July 26, 2016 - The Sheridan Press

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July 26, 2016 - The Sheridan Press
TUESDAY
July 26, 2016
131st Year, No. 56
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
INSIDE: WYOMING THEATER FESTIVAL
SCHEDULE OF PRODUCTIONS & EVENTS
Overheated brakes deemed cause of Hatchery Fire
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BIGHORN MOUNTAINS — Fire investigators identified the origin and cause of the
Hatchery Fire on Monday.
The fire started Friday on the north side of
U.S. Highway 16 in the Ten Sleep Canyon and
the origin is located along U.S. Highway 16
near mile marker 34.
The cause of the fire is human caused due
to mechanical failure — overheated breaks.
Brake lining was found at the point of origin,
which consisted of grass and fine fuels. The
mechanical failure was not severe enough to
disable the vehicle to the point that it could
be identified.
Firefighters continued to make good progress on the Hatchery Fire burning 7 miles
northeast of Ten Sleep on Monday, according to officials from the Bureau of Land
Management.
Crews working the southwestern flank of
the fire continued to mop-up the fire’s edge
and patrol the perimeter. Firefighters conducted firing operations along hand lines
on the northeastern flank in order to limit
the spread of the fire further east. Aviation
resources assisted with firing operations
doing bucket drops to cool hot spots and
within areas where risk to firefighters was
too great. Across the interior of the fire, there
was minimal fire behavior with areas of
creeping and smoldering.
The fire has reached 2,775 acres and is 60
percent contained, officials said in a press
release Monday night.
SEE FIRES, PAGE 3
‘This has already been a
welcoming community
to me. I’ve lost count of all
the people who have come up
to welcome me to town ... it
just feels right.’
BY KRISTEN CZABAN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
County school districts topped
the state average in most
grades and in most subjects
for the 2015-2016 Proficiency
Assessments for Wyoming
Students standardized tests.
Ted Bonnema
Principal at Henry A. Coffeen Elementary School
‘We look at how the
students perform from
grade to grade so
that we’re looking
at apples to
apples.’
Craig Dougherty
SCSD2 Superintendent
SEE PAWS, PAGE 3
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Ted Bonnema
was only two hours into his new
job and he already felt like he
was home.
The newly-hired principal at
Henry A. Coffeen Elementary
School said that even in the
short time he has spent in the
district, the response from
the community has been overwhelming.
Districts
attribute
strong PAWS
scores to
teachers
Sheridan County School
District 2 performed the best
of the three local public school
districts. Students in that district, at all grade levels, topped
the state averages in math,
science and reading for those
who showed themselves to be
proficient or advanced in the
subjects.
“We try to look at all of the
cohorts,” SCSD2 Superintendent
Craig Dougherty said. “We
look at how the students perform from grade to grade so
that we’re looking at apples to
apples.”
He noted that when you look
at the elementary grade levels
tested, the students improved
in each subject area. The junior
high students slipped a little
in two areas, but still outperformed the state average.
“We weren’t real pleased with
the eighth-grade math scores, so
we’ve made some reflections on
that,” Dougherty said.
The scores for math in eighth
grade fell from 68.29 to 62.19
percent scoring proficient or
advanced.
Dougherty credited the teachers and staff in SCSD2 for helping students do well on the tests.
SCSD2
welcomes
new
principals
COURTESY PHOTO | H MICHAEL ROBERTS
‘Alice Formerly of Wonderland’
Nick Ley, as the Caterpillar, left, reacts to Alice, played by Jenny Case, during the Wyoming Theater Festival’s “Alice
Formerly of Wonderland” last week at the Mars Theater. The show is playing this Wednesday at 2 p.m. and Friday at 7
p.m. at the Mars Theater.
“This has already been a
welcoming community to me,”
Bonnema said about Sheridan.
“I’ve lost count of all the people
who have come up to welcome
me to town ... it just feels right.”
This summer, Sheridan
County School District 2 officials made several changes
to their administrative staff,
including the hiring of two new
principals. Additionally, 24
certified staff were approved by
the school board to join SCSD2
schools this August.
Bonnema said it was the
reputation of the district and
the school that brought him to
Coffeen Elementary. A native
of Colorado, he had previously worked as a teacher and
an assistant principal in the
Denver metropolitan area
before arriving in Sheridan.
“This is a high-performing
school and a high-performing
team at Coffeen Elementary,”
Bonnema said about the school.
“I really want to bring what I
can to this school.”
Bonnema was approved by
the school board at the June
20 meeting to replace former
Coffeen Elementary principal
Nikki Trahan, who resigned
this summer. He began his new
job on July 25.
SEE NEW PRINCIPALS, PAGE 3
Wyoming partners with Japanese companies seeking coal
BY BEN NEARY
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHEYENNE (AP) — Gov. Matt Mead has
signed an agreement calling for cooperation
between a consortium of Japanese companies and Wyoming experts in researching
clean-coal technology.
Mead signed a memorandum of under-
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
standing Monday in Cheyenne with the
president of the Japan Coal Energy Center.
The center represents about 120 manufacturing and energy companies, including
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki
Heavy Industries.
Mead says he expects to see a conference in Wyoming within a year that
would allow Japanese researchers to work
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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with researchers from the University of
Wyoming School of Energy Resources on
coal issues.
Wyoming has been pushing to try to gain
access to ports in the Pacific Northwest
to export coal to Asia. Mead says progress
addressing emissions from coal plants could
help Wyoming export coal to meet Japanese
demand.
Today’s edition is published for:
Russ Carlson
of Sheridan
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B4
B5
B7
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
Jumping
small cars
with Monster
Trucks
Wyoming
jobless rate
ticks up in
June
The Terminator pops a wheelie
during the Mega Promotions
Monster Truck show Saturday at
the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Craft breweries try to stand out with creative tap handles
RANDOM LAKE, Wis. (AP) — Cone heads,
zombies, beards, bananas — they are some of
the creative beer tap handles that have become
a big business as the number of craft breweries has skyrocketed.
There were 2,033 craft breweries in 2011
compared to 4,144 last year, according to the
Brewers Association.
AJS Tap Handles’ business has mirrored the
breweries’ growth. They are expanding their
26,000 square foot Random Lake, Wisconsin,
office and factory by 16,500 square feet by
December. Their 45 employees make about
500,000 handles out of resin, metal and wood a
year.
“Sometimes the best ones are the simplest
ones, that have a really memorable shape and
really bold branding,” said Cole Krueger, AJS’
lead designer.
He also advises beer makers to go no wider
than three inches and stay under a pound for
the knob on draft beer faucets. That width is so
they can fit in with other handles and for the
bartenders, who have to be able to take them
off quickly if a keg runs empty during a rush.
And the weight is so the handles don’t break
faucets, causing beer to gush everywhere.
It behooves breweries to stay within the
guidelines, says Rob Zellermayer, beer buyer
and bartender at Sugar Maple in Milwaukee,
where they have 60 beers on tap.
“I need very little reason not to buy beer
sometimes and if it’s the idea it might break
a faucet unfortunately there are thousands of
other breweries I can pick from,” he said.
While for some drinkers it’s still about the
qualities of the beer and menu description,
some drinkers such as Tyler Penrod do look at
the handle for a first impression. He ordered
his Surly Brewing Company’s “Overrated”
recently at The Brass Tap in Greenfield based
on the handle, which has silver “Surly” letters
in black with a blue and white square top that
says “Overrated.”
“I liked the industrial look of it. The
name was appealing beyond the name of
the brewery, which I’m familiar with, being
“Overrated” made me curious,” he said.
Turns out, it wasn’t overrated.
“I like it a lot. I would definitely probably get
it again,” he said.
US new-home sales
climbed in June to
more than 8-year high
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans bought new
homes in June at the fastest pace in more than eight
years, a sign that a solid job market and low mortgage rates are bolstering the U.S. housing market.
The Commerce Department said Tuesday that
new-home sales rose 3.5 percent last month to a
seasonally adjusted rate of 592,000, the best level
since February 2008. Purchases of new homes have
climbed 10.1 percent year-to-date, despite volatile
sales on a monthly basis.
“Today’s report confirms the considerable strength
in the housing market over the past few months,”
said Rob Martin, U.S. economist at Barclays.
Low mortgage rates and a healthy job market
have lifted residential real estate, which continues
to recover from the depths of the housing bust that
began nearly a decade ago. Greater demand and tight
inventories have led to rising prices and signs that
housing will help overall economic growth.
But affordability remains a problem and the potential of new-home sales returning to their historic
average sales rate of 650,000 could be limited.
June’s median sales price rose 6.1 percent from
a year ago to $306,700. Just 4.9 months’ supply of
new homes is listed for sale, well below this historic average of six months. Sales surged in the West
and Midwest by more than 10 percent in June, but
declined in the Northeast and South.
CHEYENNE (AP) —
Wyoming’s unemployment
rate increased slightly to 5.7
percent in June.
The rate is up from May’s
5.6 percent and higher than
the national rate of 4.9 percent.
The state Wyoming
Department of Workforce
Services says it’s not unusual for unemployment to
increase in June as the
school year ends and young
people start looking for jobs.
Around the state, unemployment rates rose in 13
counties, fell in eight counties and were unchanged in
two counties.
Campbell and Natrona
counties had the highest
unemployment rates at
7.8 percent each. They
were followed by Fremont
County’s 7.2 percent and the
6.8 percent recorded in both
Converse and Sweetwater.
Teton County had the
state’s lowest unemployment rate at 2.6 percent,
followed by Niobrara’s 3.4
percent and Goshen’s 3.7
percent.
Guide
who fell
to death
unclipped
from
anchor
JACKSON (AP) — A
National Park Service official says a mountain guide
who died in a fall on Grand
Teton National Park’s highest peak unclipped himself
from an anchor while reaching for a rappel device.
Exum Mountain guide
Gary Falk fell about 2,400
feet on Saturday. The
42-year-old Falk had just
successfully guided four
clients up the Grand Teton,
which is more than 13,700
feet in elevation. They were
coming back down when he
fell.
Park spokeswoman Denise
Germann tells the Jackson
Hole News & Guide that a
rappelling device became
stuck and Falk unclipped
his tether from the anchor
to reposition himself to free
the device.
Another Exum guide safely led the clients down the
mountain.
It was Falk’s 12th summer
guiding with Exum.
Drone operator who flew over
wildfire under investigation
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Authorities are
considering criminal charges against the
operator of a drone that hampered firefighting efforts during a wildfire near Billings.
The Billings Gazette reports that the
unmanned aircraft had been seized after
it interfered with firefighting aircraft on
Friday. Yellowstone County Sheriff Mike
Linder says the aircraft had to be grounded
and the incident cost firefighters several
hours of air support.
Authorities located the drone operator,
who Linder says seemed to know he had
been doing something illegal. A spokesman
for the Federal Aviation Administration
says the man faces fines of up to $27,500 in
addition to criminal prosecution.
The fire, which began Friday, quickly
burned more than 2 square miles and was
determined 90 percent contained Sunday. It
destroyed one home and forced the evacuation of several others.
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TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
FIRES : Lightning found to be the cause of Arden Fire
Type 2 Initial Attack crews, two
engine, and two helicopters.
Also on Monday, the Bighorn
The area around the fire is closed
National Forest reduced the restrictto public access. The closure order
ed area around the fire; the full list
and map are on the Bighorn National
of closures and a map can be seen at
Forest’s website at http://bit.ly/
http://www.inciweb.nwcg.org/4877.
2a6OyQg.
Approximately 280 firefighters
Statewide, other fires continue to
continue to work on suppressing the
ravage the Wyoming landscape.
Hatchery Fire.
A large wildfire burning in the
The Arden Fire, burning in the
Shoshone National Forest in northnorthern Bighorn Mountains near
west Wyoming has prompted more
Shell Reservoir and Adelaide Lake
evacuations and attracted more
has burned a total of 553 acres since it resources, including a Wyoming
was detected on July 19.
National Guard unit.
The cause of the Arden Fire, which
The fire west of Dubois has burned
is 40 percent contained, has been
nearly 11 square miles and is threatdetermined to be lightning.
ening more than 200 homes and guest
Resources remaining on the fire
ranches in the area.
include three Hot Shot crews, two
Wyoming state forester Bill Crapser
FROM 1
said about 900 people have been evacuated.
Gov. Matt Mead activated a
National Guard medivac helicopter
and its six crew and maintenance
members to assist.
More firefighters have been added
to the fight and now number more
than 600. There is no containment.
In neighboring Bridger-Teton
National Forest, a fire in Sublette
and Teton counties has grown to 26
square miles and is about 10 percent
contained.
According to InciWeb, an online
fire incident information system,
nine fires are active in Wyoming covering more than 43,400 acres.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Checking out a
monster truck
A monster truck fan checks out
the Cyclops monster truck for the
VIP pit stop event prior to the
Mega Promotions Monster Truck
show Saturday at the Sheridan
County Fairgrounds.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
NEW PRINCIPALS : New teacher induction Aug. 19
FROM 1
“Coffeen is doing an excellent job
and I plan to work with staff to continue to keep everything moving forward here at the school,” Bonnema
said.
Nicki Thomas also assumed a new
role — principal at Sheridan Junior
High School. She started the job on
July 1 and comes from California.
According to the school’s website, she was the former principal at Mt.Vista Middle School in
Kelseyville, California. Thomas takes
the place of former SJHS principal
Mitch Craft.
Craft will remain in the district,
but has moved to the central office
building in downtown Sheridan. He
is replacing Tom Sachse, who retired,
as the new assistant superintendent
for curriculum and assessment at
SCSD2.
The new school is just around the
corner. New teacher induction will
take place on Aug. 19, while the rest
of the teachers will report on Aug.
23. Students at SCSD2 will begin the
school year Aug. 30.
PAWS : Asking the hard questions to improve scores
reading (from 76.47 to
73.06 percent proficient or
“The focus is really that
advanced), eighth-grade
our teachers are working
math (68.29 to 62.19), eighthevery week in those prograde reading (73.98 to
fessional learning commu72.14) and eighth-grade scinities,” Dougherty said.
ence (61.63 to 58.21).
“They’re asking those four
In Sheridan County
questions: What do we want School District 1, students
the kids to learn? How are
improved in nine of the 14
we going to measure it?
areas. Scores declined only
What do we do with the
in third-grade reading and
kids that don’t get it and
math, fourth-grade math,
what do we do with the kids fifth-grade reading and sevthat are getting it?”
enth-grade reading.
SCSD2 Director of
SCSD1 Superintendent
Elementary Education Scott Marty Kobza said he thinks
Stults added that while the
the students did well
PAWS tests are taken in
overall, but there are cerMarch, the district evalutainly areas that could see
ates students on a nearly
improvement.
weekly basis.
“Overall, we improved in
“We don’t wait until
the areas of focus that we
March to see if the students had identified,” Kobza said,
are getting it,” Stults said.
adding that middle-school
While outperforming the
math had been an emphastate averages, SCSD2’s
sis.
scores did drop slightly in
Kobza added, like SCSD2,
four areas — third-grade
that PAWS is just one way
FROM 1
students are assessed on
progress.
“We look at other testing
and locally developed outcome assessments as well,”
Kobza said. “I know this
is kind of the piece people
keep score with, but it is
just one piece of a much
bigger picture.”
SCSD1 was also above the
state average in most subjects, falling just below the
mark in fourth-grade reading and seventh-grade math
and reading.
Kobza said the district
will refocus on middle-school math and keep
checking in to ensure the
district’s curriculum is
aligned with the state’s
standards.
“We also keep looking at
whether we are delivering
the content in the best way
possible to students,” Kobza
said.
SCSD3’s results were
Feds: Senate cafeteria workers will
get $1 million back pay
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Labor
Department says hundreds of Senate cafeteria workers will get back pay totaling
more than $1 million because their private
employers illegally underpaid them.
The department’s Wage and Hour
Division said Tuesday that two federal contractors improperly paid the workers less
than they were entitled to and made them
start work before their scheduled start
times without compensating them. It says
the companies — Restaurant Associates
and its subcontractor, Personnel Plus —
also didn’t pay required health and welfare
benefits.
The division says that overall, 674 workers will divide $1,008,302 in back wages. It
says it is still deciding whether to seek to
bar the two companies from future federal
contracts.
more of a mixed bag,
but with the small class
sizes, some scores are not
reported in order to protect student privacy. In
other grades, scores can be
skewed by just one student
performing better or worse
than others.
SCSD3 improved in four
of the seven areas reporting, but saw declines in
scores for fourth-grade
math and eighth-grade
math, science and reading.
The district scored
above the state average in
fourth-grade science, and
seventh-grade math and
reading.
Attempts to reach SCSD3
Superintendent Charles
Auzqui were not successful.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Obama expanding
refugee program for
Central Americans
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The Obama administration will soon expand
efforts to help Central
American families and
children legally immigrate
to the United States amid
another surge of migrants
caught crossing the border
illegally.
White House Deputy
Homeland Security
Adviser Amy Pope said
Tuesday that the administration will expand
in-country refugee processing for families coming from Honduras, El
Salvador and Guatemala
and launch an effort to
temporarily relocate some
families to Costa Rica.
The government is also
broadening a nearly twoyear-old program to allow
some Central American
children to reunite with
parents already legally living in the United States.
Deputy Homeland
Security Secretary
Alejandro Mayorkas said
that program will now
allow some unmarried
siblings, in-country parents and other caregivers to move to the U.S.
with a child approved
for the program.
The efforts are
designed in part to combat the crush of tens of
thousands of families
and unaccompanied
children caught crossing
the border illegally this
year. But it is unclear
how quickly the expanded efforts may impact
the flow of immigrants
trying to make their way
to the United States illegally.
Since the state of the
budget year in October,
more than 51,100 people
traveling as families
and more than 43,000
unaccompanied children
have been caught illegally crossing the Mexican
border. The number of
such immigrants has
been steadily rising this
year after significant
decreases between the
2014 and 2015 budget
years.
The Obama administration first launched
the effort to allow child
immigrants to legally come to the U.S. in
December 2014. More
than 600 have moved
to the United States
since then. Mayorkas
said 2,884 kids have
been approved for the
program and more than
9,500 applications are
pending.
In January, the administration first announced
that the United Nations
High Commissioner for
Refugees would prescreen would-be refugee
families. U.S. officials
will now handle more
in-country processing for
those families.
Pope said refugee
programs in Central
America are being
expanded because “cur-
rent efforts to date haven’t
been sufficient.” The new
programs, she said, are
designed to help “promote
safe and orderly immigration and border security.”
Pope said it is unclear
how many families and
children may benefit
from the enhanced programs but officials expect
requests for help to steadily increase as the programs get underway in the
coming months.
In the meantime, Costa
Rica will also soon start
accepting up to 200 people
in immediate need of refugee at a time for up to six
months.
HAVE NEWS?
call The Sheridan
Press at 672 -2431.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
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SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Becky Martini
Chad Riegler
Marketing Director
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Teen’s act
of kindness
S
igne Hill of Sheridan
dropped by to recognize
a young man’s kindness.
Last week, she was sitting
at Perkin’s Restaurant having
finished breakfast. Nearby, a
teenager sat looking like he was
waiting for someone. Ms. Hill
was leaving when the wait person informed her that he had
paid for her meal. She was told
he was 13.
“It made me tear up at the
generosity of this
young man,”
she said
Thursday.
“It’s really
the neatest
thing. Can
you imagPUBLISHER’S ine? I mean,
I’m 83 and
NOTEBOOK
he’s 13. We
|
always comStephen Woody
plain about
kids today. I
really want to thank him.”
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
LETTER |
nytimes.com
foxnews.com
thesheridanpress.com
1. China tiger attack kills
woman at drive-through animal
park
2. Shooting at nightclub in Fort
Myers, Florida, leaves 2 teenagers
dead
3. Death Bear will see you now
4. Attach on church in France
kills priest, and ISIS is blamed
5. As Democrats gather, a
Russian subplot raises intrigue
6. Dismayed by Donald Trump,
Michael Bloomberg will endorse
Hillary Clinton
7. Democratic Convention Day 1
takeaways: Michelle Obama steals
the show
8. Hillary Clinton’s Convention:
Day 1
1. Priest murdered during mass
in attack on Catholic Church
2. Colorado family’s Disney
vacation ended by suspected
drunken driver
3. Sarah Silverman booed at
DNC for telling Bernie Sanders
supporters they’re ‘ridiculous’
4. Fans call Paul Simon’s DNC
performance troubling
5. Sanders, Warren, Mrs. Obama
slam Trump and appeal for unity
at unruly Dem convention
6. Mariah Carey reportedly acts
like a diva at dinner with fiancée
7. Roger Moore ‘heartbroken’
after step-daughter dies at 47
8. Gunman shot in Vegas by
PokemonGo player he tried to rob
1. More underage drinking,
DUIs during Rodeo Week this
year
2. BLM, EPA effigies:
Candidate’s parade float causes
controversy
3. Wyoming heats up with wildfires
4. Celebrating 10 years of living
with cancer
5. Master plan for Kendrick
Park takes shape with public
input
6. US 16 remains closed due to
wildfire
7. Longtime vet duo keeps rodeo
animals in kickin’ good shape
8. Bucking a trend of indifference
Too much
Trump bashing
Re: Press opinion pages
I am disappointed with
The Sheridan Press. I
thought the newspaper
business and the media
were supposed to just report
things and be fair about it.
But I think I see the agenda you are pushing, what
with having nothing but
cartoons bashing Donald
Trump and not many about
Hillary Clinton.
Shame on you!
Joyce Muller
Sheridan
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Today, I feel deep sadness. Why can one
person do something like this?”
— Veljo Raicevic, a resident of Munich,
paying tribute to the nine victims of a deadly
rampage last week carried out by the Germanborn son of Iranian asylum-seekers.
“To witness the darkest evil of the human
heart ... will be forever burned in my soul.”
— Mike Piazza, referencing a game-winning
home run he hit for the New York Mets in
the first game after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks,
as he was enshrined into the Baseball Hall of
Fame.
“The party now needs new leadership that
will open the doors of the party and welcome
in working people and young people.”
— Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders after
the resignation of Debbie Wasserman Schultz
as chairwoman of the Democratic National
Committee.
••••••
Certainly there’s much animus (and worse) going around
about Secretary Hillary
Clinton on the eve of her party’s presidential nomination.
This is a story from her 2008
campaign, likely apocryphal.
A professional genealogical
researcher discovered that
Then Sen. Hillary Clinton’s
great-great uncle, Remus
Rodham, was hanged for
horse stealing and train robbery in 1889. The only known
photo of Remus shows him
standing on the gallows.
On the back of the photograph is the inscription:
Remus Rodham. Horse thief.
Sent to Montana Territorial
Prison in 1885; escaped
ion 1887, robbed Montana
Flyer six times. Caught by
Pinkerton detectives, convicted and hanged, in 1889.
The researchers emailed
then-Sen. Clinton for comments. The senator’s staff of
professional “image adjusters” sent back the following
biographical “sketch:”
“Remus Rodham was
a famous cowboy in the
Montana Territory. His business empire grew to include
acquisition of valuable equestrian assets and intimate
dealings with the Montana
railroad. Beginning in 1883, he
devoted several years of his
life to service at a government
facility, finally taking leave to
resume his dealings with the
railroad.
“In 1887, he was a key player
in a vital investigation run
by the renowned Pinkerton
Detective Agency. In 1889,
Remus passed away during
an important civic function
held in his honor when the
platform upon which he was
standing collapsed.”
••••••
That said, I’ve got a skeleton in my family tree. Robert
Woody of Alabama rode
with “Bloody Bill” Anderson
during the “Kansas Burning”
days during the Civil War.
Growing up, I was told by a
great aunt he was a cavalry
officer with the Confederate
Army. Not quite.
Digging deeper while living
in North Carolina and close to
battlefields, I found his enlistment and his association with
William Quantrill and other
knaves and outlaws. Yet,
uncertain if he was in on the
infamous raid at Lawrence,
Kansas. Further research on
my own found he’s buried in
a Confederate veterans cemetery in Ardmore, Oklahoma.
••••••
Quotable
“With public sentiment,
nothing can fail; without it,
nothing can succeed.”
— Abraham Lincoln, 18091865, 16th U.S. president
E
The path ahead for Clinton with dissatisfied voters
n route to fight one of his many duels,
French politician Georges Clemenceau
bought a one-way train ticket. Was he
pessimistic? “Not at all. I always use my
opponent’s return ticket for the trip back.” Some
Hillary Clinton advisers, although not that
serene, think her victory is probable and can be
assured.
Her challenge is analogous to Ronald Reagan’s in
1980, when voters were even
more intensely dissatisfied
than they now are. There
were hostages in Iran and
stagflation’s “misery index”
(the sum of the inflation
and unemployment rates)
GEORGE
was 21.98. By August 1979,
WILL
84 percent of Americans
said the country was on the
|
wrong track. A substantial
majority did not want to
re-elect Jimmy Carter but
a majority might do so unless convinced that
Reagan would be a safe choice. Reagan’s campaign responded by buying time for several
half-hour televised speeches and other ads
stressing his humdrum competence.
Now, voters reluctant to support the
unpleasant and unprepared Republican also
flinch from Clinton, partly because of the
intimacy the modern presidency forces upon
them: As one Clinton adviser uneasily notes,
a president spends more time in the average
family’s living room than anyone who is not
a family member. Clinton is not a congenial
guest.
Her opponent radiates anger, and America
has not elected an angry president since
Andrew Jackson, long before television
brought presidents into everyone’s living
room, where anger is discomfiting. Clinton’s
campaign must find ways to present her as
more likable than she seems and more likable
than her adversary, both of which are low
thresholds. Regarding the threshold that matters most — 270 electoral votes — she would
not trade places with her opponent.
Since 1976, Florida, today’s largest swing
state, has been somewhat more Republican
than the nation. Clinton now is in a statistical
tie there (in the Real Clear Politics average
of polls), where the Hispanic vote is growing
and moving left. She leads in Virginia, the
third-largest swing state (behind Ohio), by
RCP’s 5.3 points and in another purple state,
Colorado, by 8 points.
One state that might indicate a tectonic shift
in American politics is Arizona, which has
voted for a Democratic presidential candidate
only once since Harry Truman in 1948 (Bill
Clinton in 1996, by 2.2 points). In 2012, Mitt
Romney defeated Barack Obama there by 9
points.
Today, however, John McCain’s sixth
Senate campaign may be becoming his most
difficult. His trademark has been “straight
talk” but now he must mumble evasions about
the man at the top of the Republican ticket
who has disparaged McCain’s war service.
McCain, who has won his five previous elections by an average of 33.4 points, today leads
in the RCP average by 5.5.
If Clinton, who is in another statistical tie
in Arizona, decides to compete there, one
reason will be the Mormons. They are just 5
percent of the state population, but 8 percent
of the general election turnout. In a competitive election, their deep cultural antipathy
toward Donald Trump might swing 11 elec-
toral votes. Utah Republicans in this year’s
caucuses voted 69.2 percent for Ted Cruz, 16.8
for John Kasich and 14 percent for Trump. If
Arizona becomes a presidential battleground
this year, it will validate The Atlantic’s Ron
Brownstein’s analysis that any Trump gains
for the GOP among white blue-collar votes
in Rust Belt states (e.g., Ohio, Wisconsin,
Pennsylvania, Michigan) may be more than
matched by Clinton gains among minorities and persons with college educations in
Sunbelt states and elsewhere.
Clinton’s selection of Virginia’s U.S. Sen.
and former Gov. Tim Kaine represents the
rare intersection of good politics and good
governance. He increases her chance of winning the 13 electoral votes of his state, which
has voted with the presidential winner in
four consecutive elections and seven of the
last nine. He, like she, has been an executive,
so perhaps experience has inoculated him
against the senatorial confusion between gestures and governing.
There probably is no Democratic governor
or senator more palatable than Kaine to constitutional conservatives. Such conservatives
are eager to bring presidential power back
within constitutional constraints, and Kaine
is among the distressingly small minority of
national legislators interested in increased
congressional involvement in authorizing the
use of military force. And as a member of both
the Armed Services and Foreign Relations
committees, Kaine can, if their paths ever
cross on the campaign trail, patiently try to
help Trump decipher the acronym NATO.
GEORGE WILL writes on politics, law and social character. Will began writing
for The Washington Post in 1974. He is a contributor for Fox News, a Pulitzer Prize
recipient for commentary, and is the author of 12 books.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Sheridan College announces part-time honor roll for Spring 2016 semester
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan College officials
have released the list of students named to
the spring part-time honor roll.
To be named to the part-time honor roll,
students must have been enrolled in a mini-
mum of 6 credit hours and maintained a 3.5
GPA or higher.
The following Sheridan County students earned a spot on the list:
Variya Baldwin, Brody Bard, Timothy
Corley, Shandyn Covolo, Sr., Tracee Davis,
Nicholas Dore, Kord Dover, Kendyll Ebert,
Rahal Ehsan, Lorianne Ellingrod, Drew
Espy, David Flannery, Crystal Heneger,
Emily Hepworth, Robert Hill, Ashton
Koltiska, Stephen Leonard, Jean Maisano,
Linda Malstrom, Jacob Martineau, Shelley
Meier, Rory Mills, Jennifer Mullaney,
Immaculate Okeyo, Zachary Petersburg,
Brett Pool, Susan Ralston, Carla Schlecht,
Kortni Sharp, Nathaniel Siruta, Heather
Stampka, Deneese Stone, Chloe Swan,
Joyce Thompson, Shae Townsley, Jasmine
Vaira, Alaor Vieira, Jonathan Vrieswyk,
Leasa Williams, Andrew Wilson
DSA recognized by
Main Street
America program
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Downtown Sheridan
Association has been
chosen as an accredited
Main Street America
program for meeting rigorous performance standards set by the National
Main Street Center.
Each year, the
National Main Street
Center and its coordinating program partners
COURTESY PHOTO |
Chamber hosts ribbon cutting at open house
The Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce recently visited State Farm Agent Jon Oman during his open house to host a ribbon cutting. Pictured, from left, are Chamber Ambassador Alexis Mason; insurance account representatives Stephanie Babione and Desi Powell;
Ambassador Bob De Fries; insurance account representative Tarra Donahue; State Farm agent Jon Oman; Ambassadors Nancy Herdt, Mike
Nickel and Pritam Kerkar.
Sheridan County Fair set for Aug. 1-8
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan County Fair will
take place Aug. 1- 8.
The event will include
family fun focused on
livestock competitions featuring animals that were
raised and shown by 4-H
members, with cooking and
crafts competitions for 4-H
members and the community.
For the complete schedule
of events see sherfair.com.
There is no cost to attend.
For more information call
Liz Shaffer at 674-2980 or
the fairgrounds office at
672-2079.
The Sheridan County
Fairgrounds are located at
1753 Victoria St.
Sarah Silverman: Bernie-or-bust Dems ‘being ridiculous’
BY LEANNE ITALIE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Comic Sarah Silverman joined Sen.
Al Franken Monday night to urge
Democratic National Convention
delegates to unite — then stirred up
Bernie Sanders die-hards with some
choice words: “To the Bernie or bust
people, you’re being ridiculous.”
As a Sanders supporter herself,
Silverman said she would now vote
for Hillary Clinton “with gusto” as she
continues to be “inspired and moved
to action by the ideals set forth by
Bernie, who will never stop fighting
for us.”
She spoke on the convention’s opening day just before Paul Simon stood
at a microphone and crooned the
Simon and Garfunkel classic “Bridge
Over Troubled Water.”
Singer Demi Lovato got personal at
the podium, touching on her struggle
with mental illness, including eating
and bipolar disorders. She urged an
end to the stigma of those afflicted and
called on politicians to support better
access to health care for all.
“Like millions of Americans, I
am living with mental illness,” the
23-year-old Lovato said. “But I am
lucky. I had the resources and support to get treatment at a top facility.
Unfortunately, too many Americans
from all walks of life don’t get help,
whether they fear the stigma or
cannot afford treatment.” Lovato
closed with a performance of her hit
“Confident.”
Actress Eva Longoria of “Desperate
Housewives” trashed Republican
presidential nominee Donald Trump
for his statements on Mexican immigrants.
Longoria, a Latina from a small
town in south Texas, said she is
ninth-generation American from a
place once owned by Mexico.
“My family never crossed a border.
The border crossed us,” she said, adding: “When Donald Trump calls us
criminals and rapists, he is insulting
American families. My father is not
a criminal or rapist. In fact, he’s a
United States veteran.”
Fans and fashionistas, meanwhile,
waited patiently for the dress reveal of
first lady Michelle Obama, who spoke
late Monday night. She wore a bright
blue, A-line, cap-sleeve custom dress
from American designer Christian
Siriano. It was made of silk crepe and
included high-belt detailing.
Earlier Monday, Triumph the insulting, cigar-chomping puppet dog joined
sweltering street protesters while
actress Rosario Dawson urged Bernie
Sanders supporters to “listen” to their
man.
Actor and activist Danny Glover of
the “Lethal Weapon” film franchise
addressed the convention’s black
caucus, describing Trump as a fascist
and urging caucus members to “listen
to new voices that demand speaking
truth to power.”
Glover and actresses Shailene
Woodley and Susan Sarandon joined
more than 1,000 people for a climate
rally, vowing to keep up the fight on
environmental issues even though
Sanders, their preferred presidential
candidate, would not be in charge.
Woodley urged Sanders supporters to
remain calm and Sarandon thanked
him for “igniting this spark.”
Boyz II Men performed on the convention stage, while Grammy winner
Alicia Keys, who founded a social justice organization called We Are Here,
appeared on a panel on criminal justice reform and civil rights.
Asked about remarks Hillary
Clinton made as first lady about urban
gangs with “super-predators” — which
she later walked back — Keys said:
“It’s obvious that that was a big mistake. ... If we can admit to our mistakes, that’s the beginning, and the
question is not only just admitting to
the mistake but what are we going to
do about it.”
Looking ahead to Tuesday, actresses
Lena Dunham of “Girls” and America
Ferrera of “Superstore” were among
the notables expected to attend a bash
hosted by Glamour magazine.
GO ONLINE!
www.thesheridanpress.com
announce the list of
accredited Main Street
America programs in
recognition of their
exemplary commitment
to preservation based
economic development
and community revitalization through the Main
Street Approach.
Main Street America
has been helping revitalize older and historic
commercial districts for
more than 35 years.
Wesleyan Church
to host Mega Sports
and Stuff camp
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Wesleyan Church will
host a free summer camp for kids age 4 to fifth grade
on Aug. 1-4 from 9 a.m. to noon.
Elementary kids can choose between flag football,
basketball, soccer, cheer leading, drama and art.
Preschool and kindergarten students will learn the
basic skills needed for these sports.
Register at Sheridan Wesleyan Church or online at
www.sheridanwesleyan.org.
For more information call the church office at 6720612.
The Sheridan Wesleyan Church is located at 404 W.
Brundage Lane.
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at
late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. ‘GLASS CEILING’
SHATTERING AT
DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION
With a roll call of the
states, Hillary Clinton will
become the first woman to
lead a major party into a
White House race.
2. SANDERS TO
SUPPORTERS: RALLY TO
BEAT TRUMP
The Vermont senator
embraces former rival
Clinton as a champion for
the same economic causes
that enlivened his supporters.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
3. 19 KILLED IN KNIFING
NEAR TOKYO
A Japanese man who
slashed the throats of dozens of patients at a facility
for the mentally disabled
reportedly sent a letter to
Parliament outlining the
bloody plan.
4. 2 ATTACKERS, 1
HOSTAGE KILLED IN
FRENCH CHURCH
Two attackers seize hostages in a church near the
Normandy city of Rouen,
killing one hostage by
slitting their throat before
being killed by police, a
security official says.
5. GERMANY VOWS MORE
CHECKING OF MIGRANTS
AFTER ATTACKS
Top security officials in the
country call for tougher
security screening of asylum-seekers and announce
that more police officers
will be hired.
6. FLORIDA VICTIM’S
MOTHER URGED CAUTION
Setting out tomatoes
Rod Adams sets out tomatoes for the Adams Family Concession during the farmers market Thursday on Grinnell Plaza.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Wyoming Arts Council now
accepting creative writing
fellowship applications
SHERIDAN — The Wyoming Arts Council is now
accepting applications for three creative writing
fellowships. The deadline for applications is Aug.
22.
To submit an application, see www.wyomingartscoucil.submittable.com/submit.
Recipients will receive a $3,000 fellowship and
a travel stipend to read their work at one of the
statewide literary conferences.
A complete list of eligibility requirements can be
found on the Arts Council’s website www.wyomingartscouncil.org.
For more information, contact Rachel Clifton at
777-5305 or [email protected]
Dayton Days to include food,
music, fun
is “History Runs Through It — Dayton Days 2016.”
Events include a barbecue, pet parade for children and movie in the park that will take place
Friday beginning at 5 p.m.
On Saturday, events will include a Rotary pancake breakfast, Dayton Days mile race, parade
down Main Street and booths, food and fun in the
park following the parade. Cool off with the firefighters’ water fight in the park from 2-4 p.m., and
then enjoy a concert by The Instagators in the park
from 4-6 p.m.
For more information contact Dayton Town Hall
at 655-2217 or email [email protected]
Medical Marijuana meeting
set for Wednesday at library
SHERIDAN — An informational meeting on the
voter initiative Peggy A. Kelly Act will take place
at the Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library
Inner Circle room on Wednesday from 6:30-8:30
p.m.
The act would allow medical cannabis and hemp
production in Wyoming. Wyoming NORML will
present and encourages attendees to bring questions. The group has been circulating a petition to
put the issue on the ballot.
The library is located at 335 W. Alger St.
In the aftermath of the
Pulse nightclub massacre
in Orlando, Stephanie
White advised her 18-yearold son on how to stay safe.
Stef’an Strawder was one
of two teens killed at Club
Blu in Fort Myers.
SHERIDAN — The 40th annual Dayton Days
event is set for July 29-30. The theme for this year
7. WHO IS UNLIKELY ALLY
IN RENEWABLE ENERGY
PUSH
• All day, Wyoming Theater Festival, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
• 10 a.m., Wyoming Wednesday “Mining Town of Monarch” lecture, Wyoming Welcome Center, 1517 E.
Fifth St.
• 6-8 p.m., Summer Night at the Mansion, Trail End State Historic Site, 400 Clarendon Ave.
• 7:30-9 p.m., The New Vaudevillians, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
The landing in United
Arab Emirates of a
solar-powered plane underscores the significant number of clean energy initiatives out of this major
OPEC oil producer.
8. WHAT SRI LANKA IS
LOOKING TO PROTECT
Tens of thousands of acres
of mangrove forests — the
seawater-tolerant trees
that help protect and build
landmasses, better absorb
carbon and reduce the
impact of natural disasters.
9. HOW CRAFT BREWERIES
ARE TRYING TO STAND
OUT
Cone heads, zombies,
beards, bananas — they
are some of the creative
beer tap handles that have
become a big business as
the number of specialty
breweries skyrockets.
10. SARAH SILVERMAN:
BERNIE-OR-BUST DEMS
‘BEING RIDICULOUS’
The comedian joined
Sen. Al Franken to urge
Democratic delegates to
unite — then stirred up
Sanders die-hards with
some choice words.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
NATIONAL OBITUARY |
Marni Nixon, voice of classic movie
songs, has died at 86
NEW YORK (AP) — Hollywood voice double
Marni Nixon, whose singing was heard in place of
the leading actresses in such classic movie musicals as “West Side Story,” ‘‘The King and I” and
“My Fair Lady,” has died. She was 86.
Michael Kirsten, senior vice president of Nixon’s
talent agency, Harden-Curtis Associates, said she
died Sunday of cancer in New York. “She passed
away peacefully with her family at her side,” he
said.
Nixon, who was initially uncredited for her
work, early on resented the dubbing work but later
came to terms with it. “I realized now that this
was something that would outlive me. Something
that would last,” she wrote in her 2006 memoir, “I
Could Have Sung All Night.”
In the heyday of the Hollywood musical, studios often paid big money for film rights to hit
Broadway shows, then cast them with popular
non-singing actors and actresses.
Such was the case with the 1956 hit “The King
and I,” in which filmmakers dubbed Deborah
Kerr’s voice with Nixon’s.
“I was brought in and had to follow along with
her, getting her diction and acting style,” Nixon
recalled in 2004. “She in turn would study how I
looked when I hit the high notes.”
Nixon did the same for Natalie Wood in 1961’s
“West Side Story” and Audrey Hepburn in 1964’s
“My Fair Lady,” which had starred Julie Andrews
onstage. Earlier, she added a few notes to Marilyn
Monroe’s “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,”
from “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.”
She went uncredited in the films and on their
soundtrack albums and was warned by the filmmakers that if she ever let it be known that she
was doing the singing, “they would run me out of
town.”
Word began to leak out, however, and Kerr
herself blew Nixon’s cover when she praised her
work on “The King and I.” By the late 1960s, The
Hollywood Reporter was joking that “they found
out who was doing (talking horse) Mr. Ed’s voice
on the television show; it was Marni Nixon’s
horse.”
Nixon also appeared before the cameras in 1965,
in a small role as a nun in “The Sound of Music,”
and provided the singing voice of Grandmother Fa
in the 1998 animated film “Mulan.’”
As the era of big, traditional movie musicals
dried up, though, so did Nixon’s film career. But
she kept busy with other work, including starring
in her own children’s TV show, singing opera, soloing with symphony orchestras, appearing in a road
tour of “Cabaret” and teaching at the California
Institute of the Arts.
In her later years, she was also popular at nostalgia festivals, where she told audiences, “I allowed
all these actresses to dub their bodies to my voice.”
She had landed her role in “West Side Story”
after Wood’s voice proved inadequate for the
challenging Leonard Bernstein score. She prepared for it by studying Wood singing the role of
Maria before the cameras — and had to then face
the exacting task of getting her singing to match
Wood’s on-screen lip movements.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On July 26, 1775, the
Continental Congress established a Post Office and
appointed Benjamin Franklin
its Postmaster-General.
On this date:
In 1788, New York became
the 11th state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1882, the Richard
Wagner opera “Parsifal” premiered in Bayreuth, Germany.
In 1908, U.S. Attorney
General Charles J. Bonaparte
ordered creation of a force of
special agents that was a forerunner of the Federal Bureau
of Investigation.
In 1925, five days after the
end of the Scopes Trial in
Dayton, Tennessee, prosecutor
William Jennings Bryan died
at age 65. (Although Bryan
had won a conviction against
John T. Scopes for teaching
Darwin’s Theory of Evolution,
the verdict was later overturned.)
In 1945, the Potsdam
Declaration warned Imperial
Japan to unconditionally
surrender, or face “prompt
and utter destruction.” The
same day, Winston Churchill
resigned as Britain’s
prime minister after his
Conservatives were soundly
defeated by the Labour Party;
Clement Attlee succeeded
him.
In 1952, Argentina’s first
lady, Eva Peron, died in
Buenos Aires at age 33. King
Farouk I of Egypt abdicated
in the wake of a coup led by
Gamal Abdel Nasser.
In 1956, Egyptian President
Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal.
In 1965, the Maldives
became independent of
Britain.
In 1971, Apollo 15 was
launched from Cape Kennedy
on America’s fourth successful manned mission to the
moon.
In 1986, Islamic radicals
in Lebanon released the Rev.
Lawrence Martin Jenco, an
American hostage held for
nearly 19 months. American
statesman W. Averell
Harriman died in Yorktown
Heights, New York, at age 94.
In 1990, President George
H.W. Bush signed the
Americans with Disabilities
Act.
In 1996, swimmer Amy
Van Dyken became the first
American woman to win
four gold medals at a single
Olympics as she captured the
50-meter freestyle in Atlanta.
Ten years ago: In a dramatic turnaround from her first
murder trial, Andrea Yates
was found not guilty by reason of insanity by a Houston
jury in the bathtub drownings
of her five children; she was
committed to a state mental
hospital. Iraqi Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki appealed to
a joint meeting of the U.S.
Congress to press the war in
Iraq with money and troops.
In Baghdad, a thinner but
combative Saddam Hussein
returned to his trial for the
first time since his hunger
strike and hospitalization.
Five years ago: The White
House threatened to veto
emergency House legislation
that aimed to avert a threatened national default.
One year ago: Closing out
a historic visit to the land of
his father’s birth, President
Barack Obama told Kenyans
that their country was at a
crossroads, and he urged them
to “choose the path to progress” by continuing to root out
corruption, eliminate income
inequality and be more inclusive of women and girls. In a
rare Sunday session, senior
Senate Republicans lined up
to rebuke Texas Republican
Sen. Ted Cruz — without mentioning him by name — for
harshly criticizing Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell.
Thought for Today: “One
brave deed makes no hero.”
— John Greenleaf Whittier,
American poet and essayist
(1807-1892).
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
Sally Jane Hart Strand
GOOSE VALLEY FIRE DEPARTMENT
Monday
• Medical, Pierce Lane, 8 a.m.
• Standby for Dayton and Ranchester fire districts
(which had multiple calls and no units available),
7:55 p.m.
• Vehicle fire, 3470 Bighorn Ave., 10:24 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN AMBULANCE
Monday
• No reports available at press time.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Monday
• No admissions reported.
• Dismissals — Natasha Borrego, Sheridan; Zylo
Aydyn Borrego, Sheridan
SHERIDAN POLICE DEPARTMENT
Information in the police reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Suspicious circumstance, York Circle, 12:08 a.m.
• Open door, South Main Street, 1:46 a.m.
• Open door, North Main Street, 2:15 a.m.
• Suspicious person, Kendrick Park, 9 a.m.
• Vehicle identification number inspection, West
12th Street, 9:51 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West 12th Street, 10:11 a.m.
• Animal found, Avon Street, 10:26 a.m.
• Filthy premises, Wyoming Avenue, 11 a.m.
• Phone harassment, North Gould Street, 11:04 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle, Marion Street, 12:04 p.m.
• Animal welfare, Dunnuck Street, 12:33 p.m.
• Illegal parking, North Gould Street, 12:40 p.m.
• Fraud, Weeping Willow Court, 1:03 p.m.
• Parking complaint, Zurtz Drive, 1:13 p.m.
• Motorist assist, Coffeen Avenue, 1:20 p.m.
• Animal incident, Avoca Court, 1:46 p.m.
• Reckless driver, East Fifth Street, 2:49 p.m.
• Theft (cold), Marion Street, 3:09 p.m.
• Weed violation, Idaho Avenue, 3:37 p.m.
• Dog at large, North Gould Street, 3:51 p.m.
• DUI (citizen report), Lewis Street, 4:25 p.m.
• Threat, West 10th Street, 4:53 p.m.
• Vehicle fire, Sheridan area, 5:05 p.m.
• Parking complaint, Delphi Avenue, 5:47 p.m.
• Alarm, North Main Street, 7:18 p.m.
• Missing person, Kurtz Driver, 7:49 p.m.
• Welfare check, Avoca Place, 8:51 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, East Third Street, 11:09 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, Canfield Street, 11:20 p.m.
DEATH NOTICES |
Felipe Velasquez, a 91-year-old Buffalo resident, passed
away peacefully at his home Friday, July 22, 2016. He is
survived by his wife, Bertha Velasquez, of Buffalo; two
sons, Felipe Velasquez of Sheridan and Pablo Velasquez
of Gillette; one daughter, Martha Novotny of Buffalo; 15
grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents. Condolences may be sent to
Harness Funeral Home at 351 Adams in Buffalo.
A stray
afternoon
thunderstorm
Sunshine and
pleasant
A t-storm
around in the
p.m.
88
85
89
95
Almanac
51
53
Temperature
High/low .........................................................99/53
Normal high/low ............................................89/54
Record high ...........................................102 in 1933
Record low ...............................................37 in 1911
58
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.16"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.98"
Year to date .................................................... 8.01"
Normal year to date ....................................... 9.15"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
5:48 a.m.
5:49 a.m.
5:50 a.m.
8:41 p.m.
8:39 p.m.
8:38 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
12:01 a.m.
12:36 a.m.
1:15 a.m.
1:27 p.m.
2:38 p.m.
3:47 p.m.
Last
New
First
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
56/86
Dayton
60/87
Lovell
60/88
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
58/85
Ranchester
59/86
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
64/91
Basin
60/92
57/88
July 26
Aug 2
Aug 10
Aug 18
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
Clearmont
60/85
Story
55/81
Gillette
56/83
Buffalo
61/85
Worland
57/93
Wright
58/81
Kaycee
56/86
Thermopolis
51/91
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Hardin
65/91
Full
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.00"
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Broadus
61/84
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
National Weather for Wednesday, July 27
Regional Weather
SATURDAY
A stray
afternoon
thunderstorm
55
Estimated jackpot:
$470,000
Felipe Velasquez
Billings
63/86
57
Winning numbers:
12-19-31-34-44;
Louis Timar, an 84-year-old man, residing in Prescott
Valley, Arizona, died July 20, 2016, with his family at his
side. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, July 26 at 2
p.m. from the Harness Funeral Home Chapel in Buffalo
with Pastor Tom Saur officiating. Visitation will be held
Monday, July 25 from 1-9 p.m. at the Harness Funeral
Home Chapel. Donations in Timar’s memory may be
made to the Buffalo Senior Center in care of the Harness
Funeral Home at 351 N. Adams in Buffalo. Online condolences may be made at www.harnessfuneralhome.
com.
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
A thunderstorm
in spots early
Here are the results
of Monday’s
Cowboy Draw
lottery drawing:
Louis Timar
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 56
Female inmate count: 8
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 5
Number of book-ins for the previous day: 1
Number of releases for the previous day: 1
FRIDAY
Quarter
Pounder
Maxine Fried Fudge, 64, of Big Horn, died Sunday, July
24, 2016, at St. Vincent Hospital in Billings, Montana.
A visitation will be held from 6-7 p.m. on Friday, July
29, 2016, at Kane Funeral Home, Sheridan, WY. Services
will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 30, 2016, at the
First Baptist Church in Sheridan with Pastor John
Craft officiating. Interment will be in the Mount Hope
Cemetery in Big Horn, with a reception to follow.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will not be released until the
individuals have appeared in court.
Monday
• Daniel Isaac Duff, 18, Sheridan, bond revocation,
district court, arrested by SCSO
THURSDAY
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Next drawing:
July 28
Maxine Fried Fudge
SHERIDAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Monday
• Warrant service, West 13th Street, 10:14 a.m.
• Damaged property, West 13th Street, 3:02 p.m.
• Alarm, West Brundage Lane, 7:26 p.m.
• Search and rescue, Box Canyon, 8:01 pm.
• Vehicle fire, Big Horn Avenue, 10:24 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Call The Sheridan
Press at 672 -2431.
April 29, 1937 - July 22, 2016
Sally Jane Hart Strand, 79, of Sheridan
passed away on Friday, July 22, 2016 in
the Scott Cottage at the Green House
Living.
Sally was born on April 29, 1937 in
Midwest, WY to Dr. Wilbur Hart and
Martha (Leach) Hart. She graduated from
Sally Jane
Natrona County High School in 1955. She
Hart Strand
met the man she would marry at the IXL
dude ranch at Dayton, WY. She married Donald E. (Tuffy) Strand on September 12, 1954 in Las
Vegas, Nevada.
She had many different occupations from banking to
real estate agent, but she was proudest when she and Tuffy
bought the Mountain Inn Bar in Dayton, Wyoming during
the 1980’s. Dayton was where Sally and Tuffy met and that’s
where they finished their life together. Sally enjoyed having
fun and was always up for a good time, you could always
see her with a smile and she had a contagious laugh. Some
of her greatest accomplishments were watching her two
daughters grow into successful adults. She was also very
proud of her grandchildren and spent a lot of memorable
time watching them compete in their different athletic
endeavors and grow into young adults.
Sally was preceded in death by her husband Donald E.
(Tuffy) Strand and her parents Dr. Wilbur Hart and Martha
Hart, and an infant sister Nancy.
Sally is survived by her children, Peggy Dawn Strand of
Sheridan, WY, Jannan Lee (Randy) Clabaugh of Arvada,
WY, her two grandchildren, Donald Lamont Clabaugh of
Sheridan, WY and Randa Hart Clabaugh of Grapevine, TX
and a brother Jack Hart.
If you would like to contribute memorials to honor Sally
can be made to the Green House Living at 2311 Shirley Cove,
Sheridan, WY or the Sheridan Elks Lodge 520, Cemetery
fund at 45 W. Brundage, Sheridan, WY 82801.
Services will be held at 10:00 am on Wednesday July 27,
2016 at Kane Funeral Home with Bob Moore officiating.
Interment will be in the Sheridan Elks Memorial Cemetery.
A reception will follow at the Mountain Inn Bar in Dayton,
WY.
The family wishes to thank Dr. Strahan and the staff at the
Green House Living/Scott Cottage for all the excellent and
loving care provided to our mom and grandmother.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.
com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
86/62/t
87/53/pc
83/55/t
85/58/pc
90/55/s
83/57/t
92/53/s
86/46/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
86/61/t
84/49/t
79/55/t
81/57/t
91/55/s
83/53/t
93/54/pc
86/45/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
89/62/s
88/52/s
84/57/s
83/58/s
90/57/pc
86/55/s
93/55/pc
87/47/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
83/50/pc
80/55/t
89/53/pc
90/58/pc
90/56/s
88/59/t
75/53/t
77/41/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
81/47/t
78/55/t
86/47/pc
88/57/pc
89/55/pc
83/58/t
77/54/t
78/38/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
83/50/s
83/57/s
89/50/s
90/58/s
90/57/pc
86/59/s
80/55/s
78/40/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
A7
HAVE NEWS?
OBITUARY |
SHERIDAN FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Rocky Mountain Ambulance assist, 500 block
West Fifth, 2:41 a.m.
• RMA assist, 400 block Falcon Ridge Court, 7:02
p.m.
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
History as Clinton ascends to nomination — hostility too
BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY AND CALVIN WOODWARD
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A glass ceiling
is shattering at the Democratic National
Convention as Hillary Clinton ascends to
the presidential nomination with Tuesday’s
roll call of the states, making her the first
woman to lead a major party into a White
House race.
Clinton’s campaign hoped to use the
history-making moment to bolster the candidate’s popularity — mindful that while
many voters are happy to be nominating a
woman, they’re not wild about this particular woman candidate. Former President
Bill Clinton and other speakers will offer
prime-time testimonials to her career highlights and advocacy, hoping to soften her
image and resistance to her bid.
But as history is being made, hostility is
being heard, too. Bernie Sanders’ primary
challenge has unleashed vitriol toward the
party establishment that Sanders himself
has been unable to rein in. His supporters
spent much of Monday protesting his treatment by the party, even booing Clinton’s
name.
What was expected to be a tightly orchestrated convention, run with all the professionalism and experience that were lacking
at Trump’s often-chaotic affair in Ohio,
instead showed its rough edges in the early
going, starting with chants of “Bernie”
during the opening invocation and boos at
numerous mentions of Clinton’s name.
First lady Michelle Obama gave a heartfelt endorsement of the candidate who
engaged her husband in a fierce struggle
for the nomination in 2008. “I trust Hillary
to lead this country,” she said in a speech
that provided a parent’s-eye view of the
White House and its power.
Liberal favorite Elizabeth Warren, senator from Massachusetts, and Sanders himself also gave the party something to cheer
about Monday night.
While Mrs. Obama has often avoided
overt politics, her frustration with Trump’s
rise was evident. Without naming him, she
warned that the White House couldn’t be
in the hands of someone with “a thin skin
or a tendency to lash out” or someone who
tells voters the country can be great again.
“This right now, is the greatest country on
earth,” she said.
Sanders took the stage to a sustained roar
and shouts of “We love you, Bernie.” Some
of his supporters were in tears.
While asserting “our revolution continues,” the Vermont senator implored his
restive followers to get behind Clinton.
On issues of poverty, immigration, environmental protection and more, he said,
Clinton’s election counts. “If you don’t
believe that this election is important,” he
said, “take a moment to think about the
Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump
would nominate.”
Some delegates said the messages did
the trick.
“As the night went on, we saw a party
grow stronger,” South Carolina delegate
Boyd Brown said after the first day speeches.
Where Monday’s opening night lineup showcased diversity — with black,
Hispanic, gay and disabled speakers —
Tuesday’s program will undoubtedly play
up Clinton’s historical milestone and make
an overt appeal to women voters who see it
as long overdue.
Trump seemed to acknowledge Clinton’s
edge with female voters.
“Fifty percent of our country is men,
where I’m doing very, very well,” he
began in remarks Monday night in North
Carolina. “That’s the good news. Let me
give you the bad news: The women. I don’t
know what’s going on with the women
here. But I think, I think I’m doing well
with the women.”
Clinton was firmly on track to write the
next chapter of a story that left off in 2008,
when she conceded the Democratic presidential race to Barack Obama in a speech
that lamented “we weren’t able to shatter
that highest, hardest glass ceiling this
time,” but added proudly, “it’s got about 18
million cracks in it,” a tally of her primary
votes.
The roll call, when each state announces
its delegate totals from the primary season,
will affirm a nomination Clinton locked
up weeks ago. One question of the day was
whether Sanders would press for a count
by all the states, as his delegates want, or
interrupt the process to ask that her nomination be approved by acclamation. That’s
what Clinton did on Obama’s behalf in 2008
to indicate their rivalry was truly over.
Nomination sealed, the Clinton campaign
planned to turn to a Day 2 program dubbed
“Fights of Her Life,” highlighting her advocacy for children, health care and Sept. 11
recovery efforts, the campaign said.
The speakers also will include the
so-called “mothers of the movement” —
the mothers of Eric Garner and Michael
Brown, black men whose deaths at the
hands of police helped spawn the Black
Lives Matter protests.
The moment will not be without controversy: Philadelphia’s police union
complained that Clinton was showcasing
killings by police without giving equal time
to the families of fallen officers. Clinton’s
campaign responded that two members of
law enforcement also are on the convention
schedule.
The convention opened in a dust-up over
leaked emails showing the party’s pro-Clinton, anti-Sanders slant during the primaries, when it was supposed to be neutral.
In the uproar, party chairwoman Debbie
Wasserman Schultz of Florida went swiftly
into exile, first giving up her position, then
the convention’s opening-day gavel after
being roundly booed by Sanders partisans
at a meeting of her home-state delegation.
GO ONLINE!
w ww.thesheridanpress.com
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
VIP pit stop
Ben Mumm and son Dana Mumm, 5, explore the Terminator monster truck for the VIP pit stop event prior to
the Mega Promotions Monster Truck show Saturday at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead
world for people’s height
NEW YORK (AP) — If
you want to see a tall population of men, go to the
Netherlands. Tall women?
Latvia.
And in the United States,
which lags behind dozens of
other countries in height,
the average for adults
stopped increasing about 20
years ago.
That’s the word from
researchers who analyzed
a century’s worth of height
data from 200 countries.
Results were released
Monday in the journal eLife.
National height averages
are useful as an indicator
of nutrition, health care,
environment and general
health that people have
experienced from the womb
through adolescence, said
Majid Ezzati of Imperial
College London, who led the
research. Genes also influence height.
The researchers calculated
average height for 18 year
olds, roughly the age when
people stop growing. They
drew on more than 1,400
studies that covered more
than 18.6 million adults who
reached that age between
1914 and 2014.
Experts said the results
generally agree with what
others have reported before.
The tallest men in the
new analysis were Dutch,
with an average height of
about 6 feet (182.5 centimeters). The next nine tallest
countries in order for men
were Belgium, Estonia,
Latvia, Denmark, BosniaHerzegovina, Croatia,
Serbia, Iceland and the
Czech Republic.
Latvia topped the list for
women, with an average
height of 5-foot-6 (170 centimeters). Rounding out the
top 10 were the Netherlands,
Estonia, the Czech Republic,
Serbia, Slovakia, Denmark,
Lithuania, Belarus and
Ukraine.
Over the century-long
span of the study, the biggest gains appeared in
South Korean women and
Iranian men, who added 8
inches (20.2 centimeters)
and 6 ½ inches (16.5 centimeters), respectively. There
was little change in South
Asia and some sub-Saharan
African countries.
In the U.S., men gained
about 2 ½ inches (6 centimeters) over the century, with
about 2 inches (5 centimeters) for women. The nation
is now the 37th tallest for
men and 42nd for women,
researchers said.
The analysis estimated
that average height for U.S.
18 year olds maxed out at
about 5-foot-10 (177.5 centimeters) for men in 1996,
and at about 5-foot-5 (164
centimeters) for women in
1988. Since then height has
stalled but not decreased
significantly, said James
Bentham of Imperial College
London, a study author.
Most Western countries,
including the Netherlands,
also have hit a plateau,
although the U.S. reached it
early, researchers said.
The researchers didn’t
investigate the causes of the
U.S. stagnation. But John
Komlos, a visiting professor of economics at Duke
University in Durham,
North Carolina, said there
could be several reasons. He
didn’t participate in the new
study but has previously
studied height.
Komlos suggested such
factors as lack of health
insurance, shortfalls in
medical and prenatal care,
underweight and preterm
babies from teenage pregnancies, and a rise in obesity, which leads to earlier
puberty and so stoppage of
growth.
SPORTS
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
OFF AND RUNNING
B1
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Antelope Butte Summer Festival brings runners, bikers to Bighorn Mountains
Clara Bouley, right, and a group of 8-mile runners take off from the starting line during the Summer Festival Saturday at the Antelope Butte Mountain Recreation Area. The Antelope Butte Foundation hosted a variety of
live band performances, activities, camping and races to help raise money for the area. For full race results, see B3.
Jets fall in
Class B
title game
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The state championship was within reach for
the Sheridan Jets, but the team
fell just short in a tough 6-5 loss
to Gillette.
The Wyoming Class B state
championship was on the line
as Sheridan and Gillette battled
it out Monday morning in the
second game of the double-elimination championship. Gillette
beat Sheridan Sunday to force
the final matchup.
The Jets jumped ahead early,
scoring 3 in the first inning, but
Gillette responded with 3 in the
second to tie the game.
From there, the two teams traded runs until a scoreless seventh
inning resulted in a Gillette title.
Jaxon Parker broke the 3-3
tie in the fifth inning when his
single scored Will Timberlake to
make it 4-3. It was Parker’s 13th
RBI of the tournament.
Again, though, Gillette
answered in the bottom of the
inning, scoring 3 runs that would
end up being the difference makers.
The Jets got one back in the
sixth inning but left the bases
loaded as they watched their title
slip away.
Parker, Timberlake, Race
Johnston and Caleb Keller were
all named to the All-Tournament
team after Monday’s game.
Cubs get closer Aroldis Chapman in trade with Yankees
Chapman, one of the most dominant relievers in the game, but one who also comes
with some risk for a franchise riding a posiCHICAGO (AP) — Before the Chicago
tive wave.
Cubs completed a trade for Aroldis
“This is a game-changer. Aroldis
Chapman, owner Tom Ricketts and presChapman is a game-changing-type pitcher
ident of baseball operations Theo Epstein
in the postseason,” Epstein said. “As you sit
decided they had to hear from the closer
around and game plan how you’re going to
himself about a domestic violence allegation win a big game or how you’re going to win a
in the offseason.
postseason game, it makes it look a lot easSo Ricketts and Epstein asked Major
ier when you see him there on your lineup
League Baseball for a window to speak with card.”
the left-hander, and they got him on the
Chapman is expected to join the Cubs
phone Monday. When the conversation was for Tuesday night’s game at the crosstown
over, the blockbuster deal was on.
White Sox.
Chasing their first World Series title since
For the Yankees, it was a rare July trade
1908, the Cubs addressed one of their few
that saw the best player in the deal leaving
weaknesses by sending a pricey package of
New York. But Chapman is eligible for free
four players to the New York Yankees for
agency after this season, New York also
BY JAY COHEN
AP SPORTS WRITER
has All-Stars Andrew Miller and Dellin
Betances in the bullpen, and its haul included top shortstop prospect Gleyber Torres,
versatile pitcher Adam Warren and minor
league outfielders Billy McKinney and
Rashad Crawford.
“This was an easy call, and this was the
right call,” general manager Brian Cashman
said. “Easy because we traded from an area
of strength and we are excited about the
players that we’ve received for someone
that obviously was only under control for
two more months.”
The Yankees (51-48) are three games over
.500 for the first time this season, but they
still face long odds of getting to the playoffs.
SEE TRADE, PAGE B8
Broncos rookies get head start before champs report
much as you can in the offseason. But there’s nothing like
being in the building kind of getENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) —
ting your feet wet, hearing the
Von Miller and the rest of the
quarterback say the plays, hear
Super Bowl champs report to
the cadence. So, it’ll definitely
training camp on Wednesday.
be nice to get a couple days back
The rookies got a 48-hour head
in the swing of that.
start to begin making their
“I think it’ll definitely help
mark.
and I’m definitely happy for
Denver’s draft class and colthat.”
lege free agents reported to the
McGovern said he’ll be glad
UC Health Center on Monday
to finally put the pads on this
and went through their first
weekend because it’s easier to
workouts.
fend off defensive linemen when
“It’s definitely nice to refresh,” there’s something to grab other
said Connor McGovern, a fifththan the defenders’ shirts.
round guard from Missouri
Putting on the pads is someknown already for his monster
thing veterans often dread,
weight room workouts.
knowing their bodies won’t feel
“You can watch as much film,
as good as they do now until
do as many steps, work out as
after the season is over.
BY ARNIE STAPLETON
AP PRO FOOTBALL WRITER
For rookies, it represents the
first real chance to make a good
impression.
“I’m excited to get started,
to finally put the pads on and
showcase what I can do and
showcase that I can help this
team,” said safety Will Parks, a
sixth-round pick from Arizona.
“I’m just ready to get out there
and get after it.”
Wearing pads is one thing,
lugging them around is quite
another.
Fourth-round pick Devontae
Booker raised eyebrows in the
offseason when the former Utah
running back said he wasn’t
here to carry veterans’ pads but
to take one of their roster spots.
Safety Justin Simmons of
Boston College who was selected
a round ahead of Booker, said
he respects the veterans and the
tradition of rookies carrying
their pads off the field but he
does see Booker’s point.
“You’re a rookie. You do what
every rookie had to do in the
past, that’s the way I look at it,”
Simmons said. “In the grand
scheme of things, though, you
are here to take someone’s job.”
The rookies all say they’re
blessed to join a Super Bowl
champion, but they also had to
watch as their colleagues visited
the White House last month and
then received their diamond-encrusted rings.
Simmons called it great motivation.
SEE CAMP, PAGE B8
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Jordan gives
$2M; looks
to build trust
between
blacks, cops
BY STEVE REED
AP SPORTS WRITER
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Michael Jordan finally spoke
out on Monday about racial
tensions in America in hopes
of easing conflicts between
blacks and law enforcement.
The NBA great and
Charlotte Hornets owner
announced he is giving $1
million to the Institute for
Community-Police Relations
and another $1 million to the
NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
The aim is to help build trust
following several shootings
around the country.
“As a proud American, a
father who lost his own dad
in a senseless act of violence,
and a black man, I have been
deeply troubled by the deaths
of African-Americans at the
hands of law enforcement and
angered by the cowardly and
hateful targeting and killing
of police officers,” Jordan said
in a statement. “I grieve with
the families who have lost
loved ones, as I know their
pain all too well.”
Jordan’s father was killed
in 1993 in a botched carjacking in North Carolina. Daniel
Green and his friend Larry
Demery were convicted of killing 56-year-old James Jordan
along U.S. 74 and dumping
his body in South Carolina.
Both were sentenced to life in
prison.
The high-profile Jordan has
been notoriously silent over
the years when it comes to his
opinions on politics or social
justice issues, which has
drawn some criticism.
But he said Monday he “can
no longer stay silent” on the
issue.
“I was raised by parents
who taught me to love and
respect people regardless of
their race or background, so
I am saddened and frustrated
by the divisive rhetoric and
racial tensions that seem to
be getting worse as of late,”
Jordan said in the statement.
“I know this country is better
than that. ... We need to find
solutions that ensure people
of color receive fair and equal
treatment AND that police
officers — who put their lives
on the line every day to protect us all — are respected and
supported.”
Spike Lee tweeted: “DO NOT
SLEEEP ON MJ.” NBA player
Jared Dudley tweeted: “There
u go MJ.”
Jordan won six NBA championships with the Chicago
Bulls and became one of the
most popular and respected
basketball players in the
world. After retiring, he
became the majority owner of
the Hornets in 2010.
“Over the past three decades
I have seen up close the dedication of the law enforcement
officers who protect me and
my family,” Jordan said. “I
have the greatest respect for
their sacrifice and service. I
also recognize that for many
people of color their experiences with law enforcement
have been different than
mine. I have decided to speak
out in the hope that we can
come together as Americans,
and through peaceful dialogue
and education, achieve constructive change.”
Jordan said he chose the
Institute for CommunityPolice Relations because its
policy and oversight work is
focused on building trust and
promoting best practices in
community policing. He gave
to the NAACP Legal Defense
Fund, the nation’s oldest civil
rights law organization, to
support its work in support
of reforms aimed at building
trust and respect between
communities and law enforcement.
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
Dahl debut a hit, but Rockies fall to Orioles 3-2
“Fortunately, I was able to get a
hit and get to second base. Mark
Reynolds got a hit and I scored a
BALTIMORE (AP) — For a
run to help the team.”
short time in the seventh inning,
Batting sixth and playing left
it appeared David Dahl just might field, the rookie went through a
end up scoring the decisive run
variety of emotions.
for Colorado in his major league
“I was very anxious, very
debut.
excited and it was a great atmoAlas, the Baltimore Orioles
sphere,” Dahl said. “I’m glad to
quickly pulled even and ended up get that first game out of the way.
winning 3-2 in 10 innings Monday, Unfortunately, we didn’t come
spoiling Dahl’s long awaited
away with a win.”
arrival and ending the Rockies’
The Rockies made three errors,
four-game winning streak.
which resulted in two unearned
Dahl, the 10th overall pick in
runs by the AL East-leading
the 2012 draft, went 1 for 4 with
Orioles.
two strikeouts. The 22-year-old
In the 10th, Baltimore’s Adam
was summoned from Triple-A
Jones reached on a one-out single
Albuquerque early Monday and
off the third-base bag and took
traveled across the country from
third on a single by Jonathan
California to Camden Yards.
Schoop. Manny Machado followed
His first hit in the big leagues
with a comebacker to Jordan
was a single up the middle in
Lyles, who fumbled the ball before
the seventh. He advanced on a
throwing home. Catcher Nick
wild pitch and scored to give the
Hundley caught the ball near the
Rockies a 2-1 lead.
ground and lost the handle while
“I was chasing that high pitch a attempting to tag the sliding
little bit tonight, kind of just real
Jones. Lyles (2-3) was charged
anxious and nervous,” Dahl said. with an error on the play.
BY DAVID GINSBURG
AP SPORTS WRITER
“I made a good pitch to
Machado to get a ground ball,”
Lyles said. “I caught it and looked
what to do next and it fell out of
my glove. It was just a dumb play.
... That’s a tough way to lose a
game.”
Chaz Roe (1-0) worked the 10th
for the victory.
Nolan Arenado homered for the
Rockies, who mustered only six
hits.
One of the most surprising
aspects of the game occurred in
the field, where Arenado made
two errors at third base. The
three-time Gold Glove Award
winner botched a grounder in the
first inning and threw wildly to
first base in the second, a mistake
that led to an unearned run.
Arenado came into the game
with just one error in 96 games
this season.
Seeking his 100th career victory, Colorado lefty Jorge De La
Rosa got locked in a duel with
Yovani Gallardo and failed to get
a decision. Coming off a miserable outing in which he gave up a
career-high nine runs to Tampa
Bay, De La Rosa allowed two
runs, one earned, and four hits in
6 1/3 innings.
He entered the seventh with a
2-1 lead but was lifted after hitting
a batter and giving up a double.
Jones greeted Adam Ottavino
with a run-scoring groundout.
Gallardo gave up two runs and
five hits in 6 2/3 innings.
After Jones singled in a second-inning run, Arenado led off
the fourth by sending a 1-0 pitch
into the left-field seats. It was his
26th homer of the season and second in two games.
UP NEXT
Rockies: Chad Bettis (8-6, 5.31
ERA) makes his 21st start of
the season Tuesday night in the
second game of the series. The
Rockies are 7-1 in his last eight
starts.
Orioles: RHP Chris Tillman
(14-2, 3.18) seeks his major
league-leading 15th victory.
He’s allowed one run over seven
innings in each of his last four
starts.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Setting it over her head
Ellie Bard sets the ball over her head during the Chad Teichert setters camp Saturday at Sheridan High School.
Instead of making history, Spieth trying to ignore it
BY DOUG FERGUSON
AP GOLF WRITER
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. (AP)
— Jordan Spieth walked with
purpose down the long corridor
toward his locker, not stopping to
look at the photos and scorecards
that cover more than a century of
golf history at Baltusrol.
Maybe that was just as well.
History has proven to be his
toughest opponent this year, and
it was bound to be a losing battle.
Dating to 1934 when the Masters
began, Spieth is among 14 players who have won two majors
in one year. Only five of those
players ever won a single major
the following year, and it’s an
elite group — Arnold Palmer,
Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino, Tom
Watson and Tiger Woods.
Woods is the only player to win
two majors in consecutive seasons.
Spieth is not trying to salvage his season at the PGA
Championship. All but four players would love to have his year of
two victories and a close call at
the Masters. The exceptions are
the three major champions and
Jason Day, the only three-time
winner on the PGA Tour this
year. It only seems like a struggle
for Spieth because of endless comparisons with last year.
That’s what led Spieth to try
to reason with the media, and
perhaps to remind himself, of the
reality he is facing.
“I think it’s been a solid year,
and I think had last year not happened I’d be having a lot of positive questions,” Spieth said after
the British Open. “Instead, most
of the questions I get are comparing to last year and, therefore,
negative because it’s not to the
same standard. So that’s almost
tough to then convince myself
that you’re having a good year ...
when the questions I get make me
feel like it’s not.”
Trouble is, last year did happen.
Comparisons were inevitable.
Graeme McDowell recalls his
magical season in 2010 when
he won the U.S. Open at Pebble
Beach and delivered the winning
point from the final match at the
Ryder Cup. He ended the year by
taking down Woods at his own
tournament in California. It was
tough to back up a year like that.
“It feels like a disappointment,
like a certain young American
who’s having the same issue,”
McDowell said, smiling because it
was clear he was speaking about
Spieth. “It’s the same way when
you shoot 62. It’s very hard to
come out on the golf course and
back up a 62. That’s the micro
version. The macro version is
coming off a year like that trying
to replicate it. Obviously, there’s
a lot of traps.”
Are the expectations too high?
Is the scrutiny too much?
“The kid is not having a bad
year,” McDowell said. “But he’s in
a different stratosphere now. He’s
in the Tiger stratosphere, where
every shot he hits is going to be
questioned, every move he makes
is going to be questioned. It’s
something he has to get used to.”
And there’s another sobering
reality that Spieth will have to
consider: History suggests he
might never have another season
like last year.
Spieth didn’t just win two
majors. He came as close as
anyone to being the first to capture the calendar Grand Slam.
He missed the British Open
playoff by one shot and was runner-up to Jason Day in the PGA
Championship.
Nicklaus had that chance one
time in 1972, finishing one shot
behind at the British Open.
Palmer created the modern Grand
Slam in 1960 when he won the
Masters and U.S. Open. He never
got shot the rest of his career.
Woods’ lone opportunity ended in
the rain and wind of Muirfield in
2002.
“There are aspirations and
goals and beliefs and knowledge
that you can achieve such incredible things that Jordan did,” Adam
Scott said. “But then there’s
reality balanced in there. History
shows it doesn’t repeat. One guy
(Woods) repeated it a few times.
So what’s successful after that is
what Jordan or any player having
that kind of year will have to figure out. I don’t know the answer.”
Spieth doesn’t believe that last
year was as good as it will get, nor
should he. He doesn’t turn 23 until
Wednesday.
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
ANTELOPE BUTTE FESTIVAL |
Antelope Butte Summer Festival
Bighorn Mountains
Final Results (top 20)
Butte Grind 4M
1. Brock Michaud 32:23
2. Justin Wright 34:46
3. Brady McLean 35:01
4. Cody Caves 35:49
5. Sara Kirol 36:01
.LVɈ:JV[[!
7. Kerri Rehm 36:50
8. Beth Hinkle 36:52
9. Ashli Filkins 37:24
10. Leah Bouley 37:34
11. Marni Whalen 38:16
12. Katie Siimpson 38:27
*SPU[1LɈYPLZ!
14. Keva McCarthy 38:42
15. Jake Wright 41:04
2HTTL1LɈYPLZ!
17. Sierra Powers 42:05
18. Gerry Thompson 42:27
19. David Walton 42:42
20. Gavin Schneider 43:23
Butte Grind 8M
1. Mark Johnson 1:06:34
1LɈ=VSSTLY! !
3. Richard McDonald 1:13:20
4. Matthew McCormick 1:13:48
5. Kyle Phipps 1:17:32
6. Erin Hanrahan 1:18:13
7. Clara Bouley 1:18:21
8. Bridger Michaud 1:19:51
9. Curt Schwamb 1:22:53
10. Sarah Oliver 1:26:53
11. Emily Damby 1:26:55
12. Linda Schwamb 1:27:10
13. Lynn Hartje 1:30:44
3VYLUH=LHS!!
15. Rebecca West 1:32:05
16. Kristen Schlattmann 1:35:39
17. Damon Eastman 1:38:16
18. Ben Longhofer 1:38:16
19. Jennifer Reed 1:38:18
20. Tandra Tewell 1:42:00
Butte Grind 15.5M
1. Nick Flores 2:17:11
2. Rob Michaud 2:32:16
3. Kyle McDonald 2:37:11
4. Chris Hayden 2:45:05
5. Levi Blackeagle 2:45:27
6. Nicholas Melone 2:49:05
(S`JPH=HU2PYR!!
8. Jason Szewc 2:57:58
9. Megan Truman 2:59:49
10. Brocade Blackeagle 3:00:04
11. Stacy Page 3:01:40
12. Paul McDowell 3:03:33
13. Molly Moore 3:05:07
14. Billy Sommerville 3:05:28
15. Dustin Snyder 3:07:08
16. Holly Nedens 3:07:43
17. Steve Gage 3:14:15
18. Stephanie Zier 3:14:23
;PɈHU`9LLK!!
20. Brenda Jacobs 3:17:07
Butte Grind 31M
1. Matthew Fisher 6:09:27
2. Andrew Ulrey 6:32:53
3. Mandy Rupp 6:32:53
4. Blake Spiegelberg 6:41:30
5. Lee Goodwin 7:11:43
6. Michael Sylvester 7:24:57
7. Kenneth Grant 7:24:58
8. Jim Zier 7:53:14
9. Norb Lyle 7:56:50
10. Angela Smith 8:13:54
11. Michael Horner 8:32:16
12. Hannah Wiley 9:45:54
13. Steve Burgess 10:57:14
Trail Duathlon
1. Corey Whalen 1:40:45
2. Matt Brown 1:53:00
3. Brendan Phipps 1:53:40
4. Robin Nichols 2:08:41
5. Gary Harnish 2:10:13
6. Kat Condos 2:13:51
7. Rebecca Bouley 2:14:47
8. Melody Brown 2:38:01
9. Rhonda Sollars 2:42:00
10. Mallory Brown 2:47:17
11. Jacki Franklin 2:47:39
Butte Buster 8M Bike
1. Sarah Wallick 46:30
2. Josh Chilton 48:12
3. Jason Etchechoury 57:48
4. Finn Bede 59:18
5. Chris Kirol 1:00:03
6. Andrew Walton 1:01:10
7. Brady Walton 1:01:31
8. Shawn Opitz 1:02:37
9. Cale Hinkle 1:09:38
10. Mark Spann 1:10:00
11. Jill Weibel 1:15:01
12. Justin Wisehart 1:15:12
13. Jeremy Walton 1:15:36
14. Mike Saldana 1:19:11
15. Jax Zimmer 1:21:00
16. Cody Keller 1:22:32
17. Adam Zimmer 1:32:11
18. Jeneen Hill 1:35:03
19. Amy Bouley 1:35:35
20. Ethyn Etchechoury 1:52:21
Butte Buster 22M Bike
1. Evan O’Toole 1:21:43
2. Matt Thelen 1:22:23
3. Kameron Condos 1:27:32
4. David Carter 1:28:18
5. Paul Plourde 1:28:21
6. Eric Bouley 1:35:40
7. Benjamin Ramanjenko 1:35:44
8. Ken Watkins 1:39:54
9. John Kirlin 1:40:20
10. Jack Eccles 1:43:15
11. Christian Parks 1:44:27
12. Jack Singer 1:48:55
13. Tim Cahhal 2:07:46
14. Robert Montgomery 2:21:43
15. Jared Koenig 2:28:31
16. Tom Balding 2:30:06
17. Christopher Stultz 2:39:10
18. Jess Yeigh 2:41:28
19. Joey Brown 2:46:43
20. Caryn Moxey 3:15:56
PRO RODEO |
Through July 24
All-around
1. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. $71,956
2. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $71,521
3. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $66,831
4. Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. $64,779
5. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $60,645
6. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas $58,645
7. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. $54,632
8. Shay Carroll, Prineville, Ore. $51,842
9. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $51,037
10. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $47,198
1VYKHU2L[ZJOLY:X\H^=HSSL`*HSPM
12. Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta $36,915
13. Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. $35,522
14. Kyle Lucas, Carstairs, Alberta $32,698
15. Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D. $32,317
16. Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. $28,958
17. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $26,737
18. Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. $23,113
19. Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. $22,366
20. Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas $21,781
Bareback Riding
1. Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $97,519
2. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. $86,070
3. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah $83,630
4. Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $76,823
5. R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $68,579
6. Jake Brown, Hillsboro, Texas $68,164
>PUU9H[SPɈ3LLZ]PSSL3H
8. Evan Jayne, Marseille, France $57,124
9. Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. $52,929
1. Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $100,974
2. Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah $98,359
3. CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $82,069
4. Jake Wright, Milford, Utah $61,533
5. Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah $61,225
/LP[O+L4VZZ/LÅPU3H
7. Jake Watson, Hudson’s Hope, British Columbia
$50,781
8. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. $49,557
9. Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta $46,588
ALRL;O\YZ[VU)PN=HSSL`(SILY[H
11. Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. $42,397
12. Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta $41,730
13. Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla. $37,959
14. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas $37,185
15. Cody Wright, Milford, Utah $36,012
16. Chet Johnson, Douglas, Wyo. $35,037
17. Ben Londo, San Luis Obispo, Calif. $34,567
18. Tyrel Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $34,450
19. Samuel Kelts, Millarville, Alberta $32,944
13. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz. $49,453
14. Cassidy Kruse, Gillette, Wyo. $48,941
15. Pamela Capper, Cheney, Wash. $48,918
16. Taylor Langdon, Aubrey, Texas $44,571
17. Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas $41,082
18. Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $40,725
19. Rachel Dice, Byron, Calif. $37,430
20. Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas $37,218
+\Ɉ`!WT
National League
East Division
Washington
New York
Miami
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Central Division
MLB |
American League
East Division
Baltimore
Boston
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay
W
58
55
56
51
38
L Pct
40 .592
42 .567
44 .560
48 .515
60 .388
GB
—
2½
3
7½
20
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Troopers open state tournament Tuesday
Nolan McCafferty comes around on a pitch Thursday at Thorne-Rider Stadium. The Sheridan Troopers open the Wyoming AA
State Tournament against Casper Tuesday in Jackson Hole.
1HRL=VSK7VUVRH(SILY[H
11. Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. $50,631
12. Ty Taypotat, Regina, Saskatchewan $43,227
13. Teddy Athan, Livermore, Calif. $38,785
14. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas $38,168
15. Anthony Thomas, Kimberly, Australia $35,021
19=LaHPU*V^SL`>`V 17. Jessy Davis, Power, Mont. $33,669
18. Colin Adams, Deloraine, Manitoba $32,726
19. Casey Breuer, Mandan, N.D. $32,145
20. Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah $31,370
Steer Wrestling
1. Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. $61,199
2. Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $60,179
3. Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas $53,927
4. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas $52,321
5. Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. $50,847
6. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $49,285
7. Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La. $41,452
8. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. $40,663
9. Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. $39,768
10. Jake Rinehart, Highmore, S.D. $36,953
11. Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla. $36,893
12. Clayton Moore, Pouce Coupe, British Columbia
$36,171
13. Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah $35,065
14. Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan. $34,636
15. Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb. $33,283
;YL]VY2UV^SLZ4V\U[=LYUVU6YL
17. Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho $31,645
18. Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii $28,654
19. Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev. $27,848
20. Jace Melvin, Fort Pierre, S.D. $27,545
Team Roping (header)
1. Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas $71,142
2. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. $64,477
3. Kolton Schmidt, Barrhead, Alberta $63,115
4. Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. $57,697
5. Zac Small, Welch, Okla. $56,758
6. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $56,041
7. Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $55,584
8. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas $55,091
9. Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. $46,377
10. Aaron Tsinigine, Tuba City, Ariz. $41,908
11. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $39,045
12. Spencer Mitchell, Williams, Calif. $38,094
13. Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. $37,497
14. Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. $36,722
15. Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta $35,759
16. Joel Bach, San Augustine, Texas $35,488
17. Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. $35,467
18. Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. $34,710
19. Adam Rose, Willard, Mo. $34,615
20. John Alley, Adams, Tenn. $31,877
Team Roping (heeler)
1HRL3VUN*VɈL`]PSSL2HU 2. Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. $65,766
3. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $57,764
4. Wesley Thorp, Stephenville, Texas $56,103
5. Junior Nogueira, Burleson, Texas $55,584
6. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $54,533
7. Shay Carroll, Prineville, Ore. $47,650
8. Quinn Kesler, Holden, Utah $46,347
9. Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. $40,873
10. Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $39,294
11. Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas $38,962
12. Dugan Kelly, Paso Robles, Calif. $38,697
13. Jeremy Buhler, Abbotsford, British Columbia
$38,153
14. Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. $37,325
15. Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. $36,994
16. Justin Davis, Cottonwood, Calif. $36,507
17. Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas $35,058
18. Walt Woodard, Stephenville, Texas $34,985
19. Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn. $31,877
20. Jim Ross Cooper, Stephenville, Texas $30,632
Saddle Bronc Riding
20. Tyrell Smith, Great Falls, Mont. $32,258
Tie-down Roping
1. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. $74,451
2. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas $69,075
3. Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas $68,271
4. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. $56,868
5. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. $56,134
6. Riley Pruitt, Gering, Neb. $53,040
7. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,684
8. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. $48,907
9. Reese Riemer, Stinnett, Texas $45,543
10. Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas $44,211
11. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho $38,892
12. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $36,276
13. Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas $35,807
14. Michael Otero, Lowndesboro, Ala. $35,688
15. Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $35,371
:[L[ZVU=LZ[*OPSKYLZZ;L_HZ 17. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas $34,414
18. Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas $33,066
*VY`:VSVTVU7YHPYPL=PL^;L_HZ
20. Blair Burk, Durant, Okla. $32,321
Steer Roping
1. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas $49,757
2. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. $48,320
3. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $36,880
4. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $34,783
5. Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas $34,103
6. Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas $33,929
=PU-PZOLY1Y(UKYL^Z;L_HZ
8. Marty Jones, Hobbs, N.M. $30,199
9. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D. $29,188
10. Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. $26,527
11. Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. $25,983
12. Guy Allen, Santa Anna, Texas $25,863
13. Shay Good, Midland, Texas $25,339
14. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. $22,295
15. Lawson Plemons, Axtell, Texas $19,764
16. Dan Fisher, Andrews, Texas $19,396
17. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas $19,302
18. Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas $14,794
19. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $14,278
20. Thomas Smith, Barnsdall, Okla. $13,621
Bull Riding
1. Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $95,225
2. Scottie Knapp, Albuquerque, N.M. $76,690
3. Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah $68,508
1LɈ(ZRL`([OLUZ;L_HZ
5. Tyler Smith, Fruita, Colo. $60,949
6. Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. $60,126
7. Cody Rostockyj, Lorena, Texas $59,864
8. Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash. $57,555
9. Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla. $56,373
10. Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah $53,150
11. Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla. $50,367
12. Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas $48,013
13. Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $47,943
14. Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho $46,650
15. Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas $46,355
16. Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. $45,107
17. Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho $42,627
18. Rorey Maier, Timber Lake, S.D. $42,214 19.
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas $40,878
20. Riker Carter, Stone, Idaho $39,527
Barrel Racing
4HY`)\YNLY7H\S»Z=HSSL`6RSH
2. Mary Walker, Ennis, Texas 91,003
3. Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. $89,921
4. Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas $84,751
5. Michele McLeod, Whitesboro, Texas $77,302
6. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. $76,422
7. Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Utah $73,948
8. Sarah Rose McDonald, Brunswick, Ga. $67,335
9. Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas $65,680
10. Taylor Jacob, Carmine, Texas $64,060
11. Cayla Melby, Burneyville, Okla. $57,561
12. Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas $56,810
Central Division
Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
West Division
W
56
52
49
48
37
L Pct GB
41 .577
—
48 .520 5½
50 .495
8
50 .490 8½
61 .378 19½
W
L Pct GB
Texas
58 42 .580
—
Houston
54 45 .545 3½
Seattle
50 48 .510
7
Oakland
45 55 .450
13
Los Angeles
44 55 .444 13½
Sunday
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 2
Toronto 2, Seattle 0
Baltimore 5, Cleveland 3
Boston 8, Minnesota 7
Chicago White Sox 4, Detroit 3
Houston 13, L.A. Angels 3
Texas 2, Kansas City 1
Chicago White Sox 5, Detroit 4
Oakland 3, Tampa Bay 2
Monday
Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings
Toronto 4, San Diego 2
Detroit 4, Boston 2
Texas 7, Oakland 6
Chicago White Sox 5, Chicago Cubs 4
N.Y. Yankees 2, Houston 1
L.A. Angels 6, Kansas City 2
Tuesday
Colorado (Bettis 8-6) at Baltimore (Tillman 14-2),
7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Hernandez 4-4) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 6-9),
7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 4-7) at Toronto (Stroman 8-4),
7:07 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 9-6) at Chicago White
Sox (Shields 4-12), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Pelfrey 3-9) at Boston (Wright 12-5), 7:10
p.m.
Washington (Gonzalez 6-8) at Cleveland (Salazar
11-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Gray 4-9) at Texas (Martinez 1-2), 8:05
p.m.
Atlanta (Harrell 1-2) at Minnesota (Santana 3-8),
8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-8) at Houston (Fister
10-6), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Skaggs 0-0) at Kansas City (Gee 3-3),
8:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 5-13) at L.A. Dodgers (Norris
5-9), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday
Washington (Strasburg 13-1) at Cleveland (Carrasco 7-3), 12:10 p.m.
San Diego (Perdomo 4-4) at Toronto (Estrada 5-4),
12:37 p.m.
Detroit (Fulmer 9-2) at Boston (Rodriguez 2-4),
1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Moore 6-7) at L.A. Dodgers (McCarthy
2-0), 3:10 p.m.
Colorado (Gray 6-4) at Baltimore (Bundy 3-2), 7:05
p.m.
Seattle (Paxton 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Cole 5-6), 7:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Ranaudo 1-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Hammel 9-5), 8:05 p.m.
Oakland (Manaea 3-5) at Texas (Darvish 2-2), 8:05
p.m.
([SHU[H-VS[`UL^PJaH[4PUULZV[H+\ɈL`
8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 7-2) at Houston (McCullers
5-4), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Shoemaker 5-10) at Kansas City
Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
West Division
W
58
52
53
46
33
L Pct
41 .586
45 .536
46 .535
55 .455
66 .333
GB
—
5
5
13
25
W
59
52
51
42
39
L Pct GB
39 .602
—
46 .531
7
47 .520
8
55 .433 16½
60 .394 20½
W
L Pct GB
San Francisco
58 41 .586
—
Los Angeles
56 44 .560 2½
Colorado
47 52 .475
11
San Diego
43 57 .430 15½
Arizona
41 58 .414
17
Sunday
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 2
Arizona 9, Cincinnati 8
N.Y. Mets 3, Miami 0
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 4
San Diego 10, Washington 6
Chicago Cubs 6, Milwaukee 5
Colorado 7, Atlanta 2
L.A. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 6
Monday
Baltimore 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings
Toronto 4, San Diego 2
Philadelphia 4, Miami 0
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, ppd.
Milwaukee 7, Arizona 2
Chicago White Sox 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Cincinnati 7, San Francisco 5
Tuesday
St. Louis (Martinez 9-6) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard
9-4), 4:10 p.m., 1st game
Colorado (Bettis 8-6) at Baltimore (Tillman 14-2),
7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Hernandez 4-4) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 6-9),
7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 4-7) at Toronto (Stroman 8-4),
7:07 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 9-6) at Chicago White
Sox (Shields 4-12), 7:10 p.m.
7OPSHKLSWOPH,PJROVɈH[4PHTP2VLOSLY
7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Garcia 7-6) at N.Y. Mets (Colon 8-5), 7:10
p.m., 2nd game
Washington (Gonzalez 6-8) at Cleveland (Salazar
11-3), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 4-9) at Milwaukee (Garza 1-4), 8:10
p.m.
Atlanta (Harrell 1-2) at Minnesota (Santana 3-8),
8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 5-13) at L.A. Dodgers (Norris
5-9), 10:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Reed 0-4) at San Francisco (Cain 1-6),
10:15 p.m.
Wednesday
7OPSHKLSWOPH,ÅPUH[4PHTP*VUSL`!
p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 13-1) at Cleveland (Carrasco 7-3), 12:10 p.m.
San Diego (Perdomo 4-4) at Toronto (Estrada 5-4),
12:37 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Moore 6-7) at L.A. Dodgers (McCarthy
2-0), 3:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Straily 5-6) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-5), 3:45 p.m.
Colorado (Gray 6-4) at Baltimore (Bundy 3-2), 7:05
p.m.
Seattle (Paxton 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Cole 5-6), 7:05
p.m.
:[3V\PZ>HPU^YPNO[ H[[email protected][Z=LYYL[[
3-6), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Ranaudo 1-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Hammel 9-5), 8:05 p.m.
Arizona (Bradley 3-6) at Milwaukee (Nelson 6-8),
8:10 p.m.
([SHU[H-VS[`UL^PJaH[4PUULZV[H+\ɈL`
8:10 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS |
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with
LHP Tom Gorzelanny on a minor league contract.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent LHP Carlos Rodon
to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment.
DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned RHP Buck Farmer
to Toledo (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated INF Danny
Worth for assignment. Selected the contract of INF
Alex Bregman from Fresno (PCL).
NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded LHP Aroldis
Chapman to the Chicago Cubs for RHP Adam
Warren, SS Gleyber Torres and OFs Billy McKinney
and Rashad Crawford. Assigned McKinney to
Trenton (EL) and Torres and Crawford to Tampa
(FSL). Recalled RHP Luis Severino from Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned RHP Jesse
Hahn to Nashville (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Max
Muncy from Nashville.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Designated OF Junior
Lake for assignment. Assigned 1B Chris Colabello
V\[YPNO[[V)\ɈHSV039LPUZ[H[LK6-1VZL)H\[PZta from the 15-day DL. Agreed to terms with RHP
Josh Winckowski on a minor league contract.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES — Designated OF Brandon
Barnes for assignment. Selected the contract of
OF David Dahl from Albuquerque (PCL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Sent OF Enrique
Hernandez to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab
assignment.
MIAMI MARLINS — Recalled RHP Jarred Cosart
from New Orleans (PCL). Placed LHP Wei-Yin
Chen on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 21.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Placed 3B Will Middlebrooks on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Keon
Broxton from Colorado Springs (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Sent OF Aaron Al[OLYY[V3LOPNO=HSSL`7*3MVYHYLOHIHZZPNUTLU[
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Optioned RHP Mike
Mayers to Memphis (PCL). Selected the contract of
RHP Jerome Williams from Memphis (PCL). Transferred RHP Jordan Walden to the 60-day DL.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Kevin
Quackenbush to El Paso (PCL). Recalled LHP
Keith Hessler from El Paso.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CHARLOTTE HORNETS — Signed C Mike Tobey.
Named Noel Gillespie coach of Greensboro
(NBADL).
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G Brandon Paul.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Reinstated Cleveland WR Josh Gordon
JVUKP[PVUHSS`HUKYLK\JLKOPZPUKLÄUP[LZ\ZWLUZPVU
to four games.
ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed DT Darnell
Dockett, who announced his retirement.
Woman shares her sexual assault story with Baylor players
WACO, Texas (AP) — A woman who said
she was raped by two Oregon State football
players and two other men in 1998 shared
her story with the Baylor football team
Monday.
Brenda Tracy’s talk with the Bears came
two months after a 13-page report said
Baylor failed to properly handle accusations of sexual assault, including some
against former football players.
After hearing about Baylor’s case, Tracy
had called for the NCAA to shut down the
football program.
Tracy told ESPN Central Texas radio that
Baylor football and basketball players were
engaged and paying attention, and that she
told them that they have an opportunity to
exact real change and be an example to follow. She was invited to campus by Baylor
acting head football coach Jim Grobe, who
replaced Art Briles within days after the
report from the Pepper Hamilton law firm.
“One thing I try to do is make this real
for people. Look at me, I’m a human being,
I could be your neighbor, I could be your
mother, I could be the person behind you at
the grocery store,” she said. “But I spent all
these years wanting to kill myself and hating myself because someone else took my
body and I did not give it to them.”
Tracy said what she tries to do is put a
“face and a person and a human experience
to rape.”
A month ago, Tracy shared her story with
Nebraska’s team. The Cornhuskers are
coached by Mike Riley, who was Oregon
State’s coach in 1998. The Associated Press
generally doesn’t identify sexual assault
victims, but Tracy has spoken publicly
about her experience. She has met with
NCAA officials and said she will be speaking to other college teams, with expectations that she will be contacted by more.
According to her Twitter profile, she is
a “Single mother, Registered Nurse, DV/
SA Survivor turned Activist, Speaker, &
Civilian Lobbyist. I believe one person
can change the world...” In a post on her
Twitter account after the talk, which was
closed to the public, Tracy described Grobe
as “a good man with a good heart” while
thanking Baylor for hosting her.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
In Mary Shelley’s
“Frankenstein,” the good
doctor’s monster was brought
to life by high-voltage electric shocks that jump-started
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
the creature’s organs and
brainwaves. According to a
new study, these days all Dr.
Frankenstein might need to
get the monster going would
be a smartphone!
Recent epilepsy research
from the Mayo Clinic used
an electroencephalogram
to measure study participants’ brainwaves and found
that for about 20 percent of
folks, “cortical processing
in the contemporary brain
is uniquely activated by
the use of PEDs” -- personal
electronic devices, such as a
cellphone or iPad.
That’s right, for some of
you, sending a text message
changes the pattern of your
brainwaves, creating what
the scientists described as a
“unique rhythm” that can’t
be replicated by tapping a
finger or even by talking
DEAR ABBY
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: I have been
married for almost three
years to a woman who refuses to share the same bed with
me. It started on our honeymoon when, after having sex,
she chose to sleep in a different bed whenever there were
two beds in the room.
She’s in her late 40s and
had never been married
through the same device.
Seems it takes extra effort
and concentration to complete what the researchers
called “nonauditory complex
communication,” such as
texting: For everyone, it
consumes all your conscious
attention and for one in five
it alters your brainwaves!
So now we have a scientific
explanation of why texting
while driving (or crossing
the street) is more dangerous
than hands-free calling. (And
hands-free is more dangerous than not doing it at all
-- 26 percent of car crashes
involve use of a cellphone,
including hands-free calling.) So heed the words on
the digital sign that looms
over the Holland Tunnel on
your way from downtown
Manhattan to New Jersey:
“Pay Attention. Just Drive!”
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
before. We have been intimate only twice in the last
year. Moreover, she doesn’t
let me sit next to her while
we watch TV, and there is no
kissing, no touching, no affection of any kind, physical or
verbal.
I have wracked my brain
trying to figure out why she
treats me like this, and I have
a few suspicions. She’s applying for permanent residence
status and may have married
me only for that, although
she denies it. She can no longer bear children, so she may
think there is no point in
having sex or being intimate.
She may have an aversion to
being touched, although she
doesn’t show that when we’re
out in public. She likes to hug
her female friends. (And no, I
don’t think she’s a lesbian.)
Any love that existed
between us is nearly gone at
this point, so am I justified
in getting a separation? We
have been to counseling, and
that is what the therapist
recommended. -- FEELING
UNLOVED IN UTAH
DEAR FEELING
UNLOVED: Assuming you
brush your teeth, use deodorant and shower regularly,
I’m as mystified about your
wife’s behavior as you are. I
know people who treat their
dogs and cats better than this
woman has been treating
you. That you have tolerated
it this long is surprising.
Your therapist has advised
a separation, but I would go
further than that. Because
you don’t have a marriage,
I think you should make it
official.
DEAR ABBY: I receive at
least two or three telemarketing calls a day -- and sometimes even more on Sundays.
Can you please tell me what
to do to put a stop to this?
I have written once before
to an address to curb this
situation, but no luck.
These calls come as late as
9 p.m. Thank you for any
advice. -- STRESSED OUT IN
ILLINOIS
DEAR STRESSED OUT:
I agree that telemarketing
calls are invasive when
they come in multiples. The
USA.gov Consumer Action
Handbook includes a number
you can call to restrict telemarketing calls permanently
by registering your phone
number. It is 888-382-1222.
This can also be done online
at www.donotcall.gov.
If you receive telemarketing calls after your number
has been in the national
registry for 31 days, you can
file a complaint using the
same web page and toll-free
number.
This will cut back on some
of the calls you receive, but
not all of them. Political
organizations, charities and
telephone surveyors with
which you have a relationship can still get through.
However, if you still find
yourself being inundated,
contact your phone provider
and inquire about call-blocking 800 numbers. Good luck!
What teens need to know
about sex, drugs, AIDS and
getting along with peers and
parents is in “What Every
Teen Should Know.” Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Teen Booklet,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
Household Goods &
Appliances
Hardware & Tools
(2) METAL folding
chairs w/ covered seat
$7.00 ea
674-7270
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY
duty 6" bench grinder in
very good condition.
$30
672-5119
ANTIQUE LAMP w/
Colorful Shade. $50.
751-1866
CARD TABLE. $15
674-7270
COMFORTABLE
MATCHING chairs. (2)
$30 each
(307)674-7270
FOUR POSTER twin
wood bed frame $50.
752-7943
FREE FRIDGE! Kelvinator side by side. Works
great missing some
shelves. Free delivery
within 20mi. of Sheridan. (307)751-4176
NOVELTY OLD Fashion Ice Box. Ideal for
storage. Top opens.
20"w x 29"h x 12"d. $30
674-7270
POWER LIFT & recline
chair. Asking $300
OBO. 674-7279.
SPRING CLEANING?
NEED TO
DECLUTTER?
SELL ANY ITEM
($50 or less)
FOR FREE IN THE
SHERIDAN PRESS!
For more details,
call Amber 672-2431.
Miscellaneous
COMMERCIAL GRADE
Toledo Band Meat Saw.
Model 5201. Has 5 new
bands. $600.
(307)674-4032
FRESH LOCALLY
grown rhubarb. $1.25/lb
672-3159
HAVE AN ITEM you
want to sell for
$50 or more?
Advertise with us!
ONLY $20.16!!!
Run it until it sells!
Call Amber
672-2431
Guns
Miscellaneous for Sale
SNAKE GUN. 44 mag
Colt Anaconda w/ leather shoulder holster dies.
238 rounds of ammo.
$1975 firm. 673-1542
MEN'S XL VARSITY
Jacket. Dark Green w/
black leather sleeves.
Only worn twice. $100.
307-683-6529.
WOODEN GUN Cabinet. Glass front. Storage
drawer. $35 763-8428
Services
JOURNEY MAN
painter for hire. 35 yrs
experience. Interior &
Exterior. Excel. Work!
(307)752-4197
For Lease
Farm & Ranch Supplies
10" 3 Point. Post Hole
Auger. $175 obo
307-763-1004
FORD 8N tractor with
blade. Rebuilt & restored. $4000 OBO.
672-2638
HESSTON 565 Round
baler. 1000 PTO for
parts. $500 obo.
655-9067
HESSTON 565A Round
baler. 540 PTO double
twine arms. $3500 obo
655-9067
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
LRG. 1 BR. apt. for rent
with walk in tub. $550 +
elec. No smoking/pets
(307)763-6000
Unfurn Apts for Rent
LOW INCOME
apartments for rent in
Buffalo & Wright.
Contact
Grimshaw Investments
for more information at
307-672-2810
NEW HOLLAND 7450
rotary disk bind swather. 13 ft. cut. 1000 PTO
almost new. 700 acre.
$25,000 boo 655-9067
Pets & Supplies
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
TWO BATHROOM vanities (includes countertop and sinks) $50 each
752-7943
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Section 8 available
depending on availability
and eligibility
Non Smoking Property
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
Hardware & Tools
672-8681 TDD #711
Building Materials
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
CEMENT MIXER.
Electric Motor. On
rubber wheels. With
hitch. Good condition.
$350 (307)655-2240
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
1 BR. W/D. No
smk/pets. $575/m+ Util.
752-5852.
1 BR. Newly remodeled. Laundry facilities. A/C. $600/mo.
util. incl. No smoking.
751-5815.
RANCHESTER STUDIO apt., $450/mo.+
heat & dep., util. pd. No
smk. Pets? Laundry rm.
incl. 307-752-9392.
1 BEDROOM Apartment. Part. Furnished.
Washer & Dryer.
Includes all utilities No
pets/smoking. References required.
$700/mo $500 Cleaning Dep. (307)751-4883
Equal Housing Opportunity
EXTRA LARGE 2 BR.
Low utils. $650/mo. +
$500 dep. 1 yr. lease.
Ref's req'd. 751-2445.
ELDORADO STORAGE Helping you conquer space. 3856 Coffeen. 672-7297.
15' X 30' storage unit for
rent. 673-5555
Help Wanted
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
for Registered Nurse.
Bring Resume to
Northeast Wyoming
Pediatric Associates,
P.C. at
916 Jackson Avenue,
Sheridan, WY 82801
or call Brenda at
307-675-5555
SCSD #1 is accepting
applications for
dishwashers at TRE &
TRMS. Approximately
3-5 hours a day Mon.Thurs. (following school
calendar). Please
apply online & call
Food Service
Coordinator, Dennis
Decker, with questions:
307-751-2872. E.O.E.
Houses, Unfurn for Rent
COMFORTABLE 2 BR.
w/ basement sleeping
room 1.5 BA. sm.
garage/ shop.A/C.
Newly remodeled. New
windows, carpet, appliances. $1000/mo.
Ref. req. 751-3993
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath
cute house in the
country for rent
minutes from town,
located on Big
Goose. Small pets
negotiable $950 per
month plus utilities
and $950 deposit.
Call 307-672-6179
3 BR 2 BA w/ 1 BR 1
BA Mother in law. Storage & carport. In Bighorn. $1500/m
751-7718
2 BR/1 Ba. 1 car garage $900 + util. 1 yr
lease. Sec. dep. Pet
negot. 307-631-6024
1 BR in Dayton. Nice
yd. & shop, $390/mo+
util. + deposit. 655-9337
Leave message.
Office/Retail Space for
Rent
3,000-12,000 sq./ft of
executive office building for lease in an established commercial
park. Lease part or all.
Call (307)752-8112
Carroll Realty Co.
1530 SQ/ft office space
located on Coffeen Ave.
High visibility & parking.
Please call for lease
terms & rates.
(307)751-4915.
CHAIN LINK panels for
a dog run. 1 6'x6' 1 6'x6'
w/ gate 2 6'x10' Excellent condition. $300
752-5494
LAB PUPPIES. 2 black
male, 1 yellow female.
Both parents on site.
$300. 307-750-2203.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
Office Machines &
Equipme
SHARP MX-2610N
Copier. Digital. Full Color. Multi-functional system; Copy. Print. Scan
& More! Asking $1500
(307)675-1919
Storage Space
INTERSTATE STORAGE. Multiple Sizes
avail. No deposit
req'd. 752-6111.
COMPUTER INTEL I-3
syst. 4 GB ram. 500 GB
HD. Dvd drive w/ 20"
flat screen. Canon
Copy/ fax mx320 new
cartridge. Comp. desk.
$200.00 752-3134
WEBER GRILL $50
752-7943
1992 DV 17C Tracker
Boat. 40HP Motor w/
trailer. $2000 of upgrades in 2016! Excellent shape $5500.00
307-751-1016
Unfurn Apts for Rent
Computers-Accessories
TREE EQUIP for Sale.
1250 Vermeer Chipper.
$12,000
If interested call
751-5277
Boats
Fax: (307) 672-7950
FRESHLY RENOVATED 4 room suite with
private bath. On main
next to downtown. Handicap access. Private
parking. Great visability.
$825/ mo + Deposit. Util
Not Incl. (307)752-4424
NICE 1100 sq/ft office.
Easy access. Close to
down town. 673-5555
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
COSNER
CONSTRUCTION CO.
is seeking experienced
carpenters. Must have
basic tools, a valid
driver's license &
transportation. Local,
year round work,
excellent pay &
benefits package.
Please apply in person
at 543 North Main
Street or fax resume to
674-4211
Help Wanted
SCSD #1 is accepting
applications for a
part-time coordinator/
supervisor on the BH
campus. Position
duties will include
coordinating &
supervising community
use of the BH gyms,
fields, & facilities.
Successful applicant
will communicate with
BH athletic directors &
principals to
coordinate activities
around school
sponsored activities.
$13/hour
approximately 10 hours
per week. Apply online
www.sheridan.k12.wy.u
s Email position questions to Marty Kobza
[email protected]
wy.us
EOE Open until filled.
SCSD #1 Board of
Trustees is accepting
letters of interest to
serve on the SCSD #1
Recreation District
Board (3 year term).
Applicants must reside
within SCSD#1
boundaries. Interested
applicants should email
their letter of interest to
Brandi Miller,
[email protected]
wy.us no later than
August 15, 2016
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Help Wanted
GREEN HOUSE
Living for Sheridan
Full-time CNA
Openings
Evening & Overnight
Shifts
Offering a different
work experience
with great pay,
generous shift diffs,
PTO and holidays.
Flexible 8 hour shifts
& scheduling.
Customizable health,
vision, & dental plans
available.
Come see & feel the
difference!
Contact us at
(307) 672-0600
Online: www.sheridan
greenhouse.org
Or take forms to:
Workforce Services
61 Gould Street
Sheridan, WY 82801
FT/PT maintenance
person needed for local
apartment building.
Applicant must have
experience in building &
grounds maintenance &
repairs. Salary based
on experience. Submit
resume to Human
Resources, PO Box H,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
MOTEL 6 &
QUALITY INN.
PREP COOK/
DISHWASHER:
The Brinton Museum
Bistro is currently
hiring for a dishwasher/prep cook to work
during lunch service in
our new restaurant.
Wages DOE. Email
resume to
[email protected]
museum.org
B5
Help Wanted
SAMPSON
CONSTRUCTION CO.,
INC. – OMAHA, NE
We are immediately
hiring laborers, skilled
laborers & carpenters
for our projects in &
around the Omaha, NE
area.
• Regular full-time
positions.
• Competitive wages
based on experience.
• Comprehensive
benefits package
available first of month
following 60 days of
employment.
· $500 relocation
bonus.
Please inquire or send
resume to
[email protected] EOE.
Have open
positions?
Place an ad!
672-2431
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
P/T Secretary/
Receptionist for
accounting firm.
Individual must be
self-motivated,
energetic, and
proficient in computer,
organizational & public
relation skills.
Competitive salary &
benefits. Please send
resume to P.O. Box H,
Sheridan, WY 82801
ONE P/T Energetic,
hardworking,
knowledgeable about
kitchenwares,
experience in retail
customer service. Gift
wrap & store display a
plus. Computer savvy a
MUST…Excel, Word,
Outlook & Quickbooks
a bonus. Must work flex
hrs Mon-Sat, includes
standing for extended
periods of time, heavy
lifting & stairs. Must be
able to drive to run
errands & take
deliveries. Submit
cover letter & resume
with 3 professional
references in person
at 129 N. Main.
Serious applicants
only.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Lost & Found
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
Pickups & Vans
LOST: WOOD walking
stick. 38" long 9" in diameter last seen 7/8/16
on 5th st. Reward!
(307)763-0484
ARBY'S is looking for
friendly enthusiastic
team members to work
all shifts.
Top starting wage
DOE & Benefits.
Please apply in person.
Delivery
problems?
Call
The Press
at
672-2431
PERKINS RESTAURANT is accepting
applications for all positions. Day and evening shifts available.
Apply in person at
1373 Coffeen Ave or
online at
www.please applyon
line.com/sugarlanden
terprises. EOE
THE
SHERIDAN PRESS
is looking for:
Independent
Contractors
to deliver papers.
If interested please
stop by:
The Sheridan Press
144 East Grinnell
St. Sheridan, WY
82801
IT/DATA Network
Tech- Advanced
Communications
Technologies, Inc.
(ACT) Sheridan, WY.
Provides technical
support for customer
communications
networks. Installs,
programs, monitors &
supports all customer
data lines & equipment,
to include internal IT
systems & services as
well as Corporate &
Internal Network
Security. Associates
Degree & exp
equivalent to 1 year of
work on software
applications, PC &
networking equipment.
Send resume with
Cover Letter to:
ACT/Range HR.
* PO Box 127 *
Forsyth, MT 59327;
E-mail
[email protected]
www.actaccess.net
Lost & Found
FOUND. TABLET. Approx 5"x7" Samsung.
Give the password & it's
yours. Found on Coffeen Ave. (307)6723529
Hints from Heloise
Dear Readers: How
long is a
refrigerator
or washing
machine
supposed to
last? Have
you ever
wondered
what the life expectancy is
for MAJOR APPLIANCES?
We’ve all had appliances
quit working years before
we expected them to. Then
it seems friends or family
have appliances that never
seem to stop working. Here
is a general guideline/
overview of the average life
spans of some appliances:
Central air conditioner:
10-15 years
Refrigerator: 13-15 years
Washing machine: 10-13
years
Clothes dryer: 13-15 years
Dishwasher: 10 years
How long an appliance
works depends on how often
it is used (or how rarely)
and how well you care for
it. Inspect it once in a while,
and have professionals
check for maintenance services. Changing air filters
for the air conditioner on a
regular basis is crucial for
keeping air-conditioning
units running.
-- Heloise
BEWARE OF MONITOR
Dear Heloise: I saw the
hint in the Dayton (Ohio)
Daily News about keeping
an open baby monitor by
the doorbell. This brings
some risks.
When my children were
small, we had a baby monitor in a bedroom, with the
speaker in the living room.
Two people decided to have
a confidential discussion in
the deserted hallway just
outside the bedroom. Suddenly, all the folks at the
party could overhear the
discussion. Somebody ran
out to let them know, but
the damage was done. Be
aware of open baby monitors. -- Don P. in Ohio
Don, wow! Probably one
in a million, but still worth
noting. Thanks! -- Heloise
MINI FLASHLIGHT
Dear Heloise: It’s annoying that computer manufacturers put black buttons on
a black background. (HELOISE HERE: I am in complete
agreement! I put red or purple nail polish on the “on”
button so I don’t have to
fumble around looking for
the right button!) I’ve found
that one of the handiest
things to keep around is a
mini LED flashlight. To find
Heloise
a black-on-black button, I
just take out my mini LED
flashlight.
One type of LED flashlight I’ve found especially
useful is a laptop reading
light. These can be clipped
onto books for reading, or
carried around like a flashlight. I keep one by my bed
so that if I get up, I don’t
interrupt my wife’s sleeping. This has become my
go-to flashlight. I even use
it when I walk our dog at
night. -- Alan S., via email
DRIED OUT
Dear Heloise: I do occasional woodworking and
use wood filler to cover
screw heads and such. In
the past, I have had a problem with the wood filler
drying out over time. I place
it in a leftover food-storage
container, along with a
damp sponge. This maintains 100 percent humidity
in the container, and the
wood filler does not dry out!
-- David H., Jefferson, Maine
FRESHEN UP
Dear Heloise: Here is a
handy hint for upholstered
sofa pillows: Take a scented
dryer sheet and gently wipe
both sides of the pillow with
it. Then take it outside and
fluff it in the air. -- Susie R.,
Huntington Beach, Calif.
16 K Fifth wheel swivel
hitch with rails & hardware. $225
(307)672-5119
ATV’s & Snowmobiles
2005 CHEVY C-4500
stock full size box.
Duramax 75k miles.
Custom painted. Dual
axles. semi tires.
674-8252 $39,000 obo
2005 FORD F150. 4
wheel drive. 95,000 mi.
Crew cab. Bed liner.
Tow with extra brake.
$10,000
752-3827
2 LEATHER CAR SEAT
COVERS. $50. 7511866.
NEW TIRE. PI75x80
R13 $25
672-5119
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup Flatbeds, Krogman Bale
Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
2011 GMC Denali HD
3500, Crew Cab,
every option available,
108k highway miles,
Duramax Diesel,
Allison Transmission.
New Tires,
$33,000 752-1259
RUBBER MADE travel
cooler & warmer Ac/Dc
$30 674-4086
SUBARU LEGACY.
AWD 1995 Hatchback.
117,000 Mi. $2000
751-7253
Pickups & Vans
SET OF re-conditioned
heads. Dodge 360 engine. Around 1999 model. $50. 672-5119.
2008 KAWASAKI Brute
force 750 400mi. winch
& snowplow. $5500
751-3993
ATV WAGON. All Aluminum. Suspension
System. Turf Tires. Like
New. $650.00 751-4460
2009 FLAGSTAFF
8528 RLWS. Classic
Super Lite. 2 Slides.
Low Retail $22,900
asking $19,000
Motorcycles
(307)871-1560
2015
SUMMERLAND
1985 HONDA Shadow.
by Springdale SM2670.
$700 (307)763-7621
sleeps 6-8. Fully Con2006 DYNA Wide
tained. 1 13' slide.
Glide 5k mi. screaming $16,500 (513)235-3147
eagle pipes. $8500
KEYSTONE MONTANA
Call 751-6723
High Country 323 RL
fifth wheel. Lots of
2007 V-Strom DL 1000.
Extras incl. W/D!!!
Excellent shape. 6800
3 slide outs. Stored
miles. $4000. 307-752inside. $32,000
1792
307-763-9469
2008 HARLEY Davidson Road King. With
windshield. Back rest.
Custom handlebars.
7400 mi $13,000.
(307)660-2539
Campers, Trailers
2011 GMC Sierra
SLT 3500, Crew Cab,
103,000 highway mi.
Duramax Diesel.
Allison Transmission.
New Tires, $29,000
752-1259
go slower with love.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Total honesty is always
the best policy when someone seems evasive. Work requirements could be vague
and you may find it difficult
to pin someone down on the
details. Delay making key
financial decisions.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
You observe all the controversies in the news and process information quickly.
Slower thinkers may have a
hard time keeping up. Since
you are quick on the uptake
you see the needed changes
and act accordingly.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Take the detour around
debates and disagreements.
You should take notes when
you are inspired and use
your imaginative and creative ideas at a better time.
Hold off on forming important commitments or offers.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Maintain your dignity.
Actions or words that you
consider warm and friendly
may cross someone’s imaginary line of decorum. If you
feel like fooling around be
sure to do it in the relative
safety of your own backyard.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Do not let walls develop
between you and a loved
one. Conditions that seem
to muddy the waters will
quickly clear up. Acknowledge your differences with
good grace and be an enthusiastic helpmate.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Making something into
a mystery can result in a
mess. If you evade questions or give tepid answers
LUXURY 2013 Komfort by Dutchman. 5
slides, w/ fireplace. Tall
ceilings. Dble fridge &
freezer. King sized bed.
Arctic pkg. cust. skirting
$55,500 obo 674-8252
'07 CAMEO.
35' 5th wheel.
3 slides. Fireplace.
4 Season. B&W hitch.
Skirt. Lots of storage.
$25k obo
751-4206/752-6141
1998 34' Cardinal 5th
wheel. 3 slides. Very
nice. $13,500. 6727935
2001, 1061 Lance Pickup Camper. Full Loaded, Excel. Cond. Slide
out. Satellite. In-board
Generator $16,000
751-2501 or 751-6154
2008 KEYSTONE
Everest like new. 37
feet long. 3-slides. 1
1/2 baths. Sleeps 6.
4-season pkg. $24,000.
Call 672-0996
2011 STARCRAFT Autumn Ridge. 278 BH. 29
Ft. Great Condition. Under book @ $10,300.
674-5381
BIZZARO
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
was born in Rudkobing,
Denmark on this date in
1970. This birthday guy has
starred as Jaime Lannister on “Game of Thrones”
since 2011. On the big
screen, Nikolaj’s film work
includes “Gods of Egypt,”
“Oblivion,” and “Mama.”
He will next star opposite
Lake Bell in the upcoming
crime drama “Shot Caller.”
Nikolaj has been married to
singer and actress Nukaka
since 1998 and the couple
has two children.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Drive in the fast lane.
An eye for detail and speedy
reflexes gives you an advantage with the competition.
Your amorous overtures
might impress a new acquaintance, but you should
Campers, Trailers
BRAHMA TRUCK topper. Black. Excellent
shape. 5' wide x 7'3"
long. $200 OBO. 7634631.
Autos & Accessories
13 SP Fuller transmission. $1600. 4 GMC 8
hole wheels 165. $100.
4 875 R165 tires. $300.
OBO. Like new. 7522887
Pickups & Vans
Jeraldine Saunders
you might stir up some
doubt. This is a poor time to
choose new wardrobe items
or to make changes to your
appearance.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Athletic activities will
work wonders to upgrade
your attitude. Your leadership abilities might receive
notice from those who are
further up life’s ladder.
Steer clear of friction or debates with fellow workers.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The fear of failure
or the fear of the unknown
can hold you back from
wholeheartedly pursuing
your goals. Rely on your
best friends and allies for
support. Steer clear of family squabbles and spats.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Keep privileged information to yourself. Your
ability to judge a situation
is at a high note but your
ability to persuade others to
listen might hit a low one. A
relative or neighbor might
not be completely aboveboard.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Easy come, easy
go. That fascinating new
hookup may leave you
standing at the counter all
alone to foot the bill. Tackle
important phone calls and
finish up detailed reports
but keep your money in
your pocket.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Being loyal and true
blue isn’t always easy.
When you have given your
heart you have agreed to
stick by someone’s side
through thick and thin. If
misunderstandings occur
this might be one of the thin
times.
IF JULY 27 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You are somewhat gullible and easily
impressed by romantic
ideas and people during the
next four to five weeks are
over. Wait before acting
on your most inspirational
ideas and desires. In August
and September you may
be too ambitious for your
own good and might not be
successful with financial
schemes or business affairs.
Wait until October to seek
a new job, promotion, or
career change. Your wisdom and good judgment at
that time could give your
finances a boost or a relationship could become more
solid and dependable.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Mike
Nickel
Commissioner
307-674-2900
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by carrying
out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public notices. By offering
an independent and archived record of public notices, newspapers foster a more trusting
relationship between government and its citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and have done
so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established, trustworthy and neutral
source that ably transfers information between government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are presented
in the most efficient and effective means possible.
Bridge
Zeno, a Greek philosopher who is
best known for his paradoxes, said,
“The goal of life is living in agreement
with nature.”
The goal of a successful bridge partnership is to have agreements that
both players remember and employ
correctly. As I mentioned yesterday,
it is great to have a well-oiled bidding
system, but it will also pay dividends
to discuss defense in depth. For the
rest of this week, let’s look at some
useful agreements to have.
In this deal, how should the defenders card to defeat four spades after
West leads the spade king?
North has a middling game-invitational limit raise. Five trumps and a
decent four-card side suit are good; the
two queen-doubletons are not so hot.
When a defender discards from a
suit not yet led by either side, it is an
attitude signal. Assuming you use
standard signals (not upside-down),
your lowest card in a suit says that
you think your side would do better to
lead a different suit. Alternatively, if
you pitch an unnecessarily high card,
you are asking partner to shift to that
suit -- unless he knows better.
In addition, if you can afford to signal with an honor-card, do so; even an
unobservant partner will notice that.
Here, East could signal with his heart
jack, but much better and more fun is
to place the heart ace -- yes, the ace!
-- onto the table. If you can afford to,
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to make
payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may lessen its
value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in property,
usually as the result of a default under a mortgage. Foreclosure may be
accomplished by order of a court or by the statutory process known as
foreclosure by advertisement (also known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually as
security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide security for a
Phillip Alder
when you cannot win the
trick, play the top of touching honors.
West will momentarily
think that East has lost his
mind, but then West will
lead the heart eight and defeat the contract.
debt or obligation.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage authorizing the
mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the event of default. The
process is governed by statute, but is not supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are settled and
her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected regarding certain
types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing in a newspaper of general
circulation. This notice is usually required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the reader and are not
offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
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LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following
schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
PICKLES
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Thursday Noon –
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
NON SEQUITUR
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Tom Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and
Bob Rolston
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
billing
information
are
required with each legal notice.
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
A PDF is required if there are any
signatures, with a Word Document
attached.
• Failure to include this information
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
WILL cause delay in publication.
All legal notices must be paid
STATE
in full before an “AFFIDAVIT OF
PUBLICATION” will be issued.
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-751-6428
Mark
Kinner
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-674-4777
B7
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
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B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2016
TRADE:20 saves in 31 games
Prosecutors declined to
file charges, citing conThey made the decision
flicting accounts, and
to trade Chapman after his
Chapman was suspended
agents said he would not
for the first 29 games of the
agree to a new contract that season, losing $1,856,557 of
would start in 2017, a person his $11,325,000 salary. He
familiar with the talks said. was the first player penalThe person spoke on condiized a finite number of
tion of anonymity because
games under Major League
no public statement on
Baseball’s domestic viothose talks was authorized.
lence policy.
If New York slips back
“I regret that I did not
any further, it could engage exercise better judgment
in a rare sell-off for the
and for that I am truly
franchise. Miller, signed
sorry,” Chapman said
through 2018, also could be
Monday in a statement
traded. All-Star outfielder
released by the NL CentralCarlos Beltran, first baseleading Cubs. “Looking
man Mark Teixeira and
back, I feel I have learned
pitcher Ivan Nova are eligi- from this matter and have
ble for free agency after the grown as a person. My girlseason and could be sought
friend and I have worked
by contenders.
hard to strengthen our rela“I think that when the
tionship, to raise our daughright buy-or-sell circumter together, and would
stance presents itself, then
appreciate the opportunity
this department will be
to move forward without
making recommendations
revisiting an event we conto ownership and then they sider part of our past.”
will direct me on what they
Epstein said the club
want,” Cashman said.
thoroughly investigated the
The 28-year-old Chapman
situation. But it wasn’t until
went 3-0 with a 2.01 ERA
they spoke with Chapman
and 20 saves in 31 games for on Monday that they were
New York.
ready to complete the deal.
He threw a 105.1 mph
“There was genuine sorfastball to Baltimore’s J.J.
row, regret,” Epstein said
Hardy last week, matchbefore Monday night’s 5-4
ing the fastest since Major
loss to the White Sox. “He’s
League Baseball began
open about the fact that he’s
tracking speeds in 2008.
learned from the incident
With lefty-batting slugand that he feels he’s grown
gers Bryce Harper of
as a person and will continWashington and Brandon
ue to grow as a person and
Belt of San Francisco possi- that was important to us.”
bly looming in the playoffs,
Asked if the Cubs spoke
the addition of Chapman
with Chapman’s girlfriend
gives Cubs manager Joe
or someone close to her,
Maddon one of the majors’
Epstein said they “took
top assets when in need of a efforts” to make sure they
late strikeout.
looked at the issue from
“The Cubs have been play- every possible side.
ing really good baseball,”
Warren was drafted by
Chapman said through
New York and made his
a translator before he
major league debut with
left Houston to travel to
the Yankees in 2012. He
Chicago. “I think they’re
was traded to Chicago in
probably one of the better
the December deal that
teams in both leagues right
moved infielder Starlin
now. They have a good
Castro from the Cubs to the
rhythm right now. They’re
Yankees.
fighting to get that ring, so
But the centerpiece of the
it might be a good experiYankees’ package is the
ence for me to be there.”
19-year-old Torres, one of
Chapman, who threw the
the top infield prospects in
62 fastest pitches in the
baseball.
majors last season, was
“We’re disappointed we
traded from Cincinnati to
swung and missed in our
New York last December
efforts to sign him as an
after a deal with the Los
international free agent
Angeles Dodgers fell
back in the 2013 class, but
through when it was
certainly you keep your
learned Florida police
eyes on players you’ve
investigated an accusation
liked in the past and he was
of domestic violence involv- definitely a target for us,”
ing the Cuban pitcher.
Cashman said.
FROM B1
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Finding the right footholds
Five-year-old Liam Wisehart of Greybull climbs up the rock wall during the Summer Festival Saturday at the Antelope Butte Mountain
Recreation Area. The Antelope Butte Foundation hosted a variety of activities and races during the three-day event.
CAMP: 1st full
day Thursday
FROM B1
“It was awesome to (watch),
but in the back of my mind,
it’s like wow, what an opportunity we have to be able to
repeat that and for not only
myself, but the rest of the
rookies to be in that spot next
year,” Simmons said.
The Broncos’ first fullsquad workout is Thursday,
which will mark Miller’s first
practice since he led Denver’s
24-10 win over Carolina on
Feb. 8. Miller skipped the
entire offseason program
while his agent and the
Broncos haggled over a longterm contract he signed last
week.
Athletes using platforms to speak out against violence
1960s, the struggle was for respect and dignity.
“Now the struggle is for power. And these
men have power. So they have a different
Athletes today are using their platforms as
forum than we had in the late 1960s to be able
sports celebrities to bring attention to the vio- to go on network television and make a statelence that has erupted across the country and ment concerning violence and the killing of
recently Carmelo Anthony has been one of the black men, women and children in this counmost outspoken.
try. ... That’s an exercise of power. They have
The New York Knicks All-Star is taking a
the capability today that we only dreamed
break from his preparation with the Olympic
about in the 1960s when only one or two athbasketball team Monday to host a meeting
letes even had endorsements.”
in Los Angeles with athletes, politicians and
Anthony, LeBron James, Chris Paul and
people in the community to advance the conDwyane Wade gave an anti-violence speech at
versation about what he’s called a broken
the ESPYS and expressed their support of the
system.
values behind the Black Lives Matter moveUniversity of California-Berkeley professor
ment. University of Missouri football players
emeritus Dr. Harry Edwards said today’s ath- threatened to boycott games last year in supletes have a level of power that Muhammed
port of student groups protesting the school’s
Ali and others didn’t have in the 1960s, and
racial environment.
they have begun using it to speak out against
School President Timothy Wolfe eventually
violence both by and against police.
retired. Serena Williams spoke out against
How much change they can effect remains
the violence at Wimbledon. Members of the
to be seen, as Ali changed the world.
WNBA’s Indiana Fever, New York Liberty
The newfound power of today’s athlete
and Phoenix Mercury recently wore black
comes from monetary wealth, celebrity status warm up shirts in the wake of recent shootand having the vehicle ings by and against police officers, and were
of social media to com- fined by the league.
municate directly with
The league rescinded the fines after a public
the masses. They can
backlash.
reach hordes of people,
Anthony’s meeting in Los Angeles coincides
encouraging them to
with the latest stop on the Olympic men’s
get involved in social
team exhibition schedule as the Americans
change.
prepare for the Rio Games.
“Joe Louis and Jack
It is nearly economically impossible to
Johnson and Jesse
ignore today’s athletes as the power they
Owens struggled for
wield reaches farther than their own bank
legitimacy,” Edwards
accounts.
said. Then “you
James is literally worth millions of dollars
began this struggle
to the Cleveland economy as the success of
for access. Which is
the Cavaliers motivates thousands of people
what Jackie Robinson
to spend. Cavs’ attendance ranked No. 2 in the
and Larry Doby and
league in 2009-10 and the last two seasons, but
Kenny Washington
dipped as low as No. 22 during James’ four
and all those guys were years in Miami.
involved in. In the
Their influence goes beyond promoting merBY KAREEM COPELAND
AP SPORTS WRITER
chandise and ticket sales.
Edwards said sports have become a religion
in this country and around the world, giving
athletes more influence than in the past. He
believes as “walking corporations” they carry
more weight than “the doctor up the street
or the lawyer around the corner or even the
community organizer.”
“Sports in modern societies really amount
to secular religions,” Edwards said. “Athletes
have a phenomenal megaphone. ... So that
obligation to speak up, especially in regards
to the African-American outcomes and interests, is critical.”
Social media allows athletes to directly communicate with millions of fans and followers
with a few keystrokes and encourage action.
Edwards explained ISIS has used it in a similar way to recruit self-radicalized people. The
difference is in the message.
Dr. Joseph Cooper, assistant professor at
the University of Connecticut, said any major
social policy — civil rights movement, feminist movement, passage of Title IX — began
with multiple conversations. But there must
be action behind the words.
Both Edwards and Cooper said that’s the
next step in the process.
Cooper called for sustained engagement
from athletes on whatever level they are
comfortable — from continuing the conversation to meeting with groups like Black
Lives Matter, the NAACP and 100 Black Men
to identify specific issues and target ways to
improve them. Cooper also discussed the need
to have benchmarks in which progress can be
measured.
“All these athletes say we care about the
Black Lives Matter movement, in a year from
now we want to see that you’ve actually been
continuing in championing the support,”
Cooper said. “Muhammed Ali’s legacy is a
great example of how he didn’t rest on his laurels in making one decision and saying OK,
that’s enough.

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