Contents - Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers` Association

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Contents - Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers` Association
The Magazine of MLEOA
Spring 2015
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Contents
2 Membership Application and Change of Address
3 President’s Letter
4 Secretary’s Report
5 M.L.E.O.A. Vision, Mission, and Values
6 Great K-9 Training
7 2014 Conference News
8 2014 Motorcycle Competition Results
9 Capable, Confident and Calm
11 Officer Wellness is Officer Safety
12 What It Takes
14 Great K-9 Training in Southaven
15 The Myth of Hands Up/Don’t Shoot
17 Feeling the Burn?
19 Conference Agenda
20 Just For Laughs
21 MLEOA Scholarship Program
23 MLEOA Scholarship Program Application
Members of the MLEOA Executive Committee and Board of Directors are listed on the inside front cover
(opposite).
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
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Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Assocation
Official Application for Membership
I HEREBY TRANSMIT MY ANNUAL MEMBERS DUES OF $25 IN THE MISSISSIPPI
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION FOR THE YEAR _______.
Name
Date of Birth
Department
Phone:
Address
City
Address
City
Beneficiary
E-mail:
Title
State
Zip
State
Zip
Relationship
Signature of Applicant
Annual Dues $2500. Applicants who have passed their 50th birthday are not eligible for death benefits.
MAIL REMITTANCE TO: CHARLIE SIMS, EXECUTIVE TREASURER, 14 SOUTHGATE ROAD, HATTIESBURG, MS 39401
ADDRESS VERIFICATION / CHANGE FORM
Name
New/current Address
Telephone : Work
Old Address
Membership #
City
Cell
Home
State
Zip
State
Zip
Other
Change in Beneficiary
City
E-mail Address:
MAIL TO: Charlie Sims, Executive Treasurer, 14 Southgate Road, Hattiesburg, MS 39401
Use this form to notify MLEOA of an address change. Please photocopy and give to any member you are aware of,
who has a problem receiving the magazine or other correspondence from MLEOA.
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MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
Greetings,
I want to thank you for allowing me serve as your president for another
year. We have a great executive board working hard to move the
association forward. We all look forward to hearing ideas and getting as
many people involved as possible.
We are making great progress in many area’s including training at our
conferences. Last year at the conference we had great training and a super
motorcycle competition. This year’s conference is already shaping up to
be bigger and better. Remember the conference is a family event, so
please make plans to attend and share in the training and social interaction.
I look forward to seeing each of you in June, so make plans to attend. As
always, you can call on me or any one of the board members to help you
in any way.
Sincerely,
Mike Fleming,
President of the Mississippi Law Enforcement Association
Want one of these tags?
They can now be obtained through your
local tax offices. Proceeds go to the
association to help our membership.
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
3
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
SECRETARY’S REPORT
Greetings to All,
At the end of 2014, the Executive Board for the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers’
Association passed a resolution changing the status of any member in good standing for 25
or more years from Active Member to Lifetime Member. The board wanted to show it’s
appreciation for the unwavering commitment to the association over the years. The members
were identified and cards mailed out in January. This caused a delay in the regular dues
notices going out. With that in mind, please consider this edition of the magazine your
official notice of renewal for your membership dues. We are encouraging members to go
on-line at www.mleoa.com to renew because that website helps us to track the membership.
If you do not have access to a computer, please remit your dues to
MLEOA
14 Southgate Road
Hattiesburg, MS 39401
This is the first magazine in two years because of difficulty finding an Ad Sales
Representative. We now have a company in place and look forward to providing members
with this publication. We always welcome articles and stories from around the state, so if
you have anything to submit, please send it to [email protected] or the address listed
above.
Please help us to promote and support Law Enforcement across our great state by
becoming a member and soliciting new members for our association.
Thank you and God bless.
Charlie Sims
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MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
Mission and Values
M.L.E.O.A.
With almost 1,500 members, MLEOA is one of the largest law enforcement organizations in
Mississippi. Its membership includes officers from federal, state and local law enforcement
agencies in our state. The major goals for the association are:
• Protecting our citizens
• Providing training to officers
• Promoting public safety through the legislative process
• Effectively managing our resources
Our Vision
MLEOA continues to be instrumental in its efforts to enhance law enforcement. The
association is committed to providing training to officers throughout the state at minimal or no
cost. Through these efforts, we hope to promote professionalism and instill confidence in the
officer to perform their duties safely with integrity, honesty, and fairness.
Our Mission
The mission of the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers' Association (MLEOA) is to strive
to promote professionalism, enhance the image of law enforcement, provide support for the law
enforcement community, support legislation for the betterment of all Mississippians, and local
governments, business, industry, and all the citizens of Mississippi.
Our Values
The Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers' Association values integrity, fairness,
commitment and accountability. Integrity is practiced by each of our members and the
organizations they represent and we are committed to the protection of the Officers in our state
and to our obligation to the citizens we serve.
www.mleoa.com
And also don’t forget to visit our website:
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
5
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
GREAT K9 TRAINING IN SOUTHAVEN!
MLEOA hosted a K9 training and certification
course in Southaven March 26-28, 2014. Agencies
from around the state attended and received
certification through the National Narcotic Detector
Dog Association. Lt. Richard Chandler of the
Southaven Police Department coordinated the
training and MLEOA provided lodging, meals, and
certification fees to ensure the officers and their
agencies received the needed training at no cost to
them.
The friendly K9 competion event sponsored had the
following results:
1st Place - Brad Hodge - Southaven PD
2nd Place - Russ Cordon - MHP
3rd Place - Paul Voyles - New Albany PD
www.mleoa.com
And also don’t forget to visit our website:
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MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
2014 CONFERENCE NEWS
The 2014 Annual Conference came to a close on
June 1st after a great week of training, fun and
camaraderie. The Patrol Rifle Course gave participants
an intense week of training in basic marksmanship
skills. The Motorcycle Training consisted of escort
procedures and officer survival training that
culminated in a skills competition ride that gave the
riders the opportunity to demonstrate the skills they
acquired in their training. The association also hosted
legal updates, cybercrime, and officer survival courses
to participants from across the state.
The Association also recognized two Tupelo
Officers, Sgt. Gale Stauffer (Posthumousley) and
Officer Joseph Maher as this year's Officers of the
Year. These officers were responding to a bank
robbery call and were ambushed while approaching a
vehicle matching the description given out. Sgt.
Stauffer died on scene and Officer Maher continues to
recover from his injuries. Sgt. Stauffer's family
received $1000 scholarships for each of his children
and his wife Beth was presented a plaque recognizing
his sacrifice and service. Officer Maher was also
recognized at the banquet and presented with a plaque,
gift card for a hand gun, a check for $100, and a one
year free membership in the association.
On Saturday May 31, 2014, the Mississippi Law
Enforcement Officers Association held its annual
conference at the Hollywood Casino in Bay St. Louis,
MS. At the conference, MLEOA awarded three
$1,000.00 academic and two $1,000.00 death benefit
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
scholarships.
The top overall academic scholarship, also known
as the Robbie Maxell Scholarship, was awarded to
Morgan Woodard.
Morgan graduated from
Presbyterian Christian School with a 4.0 GPA and
made a 35 on her ACT. Morgan plans to attend the
University of Mississippi in the fall and major in
Pharmacy. She is the daughter of Kenny Woodard, a
motor officer for the University of Southern
Mississippi Police Department.
The Bill Martin Academic Scholarship was
awarded to Alyssa Smith. Alyssa is the step-daughter
of Troy Russell, a police officer for Forrest General
Police Department.
Alyssa graduated from
Presbyterian Christian School with a 4.4 GPA and a 29
on her ACT. She has already enrolled at the
University of Mississippi and is majoring in
International Studies and Chinese.
The third academic scholarship was awarded to
Leigh Sumner of Saltillo, MS. Leigh graduated from
Saltillo High School with a 4.0 GPA and made a 32 on
her ACT. Leigh is the daughter of Charles Sumner, a
retired Agent of the Alcohol Beverage Control. Leigh
is already attending the University of Mississippi
where she is majoring in Chemistry with an emphasis
on Pre-Medical and minoring in Chinese.
Both Leigh and Alyssa are attending the same
Chinese program at Ole Miss and have already begun
their classes. They were unable to attend the MLEOA
Awards banquet, but the Association would like to
wish Morgan, Alyssa and Leigh the best of luck on all
of their academic endeavors.
The Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers
Association also awarded two $1,000.00 scholarships
to the children, Dixie and Skip Stauffer, of one of the
Officers of The Year, Gale Stauffer, who was killed in
the line of duty on December 23, 2013 in Tupelo, MS
after attempting to apprehend a bank robbery suspect.
Lastly, the association recognized two legislators who
were instrumental in authoring and supporting key
legislation to enhance law enforcement efforts in the
state. Senator Sally Doty and Representative Toby
Barker were recognized at the association banquet and
thanked for their outstanding efforts and support in the
2014 session.
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THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
2014 MOTORCYCLE COMPETITION RESULTS
SLOW RIDE:
1st 2nd 3rd -
Kenny Free
James Poe
Eric Tankersley
DeSoto Co. SO
Denham Springs PD
Iberville Parish SO
JIMMY BROOKS CHALLENGE RIDE:
1st 2nd 3rd -
Paul Steagall
Corey Ott
Chris Ticer
PARTNER RIDE:
1st 2nd 3rd -
Poe / Dupay
Stegall / Newsom
Sutherlen / Cox
Denham Springs PD
Mississippi Highway Patrol
Florence, AL PD
DIVISION 3 / OTHER:
EXPERT
1st - Chris Ticer
NOVICE
1st - Daniel Haynes
Florence, AL PD
Florence, AL PD
ROD CURRY B.R.A.T. AWARD:
(OVERALL BEST RIDER)
Paul Steagall
Denham Springs PD
Denham Springs PD
Denham Springs PD
Southaven PD
DIVISION 1 / WINDSHIELD:
NOVICE
1st - Josh Parker
2nd - James Bond
3rd - Johnathan Poe
Tupelo PD
Tupelo PD
DeSoto Co. SO
EXPERT
1st - Chad DuPuy
2nd - Paul Steagall
3rd - James Poe
Denham Springs PD
Denham Springs PD
Denham Springs PD
INTERMEDIATE
1st - Joseph Fourtunia
2nd - Kobi Medlock
3rd - Joey Cumbo
St. Tammany Parish SO
Madison PD
West Baton Rouge SO
DIVISION 2 / FAIRING:
NOVICE
1st - Andrew Walters
2nd - Ryan Blakley
3rd - Zak Ingram
INTERMEDIATE
1st - Marion Overby
2nd - Joey Hall
EXPERT
1st - Mitch Perry
2nd - Josh Bromen
3rd - Rick Fowler
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Richland PD
Mobile PD
Mobile PD
Richland PD
Flowood PD
Jackson PD
Gulfport PD
Brandon PD
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
CAPABLE, CONFIDENT & CALM
A case for changing police culture with hand-to-hand combat training
By H.K. Slade
Prior to becoming a police officer, I worked in bars.
First as a cook, then a bartender, then a manager, I saw a
broad spectrum of violence and violent behavior. I learned
quickly that the loud troublemaker was not the most
dangerous person in the room. Time and again, I saw men
who I knew could handle themselves (Navy Seals or semipro boxers, for example) walk away or talk their way out of
potential fights. I also saw nervous fools and insecure
greenhorns get their butts kicked in fights they had talked
themselves into with unnecessary bluster and posturing.
There’s a confidence and patience that comes from
knowing how to fight: from having been there. The guy
who can count on his ability to win in a scrap can stay
calmer, speak more effectively, and choose to start the fight
when it’s best for him. Any police officer with more than a
year on the job knows exactly what I’m talking about. The
suspect running his mouth at a traffic stop is rarely the
alpha male of the group. But the wise officer learns to keep
an eye on the quiet, slightly older guy sitting in the
passenger seat.
Where we often fail to observe this behavior is in our
fellow officers and ourselves.
Gun Fights & Other Fights
LEO culture sets a high value on shooting skills. In my
particular state, officers are required to qualify day and
night with the guns they carry at least once a year.
Individual departments have the option to raise the required
minimum scores. Every go-getter officer I can think of
spends his or her own time and money at the range getting
extra practice in. Most of our S.C.A.T. (Subject Control and
Arrest Techniques) revolve around drawing, retaining and
recovering our firearms.
One drill I remember vividly from my academy days
involved covering our holster and waiting for help while
another officer tried to drag the gun out. I recognize the
outcome of this training when I see dashcam video of
officers getting punched and kicked unconscious while they
have both hands occupied covering their holsters.
There’s a time and place for an officer to draw a gun.
There are certainly plenty of situations an officer can face
when it is necessary to pull the trigger, and any academy or
recruiter who doesn’t prepare a candidate for this possibly
is failing in his or her responsibility.
But I have a suggestion. While we as a profession do a
good job training for the most violent encounters, we’re
sorely lacking when it comes to teaching lower levels of
force. To be perfectly clear: Too many officers are coming
out of training without ever having punched or been
punched by another human being. They’re competent
gunfighters, in theory, but poor warriors.
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
This focus on the gun comes at the cost of training on
how to deal with the assault we encounter most often: the
less-than-lethal kind. Recruits are rarely given training and
practice time learning what to do after being suckerpunched. Few departments offer classes that give officers
safe hand-to-hand combat experience after the academy.
No agency I’m aware of requires yearly handcuffing
qualification.
Benefits of a Scrap
When I was a kid, it wasn’t uncommon or criminal for
two sets of parents to look the other way if their sons got in
a fist fight at the park—as long as it was a fair fight. Those
days are long gone, probably for the best, but it means most
new officers on the street have never been hit. They don’t
have the experience to know that a bloody lip or black eye
doesn’t mean the end for the fight. The fear of that
unknown causes them to bluster and posture, and when the
suspect doesn’t back down, officers will reach for
whichever tool their department has spent the most time
training them with. When all you have is a hammer, every
problem looks like a nail.
As many trainers have noted, predators seek prey.
Criminals know when an officer is scared, just as they
know on an instinctual level which officers can handle
themselves. They’re emboldened by the idea that they’re
more experienced at fighting than the average officer, and
they know that media scrutiny is starting to take the firearm
out of play, just as it did the baton.
The uneducated believe that technology will solve this
problem. Tazers, pepper spray, whatever new gadget they
develop next year—the public and the policy makers hope
each one will mean no officer will ever have to put hands
on a non-compliant subject again. The officer on the street
knows those hopes for what they are. Each new device
requires training time resources to become proficient with.
No forward-thinking department is going to accept the
liability of issuing new technology to officers and not take
the time to teach them how to use it. Where does that time
come from? Learning to actually fight.
Though it seems contradictory, improved and
consistent hand-to-hand combat training for police officers
will lower the amount of deadly force encounters in which
we find ourselves by:
• Removing some of the individual officer’s fear of the
unknown;
• Giving officers confidence that they can handle a
physical altercation without having to automatically go for
the highest level of force available;
• Allowing officers another option if less-than-lethal
technology is impractical or outright fails;
(continued)
9
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
Capable, Confident & Calm (continued)
• Diminishing the urge to bluff their way out of an
altercation by blustering and posturing; and finally
• By restoring the belief in the criminal population that
physically assaulting a cop is a losing proposition.
Conclusion
While it may be almost impossible for some
departments to correct this misappropriation of time and
focus through policy, we as officers can make considerable
headway by changing the culture. Roll those wrestling mats
out. Dust off those boxing gloves. Ask the chief for a
chance to get some hands-on training. Make it as socially
acceptable to go to the gym or the dojo on your night off as
it is to go to the range.
If you have an officer who already runs everyday, you
don’t even half to ask him to take time away from his
family. Spend one of those running days boxing. He’ll still
get a cardio workout, but he’ll learn to breath while he’s
fighting (something almost all runners forget to do the first
time they box) and learn to move when he’s pinned in a
corner. If you have a deputy who’s a CrossFit devote, get
her to change her Thursday WOD (trademark) to an hour of
wrestling. She’ll still get a her core workout, but she’ll also
learn not to panic if someone is on top of her and how to get
back up when a suspect drags her to the ground.
Whether you’re a rookie or a grizzled veteran, now’s
the time prepare yourself and your partners for the streets—
and that means preparing for physical fights.
H.K. SLADE:
H.K. Slade is Master Officer with the Raleigh Police
department. He holds a black belt in Judo and belts and
certificates in numerous other arts and systems including as
a Police Defensive Tactics Instructor through the Modern
Warrior Institute in NY. Having taught ground fighting at
numerous seminars across the country, H.K. is currently an
instructor at Krav Maga Raleigh and is the chief instructor
for BWSD, a volunteer organization specializing in
women’s safety and self defense.
Commemorative Coin
www.mleoa.com
Visit our website to order:
10
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
OFFICER WELLNESS IS OFFICER SAFETY
By Jeff Shannon
It’s time we understand, on a profound level, that stress kills
Besides courage, there’s nothing more valued in
law enforcement than safety. Courage is a given, but
safety is learned. One simply can’t be too safe:
firearms training, searching and cuffing techniques,
defensive tactics, vehicle stops, pedestrian stops—all
have “office safety” as cornerstones.
Most of us are exposed to the Cooper Color Code
system as well, which applies not only to being at
work, but when we’re sitting in our living room
watching television: “The only time you should be in
white is when you are sleeping.”
“Be safe” is probably the most common salutation
for law enforcement officers anywhere. Going home
safe to our families is the most important priority for
each and every tour of duty. This is as it should be.
After all, we don’t get to pick the time a car stop is
going to be a fight for our life. They do.
Here’s what I submit about our current emphasis
on officer safety: It’s both necessary and insufficient.
It’s necessary for all the reasons we already know.
How’s it insufficient?
Safety, Narrowly Defined
Safety, as we currently use this word, applies only
to the parts of our bodies we can see. Gunshot wounds,
bruises, broken bones, etc. There is, however, a
dawning awareness with law enforcement that coming
home fully safe to our families at the end the day, we
need to consider more than fat lips and gunshot
wounds.
Like STRESS. Many people think of stress as
feeling “stressed out,” but there’s much more to it than
that. Every time you drive Code 3 your body dumps
cortisol and adrenaline into your bloodstream. These
are the hormones all animals release when they may
have to fight to the death.
Ironically, other animals are smarter than us when
it comes to managing cortisol. For example, after the
zebra escapes the lion, within seconds he’ll put his
dumb head back down in the grass and graze. His
cortisol levels will be back to normal in a matter of
minutes. As humans, we’ve become too smart for our
own good. After we clear the code 3 run we keep
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
thinking about it.
And those thoughts keep the cortisol flowing.
Lying in bed stewing over the boss you hate or your
mortgage payment will also produce the same toxic
hormone dump — and we’re not even in physical
danger. The net result is that cops generally have
higher cortisol levels than the general population.
Because of our chronically elevated cortisol, LEOs
suffer in two ways. First, if cortisol isn’t burned off
(primarily through exercise and drinking lots of water)
it stores in the body as a particularly deadly type of
belly fat: the type associated with coronary heart
disease.
Second, having the fight or flight response active
for longer periods of time, over years and decades
creates wear and tear on our bodies (e.g., heart and
arteries). This wear and tear goes all the way to the
cellular level.
Another example: If you come home “safe” at the
end of the day, but proceed to consume a twelve pack
of beer to numb out and fall asleep, are you really
safe? How about if you go through a can of dip a day
or a prescription of Vicodin a week? These fall into the
realm of “coping.” How we cope with stress matters.
It really can be the difference between coming home
safe at the end of the day — or not.
If we don’t get at least seven hours of good sleep,
we’re not coming to work safe. Again, this is not
included in the notion of “officer safety” as we
currently employ it. The list goes on, but I think you
get the point.
There’s now a small army of law enforcement
instructors, mental health professionals and
researchers advocating for wellness and stress
management for law enforcement personnel. There are
organizations (e.g., www.BadgeofLife.com) and
books (e.g., Bulletproof Spirit: The First Responders
Essential Resource for Protecting and Healing Mind
and Heart by Capt. Dan Willis of the La Mesa, Calif.,
PD) dedicated to this topic. As part of this army, I’ll
share my biggest frustration: getting LEO’s to really
understand — on a deep level — that the way we take
care of ourselves will be difference between living
(continued)
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THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
Officer Wellness is Officer Safety (continued)
lives, as Henry David Thoreou put it, of “quiet
desperation.”
Conclusion
The parolee at large with a gun under his seat and
nothing to lose is a potential cop killer. We need to
train every single day with him in mind. Posttraumatic stress disorder, type-II diabetes, depression
and alcoholism are also potential cop killers. They
may not make the headlines of your favorite law
enforcement news website, but they’re just as real. We
need to work just as hard to ensure they don’t end our
careers, or our lives, prematurely.
By John Bostain
WHAT IT TAKES
Should police use minimal force?
Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock
somewhere, you know a lot of recent incidents have
brought police use of force to the forefront of the
national conscience. Task-forces have been formed,
agencies are reviewing their polices, and communities
are demanding that officers be retrained—even in
cases where there is no evidence of wrongdoing by
police.
Chief among the cries for reform are demands that
police officers be required to use “minimal force”
when dealing suspects. On its face it sounds pretty
good. In fact, it would be difficult to find an officer
who has not read or heard of a policy that states, in
effect: “The officer shall use the minimal amount of
force necessary to effect their lawful law enforcement
objectives.” But should police be trained to use
minimal force?
To answer this question, I think it’s smart to refer
to the ultimate authority on use of force, the U.S.
Supreme Court. In the preeminent case on the topic,
Graham v. Connor (1989), the Court ruled that an
officer’s use of force must be “objectively reasonable”
based upon the totality of circumstances know to the
officer at the moment force was used. It further states
“The ‘reasonableness’ of a particular use of force must
be judged from the perspective of a reasonable officer
on the scene, rather than with the 20/20 vision of
hindsight.” Nowhere in the text are the words
minimum or minimal found. It’s clear: The standard is
“reasonableness,” not minimal force.
So what’s the difference?
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Jeff Shannon is a police officer, law
enforcement instructor and a licensed
marriage and family therapist. He
teaches Wellness and Crisis DeEscalation as part of the Alameda
County, Calif. Crisis Intervention
Training program. Jeff is recognized
by the California Commission on
Jeff Shannon
Peace Officer Standards and Training
(POST) as a subject matter expert in the area of stress
management for law enforcement. He can be reached
at [email protected]
Minimal vs. Reasonable
I’ve heard it hundreds of times over the years:
“Minimal, reasonable—it’s basically the same thing,
right? It’s just semantics.”
No, I say, the difference is huge.
I’ve been asked: “Why do you make such a big
deal about it?” My answer: Because words matter.
Minimal and reasonable don’t have the same
meaning.
In fact, the meaning is quite different. Merriam
Webster defines minimal as “barely adequate.” You
read that right: “barely adequate.” So, what the policy
actually says is “the officer shall use that amount of
force that is barely adequate to affect their lawful law
enforcement objective.” How does that make you feel?
How do you even attempt to use barely adequate
force?
On the other hand, Merriam Webster defines
reasonable as “not extreme or excessive.” Isn’t that
what we want from our officers?
Maybe you don’t buy the argument about the
definitions of reasonable and minimal I described
above. Fair enough. Consider this: Minimal force is
also inconsistent with the Court’s prohibition on 20/20
hindsight. Notice the Court didn’t suggest that
hindsight should not be used. It didn’t say “as a
general rule” hindsight should not be used. No — the
use of 20/20 hindsight to determine reasonableness is
prohibited by the Court. The only way to determine
minimal with certainty in any given situation would be
through the 20/20 vision of hindsight, in direct conflict
with the guidance of the Court.
(continued)
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
What It Takes (continued)
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
I often hear administrators, civilians, and other
officer’s comment after an incident “the officer should
have done __ or __.” This or that, but never what the
officer actually did.
The problem with such statements is that they often
rely completely on hindsight. The question isn’t what
the officer “should” have done, but rather: Were the
officer’s actions reasonable based upon the totality
circumstances known to them at the time? The first
statement uses hindsight. The second statement uses
the language of the U.S. Supreme Court.
Conclusion
When the Court is so clear on the issue, why do
some seem so eager to deviate from the standard they
lay forth? Do we teach officers to be barely adequate
in determining probable cause? Do we teach officers
to be barely adequate in providing Miranda rights
during a custodial interview? I hope not.
So if we follow the guidance of the Supreme Court
on all other matters of law, why do we not apply the
same standard for use of force? The Court is very clear
on the standard for use of force in this country. It’s
objective reasonableness, not minimal force, and
that’s a very big distinction.
I think it’s time we start to listen to the Court. Don’t
you?
John Bostain:
John Bostain is an instructor for Calibre Press and a
Public Safety Training Specialist for Relias
Learning. John has served with the Hampton Police
Division and the Federal Law Enforcement Training
Center. His primary focus is on Use of Force, Officer
Safety, and Instructor Development.
Make Your Plans Now To Attend
2015 Conference
June 8 - June 12
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MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
13
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
GREAT K9 TRAINING IN SOUTHAVEN!
MLEOA hosted a K9 training and certification
course in Southaven March 24-26, 2015. Agencies
from around the state attended and received
certification through the National Narcotic Detector
Dog Association. Captain Richard Chandler of the
Southaven Police Department coordinated the training
and MLEOA provided lodging, meals, and
certification fees to ensure the officers and their
agencies received the needed training at no cost to
them.
There were 26 officers and K9's representing
eleven (11) agencies that benefited from this training:
Mississippi Highway Patrol, Oxford PD, Coldwater
PD, Batesville PD, Panola County SO, Horn Lake PD,
Madison PD, Hernando PD, Itawamba County SO,
Tupelo PD, and Saltillo PD.
At the end of the training, we hosted two friendly
competitions, a Detection Scramble and a Hard
Dog/Fast Dog with the following results:
Detection Scramble
1st Place.........................Wesley Rhudy and K9 Chase
Saltillo PD
2nd Place .........................Josh Wilson and K9 Gandor
Horn Lake PD
3rd Place................................Tim Harris and K9 Brun
Horn Lake PD
Hard Dog/Fast Dog
1st Place ................................Tim Harris and K9 Brun
Horn Lake PD
2nd Place .........................Russ Gordon and K9 Buster
Mississippi Highway Patrol
3rd Place .............................Paul Bunch and K9 Maxx
Madison PD
See You at the
2015 Conference
June 8 - June 12
Biloxi Golden Nugget Casino
14
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
THE MYTH OF HANDS UP/DON’T SHOOT
The narrative was invented & it cost lives
By Jim Glennon
For the last two months immediately after the
pledge of allegiance we have been showing a video at
our Street Survival Seminars. The video is of a
“protest” in San Francisco. Rest assured, it’s brutal.
Over the five minute piece you see and hear
absolute abuse being shouted at police officers. They
are called “slaves,” “pigs,” “motherfuckers,” “a shame
on the community.” Chants of “sell-out cops” can be
heard as they are harassed, given the finger and
provoked both physically and verbally. Bottles and
barricades are thrown. Windows are broken. Crowds
hold signs that advocate the killing of police officers.
They are angry because an “unarmed teenager”
named Michael Brown in a small town named
Ferguson, Mo., was murdered by an out–of-control
racist cop while Brown’s hands were in the air, saying,
“Don’t shoot.”
Problem is, the entire narrative by the protesters in
every demonstration in every part of the country was
constructed around a falsehood—some might say, a
lie.
The Attorney General of the United States, Eric
Holder, conceded to that fact yesterday.
So now what?
In my 30-plus year career in law enforcement I’ve
never seen the relationship between police and the
community they serve and protect so damn toxic.
Never in my entire lifetime.
The divide is as cavernous as it is disheartening.
Calibre Press just published a survey where more than
80% of the responding officers said they would not
recommend law enforcement to a family member. It
echoes what I’ve heard out of countless police
officers’ mouths all over the country in the last six
months.
The number one reason they wouldn’t recommend
it? Media and public attitude towards the police.
It seems as everyone, including yours truly, is
voicing an opinion on this sad state of affairs, but few
are asking the important and primary question: Why?
Importance of Trust
One word: TRUST.
Trust is the backbone of any relationship. Whether
it be a marriage, friendship, or business venture, if
there’s a lack of trust the association is doomed.
And we have none between the police and the
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
citizenry. Right? Actually, no.
Most, and in fact the great majority, of police
departments are rated high in surveys when it comes to
respect by the people they actually serve. Even in New
York, the people who lived where the police were
doing the constantly maligned practice of “Stop and
Frisk” approved of the practice by 68%.
Communities, for the most part, trust their own
cops. Everyone from Gallup to individual city polls
bear out this truth over the last several decades.
So what is the true problem?
Four things, in my humble opinion.
1. Media bias;
2. Activists with an agenda;
3. Cultural problems in some police agencies; and
4. Leadership.
Let’s examine.
Media bias: Does anyone think the truth matters
to many in the media anymore? Their sole goal, it
seems, is to beat the other countless media outlets to a
breaking story. Don’t vet the witnesses; ignore their
motives; run with innuendo and rumors; avoid
inconvenient facts, especially if you’ve already
supported a narrative that those facts will destroy. And
as soon as one “news organization” features the false
information—it becomes truth to those who view it.
There are good journalists—hard-working, honest
people who put all they’ve got into getting the story
right. But the business of media as a model—the
national media in particular—is to get eyeballs first
and get the truth … if convenient. And in this case,
people died. Because of a cynical lie.
Activists with an agenda: Don’t get me wrong.
Some demonstrators are the salt of the earth, and we
are obliged to protect them in their right to peaceably
assemble and engage in free speech. But those
screaming the loudest for truth, ethics and justice—
those demanding the limelight shine on their ego
alone—are some of the biggest charlatans and
hucksters in the country.
Cultural problems in some police agencies: The
DOJ report about the police practices in Ferguson is
disturbing. I read much of it and while I don’t assign
evil intent to the conclusions therein, negative culture
(continued)
15
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
Myths of Hands Up/Don’t Shoot (continued)
and corrupt practices can easily take hold in a police
agency. This is undeniable and it’s incredibly tough to
change. Changing a culture takes determination,
courage, honest assessment and something that I
believe is sorely lacking in this country at every level:
leadership.
Leadership: It takes guts to lead with integrity.
Government is not set up for creative, innovative,
“think outside the box” and “rock the boat” leaders.
Change is too often a dirty word. Groupthink is too
often widespread. In any sort of big organization it’s
almost impossible to lose your job if you just go along
and get along and do the bare minimum. A years-long
process of lousy work won’t get you fired, but a single
event will get you fired. Especially an event with
national media attention (see above). What’s worse:
Too often those poor workers get promoted. And the
last thing a government supervisor wants to do is lose
his/her job. So, just go along, avoid problems, ride out
the career, pick up a nice pension on a supervisor’s
salary.
Conclusion
In sum, the media should be ashamed of itself for
pushing a false narrative. Not only was “Hands
up/Don’t shoot” untrue, the media is now using this
trope to highlight and encapsulate every case they can
find of police using force. They push and push and
push singular innocuous events and present them as
epidemic examples of police abuse even when the
officers do nothing wrong.
Because of the bias and unsubstantiated reporting
people were injured and died. Many lost their
businesses. Cops and their families were harassed and
their personal information was hacked. Communities
have been damaged seemingly beyond repair.
This is a problem on many fronts. We as police
officers, leaders, and agencies cannot play the victim.
We need to reach out. We need to assess, listen and
think outside the box. We need to furthermore get
back to our basics: why we do this. What is your
mission? How do you do it better?
We need to take this opportunity and fix this thing.
Jim Glennon
Lt. Jim Glennon, a third
generation LEO, retired from the
Lombard, Ill. PD after 29 years
of service. Rising to the rank of
lieutenant, he commanded both
patrol and the Investigations
Unit. In 1998, he was selected as
the first Commander of Investigations for the newly
formed DuPage County Major Crimes (Homicide)
Task Force. He is the owner of The Calibre Press
Street Survival Seminar. He is the author of Arresting
Communication: Essential Interaction Skills for Law
Enforcement.
www.mleoa.com
Visit our website:
16
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
FEELING THE BURN?
3 tips for treating (or avoiding) FTO burnout
By Daniel Greene
The role of field training officer is one of the most
important assignments there is at any agency. FTOs,
on behalf of the department, share their knowledge
and skills with the incoming generation. They have
first crack at developing the culture, attitude and work
ethic of a young police officer.
It’s a role that must not be taken lightly, and it’s no
surprise to say that most FTOs don’t take it lightly. In
fact, most FTOs take their responsibilities very
seriously. In the year 2000, the National Institute of
Ethics completed what was at the time the nation’s
largest study of ethical standards inside law
enforcement. They found that the FTO was the most
frustrated officer in the department.
Frustrated, angry and burned out, the FTO hits the
road with their new and easily influenced police
officer. This paints a gloomy picture, in so far as it’s
accurate today. The good news is that the FTO can
also be repaired. Following are three things the FTO
and FTO manager can do to help avoid—or fix—FTO
burn out.
Prepare them for success: According to the
August 2013 edition of Police Chief Magazine, almost
55% of FTOs surveyed described their preparation and
training as a newly appointed FTO as “marginal or
non-existent.” That’s a big fail for their agencies. We
all want the FTO to be highly trained and equipped to
handle their new role as trainers, mentors, coaches and
role models. The newly appointed FTO enters his or
her new specialty with promise and capability. They
should be given the resources and training necessary
to be successful.
Never assume that the FTO is a natural born
leader. None of us are. Enroll your new FTO into a
basic FTO School. Find a school that covers topics
like adult learning, generation studies, ethics and
liability. The long-term success of the FTO can very
well depend on the training they receive as rookie
trainers.
Document, document, document: The same
Police Chief Magazine article cites the number #1
most frustrating challenge to the FTO is “lack of
administrative support.” It’s been my experience that
lack of support from your chain of command usually
sounds something like this, “We just don’t have the
documentation to support …” If you’ve heard that
before you’ve likely been disappointed and felt let
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
down by your command staff.
My best advice on conquering this challenge is to
eliminate that excuse. Beef up your documentation
and strengthen your daily observation reports. Be sure
that your performance evaluations include details on
the trainee’s deficiencies, details on the training tips
and techniques you’ve offered the OIT as well as any
kind of extended remedial training they’ve received.
Don’t forget to include examples of positive
reinforcement and coaching. Including both of those
things will help reassure your command that the
program’s number first goal is the trainee’s success.
Find your real motivation: “When people of
action cease to believe in a cause, they then begin to
believe only in the action.” An unknown French
philosopher was given credit for that quote. It rings
very true with me. Having a purpose and mission to
accomplish at work makes my job fulfilling. Hard
work doesn’t wear us down, lack of purpose does. If
you are an FTO or if you manage your agency’s FTO
program, pay close attention to what drives you. What
motivates you and your training officers? Is it a sense
of accomplishment? Maybe appreciation for a job well
done?
During WWII, General Motors Company lost a
great deal of male employees to go fight in the war.
Women began working in the plants and in the offices.
GMC also transformed a number of their car-making
facilities into war-machine-making facilities. Military
vehicles of all shapes and sizes were now assembled
inside their plants. GMC noticed that during this
period of time their productivity and efficiency
increased. But after the war, when male employees
returned to work, production numbers fell back down
to the levels they were at before the war. GMC hired a
man by the name of Peter Drucker to investigate this
phenomenon. He found that the reason the female
employees worked so hard and produced so well was
the purpose behind their mission. A noble cause that
motivated them: The women of GMC knew that the
vehicles they were producing were the very same
vehicles their husbands and sons were driving while
fighting in the war.
Law enforcement is a noble cause. Field training is
a noble cause. Anger, frustration and burn out are
easily diagnosed symptoms. If treated properly and
quickly, the FTO can be saved and motivated again.
(continued)
17
Feeling the Burn? (continued)
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
Conclusion
Always work to reignite the passion that brought you
into this wonderful profession and keep your
commitment to training the future of law enforcement.
Daniel Greene:
Daniel Greene is a Sergeant with the Chandler
Police Department in Chandler, AZ. Daniel began his
career as an Officer with the police department in
1996. In 1998 he was selected as a Field Training
Officer and served his first tour of duty in the Field
CUTTIN’ UP
1145 Hwy 98E • Columbia, MS 39429
Training Unit till the year 2000. After two years as a
detective, Daniel returned to the Field Training Unit
and remained there until 2006. In November of 2006
Dan promoted to Sergeant and remained in Patrol
supervising a team of eight officers. In January of
2008 Dan was selected to inherent the Field Training
Unit once more, this time as it’s supervisor. Dan has
received certification in a number of fields within Law
Enforcement. Dan is currently a certified General
Instructor, Defensive Tactics Instructor, Taser
International Instructor, Ground Survival Instructor,
Field Training Officer and AZPOST Leadership
Instructor.
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MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
2015 MLEOA CONFERENCE
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
June 8th - June 12th, 2015
Golden Nugget Casino / Biloxi, MS
SUNDAY (JUNE 7):
Motorcycle Course Setup
Dinner (On Your Own)
MONDAY (JUNE 8):
Motorcycle Training (motor survival class)
Officer Survival
Opening Ceremonies and Lunch
Motorcycle Training
Officer Survival
Board Meeting
Reception – Casual – Pool Side
TUESDAY (JUNE 9)
Motorcycle Training
Officer Survival
Legal Updates
K-9 Training
Lunch (On Your Own)
Motorcycle Ttaining
Officer Survival
K-9 Training
Grade Crossing Collision Investigation
Cook Out – Casual
WEDNESDAY (JUNE 10)
Motorcycle Training
Officer Survival
Cybercrime
K-9 Training
Lunch (On Your Own)
Motorcycle Ttaining
Officer Survival
K-9 Training
Water Park (Family)
Cook Out – Casual
THURSDAY (JUNE 11)
Motorcycle Skill Exhibition
Lunch (On Your Own)
Law Fit Challenge
Banquet
FRIDAY (JUNE 12)
Elections and Closing Ceremonies
1:00 PM –
8:00 AM
8:00 AM
12:00 PM
1:00 PM
1:00 PM
6:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 AM
8:00 AM
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8:00 AM
12:00 PM
1:00 PM
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1:00 PM
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12:00 PM
1:00 PM
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1:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 AM
12:00 PM
1:00 PM
7:00 PM
5:00 PM
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– 12:00 PM
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– 8:30 PM
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– 12:00 PM
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– 10:00 PM
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
19
Gas Station
One day, a Man was filling his gas tank at a Gas
Station; he filled the tank so full that gasoline got on
his shirt sleeve; unaware that there was gasoline on his
sleeve, he lit a cigarette and his sleeve caught fire, so
he jumped into his car, waved his arm up and down in
an effort to put out the flames. He looked into his rear
view mirror and saw red, white and blue lights
flashing and heard a police siren; the Policeman pulled
him over, got out of his Patrol Car, and arrested the
driver for having and illegal Firearm.
Bobby & Earl
Two rednecks, Bobby and Earl, were driving down
the road drinking a couple of bottles of Bud. The
passenger, Bobby, said "Lookey thar up ahead, Earl,
it's a police roadblock!! We're gonna get busted fer
drinkin' these here beers!!" "Don't worry, Bobby," Earl
said. "We'll just pull over and finish drinkin' these
beers then peel off the label and stick it on our
foreheads, and throw the bottles under the seat."
"What fer?", asked Bobby. "Just let me do the talkin',
OK?," said Earl. Well, they finished their beers, threw
the empties out of sight & put label on each of their
foreheads. When they reached the roadblock, the
sheriff said, "You boys been drinkin'?" "No, sir," said
Earl while pointing at the labels. "We're on the patch."
Highway Patrol
A man purchased a new Mercedes to celebrate his
wife leaving him and was out on the interstate for a
nice evening drive. The top was down, the breeze was
blowing through what was left of his hair and he
decided to open her up. As the needle jumped up to 80
mph, he suddenly saw flashing red and blue lights
behind him. "There's no way they can catch a
Mercedes," he thought to himself and opened her up
further. The needle hit 90, 100.....Then the reality of
the situation hit him. "What am I doing?" he thought
and pulled over. The police cop came up to him, took
his license without a word and examined it and the car.
"It's been a long hard day, this is the end of my shift
and it's Friday. I don't feel like more paperwork, I don't
need the frustration or the overtime, so if you can give
me a really good excuse for your driving that I haven't
heard before, you can go." The guy thinks about it for
a second and says, "Last week my nagging wife ran off
with a cop. I was afraid you were trying to give her
back!" "Have a nice weekend," said the officer.
20
Pulled Over
A man was stopped by the police around 2 am. The
officer asked him where he was going at that time of
night. The man replied, "I'm on my way to a lecture
about alcohol abuse and the effects it has on the human
body, as well as smoking and staying out late." The
officer then asked, "Really? Who's giving that lecture
at this time of night?" The man replied, "That would
be my wife."
Police Patrol
From the state where drunk driving is considered a
sport, comes this absolutely true story. Recently a
routine police patrol parked outside a bar in Fort
Worth, Texas. After last call the officer noticed a man
leaving the bar so intoxicated that he could barely
walk. The man stumbled around the parking lot for a
few minutes, with the officer quietly observing. After
what seemed an eternity in which he tried his keys on
five different vehicles, the man managed to find his
truck and trailer and fall into it. He sat there for a few
minutes as a number of other patrons left the bar and
drove off. Finally, he got into the car and started the
engine, switched the wipers on and off....it was a fine,
dry summer night, flicked the blinkers on and off a
couple of times, honked the horn and then switched on
the lights. He moved the vehicle forward a few inches,
reversed a little and then remained still for a few more
minutes as some more of the other patrons' vehicles
left. Finally, when his was the only car left in the
parking lot, he pulled out and drove slowly down the
road. The police officer, having waited patiently all
this time, now started up his patrol car, put on the
flashing lights, promptly pulled the man over and
administered a breathalyzer test. To his amazement,
the breathalyzer indicated no evidence that the man
had consumed any alcohol at all! Dumbfounded, the
officer said, 'I'll have to ask you to accompany me to
the police station. This breathalyzer equipment must
be broken.' 'I seriously doubt it', said the truly proud
Hillbilly. 'Tonight I'm the designated decoy.'
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
MLEOA Scholarship Program
Introduction
The M.L.E.O.A shall fund a scholarship program to benefit members and their children to offset the cost of higher
education. The rules, policies, and application process as
written are to insure a fair selection process.
Eligibility
Persons eligible to apply for the M.L.E.O.A. scholarship
shall:
A. Be considered a dependent child, natural or adopted, of
a member in good standing, or if deceased was a member in good standing at the time of death.
B. Be a high school senior. They will be the first considered for the scholarship. In the event not enough applications are submitted by high school seniors to fulfill
the number of scholarships to be awarded, then the
scholarship committee comprised of the three regional
vice-presidents and first vice-president of M.L.E.O.A.,
may consider active college or university students'
applications.
C. Possess a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0
scale overall high school average or cumulative GPA if
a higher education level applies. Seven (7) semester
transcripts must be submitted from high school.
Scholarship Awards
The M.L.E.O.A. scholarship shall consist of the following
awards:
A. Three (3) scholarships in the amount of $1000, each to
be awarded annually to qualified applicants.
B. Funds as awarded shall be used to pursue undergraduate studies at any accredited institution of higher learning or vocational school in Mississippi.
Application Process
Applications will be taken through May 15 of each year.
The winners will be selected and notified at the
conference.
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
A. After completing the application form, sign and mail to
the address listed on the application.
B. The M.L.E.O.A. member must sign and date the application form.
C. Include two (2) letters of recommendation. The two
letters should come from individuals having knowledge
of your achievements and potential. One recommendation shall be from a school official and one from a person other than a relative. Avoid peer recommendations. No more than two letters will be accepted.
D. A certified copy of your current high school or college
transcript depicting your accumulated grade point
average and a copy of your latest ACT and/or SAT
results.
E. A typewriter essay of at least 300 and no more than
500 words. Your career objectives, how college relates
to your objectives, and how you expect to contribute to
society, can form the basis of your essay. The essay
should provide a way for us to become better acquainted with you by means other that your accomplishments.
F. Submit a current photograph.
Rating Process
A. The scholarship committee shall review each application and return a rating report to the Executive
Secretary/Treasurer.
B. Applications shall be rated on a 100 point scale. The
following criteria shall be rated according to the applicable points.
1. Grade Point Average: 25 to 40 points. Points are
based upon the applications cumulative grade point
average. (i.e. 2.5 equals 25 points, 3.2 equals 32
points). A perfect 4.0 GPA (A) average will be considered a maximum of 40 points. Total points cannot exceed 40.
‰
21
THE MAGAZINE OF MLEOA
2. Leadership and Character: 0 to 40 points. Points are
based upon the applicants' leadership ability and positive characteristics. (i.e. class offices held, leadership
positions, community services, activities, sports,
employment, honors and awards) Total points cannot
exceed 40.
3. Essay: 0 to 20 points. Points are awarded for a clear
presentation of ideas, content, and creativity. Total
points cannot exceed 20 points.
C. The Executive Secretary/Treasurer shall total the scores
from the rating forms and forward the results to the
President. The President shall notify the scholarship
recipients.
1. Ties shall be resolved based on the applicants with the
highest ACT score.
Scholarship Committee And Selection Process
A. The scholarship committee shall consist of the first VicePresident and the three Regional Vice-Presidents of the
M.L.E.O.A. The first Vice-President shall chair the committee.
B. In the event a member of the scholarship committee has
22
a child, spouse, relative, or is an applicant for the scholarship, the executive committee shall appoint another
member to serve on the committee.
C. Awarding scholarships by the scholarship committee will
be accomplished by the following process.
1. Each applicant will be scored by each committee member.
2. The score of each committee member will be added to
obtain a final point total.
3. Awarding the scholarship will be determined by rating
the scores highest to lowest.
D. The Secretary/Treasurer shall maintain a record of all
persons submitting applications and arrange for copies of
each application to be delivered to members of the scholarship committee.
E. All applications shall be reviewed by each member of the
scholarship committee and rated.
F. All applications and rating reports shall become property
of M.L.E.O.A.
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
MLEOA Scholarship Application
The following information and documentation must be enclosed with the application for any consideration to be given:
1. A certified copy of your current high school or college transcript depicting your accumulated grade point average and a copy
of your latest ACT and/or SAT results.
2. A typewritten essay of at least 300 and no more than 500 words as described in the application packet.
3. Three letters of recommendation. One must be from a school official and one must be from a person other than a relative.
4. A current photograph.
PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT ALL RESPONSES
Full Name of Applicant:
Social Security:
Home Address:
City:
Home Telephone #: (
County:
)
State:
Zip:
Date of Birth:
/
/
Parent or Guardian:
Address (if different from above):
City:
County:
State:
Zip:
County:
State:
Zip:
Name of High School or University:
Address:
City:
Overall Grade Point Average:
American College Test (ACT) Composite Score:
Last Date Taken:
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Composite Score:
Last Date Taken:
Academic honors, awards, and leadership positions categorized as follows
(use additional pages if necessary):
Elected Positions:
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
continued ‰
23
MLEOA Scholarship Application, cont.
Volunteer Positions:
Club Memberships:
Academic Honors:
Work Experience:
Other Awards & Honors:
College or University you plan on attending (limit two):
Name:
Name:
Course of Study:
Scholarships received by applicant for this term and amount:
List any other educational assistance (i.e. grants, GI Bill, etc.) you have received:
Signature of Applicant
Date:
Signature of MLEOA Member:
Date:
MLEOA Membership #:
Submit with all required attachments to:
Charlie Sims
Executive Treasurer, MLEOA
14 Southgate Rd
Hattiesburg, MS 39401
ATTACH PHOTO
HERE
Submit by May 15, 2015.
24
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
(601) 268-2068
7048 U.S. Highway 49
Hattiesburg, MS 39402
Robbie’s
Proud Supporter of the MS Law Enforcement Officers Association
Guns H Ammo
Hunting and Fishing Supplies
1663 Hwy 98 East
Columbia, MS 39429
601-736-6763
Proud Supporter of the MS Law Enforcement Officers Association
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
25
Carpenter Pole & Piling
1513 North Magnolia Dr.
Wiggins, MS 39577
Proud Supporter of the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officer’s Association
26
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
Orkin
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
Exterminator
Pest Control
Termite Inspector
89 Industrial Drive
(601) 582-3282
AMERICAN
WOOD
Wood Preserving Products
1356 MS 15
Richton, MS 39476
(601) 788-6564
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION
TATER’S
FOOD AND FUEL
600 N. Front St.
Richton, MS 39476
(601) 788-2376
114 South Front St.
Richton, MS 39476
(601) 788-3000
Proud Supporter of the Mississippi
Law Enforcement Officer’s
Association
27
FIVE STAR
FOUNDATION REPAIR LLC
2274 HWY 11
MOSELLE, MS 39459
(601) 544-4990
Proud Supporter
of the Mississippi Law Enforcement
Officers Association
4833 Amoco Dr.
Moss Point, MS 39563
(228) 474-6170
BROOMHALL
AUTO BODY,
PAINT & CUSTOM
Auto Body Shop
Automotive Customizing
Automotive Restoration
5113 Lincold Rd. Ext.
Hattiesburg, MS 39402
(601) 543-5605
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Proud Supporter
of the Mississippi Law Enforcement
Officers Association
28
MISSISSIPPI LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION