
307-751-1016
Farm & Ranch Supplies
FORD 8N tractor with
blade. Rebuilt & restored. $4000 OBO.
672-2638
307-674-7862
1352 Avoca Place
TDD #711
CRAFTSMAN
REARBAG lawn mower
$50
672-5119
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
HESSTON 565 Round
baler. 1000 PTO for
parts. $500 obo.
655-9067
Furnished Apts for Rent
HESSTON 565A Round
baler. 540 PTO double
twine arms. $3500 obo
655-9067
WKLY FROM $210
Updated rooms.
Am. Best Value Inn
(307)672-9757
Office/Retail Space for
Rent
3,000-12,000 sq./ft of
executive office building for lease in an established commercial
park. Lease part or all.
Call (307)752-8112
Carroll Realty Co.
Equal Housing Opportunity
1530 SQ/ft office space
located on Coffeen Ave.
High visibility & parking.
Please call for lease
terms & rates.
(307)751-4915.
NICE 1100 sq/ft office.
Easy access. Close to
down town. 673-5555
COMPUTER INTEL I-3
syst. 4 GB ram. 500 GB
HD. Dvd drive w/ 20"
flat screen. Canon
Copy/ fax mx320 new
cartridge. Comp. desk.
$200.00 752-3134
POWER LIFT & recline
chair. Asking $300
ANTIQUE TRACTOR
OBO. 674-7279.
seat. $25 672-2802
SPRING CLEANING?
COMMERCIAL GRADE
NEED TO
Toledo Band Meat Saw.
DECLUTTER?
Model 5201. Has 5 new
SELL ANY ITEM
bands. $600.
($50 or less)
(307)674-4032
FOR FREE IN THE
FRESH LOCALLY
SHERIDAN PRESS!
grown rhubarb. $1.25/lb
For more details,
672-3159
call Amber 672-2431.
HAVE AN ITEM you
WEBER GRILL $50
want to sell for
752-7943
$50 or more?
Advertise
with us!
Guns
ONLY $20.16!!!
Run it until it sells!
SNAKE GUN. 44 mag
Call Amber
Colt Anaconda w/ leath672-2431
er shoulder holster dies.
238 rounds of ammo.
TREE EQUIP for Sale.
$1975 firm. 763-1542
1250 Vermeer Chipper.
*updated phone num$12,000
ber 7/29*
If interested call
Boats
– NO SMOKING PROPERTY –
Computers-Accessories
SHARP MX-2610N
Copier. Digital. Full Color. Multi-functional sysLAZY BOY couch 2 y/o.
tem; Copy. Print. Scan
Burgundy. $300 firm
& More! Asking $1500
(307)429-1009
(307)675-1919
NOVELTY OLD Fashion Ice Box. Ideal for
storage. Top opens.
20"w x 29"h x 12"d. $30
674-7270
Accepting applications for 1
and 2 bedroom apartments.
Rental assistance available
based on availability and
eligibility. This institution is an
equal opportunity provider.
TONGUE RIVER
APARTMENTS
901 W. Halbert • Ranchester, WY
655-9470 • TDD#711
Taking Applications for 2 bedroom
Apartments. Coin-op Laundry
facility, play area, Rental
assistance depending on eligibility
and availability. This institution is
an equal opportunity provider
and employer.
Equal Housing Opportunity
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
1 BEDROOM studio
apartment $650/mo.
Includes utilities
Call Grimshaw
Investments
(307)672-2810
NICE 1 BR. in 4 unit
bldg. Most utils. incl.
Pets neg. $575/mo. +
dep. 751-2105.
NEWER 2 BR.
Ranchester. Low util.
W/D. No smk. $700/mo.
751-1628
1 BR. Newly remodeled. Laundry facilities. A/C. $600/mo.
util. incl. No smoking.
751-5815.
Houses, Unfurn for Rent
3 BR 2 BA w/ 1 BR 1
BA Mother in law. Storage & carport. In Bighorn. $1500/m
751-7718
1 BR W/D. No
smoking/pets. Fenced
Yard. $550/ mo.
Dayton
(307)655-2397
COUNTRY HOME
for Rent, cute 2
bedroom, 1 bath
house just minutes
from downtown, located on Big Goose.
Small pets negotiable $950 per month
plus utilities and $950
deposit. Call 307672-6179
COMFORTABLE 2 BR.
w/ basement sleeping
room 1.5 BA. sm.
garage/ shop.A/C.
Newly remodeled. New
windows, carpet, appliances. $1000/mo.
Ref. req. 751-3993
SHER. 2 BR $700 +
MDU. 406-784-2549
3 BR 2 BA 1 car att.
gar. in Dayton. Nice
neighborhood. No
smok/pets. $1200 + ulit
& dep. 751-0253
PROF. OFFICE SPACE
5200 sq/ft. Great
location & excellent
parking. Avail. early fall.
Contact Steve
672-0785.
PROFESSIONAL
OFFICE suites for
lease Cottonwood
Center 672-8700 or
751-3828
Storage Space
INTERSTATE STORAGE. Multiple Sizes
avail. No deposit
req'd. 752-6111.
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping,
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
Comfort Inn &
Suites
or Hampton Inn
Cosner
Construction CO. is
seeking experienced
carpenters. Must have
basic tools, a valid
driver's license &
transportation. Local,
year round work,
excellent pay &
benefits package.
Please apply in person
at 543 North Main
Street or fax resume to
674-4211
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
15' X 30' storage unit for
rent. 673-5555
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
ELDORADO STORAGE Helping you conquer space. 3856 Coffeen. 672-7297.
Help Wanted
Employment
opportunity
for Registered Nurse.
Bring Resume to
Northeast Wyoming
Pediatric Associates,
P.C. at
916 Jackson Avenue,
Sheridan, WY 82801
or call Brenda at
307-675-5555
SHERIDAN COLLEGE
Facilities Specialist
Daytime & evening
positions.
Outstanding benefits &
great facilities.
Responsible for
custodial work,
event setups, office
moves, painting, light
carpentry, minor
plumbing & preventive
maintenance. Able to lift
50 lbs., work on
ladders & overhead.
Apply online at:
https://jobs.sher
idan.edu.
EOE.
P/T nanny wanted for
two kids. 3-5:30 M-F
752-4463
Perkins Restaurant
is accepting
applications for line
cooks & servers. Day
and evening shifts
available. Apply in
person at 1373 Coffeen Ave or online at
www.please applyon
line.com/sugarlanden
terprises. EOE
Kitchen Manager
Position. Experience
preferred. EEO. Send
reply to box 246, c/o
The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
Historic Sheridan Inn is
looking for front desk
associates and housekeepers. All shifts available. Please apply in
person at
856 Broadway.
Needed laborers/ operators/ lead people. For
local landscape company. Pay $12-$20
DOE. 40-50 hrs week.
(307)674-6512
NON SEQUITUR
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
MOTEL 6 &
QUALITY INN.
SCSD #1 is accepting
applications for the
following positions:
-BHE Part-Time Para
(reading aide)
-TRE Part-Time Para
(reading aide)
-TRE Full-Time Para
(SpEd)
Apply online
www.sheri
dan.k12.wy.us
Positions open until
filled. EOE
ALL POSITIONS
AVAILABLE at
RIB & CHOP HOUSE
(847 N Main)!
Bartenders, servers,
line & prep cooks,
dishwashers, hosts &
bussers. Up to
$18/hour depending on
experience & position.
It’s not too late to cash
in on the rest of
summer & secure your
future spot now! Apply
at FRGJOBS.COM or
stop in to see us for
your personal
interview today. Let us
tell you about our
flexible work
schedules & how you
can have a blast &
make some cash.
Delivery
problems?
Call 672-2431
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
IT/Data Network TechAdvanced
Communications
Technologies, Inc.
(ACT) Sheridan, WY.
Provides technical
support for customer
communications
networks. Installs,
programs, monitors &
supports all customer
data lines & equipment,
to include internal IT
systems & services as
well as Corporate &
Internal Network
Security. Associates
Degree & exp
equivalent to 1 year of
work on software
applications, PC &
networking equipment.
Send resume with
Cover Letter to:
ACT/Range HR.
* PO Box 127 *
Forsyth, MT 59327;
E-mail
[email protected]
www.actaccess.net
The
SHERIDAN PRESS
is looking for:
Independent
Contractors
to deliver papers.
If interested please
stop by:
The Sheridan Press
144 East Grinnell
St. Sheridan, WY
82801
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Now hiring housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland Dr.
Looking for an experienced line cook. Work
evenings & weekends.
Salary based on experience. Apply in person at
Wagon Box Inn,
108 N Piney Rd, Story
or email
[email protected]
Local restaurant looking for line/prep cooks &
dishwasher to join a
fun, energetic & creative team. Please send
resume to box 247, c/ o
The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Help Wanted
The Sheridan Police
Department is
recruiting to fill Police
Officer positions. Join
our team to help make
our community a safe,
great place to live. This
is a fully benefited
position including
health, dental, vision, &
life insurance, full
pension retirement
after 20 years of
service, tuition
reimbursement, a
wellness program &
paid time off. The
hiring range is $20.92$23.11 an hour DOE.
Candidates must pass
a physical fitness test,
online examination, an
interview &
comprehensive
background
investigation. A
complete job
description & a Police
Department
application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
Interested applicants
must submit a
completed Police
Department
Application Packet to
City Hall, 55 Grinnell
Plaza by 8/22/16.
Testing will be held on
8/25/16. The City of
Sheridan is a drug-free
work place.
Hints from Heloise
Dear Heloise: I don’t
know where
to get an unbiased and correct answer to
my question.
I suppose I
could go to the
deli at my supermarket, but
I want a truthful answer.
The MEAT that we buy
at the deli, and packaged
meats -- are any of these
meats “formed”? Some of
them do not appear to be
sliced off a regular turkey
or chicken breast.
I know bologna and salami are formed. But roast
beef (which sometimes
looks unlike any roast beef
I have ever seen), chicken,
turkey and ham? There is
nothing on any labels that
tells us. Can you help me?
-- Diane K., via email
Help from Heloise is here
on formed or not formed.
Ask at the deli -- they should
be happy to explain everything to you. You most
likely will get a truthful answer; they want you to come
back as a customer
You are thinking in the
right direction. Most lunchmeat and some items for
sale at the deli are “formed”
pieces of the “meat or fowl”
put together and shaped
into a loaf or roll. Packages
of lunchmeat, which are all
the same square size, are
“formed,” as you say. Read
the list of ingredients -- that
will tell you.
Whole cuts are just that
- cut in one piece from the
fowl or livestock. -- Heloise
PIZZA SCISSORS
Dear Heloise: We make
a lot of homemade pizzas.
Whether I buy a pizza cutter
at the dollar store or pay
20 bucks for a heavier-duty
one, they never seem to last
more than a few years.
The pizza cutter broke,
and all the knives were in
the dishwasher, so I used
kitchen scissors to cut the
pizza. To my delight, it was
significantly easier to cut
the pizza. That was nearly
five years ago. The irony
is that we’ve had them for
almost 20 years. -- Mike W.,
Virginia Beach, Va.
Mike, I’m with you! A
sturdy pair of kitchen
shears will do the job nicely.
Heloise
-- Heloise
NO-CRUMB CEREAL
Dear Heloise: I like cold
cereal for breakfast and
sometimes for an evening
snack. I don’t like when the
last serving in the box has a
lot of “dust” and little bits.
I get my pasta strainer,
hold it over the trash bin,
then pour the cereal into it
and give the strainer a little
shake. All the “dust” and
little bits are strained out
into the trash, and I pour
the remaining whole cereal
into my bowl. -- Lee in Connecticut
Lee, you and many of my
readers eat cereal for the
evening meal! It’s easy,
tasty and only one bowl to
wash. I like your hint, and
thanks for writing. -- Heloise
PECAN PANIC
Dear Heloise: When I
make chicken salad, I put
chopped pecans in it. I
forgot to grab them at the
store. So, I took a jar of
mixed nuts, took the pecans
out, chopped them and
added them to my chicken
salad. -- M.T., Woodstock,
Va.
Help Wanted
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
Pickups & Vans
Coffeen Car Care center is looking for a full
time Lube & Tire Technician. Apply in person
with resume.
752 Coffeen Ave.
Antiques
MEDICAL EXAM floor
lamp. Circa 1949. Used
in ORIGINAL Sheridan
Memorial Hospital.
Excel. condition. $150 +
S & H. (602)421-3686
Real Estate
WCDA READY!
2BR house with
basement sleeping
room. Garage w/
shop. All new windows, flooring, appliances & fixtures.
$175k
751-3993
Autos & Accessories
13 SP Fuller transmission. $1600. 4 GMC 8
hole wheels 165. $100.
4 875 R165 tires. $300.
OBO. Like new. 7522887
2005 CHEVY C-4500
stock full size box.
Duramax 75k miles.
Custom painted. Dual
axles. semi tires.
674-8252 $39,000 obo
2005 FORD F150. 4
wheel drive. 95,000 mi.
Crew cab. Bed liner.
Tow with extra brake.
$10,000
752-3827
2011 GMC Denali HD
3500, Crew Cab,
every option available,
108k highway miles,
Duramax Diesel,
Allison Transmission.
New Tires,
$33,000 752-1259
16 K Fifth wheel swivel
hitch with rails & hardware. $225
(307)672-5119
2 LEATHER CAR SEAT
COVERS. $50. 7511866.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup Flatbeds, Krogman Bale
Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
RUBBER MADE travel
cooler & warmer Ac/Dc
$30 674-4086
2011 GMC Sierra
SLT 3500, Crew Cab,
103,000 highway mi.
Duramax Diesel.
Allison Transmission.
New Tires, $29,000
752-1259
BRAHMA TRUCK topper. Black. Excellent
shape. 5' wide x 7'3"
long. $200 OBO. 7634631.
ATV’s & Snowmobiles
Campers, Trailers
2004 POLARIS
Sportsman 700
Electronic Fuel
Injection ATV
1,643 miles NADA Low
Retail $2,145
Avg Retail $2,825
Make Offer …
Call 684-5591
Ask for Dave
2015 SUMMERLAND
by Springdale SM2670.
sleeps 6-8. Fully Contained. 1 13' slide.
$16,500 (513)235-3147
Motorcycles
1997 HARLEY
Sportster 1200 with
Lehman trike conversion. Low miles, extras.
$9500.00 (307)7524459 (307)674-7889
2006 HARLEY Davidson Heritage Softtail
$12,500. 763-7621
2008 HARLEY Davidson Road King. With
windshield. Back rest.
Custom handlebars.
7400 mi $13,000.
(307)660-2539
FOR SALE
2012 Harley Davidson
Triglide.
Excellent condition!
3800 mi. $25,000.
(307)672-3525
JULIE KEATON
655-5226
Stop by the Sheridan
Press for your
free tickets to
Centennial Theatres
Campers, Trailers
Your five minutes of fame
may only be temporary but
there’s no reason why you
shouldn’t make the most
of it. Don’t hesitate to ask
for favors or advice as you
will most assuredly receive
them.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Put your wisdom to work.
You’ve gained a good bit
of knowledge and experience over the years so you
may want to contemplate
whether the goals you set
years ago are still in line
with where you are now.
There’s no shame in asking
for advice.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Take your time. Being
in too much of a hurry to
get things done leaves a lot
of room for errors and mistakes so stay focused on the
task at hand. Love may be
in the cards for those who
stick around familiar faces
and don’t stray from the
beaten path.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Pleasure may push business
to the back burner. A significant other may take precedent while singles may
cross paths with an attractive and intriguing acquaintance. Either way, matters
of the heart will hold the
greatest significance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Find common ground.
Arguments can easily be
avoided by looking for ways
to compromise rather than
focusing on differences. A
project may lack a key component so it may be wise to
plan before getting things
started.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
Stand your ground. Someone may put on the pressure
to make you come to a quick
decision. If you aren’t comfortable with the options
2008 KEYSTONE
Everest like new. 37
feet long. 3-slides. 1
1/2 baths. Sleeps 6.
4-season pkg. $24,000.
Call 672-0996
2011 STARCRAFT Autumn Ridge. 278 BH. 29
Ft. Great Condition. Under book @ $10,300.
674-5381
2001, 1061 Lance Pickup Camper. Full Loaded, Excel. Cond. Slide
out. Satellite. In-board
Generator $16,000
751-2501 or 751-6154
1998 34' Cardinal 5th
wheel. 3 slides. Very
nice. $13,500. 6727935
Garage Sales
'07 CAMEO.
35' 5th wheel.
3 slides. Fireplace.
4 Season. B&W hitch.
Skirt. Lots of storage.
$25k obo
751-4206/752-6141
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Chris Hemsworth was born
in Melbourne, Australia
on this day in 1983. This
birthday guy has portrayed
Norse hero Thor in both the
“Thor” and “The Avengers”
franchises. He’s also starred
in such films as “In the
Heart of the Sea,” “Rush,”
and “Snow White and the
Huntsman.” Hemsworth
has been married to actress
Elsa Pataky since 2010 and
the couple has three children.
ARIES (Mar 21-Apr. 19):
The solution may be closer
than you think. A friend or
loved one may have the essential missing piece of the
puzzle that has been troubling you for some time.
Your love life may take
an unexpected turn, with
pleasing results.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May
20): Enjoy it while it lasts.
LUXURY 2013 Komfort by Dutchman. 5
slides, w/ fireplace. Tall
ceilings. Dble fridge &
freezer. King sized bed.
Arctic pkg. cust. skirting
$55,500 obo 674-8252
2006 DYNA Wide
Glide 5k mi. screaming
eagle pipes.
PRICE REDUCED!
$8000
Call 751-6723
ATV’s & Snowmobiles
ATV WAGON. All Aluminum. Suspension
System. Turf Tires. Like
New. $650.00 751-4460
KEYSTONE MONTANA
High Country 323 RL
fifth wheel. Lots of
Extras incl. W/D!!!
3 slide outs. Stored
inside. $32,000
307-763-9469
ANNUAL MISSIONS
YARD SALE.
Bethesda Worship
Center (Old Woodland
Park School).
Thurs 8a-6p.
You name it, we have it!
Jeraldine Saunders
you can remain non-committal. Cupid’s arrow may
find its mark with romantic
pursuits tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Trust the trustworthy.
Have faith that those in
your inner circle, whom
you have come to rely upon,
will come through when
you need them most. You’ll
be on top of your game
when involved in matters of
family and close friends.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don’t close the
case too soon. Be careful not
to make a snap judgment.
Someone may shed new
light on a situation that will
change your mind. A deep
conversation with a loved
one may yield a pleasant
vision.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Shop until you drop.
Expeditions to treat yourself to a few pretty baubles
will prove satisfying and
shouldn’t put too much of a
strain on the budget. Conditions may let you see an
old friend in a completely
different light.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Go with your gut instinct. You are able to use
your intuitions to make the
right decisions and judge
who is trustworthy and
who is not. Today, you will
exude charm and attractiveness and others will enjoy
your company.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
Don’t put the cart before the
horse. The idea you have
may indeed have possibilities but there may not be a
practical way off getting it
off the ground. A loved one
may feel neglected if you
don’t notice their need for
attention.
IF AUGUST 11 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You can speed
through the next five to six
weeks riding high on enthusiasm and healthy animal
spirits. This can be a good
time to tackle physical jobs
or develop constructive
ideas. In late September and
early October you could be
easily duped by unscrupulous individuals or misled
by your own wishful thinking. Steer clear of new hookups and investments. Don’t
take time off or plan a vacation for December. That
month is better spent on the
job, meeting deadlines or
fulfilling key obligations.
Wait until April, when you
will have support and wise
advice at your fingertips, to
make crucial decisions or to
launch plans that will favorably affect your future.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4202
Public Notices
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob Rolston
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
STATE
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
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Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-751-6428
Mark
Kinner
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-674-4777
Confucius,
a wise fellow,
said, “By
three methods we may
learn wisdom: First,
by reflection, which is
noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest;
and third, by experience,
which is the bitterest.”
Bridge is rarely as simple as one, two, three,
but analyzing in logical
steps is a great idea.
South is in four hearts.
West leads the club two.
How should East plan
the defense?
The North hand was
close to a two-no-trump
opening, but not good
enough. (If you count
two points for an ace
and one for a king, a
typical two-no-trump
opening contains seven
points; this hand had
only five.) East had an
easy two-club overcall.
South had a minimum
two-heart response, but
he was right not to make
a negative double with a
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest
in property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in
the event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is
not supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
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Your Right To Know
and be informed
of government
legal proceedings
is embodied in
public notices. This
newspaper urges every
citizen to read and
study these notices.
We strongly advise
those seeking
further information
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meetings.
Bridge
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
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;6>[email protected]"A><=I;DDIB>CDGHJ79>K>H>DC6AAADI
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EjWa^h]YViZh/6j\jhi(!&%!&,!'%&+#
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that
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Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
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Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and
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C^X`^Z6gcZn!8aZg`
EjWa^h]YViZh/6j\jhi&%!&,!')!(&!'%&+#
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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BIZZARO
Phillip Alder
singleton spade, and he
was too strong to pass.
North, knowing his
partner had at least five
hearts, jumped to game.
First, East should
check the points -- a
theme of all deals.
Dummy has 19, East
holds 11, and South
promised 10. So, West’s
main job is to
avoid reneging!
Second, East
can see only
two defensive
tricks: his aces.
He must hope
partner has led a
singleton.
Third, East
wins with his
club ace and
carefully returns the jack,
his highest-remaining club
being a suit-preference signal for
spades, the higher-ranking of the
other two side
suits. West ruffs
the trick and
shifts to a spade.
Now East must complete
his job by winning with
the ace and leading a low
club. When West ruffs
with his second heart,
it uppercuts the dummy
and promotes a trump
trick for East’s queen
-- the fourth defensive
trick.
PICKLES
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2016
Gymnasts, Phelps, Ledecky all golden again
BY GENARO C. ARMAS
AP SPORTS WRITER
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) —
Good old Michael Phelps,
golden again.
For teenagers Katie
Ledecky and Simone Biles,
their star turns in the
Summer Olympics might be
just beginning.
From the pool to the gymnastics floor, Team USA
had nice day at the Rio de
Janeiro Games.
Not all the American stars
were winners Tuesday,
though. Serena Williams
lost on the tennis court and
the U.S. women’s soccer
team gave up a late goal and
ended up in a draw with
Colombia.
But a new generation of
U.S. athletes is ready to take
up the banner of Olympic
standard-bearer from
Phelps, a grizzled veteran
at 31.
Phelps earned his 20th
career gold medal after taking the 200-meter butterfly.
He erased the bad memories
from his loss in the same
race in London to South
African Chad le Clos.
Phelps got off to a rousing
start at the Rio Games by
leading his 4x100 freestyle
team to the gold medal on
Sunday.
On Tuesday, Phelps’ face
bared a familiar scowl as he
walked out on to the deck.
He held off Japan’s Masato
Sakai by four-hundredths
of a second, with Hungary’s
Tamas Kenderesi taking the
bronze. His 21st gold came
later Tuesday night after
swimming the anchor leg on
the 4x200-meter relay.
Ledecky strode atop the
medal podium again with
a bright smile after taking gold for winning the
200-meter freestyle. Sarah
Sjostrom of Sweden claimed
the silver and Emma
McKeon of Australia took
the bronze.
Ledecky, just 19, won her
second gold. At this pace,
she could challenge Phelps’
medal haul someday.
At the other end of
Olympic Park, the U.S.
women’s gymnastics team
captured a second straight
gold with a high-flying and
dominating performance.
The triumph was never in
doubt, their score of 184.897
at the Rio Games was more
than eight points clear
of the field. The day was
capped by the 19-year-old
Biles, a fan favorite, whose
boundary-pushing floor
exercise showed just how
far ahead they are of everyone else.
Biles, Lauren Hernandez,
Gabby Douglas, Madison
Kocian and Aly Raisman
also gave retiring national
team coordinator Martha
Karolyi a fitting send off
with powerful performances
on all the apparatuses.
The golden girls dubbed
themselves “The Final
Five” in honor of Karolyi’s
retirement at the end of the
Olympics and the fact that
the format is changing for
Tokyo in 2020 so that only
four team members will
take part in the team competition.
The normally stern
Karolyi broke down in tears
when she was told of the
nickname the team adopted.
“I think at this moment
we can say that that the
United States dominates
the world of gymnastics,”
Karolyi said.
Russia took the silver
medal and China earned
bronze.
Other highlights from Day
4 at the Rio Games:
MURKY POOL : At Maria
Lenk Aquatics Center, there
was more buzz over the
color of the water than the
diving competition. It had
turned a murky green since
Monday night’s events.
Chen Ruolin and Liu Huixia
didn’t seem to care about
the color. They won the
women’s 10-meter synchronized platform title to make
China 3-for-3 in the competition so far.
SOUR SERENA : Williams
shanked shots all over the
court in getting upset by
Elina Svitolina of Ukraine.
The top-ranked American
won’t get a chance to defend
the gold she won in London.
Williams looked out of sorts
and irritated, accumulating 37 unforced errors. She
had five double-faults in
one game alone in the 6-4,
6-3 loss to the 20th-ranked
Svitolina. Williams wiped
her forehead, picked up
her rackets and headed
back quickly to the locker
room. Svitolina, who had
never before played in an
Olympics, smiled and stuck
her arms out in front of her,
palms up, as if waking up
from a dream.
ON THE PITCH : Catalina
Usme beat U.S. goalie Hope
Solo on a pair of free kicks
to draw Colombia to a 2-2
tie with the United States.
The first, in the 26th minute, was Colombia’s first
ever Olympic goal, and first
ever goal against the United
States. Team USA still
emerged at the top of Group
G of the women’s soccer
tournament and will play in
the quarterfinals.
Host country Brazil played
to a 0-0 draw with South
Africa. The Brazilians had
already secured a spot in
the women’s soccer quarterfinals before their match.
The team and star Marta
have drawn more attention
while Brazil’s men have
struggled at the Olympics.
The women’s team will face
Australia in a quarterfinal
match on Friday.
MEDAL STRIPPED : A
Ukrainian javelin thrower
was stripped of his silver
medal from the 2012 London
Olympics, becoming the
latest athlete disqualified
after the retesting of stored
doping samples.
Oleksandr Pyatnytsya
tested positive for the steroid turinabol and was
retroactively disqualified
from the London Games and
ordered to return his medal,
the International Olympic
Committee said.
RUGBY STUNNER : Sonny
Bill Williams was helped off
with an ankle injury during
New Zealand’s shocking
14-12 loss to Japan in its
first game of rugby sevens.
New Zealand is a 12-time
world series champion and
one of the top contenders for
the rugby medals.
Te-ball? Tim Tebow will try to play pro baseball
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP)
— With professional football
not working out, Tim Tebow
is going to give baseball a
try.
The 2007 Heisman Trophy
winner and former NFL
first-round draft pick plans
to hold a workout for Major
League Baseball teams this
month. Tebow last played
organized baseball in high
school.
ESPN first reported the
news. Agent Brodie Van
Wagenen, the co-head of
CAA Baseball, said in a
statement that the workout
is not a publicity stunt.
“His work ethic is unprecedented, and his passion for
the game is infectious. He
knows the challenges that
lie ahead of him given his
age and experience, but he
is determined to achieve his
goal of playing in the Major
Leagues,” Van Wagenen
said in a statement.
Tebow, who turns 29 on
Sunday, has been training
in Scottsdale with former
major league catcher Chad
Moeller.
“I am beyond impressed
with Tim’s athleticism and
swing, and it goes without
saying that he has shown a
high level of discipline and
strong work ethic,” Moeller
said in a statement released
by CAA. “I see bat speed and
power and real baseball tal-
ent. I truly believe Tim has
the skill set and potential to
achieve his goal of playing
in the Major Leagues, and
based on what I have seen
over the past two months,
it could happen relatively
quickly.”
Former All-Star slugger
Gary Sheffield came to bat
for Tebow on twitter.
“I spent time with Tim
Tebow in the cages,”
Sheffield wrote, “he’s a
NATURAL. Tim has IT.”
Tebow won the Heisman
and two national championships with the University
of Florida and was drafted
in the first round by the
Denver Broncos in in 2010.
He has not played in the
NFL since 2012 with the
New York Jets. He went to
training camp with the New
England Patriots in 2013 and
the Philadelphia Eagles in
2015 but was cut before the
season each time.
Tebow last played competitive baseball more than
a decade ago, hitting .494
as a junior for Nease High
School in Florida. He didn’t
play baseball as a senior,
concentrating instead on
football.
“He was a six-tool player,”
Tebow’s high school coach
Greg “Boo” Mullins said in
a 2013 interview with The
Sporting News. “He has arm
strength, he could run, he
could hit, he could hit for
power, he could field, but
his character made him that
six-tool guy.”
John Fox, the Chicago
Bears coach who coached at
Denver when Tebow played
there, said “good for him”
when told of his decision to
try baseball.
“He was very competitive,” Fox said Tuesday, “a
super, super young person,
very dedicated to life, a guy
that I was very impressed
with that took us to the
playoffs and won a playoff
game.”
ESPN reported that Tebow
will work out for major
league teams later this
month.
He already has drawn the
attention of minor league
teams that always are on
the lookout for a successful
promotion.
The Schaumburg, Illinois,
Boomers of the Independent
Frontier League issued a
news release saying they
have offered Tebow a contract.
Former Cowboy golfer Hearn begins
Olympic competition Thursday
FROM UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING ATHLETICS
LARAMIE — Wyoming alum David
Hearn begins his quest toward the Olympic
men’s golf podium Thursday, representing
Canada in a sport that hasn’t seen Olympic
action since 1904.
Hearn, who golfed for the Cowboys from
1997-2001, will compete alongside fellow
countryman Graham DeLaet in a 60-member field that includes some of the world’s
best in the sport.
The competition is very similar to most
major tournaments. It will consist of a
72-hole stroke play format for the gold, silver and bronze medals. The event does not
feature a cut like most major tournaments
and will begin with the first of four rounds
at 4:30 a.m. Thursday. The golfers will compete in one 18-hole round each day from
Thursday until Sunday.
“I think it’s tremendously exciting,”
Hearn said of golf’s return to the Olympics
after a 112-year hiatus. “As an interesting
little piece of history, Canada won the last
gold medal. We as Canadians are real proud
of that, and we’re excited about our team
going down there. Hopefully we can bring
back a few medals.”
Although Hearn hasn’t played the
Olympic Golf Course at Reserva de
Marapendi in Barra da Tijuca, Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, he is confident in the state
of his game heading into Rio. The new
course was built specifically for this year’s
Olympics.
“This is a unique part of this competition,” Hearn said. “None of us have seen
the golf course. We’re all kind of at a level
playing field. That’ll make it a real fair
competition.”
Each round will be broadcast live on
NBC’s Golf Channel and can also be
streamed online.
2016 Olympics: Men’s Golf Schedule
First round: Thursday, Aug. 11, 4:30 a.m.
Second round: Friday, Aug. 12, 4:30 a.m.
Third round: Saturday, Aug. 13, 4:30 a.m.
Fourth round (final): Sunday, Aug. 14, 4 a.m.

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