The Sheridan Press E-Edition June 25, 2013

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The Sheridan Press E-Edition June 25, 2013
TUESDAY
June 25, 2013
127th Year, No. 29
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
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Press
THE SHERIDAN
Looking into
Ed. Department
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The changing
energy landscape
Business, B1
Soccer Celebration
Elks lodge provides solution
to transportation problem
House Speaker wants
special committee
CHEYENNE (AP) — Wyoming House
Speaker Tom Lubnau is recommending
that the chamber form a special committee to conduct its own investigation into
how the state Education Department
operated under Superintendent Cindy
Hill.
Lubnau sent an email Monday to the
59 other members of the state House,
asking for their thoughts on how to proceed following a report from an inquiry
team appointed by Gov. Matt
Mead on the department’s
operations and management
practices.
The most troubling information the report found
involved possible misuse of
Lubnau
federal money for unauthorized programs and trips in
the state plane while under Hill’s administration.
That has raised discussion of possible
impeachment proceedings against Hill,
who has since been removed as head of
the agency.
“We obviously have a problem with
behavior and otherwise and figuring out
the best course of action to address the
problem is what the committee would
do,” Lubnau said in a telephone interview Monday. “Impeachment would be
one of a myriad of options that the committee could suggest to the whole body.”
Under the Wyoming Constitution, the
House is responsible for impeaching any
elected official, while the state Senate
conducts a trial if the House approves
impeachment.
In his email to House members,
Lubnau said the House can do nothing,
appoint a special committee to investigate further or call a special session.
SEE DEPARTMENT, PAGE 2
Getting from
Point A to Point B
BY LUCY LAROSA
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | JUSTIN SHEELY
Ten-year-old Matt Hogge, left, and Colson Coon, 9, celebrate after making a goal during the
YMCA soccer camp this morning. Fifteen volunteers helped run the soccer camp, which had
almost 100 kids signed up.
SHERIDAN — You know that mountain
bike that you were really excited about when
you first bought it — those big dreams you
had to hit the local trails every weekend. Is
that bike is now collecting dust and spiderwebs in your garage? Or the bikes your kids,
who’ve gone and left for college, used still
leaning up against the side of the house?
The Sheridan Elks Lodge has a solution to
your hoarding that gives back to the
Sheridan community. The Elks began a tradition of repairing donated bikes and redistributing them to the public about six years
ago.
It began as a “Bike for Kids” program however the Elks wanted to help others who were
in need of transportation.
“We saw a need and decided we could do
something about it,” Elks member Bob
Strauser said.
The Salvation Army, Volunteers of
America Northern Rockies and Department
of Family Services create vouchers for those
in need of transportation to receive bikes
and the Elks provide them. The program is
ongoing all year.
“The community has been very responsive,” said Larry Penrice, coordinator of the
Sheridan Homeless Shelter. “They have built
around our needs.”
The Sheridan Homeless Shelter provides
an opportunity for their residents to request
a bike for transportation purposes. Most of
the residents use their bike to get to work.
The Elks program also does complimentary
tune ups for the recipients’ bikes whenever
they are needed.
Penrice recognizes the Elks bike program
as essential for homeless shelter residents as
it makes Sheridan much more accessible.
SEE ELKS, PAGE 2
Lack of quorum causes Planning Commission to adjourn
BY HANNAH WIEST
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Planning
Commission did not make quorum at its
Four out of seven planning commission
members were unable to attend the meeting due to unforeseen circumstances and
illness Planning and Development Director
Robert Briggs said.
Once it was determined that there were
not enough commissioners to conduct busi-
ness, the meeting was
adjourned. There was no discussion on any items on the agenda.
"It was a perfect storm, so to
speak,” Briggs said. “There wasn't a quorum, but we let the
Briggs
applicant know and they're
being understanding. It's not a
very common occurrence, but every once
in a while in the summer or due to unforeseen events with sickness, sometimes you
don't have quite all the board members that
you were anticipating."
Slated for Monday's meeting was a rezone
of approximately 10,400 square feet on
Illinois Street from R-2 Residential to B-1
Business.
First Federal Savings Bank has purchased two residential properties located
south of the bank at Illinois Street and
Coffeen Avenue.
If the rezone is successful, short-term
plans include parking space for employees
and long range plans include additional
office space, Briggs said.
Zoning in the area is mixed.
The bank to the north and properties
along Coffeen and South Sheridan Avenues
are zoned B-1 Business, and properties to
the south and west are zoned R-2
Residential, consisting mainly of single
family units, according to a staff memo
submitted by Briggs.
Councilwoman to change plea
BY PAOLO CISNEROS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Nearly two
months after she pleaded not
guilty to charges of driving
under the influence of alcohol, Sheridan city councilwoman Shelleen Smith is
scheduled to change that
plea at a hearing July 11.
Smith declined comment
on the newly scheduled
hearing
Her attorney,
Ryan Healy also
declined to comment on the
matter, citing
client confidentiality expecta- Smith
tions.
Smith was arrested by the
Sheridan Police Department
just after midnight on April
26 near the intersection of
Big Horn Avenue and
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SEE QUORUM, PAGE 3
Lighting the night
at the Relay for
Life
Absaraka Street.
Police reports allege she
had been driving erratically
at the time she was stopped.
In a written statement
issued later that day, she
said she regretted the circumstances that led to the
arrest and that she intended
to accept the consequences
of her actions.
Luminaries with names and messages of
hope mark the loop in Kendrick Park Friday
night during Relay for Life.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS | JUSTIN SHEELY
SEE PLEA, PAGE 2
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Gary Joy
of Sheridan
OPINION
PEOPLE
LEGALS
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
BUSINESS
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIED
B1
B2
B3
B4
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
Driver who hit train cited for DUI
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The driver
who crashed his car into
the side of a train at the
Fifth Street crossing
Monday remains at
Sheridan Memorial
Hospital for continuing
treatment, according to a
media release issued today
by the Sheridan Police
Department.
Sheridan resident Pierce
Ford, 27, has been cited
with driving under the
influence and failing to stop
at a railroad crossing.
Despite a properly functioning warning system at
the crossing, Ford reportedly drove his 2002 Subaru
Outback under the railroad
gate and subsequently
struck the train.
Initial damage estimates
to railroad property as the
result of the accident are
more than $10,000. Damage
to Ford’s vehicle was also
significant.
He is scheduled to appear
in circuit court July 9.
Ranch land values skyrocket
in some parts of Wyoming
CASPER (AP) — Wyoming
ranch land values increased
by 4.7 percent in 2012 with
an average price of $450 per
acre, according to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
The average price for
ranch land was $429 in 2011.
However, the state’s prices
are the lowest in the
Mountain West region
because of a lack of fertile
crop land, said Steven
Gunn, section leader of the
USDA’s National
Agriculture Statistic
Service in Denver.
Idaho leads the region
with an average value of
$1,210, even though it fell 8
percent between 2011 and
2012. South Dakota’s skyrocketed 25.5 percent to $590
per acre and Nebraska’s
shot up 24.5 percent to $660
in that time period.
Colorado and Utah saw no
increase in their values.
Montana rose 7.5 percent to
$570 per acre.
Land with the potential to
develop energy drives up
prices in Wyoming, Gunn
tells the Casper StarTribune.
Jim Magagna, executive
vice president of the
Wyoming Stock Growers
Association, said agricultural value means very little to the price of land
parcels in Wyoming.
“If the land were being
graded on its agricultural
value, the prices wouldn’t
be rising,” Magagna said.
Scenic views and proximity to wilderness areas also
helps drive land values up,
Gunn said.
In the past few years
there’s been a rebound in
the land market in parts of
Wyoming, said Eric Loloff,
owner of Running Horse
Realty in Powell. People are
buying because Wyoming
has a friendly tax environment, a relatively stable
state budget and its resi-
dents love their freedom, he
said.
Loloff said he recently
sold land in Powell for
between $3,000 and $6,000 an
acre.
“The Realtors I talk to are
having a hard time keeping
anything on the market,” he
said.
The high demand for scenic land makes it hard for
people in the ranching and
farming industry to purchase parcels that receive
moisture throughout the
year, said Bill Bensel, a
rancher and organizer with
the Powder River Basin
Resource Council.
Land is selling for $7,000
to $9,000 per acre in the
northeast part of the state,
he said.
“It’s virtually impossible
for people to start getting
into ranching unless they
have the assets, their family
passes it down or they
marry into it,” Bensel said.
PLEA: Entered a written not guilty plea April 29
FROM 1
“This was a severe lapse
in judgment on my part and
I apologize to the citizens of
Sheridan and to my family
and friends for this mistake,” she said.
She later entered a writ-
ten not guilty plea on April
29.
Smith was elected to represent Ward 1 last
November.
She assumed the post earlier this year.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS |JUSTIN SHEELY
Career advice
Mike MacGibbons, left, talks to Linda Gostas, assistant director at the Sheridan Senior Center, during the Veterans Job Fair on Friday in the auditorium at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Power plant limits at center
of Obama’s climate change plan
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Taking climate change
efforts into his own
hands, President Barack
Obama is proposing
sweeping steps to limit
heat-trapping pollution
from coal-fired power
plants and to boost
renewable energy production on federal property.
Obama, in a speech
Tuesday at Georgetown
University, was to
announce he’s issuing a
presidential memorandum to launch the firstever federal regulations
on carbon dioxide emitted by existing power
plants, moving to curb
the gases blamed for global warming despite
adamant opposition from
Republicans and some
energy producers.
The far-reaching plan
marks Obama’s most
prominent effort yet to
deliver on a major priority he laid out in his first
presidential campaign
and recommitted to at the
start of his second term:
to fight climate change in
the U.S. and abroad and
prepare American communities for its effects.
Environmental activists
have been irked that
Obama’s high-minded
goals never materialized
into a comprehensive
plan.
By expanding permitting on public lands,
Obama hopes to generate
enough electricity from
renewable energy projects such as wind and
solar to power the equivalent of 6 million homes
by 2020, effectively doubling the electric capacity
federal lands now produce, senior administration officials said.
He’ll also set a goal to
install 100 megawatts of
energy-producing capacity at federal housing projects by the end of the
decade.
Obama also was to
announce $8 billion in
federal loan guarantees to
spur investment in technologies that can keep
carbon dioxide produced
by power plants from
being released into the
atmosphere.
“While no single step
can reverse the effects of
climate change, we have a
moral obligation to act on
behalf of future generations,” the White House
said in a statement, arguing that climate change is
no longer a distant threat
— the 12 hottest years on
record all occurred in the
past 15 years.
The linchpin of
Obama’s plan involves
new and existing power
plants. Forty percent of
U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, and one-third of
greenhouse gases overall,
come from electric power
plants, according to the
federal Energy
Information
Administration.
ELKS: Condition varies from brand new to those left outside
FROM 1
“Bikes are their primary mode of
transportation,” he said.
While the bikes are free to recipients, the program does have a price
tag.
“Our biggest problem is getting
bikes donated and money donations
for repairs ... those little costs add
up,” Strauser said.
The Elks bike program chairman
Marvin Johnson is in charge of all
the repairs.
Johnson said the shape of the bikes
The Historic Sheridan Inn is for Sale!
varies from almost brand new to
bikes that have been left outside for
years.
“Repairs can be in an up to $100
range,” Johnson said. “There’s so
many different things that can need
replaced.”
Strauser said the average amount
spent per bike is approximately
$10.58. Johnson also said he hopes the
community will become more
involved in the program by donating
funds or bikes.
“I just don’t think it’s well known
enough,” he said.
He also mentioned that he hopes to
DEPARTMENT: Advised against special session
FROM 1
A National Historic Landmark, the Historic Sheridan Inn that was constructed by the
Burlington and Missouri Railroad and the Sheridan Land Company has been a social
gathering place since the summer of 1893. This has a Historic Preservation Easement in place.
Asking $1,550,000. Call ABC Realty Company, 674-7458 for your personal showing.
856 Coffeen Ave. • Sheridan, WY 82801
674-7458 • 1-800-378-7458
www.abcrealtycompany.com
Co-Listed with
Cheyenne, WY 82003
307-634-5282 • 1-888-278-9656
www.shamrockrealtywy.com
see more children’s bikes donated so
the program can also focus their
efforts on the children of economically disadvantaged families and not
only on adult transportation.
He added that kids in the community outgrow their bikes or graduate to
a higher mode of transportation,
leaving their bikes to hang up in
garages unused while there are other
children who would use that bike as
transportation or recreation.
“I’d like to be there for those kids
who don’t have much,” he said.
Last year, the Elks bike program
repaired and gave away 128 bikes.
Lubnau said he doesn’t
favor doing nothing because
the people of Wyoming
deserve answers and lawmakers have not been provided all the information
that the governor’s inquiry
team found. The inquiry
report contained a confidential section that has not
been released to lawmakers
and the public and also did
not make any conclusions
or recommendations.
On the other hand,
Lubnau said he advised
against calling a special session of the Legislature.
He said it is premature to
talk about or begin
impeachment proceedings
because lawmakers don’t
have all the information
they need.
A special committee could
call witnesses, allow Hill
and her representatives to
ask questions and subpoena
the confidential information.
“On an issue this important, I believe the people of
the state of Wyoming are
entitled to conclusions,
after an airing of evidence,” Lubnau said in his
email.
Lubnau noted in the telephone interview that the
Legislature has empaneled
special committees in the
past to look into various
issues — most recently the
state fuels tax and carbon
sequestration. But he
acknowledged that investigating a statewide elected
official is rather unique situation that requires careful
handling.
“If I have my choice in
the matter we’ll proceed
very, very slowly, and very
deliberately, and very prudently and we’re not going
to take any precipitous
action without thinking
about it first,” he said.
Hill has said if any further examination of the
inquiry report is done, she
looked forward to a fair and
open process.
Hill, a Republican, was
elected superintendent of
public instruction in 2010.
However, in just two years
her management of the
Education Department led
the GOP-controlled
Legislature and Mead, a
Republican, to enact a new
law this past winter that
removed the superintendent
as head of the department
in favor of a director
appointed by the governor.
Hill remains superintendent of public instruction.
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Sagebrush Art
Center offering
classes
THE SHERIDAN PRESS |JUSTIN SHEELY
Getting ready to ride
Tom Ogle bridles his wife’s horse, Cadbury, before the start of the Parkman Daze first annual Horse Race
and Poker Run Saturday near Dayton.
SHERIDAN — Sagebrush
Community Art Center
will offer a variety of creative classes for thirdthrough eighth-graders at
their “Young at Art” summer art camp July 15-18.
Class days will begin
with collage class taught
by Neltje, followed by
bracelet making with
Mary McDougall.
After a lunch break, the
classes will resume with
clay creations with Jody
Sauers, followed by painting class with Sonja
Caywood.
Fees for the four days of
classes are $200, which
includes all supplies.
In the evening, Tena
Twite will teach a “MidSummer’s Eve Fairy
WEDNESDAY’S EVENTS |
QUORUM: Staff received comments from residents
FROM 1
“Given the city’s present
zoning provisions, it would
not be appropriate to commercially zone property
west of Illinois Street.
However, between Illinois
and Sheridan/Coffeen the
answer is not as definitive.
Both the bank and the
church parcels have access
points on Illinois at the
present time; the addition
of a small parking area and
office would be a moderate
change to this existing situation,” Briggs stated in the
memo.
Briggs said city staff have
received some comments
from residents on Illinois
Street.
"Some of them are concerned about the project,"
Briggs said. "They'll certainly be here, I anticipate,
at the July 8 meeting to
express their concerns
about potential impact to
their neighborhood."
Consideration of the
rezone request, which will
include a staff report, a
presentation by the applicant and a public hearing,
will be rescheduled for the
July 8 planning commission
meeting.
Planning commission
members who were absent
were Kelly Gooch, Thayer
Shafer, Larry Storo and
Monty Webb.
Commissioners present
were Mike Giorgis, Jason
Szewc and Robert Webster.
• 9 a.m., Sheridan
County School District 1
board work session,
Central office boardroom, 1127 Dayton St.,
Ranchester.
• 10 a.m., Wyoming
Wednesday with Cheri
Jones, Sheridan County
Chamber of Commerce,
1517 E. Fifth St.
• 1 p.m., Grant proposal
writing basics, Sheridan
County Fulmer Public
Library.
• 4-6 p.m., Sheridan
County Public Health
and Sheridan Health
Center joint open house,
297 S. Main St.
Study questions Yellowstone grizzly rebound
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) —
Flaws in how the government measures
Yellowstone’s grizzly bear
population raise questions
about whether the animals
have recovered sufficiently
to merit lifting federal protections, according to a
new study.
The study concludes that
a major reason more bears
have been counted in
recent years is that more
time is now spent counting
bears. The authors argue
that the region’s bruin population could in fact be in
decline, even as officials
consider revoking the grizzly’s threatened species
status.
The peer-reviewed findings have been accepted for
publication in the journal
Conservation Letters. The
work was partially funded
by the Natural Resources
Defense Council.
Population trends within
Yellowstone’s bear population have taken on added
importance as the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service considers lifting federal protections for the animals,
possibly as early as next
year.
Government biologists
countered that there is no
evidence of a decline. They
said newly-revised population data shows more than
700 grizzlies living in and
around Yellowstone
National Park, an area that
includes Wyoming,
Montana and Idaho.
Meanwhile, rising numbers of bear-human conflicts — such as a mauling
last week south of Cody,
Wyo., that sent a man to
the hospital with severe
facial lacerations — have
lent new urgency to calls to
allow limited hunting to
resume.
But the new study’s lead
author, University of
Colorado environmental
studies professor Daniel
Doak, said shortcomings in
the government’s method
of tracking grizzly numbers mean their recovery
from widespread extermination last century may
have been overstated.
The bears lost protections once, in 2007, before a
federal judge ordered grizzlies back onto the threatened species list two years
later. The reversal came in
part over concerns that
one food source for bears,
the nuts from white bark
Court: Child isn’t required to go to Indian father
WASHINGTON (AP) — A
divided Supreme Court
said Tuesday that federal
law doesn’t require that a
Native American child be
taken away from her adoptive parents and given to
her biological father.
The justices’ 5-4 decision
came in a case about a federal law intended to keep
Indian children from being
taken from their homes
and typically placed with
non-Indian adoptive or foster parents. South Carolina
courts said the 1978 Indian
Child Welfare Act favored
the biological father of the
girl, named Veronica. But
the South Carolina couple
who raised her for the first
27 months of her life
appealed that decision.
Justice Samuel Alito,
writing for the court’s
majority, said the federal
law didn’t apply in this
case because the biological
father never had custody of
the child and abandoned
her before birth. Alito also
said the law doesn’t stop
non-Native Americans
from adopting the child
when no other eligible candidates stepped forward.
The law “doesn’t apply in
cases where the Indian parent never had custody of
the Indian child,” said
Alito, who was joined in
his opinion by Chief
Justice John Roberts, and
Justices Anthony Kennedy,
Clarence Thomas and
Stephen Breyer.
“The Act would put certain vulnerable children at
a great disadvantage solely
because an ancestor —
even a remote one — was
an Indian,” Alito said. “A
biological Indian father
could abandon his child in
utero and refuse any support for the birth mother —
perhaps contributing to the
mother’s decision to put
the child up for adoption —
and then could play his
ICWA trump card at the
eleventh hour to override
the mother’s decision and
the child’s best interest. If
this were possible, many
prospective adoptive parents would surely pause
before adopting any child
who might possibly qualify
as an Indian under the
ICWA.”
But Justice Sonia
Sotomayor dissented and
pointed out that the court’s
ruling doesn’t mean
Veronica will now go back
to her adoptive parents.
The law gives tribes and
relatives a say in decisions
affecting a child, she said.
“The majority does not
and cannot foreclose the
possibility that on remand,
Baby Girl’s paternal grandparents or other members
of the Cherokee Nation
may formally petition for
adoption of Baby Girl,” she
said. “If these parties do
so, and if on remand, Birth
Father’s parental rights are
terminated so that an adoption becomes possible, they
will then be entitled to consideration under the order
of preference established
in” federal law.
Her dissent was joined by
Justices Antonin Scalia,
Ruth Bader Ginsburg and
Elena Kagan.
pine trees, has grown
increasingly scarce as
insects kill large stands of
the trees.
Doak said the loss of
whitebark pine and a
decline in another food
source, cutthroat trout,
may have pushed bears
into areas where they are
more likely to be seen during aerial surveys done by
government agencies.
That doesn’t necessarily
mean there are more bears.
“It’s a pretty standard
thing in all of wildlife biology and conservation biology that if you triple the
amount of time you’re
looking for some rare
species, it’s likely you’re
going to seem more of
them, just because you
spend a lot more time
doing so,” he said.
Garden” class for thirdgraders through adults.
This class has a separate
$100 fee. Registration deadline is Monday.
Classes will be held at
the Historic Train Depot
on the corner of Fifth
Street and Broadway
Street.
For more information or
to register call 674-1970 or
come to the Sagebrush Art
Center at 251 E. Fifth St.
Bighorns discussion
at Wyoming
Wednesday
SHERIDAN — The next
Wyoming Wednesday program will be tomorrow at
10 a.m.
Cheri Jones will talk
about the U.S. Forest
Service, focusing on the
Bighorn Mountains.
Wyoming Wednesdays
are held at the Wyoming
Welcome Center, 1517 E.
Fifth St., each Wednesday
in June and July, except
for July 3.
They are free and open to
the public.
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
‘Shop
Sheridan’
goes
beyond retail
R
yan Little has good point.
Little, owner of Rocky Mountain
Exteriors, correctly noted that
Sheridan homeowners and car owners — those who had their cars and homes
pounded viciously by the large hail and
wind storms recently, should consider,
“shop locally,” first.
The local guys who can provide remedy
and repair are the folks who live here year
‘round, write checks to support local softball teams, put something in the plate at
church, who meet a local payroll.
The “Shop Sheridan!” mantra is one of
value and stretches beyond retail. It means
responding to weather disasters as well.
••••••
Summer reading recommendations ...
• “The World on a
String,” by jazz guitarist
John Pizzarelli is a
breezy read through his
PUBLISHER’S New Jersey roots and
honing a skill with his
NOTEBOOK
father, the legendary gui|
tarist, Bucky Pizzarelli,
Stephen Woody
who played, as the saying
goes, “with everybody.”
Frank. Ella. Mel. The Duke. The lively
memoir, which drops a lot of jazz names
and nightclubs, also speaks to how hard
work early on in a career is rewarded later.
Pizzarelli and his wife, the jazz vocalist
Jessica Molaskey, hold court every
February in New York’s best cabaret, The
Carlyle Hotel.
• “Bad Monkey” reminds the reader of
how gifted, how insightful and how laughout-loud funny author Carl Hiasson can be.
He has a lifelong affectation for everything
Florida, but is also a realist about its corruption, real estate scams and other
scoundrels who make a living at the
expense of others. This time it’s a murder
for hire, a demoted detective trying to get
his police badge back through being a
restaurant inspector, a contested last will
involving money, some voodoo from the
Caribbean, a neighbor who is spoiling the
ocean view, a couple of “trophy wives” and
of course, a misbehaving monkey. Or, as
one critic puts it, “a monkey with a back
story.”
Hiasson, 60, is a journalist and novelist.
He joined the Miami Herald in 1976, was
its lead investigative reporter for many
years, and continues to write a column for
the newspaper. He’s the author of more
than 20 books of fiction, nonfiction and
young readers books.
Both are available from our local bookstore, Sheridan Stationery, Books &
Gallery.
••••••
Dept. of incidental info……..
Heritage Auctions of Dallas last weekend
sold a couple of items of pure Americana:
• Abolitionist John Brown’s leg irons
that he wore while waiting trial and the
gallows in his attempt to rouse insurrection in 1859 over slavery were sold: $13,145.
• But … drawing far more money was the
original “uniform” of Col. (honorary)
Harland Sanders of Kentucky Fried
Chicken fame. That white suit of his
brought $21,510.
••••••
Shop Sheridan!
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Annette Bryl
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
The long drive of Nelson Story
T
en years before the
Battle of the Little
Bighorn and 24 years
before Wyoming became
a state, in September 1866, 30year-old Nelson Story camped
a few miles outside of Fort
Phil Kearny.
Story's epic cattle drive is
referred to by a number of
historians as the largest,
longest and first major commercial cattle drive into
Montana.
Story was stopped there,
with about 1,000 head of cattle, mostly breeding stock and
a crew of 27 men, by fort commander, Col. Henry B.
Carrington. Story was
ordered to await another
wagon train to bring his numbers up to better ensure safety
from hostile Indians while
traveling along the Bozeman
Trail to the gold mines of
Montana.
Story waited for a week and
with no additional wagon
trains joining him, grew
increasingly impatient to
move on.
He had purchased new
Remington rapid fire breechloading rifles for each man in
the crew. These were far superior to arms that were issued
the soldiers at Fort Phil
Kearny and his crew was well
trained.
So, under cover of night, he
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pulled up
and headed
north. By
the time
Carrington
discovered
he was gone,
Story was
well on his
THEN
way.
Carrington
AND NOW
was so
|
angry that
Mary
he estabEllen McWilliams
lished a new
rule at the
fort, which ordered all wagon
trains coming through to
camp inside the stockade
behind locked gates.
Story felt no fear of man or
beast and with a well-trained
crew and superior arms felt
secure in moving on.
He was running out of grass
for his cattle and wanted to
reach his land in Montana
before winter hit.
His herd had been raided by
hostile Native Americans
near Kaycee before he reached
Fort Reno, with two men
wounded.
After taking care of his
wounded men and slowing
down the stampeding herd,
Story took a number of his
men and trailed the Native
Americans and found them
sitting around a campfire,
enjoying roast beef. Story and
his men took back the cattle.
Earlier, shortly after gold
was discovered in Montana,
he did some prospecting and
took the gold he'd found back
to Texas, turned it into cash to
buy cows, rounded up a crew,
and headed north.
He didn't travel the Texas
Trail, because there was no
Texas Trail at the time.
(Another legend, Teddy
“Blue” Abbott said that Texas
Trail cattle didn't come into
Miles City until 1880, 14 years
later.) Story did make good use
of the Oregon and Bozeman
emigrant trails across many
miles of open country.
Story established a huge
ranch operating out of an area
near Livington, Mont. He
would become a legendary
pioneer cattleman and also
trailed hundreds of head of
mustang mares from
California into Montana.
He established a trading post
on the Crow reservation, a
bank, a flouring mill and traded in real estate.
He donated 40 acres in
Bozeman in 1893 for the
Montana State University
campus.
By the time he died in 1926
he had extended his real
estate holdings to business
space in California where he
owned more than 600 office
rental units in downtown Los
Angeles.
While on the ranch however,
in April 1867, John Jacobs,
companion to John Bozeman
(the man generally credited
with establishing the
Bozeman Trail) walked into
Nelson Story's cattle camp. He
had a minor gunshot wound
on his arm and reported that
he and Bozeman were
attacked by Indians and
Bozeman was killed.
And thus begins another
tale entitled “Who Killed John
Bozeman?”
Note: The author's facts,
some which contradict those
in Montana history books,
come from conversations and
letters from Story's grandson
Malcolm Story and famous
Montana historian, University
professor, and Story family
friend Dr. Merrill Burlingame.
Also, Bozeman Trail scholar
Susan Badger Doyle.
I spent a day with Story's
great-grandson, Peter, and his
wife, Eileen, on the old family
ranch near Emigrant, Mont.
Peter and Malcolm Story, are
pictured along with Sheridan
area historians Mark Badgett
and Elsa Spear Byron in
National Geographic's special
publication “Trails West.”
MARY ELLEN MCWILLIAMS is an adviser to the
Sheridan County Historical Society and the Fort Phil
Kearny/Bozeman Trail Association.
Justice Alito’s
middle-school
antics
T
he most remarkable thing
about the Supreme Court’s
opinions announced Monday
was not what the justices
wrote or said. It was what Samuel
Alito did.
The associate justice, a George
W. Bush appointee, read two opinions, both 5-4 decisions that split
the court along its usual right-left
divide. But Alito didn’t stop there.
When Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg read
her dissent
from the bench,
Alito visibly
mocked his colleague.
Ginsburg, the
second woman
to serve on the
high court, was
DANA
making her
MILBANK
argument about
|
how the majority opinion made
it easier for sexual harassment to occur in the
workplace when Alito, seated
immediately to Ginsburg’s left,
shook his head from side to side in
disagreement, rolled his eyes and
looked at the ceiling.
His treatment of the 80-year-old
Ginsburg, 17 years his senior and
with 13 years more seniority, was
a curious display of judicial temperament or, more accurately,
judicial intemperance. Typically,
justices state their differences in
words — and Alito, as it happens,
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
had just spoken several hundred of his own
from the bench. But he frequently supplements words with middle-school gestures.
Ten days earlier, I watched as he demonstrated his disdain for Elena Kagan and
Sonia Sotomayor, the two other women on
the court. Kagan, the newest justice, prefaced her reading of an opinion in a low-profile trucking case by joking that it was “possibly not” the case the audience had come to
hear. The audience responded with laughter,
a few justices smiled — and Alito, seated at
Kagan’s right elbow, glowered.
A few minutes later, Sotomayor, reading
another low-profile case, about water rights,
joked to the children in the audience that
they were learning a lot about “preemption”
that day; Alito rolled his eyes and shook his
head.
Alito is best known for his antics at the
2010 State of the Union address, when
President Obama criticized the Citizens
United decision. While other justices
remained expressionless, Alito adopted a
sour look, shook his head “no” and appeared
to mouth the words “not true.” At the various oral arguments I’ve watched over the
past few years, Alito’s eye-rolling, head-shaking and other expressions of exasperation
are a fairly common occurrence, most often
when Sotomayor has the floor.
Alito’s latest irritability came, ironically,
on a day when the main headline about the
court was comity: Justice Anthony Kennedy
read an unexpectedly modest decision on
affirmative action that left some racial preferences intact and commanded a 7-1 majority. Beyond the broad agreement on affirmative action, though, were three 5-4 decisions
Monday, two read by Alito with a dry and
clinical delivery.
Even Ginsburg, no comedienne, can be colloquial and accessible. In her dissents
Monday, she noted that an employee can
avoid a harassing co-worker by telling him to
“buzz off.”
Ginsburg was tart, even acidic — but she
confined her objections to words. That kind
of judicial restraint would benefit her junior
colleague.
DANA MILBANK is a political reporter for The Washington Post and has
authored two books on national political campaigns and the national political
parties.
IN WASHINGTON |
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Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
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DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
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freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
STUDENT NEWS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Roberts graduates
with honors from
University of
Colorado
SHERIDAN — Lauren
Michelle Roberts has graduated with honors from the
University of Colorado in
Boulder, Colo.
She received her Bachelor
of Arts degree in art history with a certificate in digital media and was a dean's
list honoree.
Roberts is a 2008 graduate of Big Horn High
School and the daughter of
Gwen Roberts of Sheridan
and Dr. Dale Roberts of
Boulder, Colo.
She is currently employed
by the Denver Art Museum
and as an intern at the
David B. Smith
Contemporary Art Gallery
in Denver, Colo.
Geary graduates
from U.S. Military
Academy
SHERIDAN — Scott J.
Geary graduated from the
United States Military
Academy at West Point,
N.Y., on May 25 with a bachelor’s degree in systems
engineering.
Commissioned
as a second lieutenant in the
Army, Geary will
be stationed at
Fort Hood,
Texas, after com- Geary
pleting the
Infantry Basic Officer
Leadership Course at Fort
Leonard Wood in Missouri.
While at West Point,
Geary competed as a thrower on the Division I track
team and as a senior was
named Academic AllConference for the Patriot
League.
Geary graduated from
Great Plains Lutheran High
School in Watertown, S.D.,
in 2009 and is the son of
Tim and Rita Geary of
Sheridan.
Adsit promoted to
chief warrant
officer two
SHERIDAN — Brandon
Adsit of Sheridan was promoted to chief warrant officer two in the Wyoming
Army National Guard on
May 11.
Adsit is a target acquisition officer in headquarters
and headquarters battery,
2nd Battalion, 300th Field
Artillery.
He has been a member of
Wildflower painting
weekend June 29-30
Big Horn High School.
He is the son of Philip
James Kane III and Vicki
Kane, both of Big Horn.
the Wyoming National
Guard for 12 years.
Besides serving in the
Wyoming National Guard,
Adsit manages a construction crew in Sheridan.
Wendtland makes
dean’s list at
Gonzaga University
Kane makes dean’s
list at University of
Montana
SHERIDAN — Philip
(Junior) James Kane IV has
been named to the spring
semester dean’s list at the
University of Montana in
Missoula, Mont.
To qualify for the list a
student must have a GPA of
3.5 or higher.
Kane is a 2000 graduate of
SHERIDAN — Kit
Wendtland of Sheridan has
earned placement on the
dean’s list for the spring
semester at Gonzaga
University in Spokane,
Wash. To be on the dean’s
list a student must earn a
GPA of 3.5-3.69.
‘Starving
Artists Sale’
June 29
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Wyoming Wilderness
Association and Sheridan Artists Guild Et al have
partnered to host a wildflower painting weekend
in the Rock Creek recommended wilderness area
of the Bighorn National Forest.
Joan Hoffmann, an oil and watercolor artist
from Vermont and Colorado and Kathryn Turner,
a Jackson Hole native and plein air painter, will
lead the two-day painting workshop.
Participants will have the opportunity to paint
vistas at two historic guest ranches that border the
Rock Creek recommended wilderness area.
June 29 will be at the HF Bar Ranch with views
of Rock Creek from the east face.
June 30 is at Paradise Guest Ranch painting Fan
Rock and other Rock Creek views.
The fee is $40 per day which includes lunch at
each ranch.
An optional camp out is offered to participants
the night of June 29. Bring your own camping
equipment and food.
For more information about the artists see
www.joanhoffmann.com and
www.turnerfineart.com.
For more information about the weekend or to
register call WWA at 672-2751 or email
[email protected]
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sagebrush Community
Art Center will have a
“Starving Artists Sale”
June 29 from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Local artists will
have their works available for viewing and purchase.
Their creations
include drawings, paintings, sketches, pottery,
glass, jewelry, woodwork,
photography, prints,
cards and more.
The sale will be at
Sagebrush Community
Art Center, 201 E. Fifth
St., in the Historic Train
Depot.
For more information
call Sagebrush at 6741970.
COURTESY PHOTO|
Rec. district to start
mosquito spraying
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Recreation District
Weed and Mosquito Department will be starting
their summer mosquito spraying today.
This will include all areas within the city of
Sheridan.
Spraying will be will be north of Loucks Street
and west of Main Street on Mondays.
Tuesday sprayings will be south of Loucks
Street and west of Main Street.
On Wednesdays, all areas east of Main Street
and Big Horn Avenue will be sprayed.
For more information call 672-7083.
Krystle Jean Carcich and Lawrence Edward Baumgartner will
marry July 12.
Carcich, Baumgartner to
marry July 12
Local news?
Call
The Sheridan
Press
at 672-2431.
Thank You
to Jodi Baghai and
Toni Rivas for
allowing me to be of
service in the sale
of your aunts home
here in Sheridan. It
was nice to meet
you, sorry it was not
under better
circumstances. I am
glad we could get
such a quick and
easy sale! The best
to you both.
Amy
Amy Kasper
752-3600
www.amyadell.com
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Krystle Jean Carcich and Lawrence
Edward Baumgartner are engaged to marry July 12 in
Sheridan.
Carcich is a 2008 graduate of Sheridan High School.
She is the daughter of Kenneth and Debra Carcich of
Sheridan.
Baumgartner is a 2002 graduate of Sheridan High
School and a 2003 graduate of WyoTech in Laramie.
He is the son of Steven and Tracey Baumgartner of
Sheridan and William and Terri Bentley of Colorado.
Colorado fire crews look to change in winds
DEL NORTE, Colo. (AP) —
Crews defending resort
towns, homes and cabins
against a massive and erratic wildfire in Colorado’s
southwest mountains were
looking Tuesday for a slight
break after nearly a week of
unrelenting winds.
Tim Foley, a fire behavior
expert working the 117square mile blaze, said officials are hoping to begin a
more strategic assault on
the backcountry blaze,
which forced the evacuation
of more than 1,000 residents
and visitors from the summer retreat of South Fork
and surrounding areas on
Friday.
“We’re going from extreme
(winds) to very high, basically,” Foley said. “So it’s
not like it’s going to be a
piece of cake.”
The high winds have
grounded most afternoon
flights and have limited
where tankers and helicopters can drop retardant and
water.
But a decrease in winds
that have gusted to 50 miles
an hour since last week is
expected to give the nearly
1,000 firefighters a better
chance at trying to control
the fire, an arm of which
officials say has advanced to
within a mile-and-a-half of
South Fork.
And every day that it is
kept at bay, officials said,
increases the odds of saving
that town.
“We like our chances, said
incident commander Russ
Long, noting, however, that
crews still have no control of
the fire.
The fire did advance
slightly toward South Fork
on Monday, according to
another incident commander, Russ Long. But it
remained about two miles
away. And crews were able
to beat back flames threatening homes and cabins along
Highway 149, between South
Fork and the historic mining town of Creede.
As of Monday night, no
structures were known to
have been lost.
The fire is feeding on
drought-stricken, beetlekilled trees fanned by the
recent hot, windy weather
across much of Colorado,
Utah, Arizona and New
Mexico, where a 119-squaremile wildfire in the mountains of the Gila National
Forest is expected to grow
this week.
The southwestern
Colorado blaze started June
5 with a lightning strike in a
rugged, remote area of the
San Juan Mountains, west
of the Continental Divide. A
second lightning strike
sparked a fire east of the
divide.
The two then joined, making a fast run Thursday and
Friday at popular tourist
areas, including South Fork
and the Wolf Creek Ski
Area.
A third lightning strike,
meantime, sparked another
fire to the west, creating
what is now called the West
Fork complex, the largest
and most intense to ever hit
this area, Blume said.
That fire was moving
north but was about 10
miles from Creede.
Near the headwaters of
the Rio Grande, the town
now has a thriving tourist
industry that relies on its
colorful past. On Monday,
residents and tourists shopping went about business as
usual as the hills on
Highway 149 west of town
smoldered.
NT !!
WA CAR
E
W UR
YO
ROD RUN 2013
July 5th-7th, 2013 • Sheridan
Registration Options:
Saturday Show
Saturday Show & Dinner
Sunday Poker Run & Picnic
OR
Entire Weekend
Visit
karzclub.org
for registration info and click on Rod Run
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John
Heath
Councilor
Ward I
307-673-1876
Dave
Kinskey
Mayor
307-675-4223
Levi
Dominguez
Councilor
Ward III
307-461-1175
Kristin
Kelly
Councilor
Ward II
307-673-4751
Alex
Lee
Councilor
Ward II
307-752-8804
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
Ward I
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
Ward III
307-674-4206
COUNTY
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Commission
Chairman
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
A6
Public Notices
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
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newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note ("Note") and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”).
The Mortgage dated April 14, 2008, was executed and
delivered by Robert S. Hruza aka Robert S. Hruza Jr. and
Emely L. Hruza (“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide
Bank, FSB its successors and assigns, as security for the
Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded
on April 18, 2008, at Reception No. 606294 in Book 703
at Page 685 in the records of the office of the County
Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for
Sheridan County, State of Wyoming; and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as
follows:
Assignee: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP
Assignment dated: February 24, 2010
Assignment recorded: March 1, 2010
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
663235 in Book 763 at Page 609
Assignee: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka
Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP
Assignment dated: July 19, 2011
Assignment recorded: July 25, 2011
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2011-689490 in Book 802 at Page 604
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale
which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares
to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding
has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured
by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such
suit or proceeding been instituted and the same
discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the
Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served
upon the record owner and the party in possession of
the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to
the commencement of this publication, and the
amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first
publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of
$167,832.25 which sum consists of the unpaid principal
balance of $141,541.46 plus interest accrued to the date
of the first publication of this notice in the amount of
$19,108.30, plus other costs in the amount of $7,182.49,
plus attorneys' fees, costs expended, and accruing
interest and late charges after the date of first
publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid;
NOW, THEREFORE Bank of America, N.A., successor by
merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka
Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, as the
Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law
provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold
at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and
for Sheridan County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for
cash at 10:05 o'clock in the forenoon on July 19, 2013 at
the north door of the Sheridan County Courthouse
located at 224 South Main Street, Sheridan, WY,
Sheridan County, for application on the abovedescribed amounts secured by the Mortgage, said
mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit:
THE EAST ONE-HALF (E1/2) OF LOTS 10, 11, AND 12,
BLOCK 14, ORIGINAL TOWN OF DAYTON, SHERIDAN
COUNTY, STATE OF WYOMING
with an address of 219 W 3rd Ave, Dayton, WY 82836.
Together with all improvements thereon situate and all
fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC
Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans
Servicing LP
By: The Castle Law Group, LLC
330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202
Casper, WY 82609-0000
(307) 333 5379
Publish: June 18, 25; July 2, 9, 2013.
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note ("Note") and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”).
The Mortgage dated January 5, 2007, was executed and
delivered by Terry Freeman and Belinda Freeman
(“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage
Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns, as security for
the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was
recorded on January 19, 2007, at Reception No. 563301
in Book 656 at Page 0480 in the records of the office of
the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and
for Sheridan County, State of Wyoming; and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as
follows:
Assignee: HSBC Bank USA, National Association as
Trustee for Merrill Lynch Alternative Note Asset Trust,
Series 2007-A2
Assignment dated: December 20, 2012
Assignment recorded: December 31, 2012
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2012-701912 in Book 851 at Page 107
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale
which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares
to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding
has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured
by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such
suit or proceeding been instituted and the same
discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the
Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served
upon the record owner and the party in possession of
the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to
the commencement of this publication, and the
amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first
publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of
$144,101.90 which sum consists of the unpaid principal
balance of $139,277.20 plus interest accrued to the date
of the first publication of this notice in the amount of
$3,617.70, plus other costs in the amount of $1,207.00,
plus attorneys' fees, costs expended, and accruing
interest and late charges after the date of first
publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid;
NOW, THEREFORE HSBC Bank USA, National
Association as Trustee for Merrill Lynch Alternative Note
Asset Trust, Series 2007-A2, as the Mortgagee, will have
the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing
the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by
the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Sheridan County,
Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:20 o'clock
in the forenoon on July 19, 2013 at the NORTH door of
the Sheridan County Courthouse located at 224 South
Main Street, Sheridan, WY, Sheridan County, for
application on the above-described amounts secured
by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being
described as follows, to-wit:
SITUATED IN THE CITY OF SHERIDAN, COUNTY OF
SHERIDAN AND STATE OF WYOMING: THE NORTH 95
FEET OF LOTS 5 AND 6, BLOCK 8 OF THE MURRAY AND
MARLEY ADDITION TO THE TOWN, NOW CITY OF
SHERIDAN, SHERIDAN COUNTY, WYOMING.
with an address of 346 Huntington Street, Sheridan,
WY 82801-0000.
Together with all improvements thereon situate and all
fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
HSBC Bank USA, National Association as
Trustee for Merrill Lynch Alternative
Note
Asset Trust, Series 2007-A2
By: The Castle Law Group, LLC
330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202
Casper, WY 82609-0000
(307) 333 5379
Publish: June 25; July 2, 9, 16, 2013.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF FORECLOSURE SALE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note (the "Note") dated March 11, 2011, executed and
delivered by Stephan Lane Stolz (“Mortgagor(s)”) to
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Buffalo Federal Savings Bank its successors
and assigns (“Mortgagee”), and a real estate mortgage
(the "Mortgage") of the same date securing the Note,
which Mortgage was executed and delivered by
Mortgagor(s), to Mortgagee, and which Mortgage was
recorded in the records of the office of the County Clerk
and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan
County, State of Wyoming, on March 11, 2011, at
Reception No. 2011-686832 in Book 794 at Page 767;
WHEREAS, the Mortgage has been duly assigned for
value by Mortgagee as follows:
Assignee: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Assignment dated: May 24, 2012
Assignment recorded: May 29, 2012
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2012-696654 in Book 826 at Page 342
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming;
and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the
Mortgage by advertisement and sale, pursuant to the
terms of the Mortgage, has been served upon the record
owner and party in possession of the mortgaged
premises at least ten (10) days prior to first publication
of the notice of sale;
The property covered by said Mortgage is described as
follows:
LOT 13, BLOCK 2, VALE AVOCA PLACE, AN ADDITION TO
THE TOWN OF, NOW CITY OF SHERIDAN, SHERIDAN
COUNTY, STATE OF WYOMING.
with an address of 655 Big Horn Ave, Sheridan, WY
82801.
WHEREAS, the property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to Wyoming
Statutes Section 34-4-109 (2003) that the foreclosure
sale of the above Mortgage, scheduled for May 17, 2013
at the NORTH door of the Sheridan County Courthouse
located at 224 South Main Street, Sheridan, WY,
Sheridan County, State of Wyoming, has been
postponed to 10:05 o'clock in the forenoon on June 28,
2013 at the NORTH door of the Sheridan County
Courthouse located at 224 South Main Street, Sheridan,
WY, Sheridan County, State of Wyoming.
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
By: The Castle Law Group, LLC
330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202
Casper, WY 82609-0000
3073335379
Publish: May 21, 28; June 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon – It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon – It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon – It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon – It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon – It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon – It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing
information are required with each legal notice.
A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with
a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause
delay in publication. All legal notices must be
paid
in
full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal
advertising department at 672-2431 if you have
questions.
Your Right To Knowand be informed of government
legal proceedings is embodied in public notices.
This newspaper urges every citizen to read and
study these notices. We strongly advise those
seeking further information to exercise their right
of access to public records and public meetings.
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
A D V ICE
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Si
x days a w eek,The S herid a n P res s deli
vers
advi
ce.Health advi
ce.Li
festyle advi
ce.A dvi
ce to
m ake your hom e m ore li
vable.A dvi
ce from the
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
stars.A dvi
ce that’
s entertai
ni
ng,i
nsi
ghtful,useful.
D ea r A bby
D rs . O z &
R o izen
H ints f ro m
H elo is e
O m a rr/
H o ro s co pe
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
John
Schiffer
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-738-2232
OF
Content matters.
144 G ri
nnell•Sheri
dan,W Y •672-2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Activated fire alarm, 2
N. Main St., 4:20 a.m.
• Car hit by train, Fifth
Street and Broadway Street,
6:28 a.m.
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 1100
block Avon Street, 10:29
a.m.
• RMA assist, 700 block
South Main Street, 4:27 p.m.
• RMA assist, 500 block
North Main Street, 7:33 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:36 a.m.
• Trauma, Fifth Street and
Broadway Street, 6:28 a.m.
• Trauma, 1100 block Avon
Street, 10:13 a.m.
• Transfer, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, Billings, 11:30
a.m.
• Medical, 1000 block
Coffeen Avenue, 12:22 p.m.
• Medical, 1900 block
Omarr Avenue, 2:03 p.m.
• Medical, 700 block South
Main Street, 4:26 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90,
Montana state line, 6:40
p.m.
• Trauma, 600 block North
Main Street, 7:17 p.m.
• Medical, 500 block North
Main Street, 7:32 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 10:40 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Monday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Alarm, Loucks Street,
4:09 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, North
Main Street, 4:56 a.m.
• Accident with injuries,
Fifth Street, 6:26 a.m.
• Accident, North Main
Street, 7:56 a.m.
• Accident, Coffeen
Avenue, 8:22 a.m.
• Dog violation, Bruce
Mountain Drive, 11:09 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstances, Highland Avenue,
11:17 a.m.
• Found property, North
Main Street, 11:24 a.m.
• Cat trap, Decker Road,
11:40 a.m.
• Animal incident, East
Fifth Street, 11:51 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West
12th Street, 12:51 p.m.
• Animal welfare, Warren
Avenue, 3:17 p.m.
• Accident, Coffeen
Avenue, 3:21 p.m.
• Welfare check, Kroe
Lane, 4:16 p.m.
• Solicitors, North Main
Street, 4:19 p.m.
• Accident, Coffeen
Avenue, 5:05 p.m.
• Child abuse, Jackson
Avenue, 5:18 p.m.
• Motorist assist, Val Vista
Street, 5:29 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
North Sheridan Avenue,
5:45 p.m.
• Civil dispute, North
Heights Way, 7 p.m.
• Medical, North Main
Street, 7:32 p.m.
• Dog violation, West
Works Street, 7:46 p.m.
• Fire (other), Beaver
Street, 7:53 p.m.
• Welfare check, Works
Street, 8:27 p.m.
• Juvenile out of control,
Mydland Road, 9:10 p.m.
• DUI-Reddi report,
Coffeen Avenue, 9:17 p.m.
• Domestic, Marion Court,
11:19 p.m.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
On June 25, 1973, former White House
Counsel John W. Dean
began testifying before
the Senate Watergate
Committee, implicating
top administration officials, including
President Richard Nixon
as well as himself, in the
Watergate scandal and
cover-up.
On this date:
In 1788, Virginia ratified the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1876, Lt. Col.
Colonel George A. Custer
and his 7th Cavalry were
wiped out by Sioux and
Cheyenne Indians in the
Battle of the Little
Bighorn in Montana.
In 1888, the
Republican National
Convention, meeting in
Chicago, nominated
Benjamin Harrison for
the presidency.
(Harrison went on to
win the election, defeating Grover Cleveland.)
In 1910, President
William Howard Taft
signed the White-Slave
Traffic Act, more popularly known as the Mann
Act, which made it illegal to transport women
across state lines for
“immoral” purposes.
FROM THE SHERIDAN PRESS
1988 — Three more
temperature records fell
victim to Wyoming’s continuing hot weather as
the state sweltered under
high temperatures in the
90s and 100s.
2003 — A 12-inch fall
of snow over the Burgess
Junction area may — or
may not — be a record
for this time of year, but
it is unusual, officials
said.
2008 — Sheridan-area
residents last year broke
records going back at
least eight years in donations to the Sheridan
Memorial Hospital
Foundation, Tom Ringley
told foundation board
members during their
annual meeting.
2012 — Torrington
native Lexie Madden
planned for her trip to
Paradise, Nev., in
January 2013 to make
her run at the Miss
America title in the
hopes of becoming the
first-ever Miss Wyoming
to win the crown.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS |JUSTIN SHEELY
Battle under the boards
Buffalo defense knocks the ball out-of-bounds from fifth-grade Lady
Eagles Zaveah Kobza, center, during the Battle of the Bighorns 3-on-3
Basketball Tournament Saturday at Scott Bicentennial Park in Dayton.
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Today’s Highlight in
History:
Enzi backing minting NPS coins
CHEYENNE (AP) — U.S. Sen. Mike Enzi has introduced legislation to allow the minting of coins to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the establishment of
the National Park Service.
The bill would authorize the Secretary of the Treasury
to produce a five dollar gold coin, a silver dollar, and a
clad half dollar. The proceeds from sales of the coins
would be used by the National Park Foundation for park
preservation.
TONIGHT
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
The town of Dayton
spends approximately
$4,000 per month, or
$48,000 per year, to dispose of its solid waste at
the Sheridan Landfill.
This figure was incor-
55
Partly sunny
85
Sunny much of
the time
56
85
Almanac
54
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
90
83
52
Temperature
High/low .........................................................85/48
Normal high/low ............................................80/49
Record high ...........................................100 in 2012
Record low ...............................................32 in 1967
56
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 2.19"
Normal month to date .................................... 1.82"
Year to date .................................................... 9.51"
Normal year to date ....................................... 7.85"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
5:23 a.m.
5:24 a.m.
5:24 a.m.
8:58 p.m.
8:58 p.m.
8:58 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
10:36 p.m.
11:11 p.m.
11:42 p.m.
8:15 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10:43 a.m.
Last
New
First
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.00"
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Hardin
58/88
Parkman
56/86
Dayton
54/88
Lovell
57/88
Cody
56/83
Ranchester
53/86
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
58/86
Basin
57/87
55/85
June 29
July 8
July 15
July 22
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Clearmont
55/87
Story
55/81
Gillette
55/84
Buffalo
57/84
Worland
54/86
Wright
54/89
Kaycee
55/85
Thermopolis
59/87
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Full
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 73
Female inmate count: 14
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate total): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate total): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 1
Number of releases for
the previous day: 13
legal permission
Today’s Birthdays:
Actress June Lockhart is 88.
Civil rights activist James
Meredith is 80. Rhythm-andblues singer Eddie Floyd is
76. Actress Barbara
Montgomery is 74.
Basketball Hall-of-Famer
Willis Reed is 71. Singer
Carly Simon is 68. Rock
musician Ian McDonald
(Foreigner; King Crimson) is
67. Actor-comedian Jimmie
Walker is 66. Rapper-producer Richie Rich is 46. Rapper
Candyman is 45. Actress
Linda Cardellini is 38.
Thought for Today: “Four
hostile newspapers are more
to be feared than a thousand
bayonets.” — Napoleon
Bonaparte (1769-1821).
SERVICE NOTICE |
Melvin R. Smokey Edwards
Funeral Services for Melvin Russell Edwards, 93 year old
Gillette, Wyoming man who died Thursday, will be held
Saturday, June 29th at 2:00
p.m. from the Harness
Funeral Home Chapel with
Reverend Dave Eades officiating.
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
Burial will be in Willow
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Grove Cemetery with military graveside services to follow the funeral. Donations in
Smokey’s memory may be
made to the Melvin R. Smokey
Edwards Memorial in care of
the Harness Funeral Home at
351 N. Adams in Buffalo.
Quarter
Pounder
National Weather for Wednesday, June 26
Broadus
58/88
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Monday
• Sharon Lee Johnson, 51,
Sheridan, breach of peace,
circuit court, arrested by
SPD.
rectly stated in a story
about the Wyoming
Association of
Municipalities convention that ran Saturday.
The Sheridan Press
regrets the error.
SATURDAY
Billings
60/86
Mainly clear
Ten years ago: The
Recording Industry
Association of America
threatened to sue hundreds
of individual computer users
who were illegally sharing
music files online.
Five years ago: A divided
U.S. Supreme Court struck
down a Louisiana law that
allowed capital punishment
for people convicted of raping children under 12; the
ruling also invalidated laws
in five other states that
allowed executions for child
rape that did not result in
the death of the victim.
One year ago: A divided
U.S. Supreme Court threw
out major parts of Arizona’s
tough crackdown on people
living in the U.S. without
Lane, Dayton, 6:29 p.m.
CORRECTION |
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
Monday
• Possession of drugs,
North Piney Road, Banner,
7:38 a.m.
• Animal welfare,
Highway 345, Ranchester,
10:24 a.m.
• Prowler, West 13th
Street, 11 a.m.
• Agency assist, Bruce
Mountain Drive, 11:20 a.m.
• Found property, Prune
Creek Campground, 12:26
p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Upper Cat Road, Banner,
1:22 p.m.
• Motorist assist,
Interstate 90 westbound
mile marker 11, Ranchester,
3:41 p.m.
• Lost property, Highway
335 and Highway 87, 5:16
p.m.
• Accident, Coffeen
Avenue, 5:38 p.m.
• Phone harassment,
Sherri View Drive, 5:55 p.m.
• Civil dispute, Whisper
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
86/61/pc
88/53/s
88/59/s
83/56/pc
80/53/s
84/54/s
89/59/s
76/45/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
88/60/s
91/50/s
92/51/s
86/56/s
90/53/s
86/53/s
97/60/s
84/42/s
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
94/60/s
94/51/s
90/54/pc
87/53/s
90/54/s
93/53/s
96/62/s
89/44/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
82/50/s
84/56/s
89/54/s
89/58/s
86/57/s
96/59/s
83/56/s
68/38/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
88/46/s
87/56/s
91/49/s
92/60/s
89/56/s
97/58/s
83/52/s
75/40/s
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
87/49/pc
88/55/s
92/50/s
94/57/s
93/59/s
97/58/s
89/51/s
79/41/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
BUSINESS
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
A changing landscape in Sheridan County
Texas oil company taking ‘Educated Guess’ with oil rig along U.S. Highway 14
BY PAOLO CISNEROS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The landscape of rural Sheridan
County now includes an
additional element among
its vast expanses of rolling
hills and grazing livestock.
Near mile marker nine on
U.S. Highway 14 East, an oil
rig towers dramatically
over the largely undeveloped terrain.
For many proponents of
increased energy production, it’s a welcome sight.
Whether its operation
amounts to extra revenue
or added jobs for local residents remains to be seen.
Texas-based Onshore
Holdings LLC is the company behind the recently constructed horizontal well.
A subsidiary of Statoil —
a Norwegian oil and gas
company that employs
about 21,000 people in 37
countries — the well represents Onshore’s first foray
into the Wyoming oil market.
Statoil spokeswoman
Christine Wigand said
Onshore recently entered
into an agreement with
another company, Cirque
Resources, regarding oil
exploration in Wyoming.
While Cirque is operating
most of the other wells cov-
THE SHERIDAN PRESS |JUSTIN SHEELY
A spokeswoman for the owners of an exploratory drilling rig known as “Educated Guess” east of
Sheridan says they are hopeful the project yields profitable results.
ered in the deal, Onshore is
leading the charge in
Sheridan County.
As for what it might yield,
representatives can’t say
with certainty.
“We’re basically trying to
figure out what’s there,”
Wigand said.
Originally leased in 2010,
Onshore recently took over
the lease that gives the company permission to drill on
state land.
Referred to by the company as “Educated Guess,”
the site encompasses a 120acre parcel of land. Wigand
said Onshore Holdings
plans to drill about 11,000
feet below the surface.
Spudding — the process of
breaking into the ground to
begin the drilling process
— began at the Educated
Guess site last week and
Wigand estimated the
drilling process would take
three to four weeks to complete.
“And then, who knows?”
she said. “We have to look
and see what the drilling
tells us.”
Wigand said representatives of Onshore Holdings
will analyze their findings
and subsequently decide
whether expanded drilling
at the site is a financially
viable option.
That process, however,
could take up to a year to
complete.
Still, Wigand said Statoil
administrators are hopeful
that Sheridan County and
Wyoming represent new
opportunities to increase
production of energy in the
United States.
“North America is a very
exciting area for us,” she
said.
While the United State’s
dependence on foreign
petroleum has declined
since peaking in 2005, the
country still relied on about
18.6 million barrels of
imported petroleum products every day in 2012,
according to figures from
the U.S. Energy
Information
Administration.
A Bernanke exit might complicate Fed’s pullback
WASHINGTON (AP) — The
Federal Reserve expects to start
slowing its bond-buying program this year just before it
might need to manage another
major transition that could
spook investors: the likely exit
of Chairman Ben Bernanke.
Bernanke is expected to step
down in January. By then, financial markets will likely be
absorbing a pullback in the
Fed’s bond purchases, which
helped push long-term interest
rates to record lows. Bernanke
said last week that the Fed
expects to slow its bond-buying
later this year — and end it next
year — if it thinks the economy
can manage without it.
Bernanke hasn’t said he’ll
leave in January, when his second term ends. But he’s widely
expected to step down then.
Among several possible successors, most Fed watchers think
the leading candidate is Vice
Chair Janet Yellen.
As chairman, Yellen would
likely aim to carry on
Bernanke’s policies. Even so,
economists say a
shift in leadership at
such a delicate time
might rattle
investors.
“We know for sure
now that Bernanke
is a lame duck,” said Bernanke
Sung Won Sohn, an
economics professor at
California State University.
“The leadership change at the
Fed will add to the uncertainty
in the markets at a time when
the Fed is trying to navigate the
transition from easy money to a
less accommodative stance.”
Even before he leaves, the
expectation that Bernanke has
just a few months left as chairman could raise doubts about
his policies, even though Yellen
would be expected to push the
same policies.
Investors’ panicky response
since Bernanke said the Fed will
likely slow its stimulus later
this year — if the economy is
sturdy enough then — showed
what could go wrong if a leadership transition is poorly man-
aged.
The possible overlap between a
Fed pullback in bond purchases
and a new chairman “will compound the uncertainty and possible market volatility,” said
Brian Bethune, an economics
professor at Gordon College in
Wenham, Mass.
Mark Zandi, chief economist
at Moody’s Analytics, said the
Fed will probably learn from the
distress it caused investors with
Wednesday’s word of a likely
pullback in bond purchases this
year. Many investors had
thought — or hoped — the Fed
would wait longer.
“They went too far and too
fast,” Zandi said. “The lesson for
them is to move more incrementally with regard to their communications.”
Most economists say the
administration will strive to
avoid any surprises in its handling of Bernanke’s expected
exit. Yellen is seen as a comforting choice, given that she’s considered a like-minded Bernanke
ally who has held the No. 2 post
at the Fed since October 2010,
said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.
Yellen led the Fed’s communications committee, which recommended many of the changes
the central bank has made to
make the Fed more publicly
transparent.
“Investors are fully anticipating that Bernanke will leave
when his term is up and that
Yellen will succeed him,” Zandi
said. “If that happens, I think
there will be a smooth transition.”
Yet in the meantime, the perception that Bernanke has just a
few months left could raise
doubts about his leadership.
“When you are a lame duck,
people are not as willing to follow you,” Sohn said. “It could be
more difficult now for Bernanke
to mobilize the Fed to march to
his tune.”
Bethune said he’s holding out
hope for intervention from
President Barack Obama to help
calm investors during a precarious time.
Should the Educated
Guess site go on to produce
a fair amount of oil, the
local economy stands to
benefit via both severance
tax revenues and county
mill levies.
Unlike some Wyoming
counties where surging
extractives industries have
led to sharp decreases in
unemployment, Sheridan
County’s jobless rate has
remained fairly sluggish in
recent years.
The local rate stood at 6.8
percent compared to a
statewide average of 4.8
percent in April 2013,
according to figures from
the Research and Planning
section of the Wyoming
Department of Workforce
Services.
State economists credit
energy production with
having prompted some of
the most dramatic drops in
county jobless rates in
recent years.
And while Sheridan’s
location in the Powder
River Basin has historically
linked the city to nearby
coal production, oil drilling
remains a miniscule component of the area’s economy.
Proponents of drilling
activity at the Educated
Guess site hope the project
might play a role in ultimately reversing that trend.
Contractors
must
meet city regs
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The city of
Sheridan Building Department
is reminding residents that contractors must be licensed, bonded and insured in order to work
in the city.
Additionally, all roofs must be
properly permitted.
A Building Department representative said in an email to The
Sheridan Press that the area has
seen numerous out-of-state contractors coming to work on roofs
and siding in recent weeks and
that department administrators
encourage people to verify the
legitimacy of said contractors if
they have concerns.
Residents with questions
about the license status of a contractor or the permitting
process in general are asked to
contact the Building
Department at 674-5941.
B2
SPORTS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Nuggets give
Shaw first
shot at head
coaching job
Governor’s Cup
COURTESY PHOTO | BLAINE MCCARTNEY/WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
Julia Fenn returns a volley against Regan Hendricks during the No. 1 singles championship match of the Wyoming Governor's Cup on Sunday at the Cheyenne Country Club.
Fenn defeated Hendricks 7-5, 6-2. She won a No. 1 singles state championship last fall as a freshman for Sheridan High School.
Blackhawks take 2nd Stanley Cup in 4 years
Two goals in 17
seconds seal
Chicago’s title
BOSTON (AP) — Two hours
after clinching the Stanley Cup
title, a handful of Chicago
Blackhawks wandered back out
onto the TD Garden ice in their
street clothes.
Two of them walked gingerly
over to the corner and recreated
the goals that brought the NHL
season to a stunning conclusion.
A few took swigs from
Champagne bottles. Some posed
for pictures. Others took them.
The Blackhawks celebrated
their second Stanley Cup championship in four seasons on
Monday night, coming from
behind when Bryan Bickell and
Dave Bolland scored 17 seconds
apart in the final 1:16 to beat the
Boston Bruins 3-2 and take the
best-of-seven series in six games.
“This goal, the ending —
nobody saw it coming,”
Blackhawks coach Joel
Quenneville said. “You just hope.
And we tied it up and the other
one was icing on the cake. But
nobody foresaw either one coming.
“That series and the pace that
we just saw for six straight games
was an amazing series,” he said.
Seventy-six seconds away from
defeat and a trip home for a decisive seventh game, Bickell tied
and, while the Bruins were settling in for another overtime in a
series that has already had its
share, Bolland scored to give
Chicago the lead.
The back-to-back scores in
about the time it takes for one
good rush down the ice turned a
near-certain loss into a championship clincher, stunning
Boston’s players and their fans,
and starting the celebration on
the Blackhawks’ bench with 59
seconds to play.
“We thought we were going
home for Game 7. You still think
you’re going to overtime and
you’re going to try to win it there.
Then Bolly scores a huge goal 17
seconds later,” said Chicago for-
ward Patrick Kane, who won the
Conn Smythe Trophy as the postseason’s most valuable player. “It
feels like the last 58 seconds were
an eternity.”
“I don’t think there’s any
question, even though — let’s
face it — today was a little bit
of luck, we’re still the best
team in the league.”
Johnny Oduya
Blackhawks defenseman
The team that set an NHL
record with a 24-game unbeaten
streak to start the lockout-shortened season won three straight
after falling behind 2-1 in the
finals, rallying from a deficit in
the series and in its finale. Corey
Crawford made 23 saves, and
Jonathan Toews returned from
injury to add a goal and an assist
in the first finals between
Original Six teams since 1979.
“I still can’t believe that finish.
Wimbledon: Williams into 2nd round
LONDON (AP) — Back in
her comfort zone on
Wimbledon’s Centre Court,
Serena Williams delivered a
statement that no one can
argue with: When her powerful serve is clicking, she’s
still the woman to beat at the
All England Club.
Putting aside her recent
comments that led to apologies and a brief spat with
Maria Sharapova, Williams
looked every bit the five-time
champion as she began her
Wimbledon title defense with
a routine 6-1, 6-3 victory over
Mandy Minella of
Luxembourg.
Williams put the focus
firmly back on tennis following the recent verbal jousting with Sharapova about
their private lives and comments about a high-profile
rape case.
As usual on grass, the topranked Williams dominated
with her hard serve, winning
the first set without dropping a single point on her
service game. Her serve let
her down only at the start of
the second set, when Minella
was able to take a 2-0 lead
when Williams double-faulted on break point.
She was one point from
trailing 3-0 but won 15 of the
next 18 points to take a 4-2
lead, and broke again to
wrap up the win.
“For me, it’s the greatest
moment for a tennis player,
to walk out on Centre
Court,” Williams said after
her first match at
Wimbledon since winning
Olympic gold here last year.
“That was such a great
moment, too. So many great
memories on this court.”
Williams improved her
career record to 68-8 at the
All England Club and
extended her career-best
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
winning streak to 32 matches, which included her second French Open title.
“I don’t think about it,”
Williams said about her
streak. “Every single time I
step out on the court it’s a
new match.”
Also Tuesday, 42-year-old
Japanese veteran Kimiko
Date-Krumm cruised past
German teenager Carina
Witthoeft — who is less than
half her age — 6-0, 6-2 in just
44 minutes.
Date-Krumm is the second
oldest player to have won a
match at Wimbledon after
Martina Navratilova, who
was 47 when she reached the
second round in 2004. The 18year-old Witthoeft was making her Grand Slam debut.
Sixth-seeded Li Na of
China reached the second
round, routing Michaella
Krajicek of the Netherlands
6-1, 6-1.
Oh, my God, we never quit,”
Crawford said. “I never lost confidence. No one in our room ever
did.”
Trailing 2-1 with Crawford sent
off for an extra skater, the
Blackhawks converted when
Toews fed it in front and Bickell
scored from the edge of the
crease to tie the score. Perhaps
the Bruins expected it to go to
overtime, as three of the first
four games in the series did.
They seemed to be caught offguard on the ensuing faceoff.
Chicago skated into the zone
and Johnny Oduya sent a shot on
net that deflected off Michael
Frolik and the post before landing right in front of Bolland. He
chipped it in, and the
Blackhawks knew it was over.
The Chicago players who’d been
on the ice gathered in the corner,
while those on the bench began
jumping up and down. It was
only a minute later, with Boston’s
Tuukka Rask off for an extra
man, that the Blackhawks withstood the final push and swarmed
over the boards, throwing their
sticks and gloves across the ice.
DENVER (AP) — At long
last, Brian Shaw is getting his
first chance to coach an NBA
team.
The former guard for the
Los Angeles Lakers and Phil
Jackson pupil has agreed to
succeed George Karl as coach
of the Denver Nuggets, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated
Press. The person spoke to the
AP on condition of anonymity
Monday night because the
deal hadn’t been officially
announced. Still, it was the
buzz of the basketball world.
“I think the Nuggets are
going to benefit from his
tenure,” Jackson tweeted.
“So great to see
Brian Shaw
rewarded with this
long overdue
opportunity,”
Pacers coach
Frank Vogel told
The AP in a text.
“Congrats to Brian Shaw
and the Nuggets.
Denver just got one of the best
head coaches this league will
see for years to come.”
The Denver Post first
announced the agreement
with Shaw, the Indiana Pacers
assistant who told the newspaper he’s been “prepared by the
best of the best” for his first
NBA head coaching job,
adding “I feel like I’ve waited
and paid my dues.”
Shaw is a longtime assistant
who has interviewed about a
dozen times for head coaching
positions but kept coming up
short until Monday.
He beat out Lionel Hollins,
the former Memphis Grizzlies
coach. Shaw replaces Karl,
who was ousted June 6 just
weeks after winning the
league’s Coach of the Year
award. Shaw inherits a young
team loaded with talent that
won a franchise-record 57
games but lost Danilo
Gallinari to a knee injury
down the stretch and bowed
out in the first round of the
playoffs for the ninth time in
10 years. Shaw, 47, owns five
NBA championship rings as a
player and assistant coach. A
first-round draft pick by the
Boston Celtics in 1988, Shaw
played for eight teams in his
14 NBA seasons.
As Vogel’s top assistant,
Shaw drew praise for his work
with rising star Paul George
last season. The Pacers forward was an All-Star and
helped lead Indiana to the
Eastern Conference finals,
where they took the eventual
champion Miami Heat to
seven games.
Polo with the Big Horn Smokehouse
COURTESY PHOTO |
The Pony Bar & Grill polo team defeated Century 21, 7-5, Sunday afternoon in the Big Horn
Smokehouse Cup at the Big Horn Equestrian Center. Pictured, from left, Doug Meier of Big Horn
Smokehouse, Drew Luplow, Best Playing Pony “GiddyUp” and Craig Luplow. The Pony Bar & Grill
team consisted of Fox Benton, Amanda Burns, Rob Beckman, Kristine Dalton and Drew Luplow.
Polo continues Sunday with the Polaris Cup at 2 p.m. Admission is always free for the event held
each Sunday afternoon at the Equestrian Center.
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
B3
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
Apparently, fatigue isn't
just for Cleveland Indians
baseball fans waiting (again)
to see their team play in the
postseason. (Dr. Mike wouldn't mind a division title, but
even a wild-card spot would
be OK.) Fatigue can happen
to players, too. One new
study reveals that near the
end of the season, in
September, most majorleague baseball players don't
judge the strike zone as well
as they did in April. Another
study revealed that the length
of a baseball player's career
can be fairly well predicted
by how sleepy he gets during
the day.
We've mentioned before
that lack of sleep and fatigue
can put on pounds, impair
your driving safety and cause
a big drop in your bedroom
batting average. One report
showed sleep deprivation can
even make men mistakenly
believe (due to frontal-lobe
impairment) that a woman's
sexual interest has increased.
But fortunately, bad sleeping
habits and fatigue can be
remedied. These techniques
work on and off the field.
--Opt for a diet that's got
plenty of lean protein and
only 100 percent whole grains
to reduce daytime drowsiness
and give you seven to eight
hours of sleep every night.
And avoid caffeine within six
hours of bedtime.
--If you're changing time
zones, start shifting your
inner clock BEFORE you
leave, by hitting the sack an
hour earlier (heading west)
or later (heading east) than
normal.
--When in bed, no computers, TV or bill-paying. Then
you'll make it around the
bases with your sweetie more
often and make the playoffs
at work.
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, visit
sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: I have written
to you before, and your
advice served me well. I have
another problem now, and I
don't know what to do about
it.
I am a childless man, but I
have owned my dog for 12
years. I work from home and
we are together constantly.
Honestly, Abby, he is the joy
of my life.
My problem is I live in constant fear of losing him. I
know it will break my heart,
and I'm not sure I can deal
with it. At night, when I rub
his belly at bedtime and see
the love in his eyes, I can't
sleep for thinking about the
day when he will no longer
be with me.
I know he's "just a dog," but
he has been my kid for all
this time. Do you have any
advice for me? -- AFRAID OF
THE LOSS
DEAR AFRAID: I understand your feelings. I doubt
there is any pet owner who
hasn't had one special departed pet who lives on forever in
his or her heart.
My advice to you is to not
spoil one more precious second you have with your dog
by worrying about what will
eventually happen. You knew
going in that your dog would
have a certain life span.
That's the "deal" we make
when we become animal
guardians.
When the time comes, talk
to your veterinarian about
support groups in which you
can share your feelings. And
don't be surprised when you
find out you are one of many.
DEAR ABBY: I have this coworker, "Sam," who is no
longer performing 100 percent at work. It started shortly after he moved out of town
and he was forced to start
commuting. Sam complains a
lot about the commute
because he doesn't allow
enough time for it and he
ends up being late to work.
Lately I have noticed that
he has also started to slack
off on his daily tasks. He'll sit
down, prepare to do something, then get up and disappear for 20 to 25 minutes.
He'll come back for a few
minutes, then disappear
again. I don't know where
he's going. All I know is we
generally have to pick up the
slack when he gets to the end
of his shift and realizes he
hasn't accomplished everything.
Is this something I should
report to my managers? I feel
it's unfair that Sam gets paid
for the same amount of time
that I do, while I'm doing my
work at full capacity and he's
putting in less than half. -FRUSTRATED CO-WORKER
IN ILLINOIS
DEAR FRUSTRATED: If it
won't have a negative impact
on your job ratings, you and
the others on your shift
should stop picking up the
slack for Sam. It will then
become apparent to your
managers that he's not doing
his share, and he will cook
his own goose.
DEAR ABBY: When I was
11, I lived with my dad and
stepmom. My 14-year-old
brother lived with our grandparents in another town, but
they would visit every couple
of months.
After one visit, as they
were leaving, my grandmother said, "Come here and give
your brother a kiss and tell
him you love him." My brother and I looked at each other
and, in typical kid fashion,
said, "YUCK!!"
Abby, I never saw my brother again. He died the next
week from a congenital brain
aneurism.
It taught me a lesson. The
words we say to our loved
ones should be sweet,
because they may be the last
words from us they will ever
hear. My brother died 55
years ago and I miss him
still. -- STILL MISSING HIM
DEAR STILL MISSING
HIM: Please accept my sympathy for your loss. The life
lesson you learned from your
brother's untimely death was
an important one. I am sorry
it is one you had to learn at
such a tender age.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
B4 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
SCOREBOARD |
MLB |
American League
The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Boston
45
33
.577
—
New York
41
34
.547
2½
Baltimore
42
35
.545
2½
Tampa Bay
40
37
.519
4½
Toronto
38
37
.507
5½
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Detroit
42
32
.568
—
Cleveland
39
36
.520
3½
Kansas City
35
38
.479
6½
Minnesota
34
38
.472
7
Chicago
31
42
.425
10½
West Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Texas
44
32
.579
—
Oakland
44
34
.564
1
Seattle
34
43
.442
10½
Los Angeles 33
43
.434
11
Houston
29
48
.377
15½
Monday’s Games
Cleveland 5, Baltimore 2
Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 1
Tuesday’s Games
Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Colorado at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto (Dickey 6-8) at Tampa Bay
(Ro.Hernandez 4-8), 12:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 5-6) at Miami (Koehler
1-5), 12:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 4-5) at Oakland (Griffin
5-6), 3:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 3-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-4), 3:40 p.m.
Colorado (Oswalt 0-1) at Boston (Lackey 45), 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kazmir 4-4) at Baltimore (Hammel 7-4), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Grimm 6-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 5-5), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-2) at Detroit (J.Alvarez 1-0), 7:08 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 8-3) at Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Marcum 0-9) at Chicago White
Sox (Joh.Danks 1-4), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 10-1) at Houston (Bedard 23), 8:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
National League
The Associated Press
East Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Atlanta
44
33
.571
—
Washington
37
38
.493
6
Philadelphia
36
41
.468
8
New York
30
42
.417
11½
Miami
25
50
.333
18
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
St. Louis
47
29
.618
—
Pittsburgh
46
30
.605
1
Cincinnati
45
32
.584
2½
Chicago
31
43
.419
15
Milwaukee
31
43
.419
15
West Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Arizona
41
34
.547
—
Colorado
39
38
.506
3
San Diego
39
38
.506
3
San Francisco 38
38
.500
3½
Los Angeles 33
42
.440
8
Monday’s Games
San Diego 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings
L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 1
Tuesday’s Games
Arizona at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota (Diamond 5-6) at Miami (Koehler
1-5), 12:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 4-5) at Oakland (Griffin
5-6), 3:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 3-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-4), 3:40 p.m.
Colorado (Oswalt 0-1) at Boston (Lackey 45), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 4-6) at Washington (Zimmermann 10-3), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 8-3) at Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Feldman 6-6) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 6-6), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Marcum 0-9) at Chicago White
Sox (Joh.Danks 1-4), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 10-1) at Houston (Bedard 23), 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 2-11) at San Diego
(Undecided), 10:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 4-7) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 5-5), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 6:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
COLLEGE WORLD SERIES |
NCAA College World Series Glance
The Associated Press
At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
UCLA 4, North Carolina 1, UNC eliminated
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 24: UCLA 3, Mississippi
State 1
Tuesday, June 25: Mississippi State (5119) vs. UCLA (48-17), 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 26: Mississippi State
vs. UCLA, 8 p.m.
WIMBLEDON |
Wimbledon Results
The Associated Press
Tuesday
At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club
London
Purse: $34.9 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, def. Blaz
Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3.
Kevin Anderson (27), South Africa, def.
Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1.
James Blake, United States, def. Thiemo
de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2.
Michal Przysiezny, Poland, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-0.
Denis Kudla, United States, def. James
Duckworth,
Australia, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 6-1.
Kei Nishikori (12), Japan, def. Matthew
Ebden, Australia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Aljaz Bedene, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4.
Jesse Levine, Canada, def. Guido Pella, Argentina, 6-4, 6-2, 4-6, 3-6, 4-3, retired.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber (16), Germany, 4-6, 6-7 (6),
7-6 (3), 6-3, 2-1, retired.
Michael Llodra, France, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 7-6 (3), 6-4, 6-3.
Tommy Haas (13), Germany, def. Dmitry
Tursunov, Russia, 6-3, 7-5, 7-5.
Women
First Round
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Carina
Witthoeft, Germany, 6-0, 6-2.
Madison Keys, United States, def. Heather
Watson, Britain, 6-3, 7-5.
Sam Stosur (14), Australia, def. Anna
Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-3.
Olga Puchkova, Russia, def. Arantxa Rus,
Netherlands, 6-4, 6-2.
Li Na (6), China, def. Michaella Krajicek,
Netherlands, 6-1, 6-1.
Caroline Garcia, France, def. Zheng Jie,
China, 6-3, 6-4.
Serena Williams (1), United States, def.
Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 6-1, 6-3.
Mona Barthel (30), Germany, def. Monica
Niculescu, Romania, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5.
Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, def. Tamira
Paszek (28), Austria, 6-2, 7-5.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TO PLACE YOUR AD
Peng Shuai (24), China, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-3, 6-2.
Simona Halep, Romania, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Ayumi
Morita, Japan, 4-6, 6-0, 7-5.
MLB ALL-STAR FAN VOTING |
All-Star Fan Voting Leaders by position
The Associated Press
To Be Held: Tuesday, July 16
At Citi Field, New York
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Through June 23
FIRST BASE
1. Joey Votto, Reds, 2,677,813
SECOND BASE
1. Brandon Phillips, Reds, 2,597,742
SHORTSTOP
1. Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies, 3,104,285
THIRD BASE
1. David Wright, Mets, 2,917,819
CATCHER
1. Yadier Molina, Cardinals, 3,596,858
OUTFIELD
1. Carlos Beltran, Cardinals, 3,473,030
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Through June 22
FIRST BASE
1. Chris Davis, Orioles, 3,960,299
SECOND BASE
1. Robinson Cano, Yankees, 3,032,183
SHORTSTOP
1. J.J. Hardy, Orioles, 2,548,682
THIRD BASE
1. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers 4,337,223
CATCHER
1. Joe Mauer, Twins, 2,788,972
DESIGNATED HITTER
1. David Ortiz, Red Sox, 3,247,462
OUTFIELD
1. Adam Jones, Orioles, 3,571,693
Fax: (307) 672-7950
DEADLINES
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Hints from Heloise
Old Glasses Can View New
Home
Dear Heloise: I know you
have given out this information
several times, but until I had
eye surgery, I didn't need the
information. Now I have SEVERAL OLD EYEGLASSES and
would like to donate them.
Where should I send them? -Jason C., via email
Well, Jason, there are two
wonderful organizations you
can donate eyeglasses to. One,
which I have written about
through the years, is New Eyes
for the Needy, founded in 1932
(www.new-eyes.org). It accepts
donations of eyeglasses, reading glasses and sunglasses,
which are sent to poor countries. Monetary donations, jewelry, hearing aids, silverware
and watches also are welcome.
They are sold in their resale
shop (Fabulous Finds), and proceeds are used for U.S. eyeglass
voucher programs. If you're in
the New Jersey area, be sure to
visit the boutique. You can
send donations to:
New Eyes for the Needy
549 Millburn Ave.
P.O. Box 332
Short Hills, NJ 07078
Another organization I have
always supported is Lions Club
International (www.lion-
Heloise
sclubs.org). There
are donation centers throughout our
country at schools,
libraries, community centers and optometrist offices,
just to name a few locations
where you can drop off your old
glasses. They also send all
types of glasses to developing
countries and distribute them
to the needy. Send your donation to:
Lions Club International
Headquarters
Attention: Receiving Department
300 W. 22nd Street
Oak Brook, IL 60523
Both organizations provide
the wonderful gift of improved
sight to others. Consider donating all those unneeded or unwanted eyeglasses today! -Heloise
SAVE FOR LATER
Dear Readers: I have a dear
friend, Sabrina, who taught me
a hint that I use every day.
When there is no time to read
an entire newspaper or magazine (especially if you get several papers and a lot of
magazines, like I do), scan the
headlines and tear out just the
page or article you want to
read.
Collect these in a folder and
take with you to doctor's appointments, or keep by the
phone for when you're on hold,
and you can catch up on the articles. I put one in my carry-on
to read on the airplane. -Heloise
FLAT RUG
Dear Heloise: I read your column in the Erie Times-News
daily. Washing small braided
rugs can cause the center to
draw up, resulting in a
"humped" center that's uncomfortable and can cause a trip.
I stretch the wet rug, hard,
sideways, and hang it from the
side, using two pants hangers.
This lets the rug stretch while
drying and returns it to the
original flat shape. -- Sarah P.
in Pennsylvania
COLLECTING COBWEBS
Dear Heloise: I was having
trouble reaching the crown
molding and high corners in
my living room to dust them.
My husband had a nifty idea.
He used a rubber band to attach a dust cloth (Heloise here:
microfiber works best) to the
head of a broom. No more dusty
corners or balancing on chairs!
This also is helpful if you can't
bend down to dust. -- Eve K. in
Mississippi
Bridge
Phillip Alder
ANOTHER COMBINATION WORTH MANY
POINTS
Denis Diderot, an 18thcentury French art
critic, philosopher and
writer, said, "There are
three principal means of
acquiring knowledge:
observation of nature,
reflection and experimentation. Observation
collects facts; reflection
combines them; experimentation verifies the
result of that combination."
At the bridge table, declarer, after observing
the dummy, collects
facts -- winners and losers -- and reflects by
combining them. Then
he tries to find the best
line of play without experimentation.
In today's deal, how
should South play in six
no-trump after West
leads the club jack?
As soon as North
opened the bidding,
South knew it was either
a six or seven deal. But
he started quietly with a
two-diamond response.
However, when North
raised diamonds, South
launched
Blackwood to
learn that the
diamond king
was missing.
South can afford one
diamond loser, not two.
If the suit is splitting 2-1,
there are no problems.
So declarer should assume a 3-0 break.
If South first cashes
his ace, he loses two
tricks when West discards. Similarly, if declarer starts by calling
for dummy's queen, he
fails when East has the
void. The guaranteed
line is to take the first
trick on the board and
play the diamond three.
If East pitches, South
wins with his ace and
leads back toward
dummy's queen. But
when East plays the two,
declarer covers with his
four! Here, that wins the
trick and the contract is
safe. But if West takes
the trick, the suit must
be 2-1.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Nick Offerman was born in
Joliet, Ill., on this date in
1970. This birthday guy has
starred as Ron Swanson on
"Parks and Recreation"
since 2009. He's also appeared on episodes of "Children's Hospital," "CSI: NY"
and "Gilmore Girls." On the
big screen, he's appeared in
"21 Jump Street," "The Men
Who Stare At Goats" and
"Sin City." Offerman has
been married to actress
Megan Mullally since 2003.
ARIES (Mar 21-Apr. 19):
Beware of the wolf in
sheep's clothing. Someone
you deal with may hide
their true intent or purpose,
so be careful to read between the lines. Remember
that those who live on the
edge are likely to fall.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20):
Don't get too big for your
britches. Speak with people,
not at them; don't try to
guess what's on someone's
mind. Remember that just
because you're in charge
doesn't mean everyone else
is inferior.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Get right to the point. Don't
waste your time trying to
smooth talk someone when
saying exactly what you
mean will get the job done
much faster. Don't make
any promises you don't intend to keep.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): If you want to dance to
the music, you've got to pay
the piper. Don't shirk responsibilities or think you
don't have to pick up your
own tab. If someone has
done something for you,
repay the favor.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Wherever you may go,
there you are. There's no
need to put on a false front
or pretend you're something
you're not, when just being
yourself will put you over
the top. Honesty is the best
policy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Change lanes. Sticking to
the same old routine for too
long can grow tiresome.
Spice things up by trying
something new and exciting. Spending a little cash
won't hurt as long as the
price is within reason.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
Look before you leap. Diving headlong into a situation you aren't ready for
could leave you mired in a
murky bog of confusion.
Take time to prepare
painstakingly for any en-
Get your paper
online!
Jeraldine Saunders
deavor you undertake.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): If you've got it, flaunt it.
Others may find you more
attractive than usual today
and you can have your way
with the greatest of ease. Be
merciful, though, as taking
advantage of others could
be cruel.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Take advice with a
grain of salt. Others may
try to be genuinely helpful
to you, but in reality, the
only one who knows what's
best for you is you. Don't
take on added responsibilities on impulse.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Out with the old, in
with the new. Take an inventory of those things in
your life that are outdated
or obsolete and replace
them with what's "in." A
keen and discerning eye
can find great bargains.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Shake up the books.
Your finances may be in
need of some help. Carefully
go over the numbers or restructure your entire approach. The object of your
affections may take a little
time to come around.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
The more the merrier.
You'll be in your element in
social situations, so put on
your best outfit and head
out and about. Look up old
cronies or touch base with
family and a good time will
be had by all.
IF JUNE 26 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You could be
blessed by success during
the next four weeks. Just remember that success is not
always measured in dollars
and sense. Since you have
both vision and good judgment, this is an excellent
time to launch key plans or
make crucial decisions
about your future. People
who have your best interests at heart grow closer,
but those who act from selfish motives can't get
through. You'd be wise to
hold off until September to
make a career move or financial restructuring if it's
not completed by the first
week in July. By the end of
July, your ambitions are on
the rise, so you must
knuckle down to work.
Look for a new love at the
end of the year.
CLASSIFIEDS
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
Personals
65 YEAR old, long-time,
male resident of sheridan
seeks
24
hr
caretaker/housekeeper
over 50 who desires
benefits
of
housing.
Background check and
references required. Call
672-3618 for appt.
Sporting Goods
WANTING TO buy deer, elk
& moose antler. Please
contact Rob at (208)8218160.
Guns
WANTED:
SAVAGE
OVER/UNDER, .22 over 20
gauge, .223 over 20 gauge,
.30-30 over 20 gauge.
683-2969
Pets & Supplies
CHAMPION PEDIGREE
Puppies-German
Shepperd 4 F & 2 M. $400
Ready to go. First shots
incl. 307-763-9581
Miscellaneous for
Sale
PRIDE JAZZY 1170 XL
Power Wheelchair, new
battery, $2500 Call 6726733
For Lease
1200 SF SHOP FOR
LEASE, Air Compressor,
Post Lift, Floor Drains,
Office Area, Extra Storage,
Large Overhead Doors.
Utilities Included. Call 6721841
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for
Rent
1BR UP/1 BR $495/$545
Coin laundry & cable. Utils.
incl. Pets? 673-4506
STUDIO, UTIL. pd except
elec., no smk/pets, coinop laundry, $495 +
deposit 307-674-5838
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
SUPER NICE 2 BR off
street parking, quiet
neighborhood, W/D hks.,
sm storage unit. $600/mo
+ 500 dep. 1 yr. lease.
small pet neg. 751-2445
www.thesheridanpress.com
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Courtyards
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider.
672-8681
TDD-1-800-877-9965
Grimshaw
Investments
Now renting
apartments in
Sheridan, Buffalo
and Wright,
Wyoming
Income Based
For more information call
307-672-2810
NEW! 2BR $850/mo
water/heat paid 1000 sq
ft 818 E. 7th St 751-4061
SHERIDAN APARTMENTS
Taking Applications
for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments. Coin-op
laundry facility & play area.
Rental assistance depending
on availability and eligibility
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
307-672-0854
TDD#711
1917 N. Main Street
Sheridan, WY
NICE 3 BR, 1.5 ba. Twnhse.,
dishwasher, fireplace, lg.
deck, $950/mo. + dep., No
smk/pets. 752-6952.
LG CLEAN, 2 BR 1 ba., Big
Horn, No smk/pets, W/D
hooks, storage, WSG,
Lawn
care
provided
$750/mo. + elec., 6747718 or 751-7718.
LG 2 BDRM, 1 bath, WD
Hooks, garage, storage,
WGS
provided,
No
smoking/ pets $750 mo. +
elec. Dayton 674-7718 or
751-7718
1BR NEWLY updated,
$575/mo. + dep+ elect. &
6mo. lease. on site
laundry, no smk/pets. 6723507
VERY NICE 2 BR. duplex.,
most util. incl., $750/mo.
+ dep. pets nego., 7512105.
at
Sheridan
Apartments
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces Available!
ACCOUNTING
TECHNICIAN, Wyo. Girls
School, Sheridan; Class
Code FIAC06-21785,
Target Hiring Range:
$2735-$3217/mo. General
Description: Primarily
responsible for a variety of
fiscal duties, ranging from
processing transactions
on the State of Wyoming
WOLFS Accounting
System to maintaining
accurate records for the
residents’ accounts. For
more info. or to apply
online go to
http://statejobs.state.wy.
us/JobSearchDetail.aspx?
ID=21785 or submit a
State of Wyo.
Employment App. to the
HR Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Ave., Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060, Phone:
(307)777-7188, Fax:
(307)777-6562, along w/
transcripts of any relevant
course work. The State of
Wyo. is an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
actively supports the ADA
& reasonably
accommodates qualified
applicants w/ disabilities.
AACE SELF Storage, above
Mullinax. Office at 550
Highland Ave. 752-0037.
4 Bedroom / 2 Bath
$770/month + Utils
DOWNER ADDITION
Storage 674-1792
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
$710/month + Utils
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th Ave. E.
752-9114.
2 Bedroom / 1 Bath
$650/month + Utils
Income Restrictions
Apply
Security Deposit Required
918 HIGHLAND Ave., Unit
C Condo avail. 7/20 6746644.
Houses, Unfurnished
for Rent
2 BR 2 ba. Townhome,
W/D. No smk/pets. Snow
removal incl. Lease. $1100
674-6447
5 BR 2 ba., near Kendrick
park, $1350/mo. + utils.
Avail. July. Call for appt.
(307)752-9079.
2BR, 1BA A/C, W/D, 1 car
gar, fncd bkyard, $850/mo
+ util + dep. 6mo lease,
NO smk/pets 672-3507
2BR & 3BR Twnhm $695
& $950mo 752-3665
4 BR, 2 ba. Home, near
Kendrick Mansion & Park.
No smk., $1575/mo. + util.,
461-0552. Owner is
Licensed Agent.
1 BR 1 ba., garage, W/D. No
smk/pets. $750/mo. 6731185
2 BR 1 ba. sngl. att. gar.
$1125/mo. 674-4673
CLEAN & Cared for 2BR
1ba 1 car gar. No Smk/ pets
$950mo+util. Jackie
Warnke RE/MAX 307-7515838
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
FOR RENT: 2 BR. $700/mo
$1000 dep. Call 751-4908.
LIKE NEW 4BR 2ba.
$1100mo+dep. pets neg.
Avail. 7/1 751-4367
Duplexes, Furnished
for Rent
1BR FURN, ground level
studio apt. No Smk/pets
$525/mo. Util. incl. Jackie
Warnke RE/MAX 307-7515838
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
NOW RENTING Clean nice
sized 2BR W/D city util.
incl. No smk/pets.
$675mo+dep +elect. 7528427
Office Space for Rent
2 BR, upstairs, near
dwntwn. $650 + dep.
Water/heat
pd.
No
Smk/pets. 752-6716.
Help Wanted
1735 S. Sheridan Ave
(307) 672-2121
LG. 2BR apt. Quiet 4 unit
building. Completely
remodeled Most util.
included. $775mo. 7512105
CLEAN SPACIOUS Studio,
Quiet Location, appl./util.
incl, No pets/smk., Lease
$575mo 752-7360
Storage Space
SPACE FOR Rent off st.
parking, some util.
furnished 674-6713
FOR LEASE:
Prime
Main
Street
Location for Professional
Office or Retail Space as
follows:
54 South Main :
Main Floor – 2750 sq. ft.
Upper Floor - 2244 sq. ft.
44 South Main :
Main Floor – 1200 sq. ft.
Contact:
(307) 672-7491
ELDORADO STORAGE
Helping you conquer
space. 3856 Coffeen. 6727297.
INTERSTATE STORAGE
Multiple Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd. 752-6111.
ACMS STORAGE 6747350. Gated, Secure &
some climate control.
CIELO STORAGE 7523904
Work Wanted
WHITETIGERS
PROFESSIONAL
CLEANING
SERVICES
Res/ Commercial
General/ Deep Clean/
Carpet shampoo
Heather 752-4962
Help Wanted
IMMEDIATE CASHIER
/Food Prep/Stocking
assoc. position avail. Must
be able to work all shifts.
In a friendly environment.
P/U app. @ Big Horn Y,
7088 Coffeen Ave.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
Hospital is recruiting for a
Nutrition Assistant in our
Nutritional Services
department. Work with a
great team and
organization priding on
Service Excellence &
kindness! Ideal candidate
will possess basic cooking
skills, ability to multi-task,
understand & adjust
recipes to meet guidelines
for special diets, &
maintain excellent
customer service skills.
Apply online
www.sheridanhospital.org
or pick up an application
in HR. EOE/AAP
CUTTING EDGE Salon has
two
styling
stations
available for booth rental.
Call 673-0713
LOCAL SIDING
company looking for
siding/gutter installer.
Wages depend on Exp.
655-9272
NEED EXTRA CASH?
Immediate opening,
No Collections!
Delivery route available
for The Billings
Gazette. Dayton,
Ranchester area. 1 1/2
hours in the morning.
Approx. $650 + every 4
weeks. Independent
Contractor, Call Sherell
Clark at 1-800-7626397 (ext. 5) or 406740-1438.
ROCK STOP Subway &
Convenience Store, 1514 E.
5th St., apply within.
HIRING SERVERS, Bussers
& cleaning person at
Wagon Box Inn, apply in
person or call 683-2444.
Help Wanted
BIG HORN Middle School BHMS has a Social
Studies position available.
Applicant must hold a
MS Social Studies
endorsement. Please
contact Brandi Miller for
an application or
questions. 307-655-9541
or [email protected]
BIG HORN Power Sports is
adding a FT mechanic to
our team. $18 DOE. Must
have experience. Apply in
person at 1440 Wesco Ct.
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTERS NEEDED!
Pay DOE, Excellent
Benefits including
Vacation, Employee &
Family Health Insurance
and Retirement Plans.
Apply at KWN
Construction, 2675
Heartland Drive, Sheridan
WY. KWN is an equal
opportunity employer.
HOUSEKEEPING/LAUNDR
Y RAPIDLY growing
management company
Seeking Housekeeping
/Laundry managers for a
full time position in the
Sheridan area. Starting
pay is 28K per year Email
resume to
WYO. FINEST restaurant
in Story is now hiring F/T
& P/T Bartenders, Sous
Chef, or Kitchen Manager
and Front of the House
professionals. Benefits
and sign on bonus. Apply
in person or call
530-921-9236 or 307683-2296
MOUNTAIN VIEW Building,
Inc., an equal opportunity
employer and a Drug Free
Workplace, is seeking
qualified individuals for
the following positions:
Class A CDL Truck Drivers.
Fax your resume to 307675-1822 or stop by 237 N.
Main St.
NEED
RESIDENTIAL
Assistant for Eagle Ridge.
Must be avail. overnight &
weekends. $9.90 Hr.
Application avail. at 54
Seymour or call 673-0299.
WANTED EXPERIENCED
Roofer/Carpenter UA & DL
required. Pay DOE 6727643
POWDER RIVER Heating
& A/C now seeking a
HVAC/R installer w/ 5yrs.
experience. We are a Drug
Free workplace. Benefits
include 401K, Medical,
Vacation & more. Pay base
on experience. Call Ken @
674-4822
POWDER RIVER Heating
& A/C is growing now
seeking a retro fit installer
w/ 5yrs. experience. We
are a Drug Free workplace.
Benefits include 401K,
Medical, Vacation & more.
Pay base on experience.
Call Ken @ 674-4822
ARE YOU the best? Join
our fun & fast pace team
@ Perkins. Flx. hrs. w/ a
positive atmosphere.
Apply in person @ 1373
Coffeen Ave. EOE
WESTIN
MECHANICAL
needs Journeyman HVAC
installer. Call 763- 1733.
NEW IMAGE HAIR SALON
looking for exp. Stylist to
join our team. 674-9877
Campers, Trailers
LIKE NEW, 2005 S&S
Montana Bitteroot 4
Season camper, elec.
jacks, fits short box trucks,
$8500 OBO Call for more
details. 307-247-4455
THE FARMER'S CO-OP, a
multi-million dollar
operation, located in
Sheridan, WY is seeking
an Assistant General
Operations Manager. Will
train right candidate. Must
have experience in retail
sales, have excellent
customer service and
communication skills.
Knowledge in distribution
of agriculture
feeds,gasoline/diesel,
propane, and the sale and
application of pesticides,
herbicides, and fertilizers
is a must. Supervision of
20+ employees. Focus is
excellent customer service
and profitable business
environment. Direct
communication with
member and board of
directors. Requires
attracting new members
and meeting membership
levels. Responsible for
compliance with State
and Federal laws and
regulations. Bachelor's
degree in Finance or
Management is preferred,
and/or 7-10 years related
experience. Salary DOE
Help Wanted,
Professional
with a competitive
benefits package. The COOP is an equal
opportunity employer.
Please send resume, letter
of interest and references
to P.O. Box 766, Sheridan,
WY 82801.
Professional Trades
C.C.R.S, WHEN only the
best will do! Roofing,
Windows, Siding, Doors &
more. Free estimates. 307441-4161
Antiques
DOWN SIZING, moving, or
just getting rid of stuff?
Call us, Wyoming Chick
Pickers 307-461-2151
Land/Property Sale
40 ACRES at Tongue River
Reservoir, 1/4 mile SW of
dam & above, BLM land
on west boundary. Power,
trees, views of reservoir &
mountains. Can be divided
up into 8-5 acre lots.
$105,000. Call SK Realty
406-580-4207
Real Estate
BUFFALO, WY., Eagle
Summit Subdivision. 3BR,
2BA redwood house.
Immaculate cond.,
Vaulted ceilings. Over
sized lot, garage & BR.
Well manicured w/ plants,
shrubs & trees. Heated
garage & auto. sprinkler
system. Call 307-6848833.
FSBO BEAUTIFUL
executive home in The
Summit 4BR 2.5ba. full
unfinished bsmt. 3 car 2
furnaces 2 A/C Cen Vac
$480,000 751-4751 or 7514200
RENTAL WANTED: VA RN
Wellness Coach needs
small
rental.
Trade
services. 970-397-6317
Mobile Homes for
Sale
'71 CENTURY 14x70, 3BR,
2ba. Wood siding w/metal
pitched roof, parked &
skirted on nice shaded lot.
$15,000 as is. 752-1769
Real Estate
3BR 2BA, fully furn.,
energy efficient. $15k/neg.
Call 763-8284
3BDR 2BA HOME ON DBL
LOT, 329 CARRINGTON ST,
$162,000 751-9085
FSBO: 4BR 2ba. 28x32
attached garage on
2 lots. 751-6201
434 S. Carlin New in '97
2BR 1BA, private patio w/
spa 307-751-1029 see on
FSBO.com
BRAND NEW
Luxury homes. 3 br,
2 1/2 ba, 1800 sq ft,
heated 4 car garage.
Open floor plan, tall
ceilings, all granite,
maple cabinets, topend appliances, whole
house fans, custom
lighting, elegant
porcelain, fine fixtures,
central vacuums,
hand- tiled showers,
bidets, Trex decking.
Snow removal.
Innovative, no
maintenance, worryfree living. Warranty.
Qualified buyers call
for showing 461-9461
Autos-Accessories
2004 NISSAN Altima 2.5
S, 163K miles, New tires,
runs great. $4200 OBO
751-5368
92 GMC Suburban runs
great. $1500 751-3138
COMING SOON to a
North Main St. location
near you. Mother
Nature decided it's
time for Kevin's Cars to
have a SALE.
She picked a
HAIL of a SALE!
Watch for further info
to see if Mother
knows best.
Motorcycles
2005 V-STAR 1100 Show
room cond. garage kept.
307-673-4553
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
2013
BUICK VERANO
LEATHER
$
2013
$
19,495
2013
CHEVY EQUINOX LT
$
TRUCKS & SUV’s
CARS
'13 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$
'12 GMC 1500 CREW
$
'11 CHEVY 2500 LTZ CREW
$
'11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LTZ
$
'13 CHEVY EQUINOX 2LT
$
'13 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
$
'12 CHEVY EQUINOX 2LT
$
'10 CHEVY 1500 X-CAB LTZ 6.2 Liter
$
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$
7,495
'09 DODGE JOURNEY SXT
$
'04 CHEVY COLORADO LS
$
5,995
'13 BUICK VERANO/LEATHER $22,995
22,995
VW JETTA SE
LEATHER
25,995
'13 VW JETTA SE/LEATHER
$
'13 CHEVY IMPALA LT
$
19,495
19,495
'12 CHEVY MALIBU LT
17,495
$
'10 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ Local Trade $16,495
'09 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$
'07 CHEVY IMPALA SS 5.3 V8
$
15,495
$
'02 CHRYSLER 300M
$
'06 CHEVY IIMPALA
$
42,495
33,995
32,995
29,495
27,495
25,995
25,495
23,995
23,495
16,495
10,795
'05 FORD EXPEDITION XLT
$
9,995
'04 CHEVY TAHOE LT
$
9,995
'02 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
$
6,995
4,495
2013
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
14,995
'05 VW PASSAT
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
CHEVY CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$
42,495
Rating: SILVER
© 2013 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Solution to 6/24/13
6/25/13
B5
HAMMER CHEVROLET
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
DYNAMIC
MEDICAL
practice seeking friendly
adult to work full time
helping provide care to
patients of all ages.
Training
provided,
$10/hour. Send reply to
box 186, c/o The Sheridan
Press, PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
Help Wanted,
Professional
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS!
Housekeeping, Nite
Audit & Breakfast
Attend., Exp.
preferred, Top wages
Apply in person at
Motel 6.
[email protected]
FT DRIVER needed for fun
local office, great
customer service skills a
must. Send reply to Box
140, c/o The Sheridan
Press, PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
Help Wanted
ABSAROKA, INC. has an
opening for the 2013-2014
school year for the
position of Preschool
Teacher at our Head Start
Center in Sheridan,
Wyoming. Applicants
must meet the following
qualifications: A minimum
of an associate degree in
Early Childhood Education
or a related field with the
ability to obtain
additional credits towards
a BA/BS degree in Early
Childhood. Applicants
must also have experience
teaching preschool age
children. Please send a
letter of interest and
resume to: Absaroka, Inc.,
PO Box 952, Worland, WY
82401. Absaroka, Inc. is an
EOE
EMERITUS AT Sugarland
Ridge is looking for an
energetic, multi tasking
individual to work in the
kitchen as a Dietary
Aide/Sub Cook. This shift
will rotate two days of day
shift and two of evening
shift. Please apply in
person at 1551 Sugarland
Drive. EOE
ABSAROKA, INC. has an
opening for the 2013-2014
school year for the
position of Preschool
Teacher Aide at our Head
Start Center in Sheridan,
Wyoming. Applicants
must meet the following
qualifications: A Child
Development Associate
Credential, a college
degree, or a high school
diploma/GED and
experience working with
young children. Please
send a letter of interest
and resume to: Absaroka
Inc., PO Box 952, Worland,
WY 82401. Absaroka, Inc.
is an EOE
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
Serving downtown Sheridan
for 76 years!
107 E. ALGER ·
307-674-6419
Open Saturdays until 4pm
LET US FIND YOUR PERFECT VEHICLE! NO PRESSURE!
LIKE
US
ON
FACEBOOK
w w w. h a m m e r c h e v y. c o m
B6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Cool Cowboy
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013
2013 4-H County Shoot results
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Forty Sheridan
County 4-H Shooting Sports Members
participated in the 2013 4-H County
Shoot June 8 and 9 at the Sheridan
County Sportsman’s Club and the
Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
The event provides “4-H members
with an opportunity to showcase
their skills and be awarded for them,
skills that they have been practicing
throughout the year. The event also
allows them to prepare for the State
Shoot in Douglas in July,” reads a
press release from 4-H.
Results are listed below within the
Junior Division (8-10 years old), the
Intermediate Division (11-13 years
old), and the Senior Division (14-18
years old).
Brinton
Brownell rounds
a barrel Sunday
morning during
the Wyoming
Junior Rodeo
Association
event at the
Sheridan
County
Fairgrounds.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS |
BRAD ESTES
Griz hoops assistant
leaving for Oregon State
MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Montana
men’s basketball assistant Freddie Owens
has announced he’s leaving the program
after four years for an assistant’s position
at Oregon State.
Owens says he learned a lot at Montana
about running a program and how to do
things the right way and create a winning
atmosphere.
Archery – Class A
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Michael Shaw; 260
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Matai Trampe; 277
Reserve Champion-Kaitlin Shaw; 140
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Dennis Olson; 133
Reserve Champion-Spencer Porden; 101
Archery – Class B
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Andrew Hersman; 259
Reserve Champion- Sam Murphy; 251
Blue-Isai Sears; 236
Red-McKaya Gillespie; 163
Red-John Coffin; 120
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Anastasia Beutler; 170
Reserve Champion-Samantha Lamb; 137
Archery – Class C
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Tyra Araas; 326
Archery – Class D
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Wyatt Gillespie; 381
Reserve Champion- Zane Huntley; 359
Blue-Gaige Vielhauer; 349
Blue-Cade Relaford; 341
White-Sierra White; 191
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Joel Sayer; 359
Reserve Champion- Hunter Benedict; 152
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Cole Kayser; 392
Reserve Champion- Justin Beutler; 390
Air Rifle – Light Target Class
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Zane Huntley; 120
Reserve Champion- Gaige Vielhauer; 89
Red-Brayton Ankney; 78
White-Aiden Vielhauer; 31
Intermediate Class
Grand Champion- Samantha Lamb; 170
Reserve Champion- Joel Sayer; 160
Red-Jasper Forsness; 118
Red-Anastasia Beutler; 102
White-Matthew Benedict; 84
White-Dane Hansen; 83
White-Kylie Sorenson; 80
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Justin Beutler; 207
Air Rifle – Precision Class
Intermediate
Grand Champion-Jonathan Haugen; 307
Red-Michael Weber; 190
Air Rifle – Sporter Class
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Thomas Sorenson; 123
Reserve Champion- John Coffin; 46
Air Pistol
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Thomas Sorenson; 132
Reserve Champion- Zane Huntley; 116
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Jasper Forsness; 179
Reserve Champion- Joel Sayer; 131
Red- Kylie Sorenson; 127
Red- Matthew Benedict; 115
White-Anastasia Beutler; 85
.22 Pistol
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Zane Huntley; 90
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Jonathan Haugen; 311
Reserve Champion- Michael Weber; 190
Red-Jasper Forsness; 186
Red-Joel Sayer; 124
White-Wyatt Ankney; 82
White-Matthew Benedict; 44
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Cole Kayser; 246
Reserve Champion- Justin Beutler; 127
Red-Justin Hope; 114
Shotgun – Singles
Junior Division
Grand Champion- Zane Huntley; 27
Reserve Champion-Sam Murphy; 24
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Jonathan Haugen; 38
Reserve Champion- Michael Weber; 34
Blue-Wyatt Ankney; 32
Red-Abraham Ross; 29
Red-Joel Sayer; 27
Red-John Lenzi; 20
White-Anastasia Beutler; 15
Senior Division
Grand Champion-Cole Kayser; 44
Reserve Champion-Parker Tiffany; 41
Blue-Nash Mefford; 40
Red-Justin Hope; 36
White-Justin Beutler; 22
White-Michael Haugan; 22
Shotgun – Handicap
Junior Division
Grand Champion-Sam Murphy; 24
Reserve Champion-Zane Huntley; 22
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion-Jonathan Haugen; 30
Reserve Champion- Joel Sayer; 29
Blue-Michael Weber; 28
Blue-Ross Abraham; 26
Blue-Wyatt Ankney; 25
Red-John Lenzi; 18
White-Anastasia Beutler; 8
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Nash Mefford; 39
Reserve Champion-Cole Kayser; 36
Blue-Parker Tiffany; 35
Red-Michael Haugan; 26
Red-Justin Beutler; 25
.22 Rifle – Precision Class
Junior Division
Grand Champion-Zane Huntley; 221
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion-Jonathan Haugen; 311
Reserve Champion-Joel Sayer; 198
Red-Wyatt Ankney; 127
Senior Division
Grand Champion-Cole Kayser; 339
Reserve Champion-Justin Beutler; 240
.22 Rifle – Light Target Class
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion-Michael Weber; 270
Reserve Champion-Samantha Lamb; 191
Red-John Lenzi; 189
Red-Jasper Forsness; 154
Red-Kylie Sorenson; 117
White-Matthew Benedict; 82
White-Anastasia Beutler; 65
Senior Division
Grand Champion-Justin Hope; 64
.22 Rifle – Sporter Class
Junior Division
Grand Champion-Thomas Sorenson; 111
Muzzleloading
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion- Jonathan Haugen; 219
Reserve Champion-Joel Sayer; 112
Red-Wyatt Ankney; 107
Senior Division
Grand Champion- Justin Beutler; 194
Reserve Champion- Cole Kayser; 178
Red-Michael Haugen; 96
Outdoor Skills
Junior Division
Grand Champion-Thomas Sorenson; 133
Reserve Champion-Aiden Vielhauer; 115
Red-Gaige Vielhauer; 95
Intermediate Division
Grand Champion-Samantha Lamb; 175
Reserve Champion-Matthew Benedict; 170
Red-Kylie Sorenson; 145
Red-Hunter Benedict; 140
Red-John Lenzi; 115
Red-Dane Hansen; 100
White-Anastasia Beutler; 90
White-Wyatt Ankney; 80
White-Michael Weber; 80
White-Joel Sayer; 70
Senior Division
Grand Champion-Justin Beutler; 165
Reserve Champion-Michael Haugan; 160
Red-Cole Kayser; 135
Red-Parker Tiffany; 135
Red-Nash Mefford; 120
WEEKLY HAPPENINGS
PUBLIC WELCOME
GREAT GOLF
27 Holes of Golf NOW Open!
Marathon Mondays – All the golf you can play,
$75 with cart after 10 am
Junior Club Lease Program – $30 to $50 for the season
For all kids/teens ages 5 to 18 yrs
Dog & Cat Shelter Tournament – June 28th, 1 pm
Call the Pro Shop for Tee Times at 672-5323
REMINGTON’S & THE COWBOY BAR
Serving Lunch & Dinner Tuesday – Saturday
Sunday Breakfast & Lunch 10am to 2pm
June 27th – Pasta Night
June 28th – Live Music on the Patio by SideTrack
Wednesday – Burger & Beer $900
Tuesday and Saturday – Prime Rib
Friday Night Happy Hour
JOIN THE POWDER HORN CLUB NOW!
$850 Initiation Fee & Get Two Free Months in 2014
Member Pool Now Open
Premium Golf and Social Memberships available
Where Mountains Touch the Greens
Six miles south of Sheridan
www.thepowderhorn.com
673-4800
Ex-QB Kelly
says no chemo,
raditation
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) —
Hall of Fame quarterback
Jim Kelly says he has been
told by doctors that he won’t
need to undergo chemotherapy or radiation treatment
after having surgery to
remove cancerous cells in
his jaw.
The former Buffalo Bills
star made the announcement at his football camp in
Buffalo on Monday and his
comments were posted on
the Bills’ website. He says
he had the left side of his
jaw and the teeth on that
side of his mouth removed
in surgery on June 7. He
was released from the hospital three days later.