CommonCents for Kids & Top Tips for Halloween Fun!

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CommonCents for Kids & Top Tips for Halloween Fun!
CommonCents
SHELBY COUNTY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION’S
for Kids &
OCTOBER 2013 NEWSLETTER
HALLOWEEN EDITION - BOO!
Top Tips for
Halloween Fun!
BE COMFORTABLE! Find a costume
that is both fun and functional. Wear
your best sneakers for the long walk,
make sure your costume fits so you
don’t trip and stumble. Try to find a
costume without a mask so that you can
see and breathe clearly. Flame resistant
costumes are the best choice.
BE SEEN! Carry a flashlight and wear
reflective tape or glow sticks so your
guardians and oncoming traffic can see you at all times.
AVOID FIRES! Instead of putting a lit candle in your jack-o-latern, opt for a
flameless LED candle.
CHECK YOUR STASH! Before you dig in to your treats, make sure an adult
goes through your candy with you. Never eat unwrapped candy and only eat
homemade treats from neighbors you know.
REMEMBER THE GOLDEN RULES! You’ve heard these important lessons
before ... NEVER get into cars or talk to strangers. NEVER enter into a stranger’s home or any home without your parents’ consent. AND ALWAYS watch
both ways before crossing streets and cross only when the lights allow.
Something Sweet
for Our Troops!
Dentists across the country are “buying” back
Halloween candy from neighborhood kids, then
sending it to the troops overseas! In exchange
for candy, kids receive gifts and coupons from
dentists. What a great way to brighten the day
of an American Hero! And not only do kids
come out a little bit richer -- but they may be
saving themselves rotten gums or “jack-o-latern smiles”! To find a participating dentist near
you, visit
halloweencandybuyback.com.
Check out our website @ ShelbyCountyCU.com
HALLOWEEN
FUN FACTS!
The first Jack O’Lanterns were actually
made from turnips.
What’s the most popular Halloween
costume? A witch!
The largest pumpkin ever recorded broke
the world record in 1993 coming in at
836 lbs.
Ireland is typically believed to be the
birthplace of Halloween.
According to tradition, if a person wears
his or her clothes inside out and then
walks backwards on Halloween, he or
she will see a witch at midnight.
Fifty percent of kids prefer to receive
chocolate candy for Halloween, compared with 24% who prefer non-chocolate
candy and 10% who preferred gum.
When trick-or-treating first became popular in the United States in the 1800s,
more children played mischievous pranks
than asked for candy. By the 1950s,
though, the focus had switched to good
old family fun, with sugar-hyped children
dressed in costumes.
Your savings federal insured to at least $250,000 and backed
by the full faith and credit of the United States Government
NCUA
National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency
HORROR-IBLE JOKES!
Q. Why couldn’t the ghost see his mom
and dad?
A. They were trans-parents!
Q. What do goblins and ghosts drink
when they’re hot and thirsty on
Halloween?
A. Ghoul-aid!
Q. What did the little ghost say to his
mom?
A. “I’ve got a boo boo.”
Halloween Apps for Kids!
High-rated “not-so-spooky” apps for kids of all ages!
I SPY Spooky Mansion: Find spiders, ghosts, skeletons
and bats based on clues.
Plants vs. Zombies (10 and up): Guard the house from
funny creatures by blocking them with flora.
The Very Hungry Pumpkin: Guide your pumpkin to candy
treats.
LEGO Halloween Creationary: Build Halloween-themed
structures with LEGOs.
PUMPKIN PAL: Virtually carve a pumpkin with crooked
smiles and cute patterns, without making a mess!
LOOK BOTH WAYS
ON HALLOWEEN!
On average, children are more than
twice as likely to be hit by a car and
killed on Halloween than on any other
day of the year. Please make sure you
have reflective gear and flashlights,
and always look before walking into the
street!
Cha-Ching, It’s
Halloween!
With store bought
costumes, home decorations, and candy
purchases, Halloween
is the second highest
grossing commercial
holiday in American after
Christmas! Americans
will spend an average of
$79.82 this year, according to the National Retail Federation., and the National Confectioners Association says
that Americans will buy more than 600 million pounds of
candy this year – just for Halloween - for a $2.4 billion on
sweets in the weeks leading up to Oct. 31. In total, that’s
a whopping $8 billion on this sweet and spooky day!