THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE - Florida State College at Jacksonville

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THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE - Florida State College at Jacksonville
THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE
L’ Arbre de la Connaissance
Florida State College at Jacksonville: Kent Campus
Volume 2, Issue 1 Spring 2013
THE INFORMERS!
When you first walk into the library,
off to your right you see the Circulation
Desk. You might already know that at this
desk you can check out books and other
media, such as CDs and DVDs, but the
Circulation Desk Staff do much more, including interlibrary and intercampus loans.
So, if you want to request a book, DVD, or
CD, just ask them.
Even more importantly, Circulation
Desk Staff Member Maria De Marco says
that “they are often the first filter for questions.” Staff members also include Robyn
Dohrmann, Sue Davis, and Erin Stuckey.
Sometimes, the staff know the answers
themselves or can look up the materials
students are looking for, but if not, the staff
knows who to ask—the nearby librarian
ready and waiting.
Although the Circulation Desk Staff
require no special education, to be a librarian, one needs a master’s degree in some-
Maria De Marco, Art Chiang, and Robyn
Dohrmann at Circulation Desk
thing like Library and Information Studies.
Virtually any B.A. can be used as a jumping
off point to get this master’s degree, but the
total college education necessary to work as
a librarian takes between five and six years.
The LLC’s well-educated librarians are Art
Chiang, Cindy Fraser, Kate Levitz, Irene
Kenner, and Sharon Uskokovich.
You might think that all this education
is a bit over the top, but you’d be wrong.
Here in our LLC, the librarians’ job at the
Reference Desk is to help you find the information you need.
In order to help you find information,
they often ask questions to help you narrow
your search. Then, drawing on years of
accumulated general and specific knowledge,
they classify the pieces of information.
For instance, the Nuremburg Trials
have both legal and historical elements.
Unlike a lawyer or a historian who might
focus on just one aspect, the librarian is
trained to look at the big picture, and by
doing so, can help you find the exact information you need.
Kate Levitz says of her job, “If you’re a
curious person, it’s fun because you learn
something every day.” So, when she learns
something, so do you!
Come see an informative librarian during LLC hours: Monday through Thursday,
7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday, 8:00 a.m. to
3:00 p.m., and Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to
3:00 p.m.
NEVER LOSE SIGHT OF
YOUR DREAMS!
Did you know Milton S. Hershey failed three times at building a confectionary business
before he found success with
the Lancaster Caramel Company, which he sold in 1900 to
pursue chocolate making?
Known for his Hershey bar,
Hershey was also a great philanthropist who focused on enriching the lives of others, whether
they were his workers, his customers, or orphans. His legacy
continues today.
“One is only happy in
proportion as he makes
others feel happy and only
useful as he contributes
his influences for the finer
callings in life.”
—Milton S. Hershey
$$$$ HOW TO SAVE MONEY IN COLLEGE $$$$
In college, you typically only hear about the things you
have to buy: books, paper, and, of course, your classes. Going through life and buying the necessities for college, you
just don’t hear the word “save”. It is almost like a mythical
creature; if only you could get a glimpse of it, it would be
awesome. Saving money isn’t as hard as you think it is,
though. Give it a try!
Yard sales aren’t just a spring time
fling but surely are more fun during the
nice warmth of summer and softening
breeze of winter. Having a yard sale not
only earns you money, but it also helps you remove clutter
from your home. The best time to find a yard sale is earlier
in the day from Friday to Sunday—just look for the signs
around town!
Flea Markets have great prices for everyday household
items and such. All flea markets are open on the weekend.
Not all items at the flea market are used. You can find vendors there as well. It’s a nice weekend morning or afternoon
spent interacting with new and sometimes very interesting
people.
Tired of buying expensive books? You
may still have to buy books, but they don’t have
to be so expensive. At a college bookstore, you
can buy digital copies or rent books. Digital
copies and renting books are significantly cheaper than buying those big bulky books. Buying books online can be much
cheaper than buying at the store, too. However, depending
on where you buy, you may need to buy your books as soon
as possible in order to receive them on time. Websites like
Amazon, eBay, and DealOz are reliable sources for books.
Also, at the local College Bookrack, there are friendly, helpful
people with decent prices for college books.
Coupons may seem silly because you think they can
only save you a little bit of money—not even worth your
time to cut them out. That’s not true, though! With the right
coupons, you can save a good amount of money. For instance, at Publix, if you utilize the right coupons (and maybe
some competitor’s coupons too), then it is possible to spend
only $200 for $300 worth of groceries. You cannot say that
you couldn’t use $100 in your pocket; it’s certainly more
than a little bit of money saved.
Thrift stores aren’t just collections of old things; they
can be a way to save money! There are thrift stores located
all over town. Thrift stores, like Goodwill, receive donated
items daily. Brand name clothing can sometimes be found
for severely reduced prices at thrift stores. So, there isn’t a
need to always go to Hollister
or American Eagle to get those
faded jeans you want. Furniture, house décor, toys, electronics, and shoes can also be
found in these stores.
For no money at all instances, Craigslist has “freebies” or
“curbsides” for items people are getting rid of for absolutely
nothing! All you need is the address from Craigslist and a
means to pick up your wanted item. The website also has
reduced prices on a variety of items ranging from cars to
baby carriages. Be careful, however. Remember that some
may be dishonest about items for sale. So, be a cautious
buyer.
All in all, you, of course, expect to spend money in college, but saving money isn’t as difficult as it seems. It may
take a little searching, but it is possible to find
those savings you need. So, go out and look
while you live a little—money saved could be
just around the corner!
WORD FOR THOUGHT
‘Emanate’: (ˈeməˌnāt) /verb
Issue or spread out from (a source); originate from; be produced by
Synonyms: arise, birth, derive, originate, exude, initiate, “stem from”, radiate.
Word
Etymology of Emanate: A Break-down
(past tense of emanare): “to flow out, arise, or manifest”
Derived from the Latin word emanates
“You can teach a student a lesson for a day; but if you can teach him to learn by creating
curiosity, he will continue the learning process as long as he lives.” - Clay P. Bedford
ATTENTION ALL WRITERS!
Spring is in the air, and newly formed buds are ready to bloom. That’s not all—your minds are probably chock full of
wonderful new ideas that you just cannot wait to write about! So, why not write something to be published in the Kent LLC
Newsletter?
The Writing Lab will be accepting poems, critiques, short/flash stories, short nonfiction, plays, and anything else you want
to write! We ask that you please try to limit yourself to a maximum of 1,800 words. Of course, if something is truly wonderful, we will make an exception. So, make your submissions, and maybe you will see your piece in our fall newsletter! Currently, the newsletter goes online college-wide and 250 print copies are made readily available around Kent.
To make a submission, please bring a copy of your literary piece to the Writing Lab in the Kent LLC (C-100). Please also
include contact information (name and email/phone number) as well as a 60 word or less biography written in third person
and a picture of yourself.
Submissions may also be made through email addressed only to [email protected] If you choose to submit this way, type the word “newsletter” in the subject line. Include a bio and picture as well.
We will only be accepting submissions made by current students of FSCJ. Submit no later than
March 31, 2013.
Once the newsletter has been published, all submissions made for the contest will be posted on the Kent Writing Lab Blog for all to see.
Beforehand, we would like you to know that we appreciate all submissions and will enjoy
reading every single one of them.
Please also know that we will be accepting weekly submissions for the Kent Writing Lab
Blog. In order to do so, please bring your submissions to the same location or email to the
same address, writing “blog” in the subject line.
For more information, please contact the Kent Writing Lab during typical semester lab
hours. Again, we appreciate all submissions, so don’t hesitate to send in your work. We’d love
to see your opinions and ideas, your thoughts and points of view, or anything else you wish to send us!
BOOKS THAT MATTER
The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings, 1938
Written in 1938 by Marjorie Kinnan Rawl-
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest
Hemingway, 1929
A Farewell to Arms is written from the
ings, The Yearling is set in rural 1870s
Northeast Florida. This isn’t the Florida
we know, though. This is a rough and
isolated Florida better suited for turning
boys into men than turning CEOs into golfing enthusiasts.
viewpoint of Frederic Henry, an American
ambulance corps lieutenant serving during
World War I. He falls for a British nurse
in this dramatic yet cynical and bleak tale
of war. Outbreaks of war lead to Henry being interrogated
When Jody and his father Ezra “Penny” Baxter set off to find
some stolen pigs, Penny is bitten by a rattlesnake. In order
to get the venom out, Penny shoots a doe for her liver, only
to discover that she has a fawn. Jody adopts the orphaned
fawn and names him Flag. A story about friendship and strug-
and then escaping to his pregnant lover in Switzerland.
Things seem happy and dandy now, but
are they really? A story ahead of its
time, A Farewell to Arms puts things into
perspective on war as well as unimag-
gles in harsh northeast Florida, The Yearling will touch you.
ined hardships in life.
“Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.”
- Will Durant
MATH DECODER
Math is fun! So, start your brain back up after the holidays by solving this decoder. Use the key to
figure out the hidden message. What classic movie is the message from?
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
-3
13
-2
64
7
9
-5
11
2
¼
12
22
M
5
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
3
24
36
½
56
0
8
27
69
.3
4
-8
6
1.
(I • B)/I
2.
(√F) + (X)
3.
(√D) + (Y)
4.
N3
5.
6.
(R/X)Q
7.
(√D)
8.
(√D) • N
9.
T2
10. (2E) • X
E•T
11. ¼T
12. √F
13. N • X
14. X • C
15. E(X) – T(½)
16. (F2/N)
17. 2(M2) + Z
18. (U-N)/(I+A)2
19. (B + 10) • N
20. (N – I) – X
21. 2H
22. (P – X)/X
23. (32Q)/T
24. Z(Q)
25. B – Z
___ ___ ___ ___ ___
___ ___ ___ ___
c“___ ___
1
___ ___ ___ ___
2
3
4
5
___ ___
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
c ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.”
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
RANDOM ACCOUNTING KNOWLEDGE
COMPUTER JOKES
1. All accounting knowledge is random.
2. Debit just refers to the left side of the ledger, and credit
just refers to the right side of the ledger.
3. Assets are increased by credits, and liabilities are increased
by debits.
4. Assets minus liabilities equal shareholder’s equity.
5. When revenue is greater than expenses, a business has a net income.
6. The initial cost of acquiring an asset
is called the historical cost.
A few error messages we all keep expecting to see:
--Press any key to continue or any other key to quit.
--Bad command or file name! Go stand in the corner.
--Error saving file. Format drive now? (Y/Y)
--File not found. Should I fake it?
--Runtime error 6D at 417A:32CF:
Incompetent user.
--User error: Replace user.
--Your hard drive has been scanned
and all stolen software titles have been
deleted. The police are on their way.
WORLD LANGUAGES
English: flower
Chinese: 花
Spanish: flor
Romanian: flare
French: fleur
Portuguese: flor
Japanese error messages written in haiku form:
--The Website you seek
--Yesterday it worked.
Cannot be located, but
Today it is not working.
Countless more exist.
Windows is like that.
--Chaos reigns within.
Reflect, repent, and reboot.
Order shall return.
--A crash reduces
Your expensive computer
To a simple stone.
“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
- Oscar Wilde
SCHOOL DATABASES
While the FSCJ Library & Learning Commons offers print and electronic books, magazines, newspapers, and journal
articles, they also offer access to a number of online databases for use in conducting research. For this walkthrough, prehistoric civilizations will be the topic of research,; though the databases do cover all fields you may need to investigate. The
starting point is Lost Civilizations of the Stone Age by Richard Rudgley. Like any good researcher, the first source is used to
find more sources and avenues of investigation. In this case, the scholar Marija Gimbutas and the term, chalcolithic, were
looked up and found in Lost Civilizations.
 First, go to Connections (Student Portal) on the FSCJ main page: http://www.fscj.edu/.
 Log onto Connections with your FSCJ Student username and password.
 Once logged in, scroll down the “Quick Links” to the “Search Library Materials at FSCJ” option.
 Once on the library page, select one of the database options, either “Databases A-Z” or “Databases by Subject.”
 If using the alphabetical list, scroll down to the database you intend to use. In this case, scroll to JSTOR.
 If by subject, select the field, such as Arts and Humanities, then scroll down to JSTOR.
 Databases A-Z and by subject will allow the selection of a database, in this case, JSTOR. When
you click on your chosen database, you will get a screen prompting you to connect to the database.
 Once you click on the “Connect to Database” button, it will take you to the database’s homepage, which in this case, is the JSTOR home page.
 Enter your search term like you would in Google or Bing. If this doesn’t help you find what you are
looking for, the advanced search option will allow you to combine terms and many other variations to the basic search.
 If you still have difficulty finding a particular term, try using other, similar terms and different databases. The available databases do not contain the same material organized in the same manner.
 If you find an article you like and a “terms of use” option pops up, accept them to get the article.
 Specific journals are also possible to find. To find a journal, enter the journal’s subject or name and search. Then scroll
through the results until you find it. Unless you are looking for a specific edition of a particular journal, the databases
are much easier to use when searching for specific topics within a subject.
Still, using the databases might take some getting used to, just like anything else technology-based. Let’s face it, did you
always know how to use Google or Facebook? You probably didn’t, but what does it matter? With a little practice, you were
able to figure out how to use both of them. The same practice can be applied to the school’s databases. A little practice
goes a long, long way!
For more help with FSCJ Databases, go to the Writing Lab Blog to find detailed instructions on how to do so:
http://blogs.fscj.edu/kent_campus_writing_lab/, or get some face-to-face help from one of our campus librarians at
the Reference Desk in the LLC.
ESSAY FORMATING TIP
Writing can be fun and exciting. However, writing can only be fun when you understand how to write. One thing that has
to be understood is MLA and APA formatting. How do you tell the difference between APA and MLA? What is each format
used for, and how do you tell?
Modern Language Association format, better known as MLA format, is used for Humanities papers. This includes Sociology, Humanities, and English. American Psychological Association format, or APA format, is used for science-based course papers, such as Biology, Psychology, and Earth/Space Science. The first telltale sign is what course or field the paper is geared
towards. There are other ways to differentiate between MLA and APA, though. You can look at the headers, title page, references, parenthetical citations, and whether or not the paper contains an abstract. APA papers contain
abstracts and MLA papers generally do not.
So, the next time you look at a paper, really look at it. With just a little understanding, writing can be
fun! You might just learn that looking at APA and MLA is comparing apples to oranges.
“Tell me and I’ll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I’ll understand.”
- Chinese Proverb
THE GARDENS OF KENT
When you come to Kent, do you notice the old-timey
Florida trees? Do you notice the Spanish moss? It is almost
impossible not to notice the trees of Kent. Of course, it is
So, if you want to meet others who share your interest in
gardening, and you want to be a part of the Garden Club at
Kent, you can contact Professor Dana Logan, the coordina-
understandable if you are always in a rush to get to class.
Even so, you should take the time to raise your head and
look around. You’ll find trees that are nice to sit underneath, but you will also find gardens all around the campus.
Currently, you can go to any side of Kent and find one.
tor of the garden, for more information.
Next to the art gallery in
Building E, there is the Dumbleton Memorial Garden. The
garden was cultivated in hon-
There are four gardens.
Near the Business Office
is the small but unique Butterfly Garden. It is a great place
to find butterflies about the
or of Duane D. Dumbleton,
former campus president.
Learning Center Manager,
Michael Turnquist states that
“Dr. Dumbleton was campus
brush. Not only can butterflies be found there but so can
moths and caterpillars as well.
Particular plants attract certain kinds of butterflies, cater-
president at Kent from 1997 to 2006. He is remembered
fondly for his warm and effective leadership. He was a deeply
spiritual man and had a wonderful sense of humor.” In 2006,
the late president died of brain cancer but is widely remembered for the impact he made on others. Inside the garden,
pillars, and moths. The plants—tropical sage, salvia azurea,
black salvia, fennel, and fire bush—are enticing to the little
flying wonders, drawing them in. Flowers are pretty, but
they are also a source of food, shelter, and opportunity for
mating. Even with the different assortment of plants, the
you can see how Dr. Dumbleton affected the college as well
as the community by the contributing names engraved on
the brickwork and plaques. Outside the garden, you can find
small trees planted for professors of Kent who have passed
since 2006.
foliage is non-invasive and natural to the environment. So, if
you love butterflies or just have an immense curiosity, you
should volunteer to help out with the Butterfly Garden. For
more information about the Butterfly Garden, contact Student Success Advisor Maurie Hartshorn.
Next to the A Building
is the Memory Garden,
which is considered an extension of the Dumbleton
Memorial Garden. Plaques
Between Building C and D, next to the basketball
court, there is the Community Garden. According to
FSCJ student, Shaylea
Crutchfield, “the garden is a
and stone benches are
placed all around. To students, it is a wonderful place
to have a seat and relax. All in all, the garden is a reminder
of all things good because, when everything else is done,
said, and gone, all we have left are our memories. Besides,
fun way to grow and learn
about plants as well as meet
fellow students and professors.” Each semester, new
vegetables and other plants
are grown and harvested.
Shaylea Crutchfield watering
plants
what better place to reminisce than a garden?
Years from now, when you think of Kent, remember
more than disliked professors and courses. Instead, remember there was more good to Kent than just the beautiful
gardens.
“The more you like yourself, the less you are like anyone else, which makes you unique.”
- Walt Disney
THE “MAN OF MYSTERY”
Learning Center Manager. Musical composer. Community faith leader. Volunteer.
Zookeeper?
Can one man be all these things? Only if he is Michael Turnquist! Not only is Michael
the Learning Center Manager at the Kent Campus LLC, he is a fine arts connoisseur. In his
free time, Michael composes ambient music, and his compositions have been heard in art
galleries, museums, and auditoriums. A proponent of interfaith dialogue, Michael serves on
the Education Committee of the Interfaith Council of Jacksonville, promoting dialogue and
understanding between various faiths. When he goes home, he heads to his farm, where
he houses 55 different animals, including chickens, pigs, sheep, bunnies, parrots, peacocks,
and more! One would think all these endeavors would keep Michael busy enough, but he
always seeks out more ways to help students, staff, and people in the community.
At Kent Campus, he oversees all of the tutoring departments of the Learning Center,
found in the Library & Learning Commons. In addition to hiring, scheduling, and running
the department, Michael is helping recalibrate the college-wide virtual labs in Blackboard.
Tying his personal interests into his work at the college, he coordinates monthly fine arts
presentations and workshops in the LLC. If that were not enough, Michael is an integral part of the QEP (Quality Enhancement Plan) committee, where the overall goal is to improve persistence and degree completion rates of first time college students.
What does this mean to you? Like the staff of the Learning Center, Michael is here to help you. Even though he isn’t
tutoring students, he is the “behind the scenes guy” who ensures that students get the help they need. Contrary to what you
might imagine, in meeting Michael Turnquist, you will not meet a busy, over-burdened person running from one thing to the
next. You will find him to be a patient, creative person always genuinely happy to help you with your needs.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS IN C-107
MATH WORKSHOPS IN C-117
Spanish Classes: SPN1120 and SPN1121
Factoring 1/17 6-7:30PM, 1/18 10-11:30AM
Probability 1/24 6-7:30PM, 1/25 10-11:30AM
Linear Equations and Inequalities 2/7 at 6-7:30PM, 2/8
10-11:30AM
The Binomial and Normal Distribution 2/14 6-7:30PM,
2/15 10-11:30AM
Parabolas and Circles 2/21 6-7:30PM, 2/22 10-11:30AM
Exponents and Logarithms 2/28 6-7:30PM. 3/1 10-11:30AM
Refresher on Basic Grammar 1/29, 2-3PM
Subject/Verb Agreement 2/19, 2-3PM
Verb Endings 2/26, 2-3PM
Constructing Sentences 3/19, 2-3PM
Review for Final 4/26, 2-3PM
SCIENCE WORKSHOPS IN C-117
To Be Announced…
WRITING WORKSHOPS IN C-100B
Commas Splices, Run-on, and Sentence Fragments
1/29, 3/20 2-3PM
Critical Thinking Skills 1/30, 3/19 2-3PM
Titles, Introductions, and Conclusions 2/5, 3/5, 4/9 2-3PM
Thesis Statements 2/6, 3/6, 4/10 2-3PM
Paraphrasing and Summarizing 2/19, 4/17 2-3PM
Content and Transitioning 2/20, 4/16 2-3PM
For more information, please contact the individual labs.
“The one real object of education is to have a man in the condition of continually asking
questions.” - Bishop Mandell Creighton
SPRING WORD SEARCH
STUDENT ARTS
Spring is here! Can you feel it?
Look for the spring-related words
listed below, which may be found
forwards, backwards, and diagonally.
Can you find all of them?
G V A M F
U M B
K
S
B
L
S N O N U U Q T O U A
S
U
I
O
B B
I
L
E
I
B
B N
S
S
A N A
J
S O S
B U
U Z O D E M R N R V
I W L
S
E
B
K
S
R Z
B H C
Y
E
S
T E
E W H H L
E G N A H C O
I
E
I
T X A O E N L M A R C H N C R
D R U R
I
B
S
C Y A M S
K B
E
R G D A R G
M L
P
E
B U E
T
E
V
S
Y A R D
S
S
L
E N P
X N Q A A
L
E N M
I
T
B X
L W I
A H O Z
A
L
S
L M M
D O R
F
R P
G Y W A R M T H H
I
N L
P
B
Y
E
S
F
S D
S
E
X A T
K M O L
Y
S
E
Y O A
My Winter Night
by Allen Cawthon
Free in forest green beneath lunar light such glorious night,
Keep my heart in your silver sight below your heavenly dark,
Within your grasp, I am whole and caught forever in your might;
I am caught in your sweet solitude that will never be stark.
Sing me your lovely serenade and drift me into sweet bliss,
Let me spread your icy song through the words of my winter heart.
Oh, my winter, please never deny me your refreshing kiss,
May you bestow upon me desire for glory to impart,
And free me from the chains that the fire places upon my mind—
Let that fire fall into silence locked away from winter’s grasp.
Winter, my sire, your cold embrace, like lunar mother, so kind,
Please, sweet mother, defy bastard dawn for I want not his clasp.
My darling December, fairer than Chloris and her flower,
You, my sweet, raise my glory higher than Babylon’s tower.
X
F
L D A K Z C Q Z B
ANEW
APRIL
TREES
BIRTH
CHANGES
BASEBALL
BULBS
FLOWERS
EASTER
EQUINOX
ROMANCE
MAY
LOVE
BLOOM
BUDS
RAIN SHOWERS
WARMTH
TAXES
SPRING CLEANING
MARCH
SPRING BREAK
GRASS
SUNSHINE
YARD SALES
KENT LLC CONTACTS
Librarian and Staff
Circulation Desk (904) 381-3481
Reference Desk (904) 381-3482
Labs
Writing Lab (904) 381-3449
Math/Accounting Labs (904) 381-3441
Science Lab (904) 381-3441
Foreign Languages Lab (904) 381-3496
Blood on My Hands
by Grant Broadhurst
The iron nails still held between my teeth,
The ringing hammer still clenched in my fist,
My hands still bleed from when I made your wreath,
As I throw the dice with a vicious twist,
Hoping for the robe of the dying king,
Cleaning the sword I plunged into your side,
Watching the crimson waterfall spilling,
Looking up at you whom I crucified.
The look you give condemns me in a breath,
For there is no hate, no condemning gaze,
Only forgiveness for the unjust death,
Of you I killed with my rebellious ways.
I murdered You, with senseless, thirsting glee,
And as You walked, I covered You in spit.
Yet You—You willingly died to free me;
You forgave and snatched me out of the pit.
Now I am free of the broken commands,
Made clean through the blood on my guilty hands.
FOLLOW AND FRIEND US!
Kent Writing Lab Blog
http://blogs.fscj.edu/kent_campus_writing_lab/
LLC Facebook page
http://www.facebook.com/KentLibrary

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