Creating Solutions... ...Changing Lives

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Creating Solutions... ...Changing Lives
Creating Solutions...
...Changing Lives
Annual Report 2008
A Message from the CEO & Board Chair
Dear Friends,
You may have seen a video circulating the Internet last year set to the music of
“What Kind of World Do You Want?” from the band Five for Fighting. The video
spotlighted people with autism, and captured so well the essence of where Easter
Seals Work Resource Center is directing its energy. What kind of world do we want?
Since our agency’s inception more than thirty five years ago, the answer has remained
the same. At Easter Seals WRC, we want a world where every person regardless of
disability or life disadvantage, has the opportunity to participate in the workforce and
all the benefits that work provides: self-esteem, financial independence and
community, among others.
As recent events have brought home all too well, our world is constantly changing.
While our mission and our commitment to our mission remain unchanged, we at
Easter Seals WRC must aspire to stay one step ahead; to create the change we want
to see in the world, we must continually adapt to the needs of the community and the
people we serve--oftentimes before the need is recognized.
We believe that the key to our sustainability and our ability to deliver strong outcomes
is our vision of what we want the world to look like. Last year, our Board of Trustees and
agency leadership identified four strategic aras of focus:
Lisa J. FitzGibbon,
President & CEO
• Expand our social enterprise success with initiatives that reuse materials and
train individuals with disabilities and disadvantages. (see pages 3-4)
• Foster corporate and community partnerships to provide new services and
career experiences for underserved youth. (See pages 5-6)
• Become a regional resource for individuals and families living with autism.
(see pages 7-8)
• Improve the financial viability of our Building Value social enterprise thus
increasing the organization’s indepence. (see pages 9-10)
The stories and outcomes shared in the following pages relate just a few of our
successes. We recognize challenges and opportunities that lie ahead:
• We must ensure our social enterprises are given proper opportunities for
expansion. Social enterprise is how we can sustain our organization when
funding sources fluxuate.
Craig Decker,
Board Chair
• We need to identify new ways to meet the demand for transition services for
underserved youth as funding options change.
• Easter Seals WRC must strengthen partnerships in order to advocate for the high
numbers of people who are seeking employment in a difficult job market.
It is only through the support of our partners and donors like you that Easter Seals WRC
can address these needs and operate from a position of strength in the face of rapid
and unpredictable changes.
So we ask: what kind of world do you want? As the song says, the future starts now.
Lisa J. FitzGibbon,
President & CEO
Craig Decker,
Board Chair
Mission
Easter Seals Work Resource Center empowers individuals with
disabilities and disadvantages to increase their independence
through employment.
Who We Serve
During fiscal year 2008, Easter Seals WRC served 10,150
individuals, providing more than 21,000 total services through 17
different programs. People served are represented in three
categories:
• People with disabilities who need support to find and keep a
job
• People who are chronically unemployed or underemployed
• Underserved youth transitioning from school to the workforce.
On-the-job training
Individuals come to Easter Seals WRC to achieve employment goals by:
• Identifying & Creating an Individualized Path to Success
Participants in Easter Seals WRC programs learn to identify their skills, talents and desires to create
employment goals. Through community-based assessment, work and volunteer experiences and
school-to-work transition, Easter Seals WRC staff helps individuals learn more about themselves and
increase the chance for real success.
Preparing youth to work
• Developing Job Qualifications & Work-Related Life Skills
Obtaining meaningful employment in a competitive job market requires experience, skills and
training. Our programs offer industry-specific experience and training to develop references
and industry-specific expertise. Building Value, work-based training, summer youth employment,
SmartLab and community experiences each allow participants to gain very specific work
experience in real work settings.
Connecting to employment
• Obtaining & Retaining Employment
Easter Seals WRC focuses on finding work and developing the skills to be successful in retaining
employment. Many individuals need continued support to help them remain employed. At Easter
Seals WRC programs like job placement, job coaching, follow-along and Work Link are designed
to help participants remove barriers keeping them from holding a consistent job.
Building a workforce for the future
2
Creating New Job Training Experiences
A quiet young man diagnosed with multiple
disabilities, David came to Easter Seals WRC
because he wanted to work and earn a paycheck.
As a production employee assembling medical
testing kits, he demonstrated reliability and
productivity, but kept to himself.
David realized his own talents as he began working
in the new Building Ability woodshop building green
products from recycled material. Learning quickly,
he was operating power tools, building cornhole
sets and setting an example of safe work habits.
David began to change, from a person not
comfortable communicating to a leader who is
ready to teach his co-workers the skills he has
mastered. (He’s known in the wood shop as the
“master sander.”) He’s quick to play a trick on
Building Ability staff including several April Fool’s Day
jokes. His family continues to notice the changes
in him, as he comes home each day excited and
ready to tell them about all he’s accomplished.
David’s woodworking skills contine to improve, and
he’s now working on more advanced products like
a dollhouse and an adirondack chair and rocker.
3
37% of individuals with a disability are employed
compared to 80% of individuals
without a disability
Providing people with an opportunity to work at Easter
Seals WRC increases the likelihood they will succeed in
community employment and achieve personal goals.
At Easter Seals WRC, such work and training
opportunities include subsidized employment,
community volunteering and paid internships. In FY
2008, job training included:
• Summer Internships
• Community Experiences with local
hospitals, soup kitchens, Building Value, lawn
care services and more.
• Packaging and Fulfillment
• Building Ability, woodworking program and
green social enterprise
75% of work services participant hours
were spent in paid work or community
experiences.
26 individuals worked in Building
Ability learning woodworking, design,
safety and product marketing in 2008.
Percentage of persons participating in
Work Experience activities.
100
80
56
60
65
73
Revenue from Building Ability products
increased 75% in 2008.
2005/06
2006/07
40
2007/08
20
0
Number served in Assessment services
200
166
150
100
50
0
79
107 102
133
184
2002/03
2003/04
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
4
Research shows that the single most important factor
predicting success for work after high school is
work experience in high school, including paid
The ability for youth to transition successfully to work
and unpaid internships.
or higher education is critical for students from lowincome backgrounds to move out of poverty. Nearly
1 in 4 Ohio adults without a high school degree lives in
poverty, compared to 1 in 12 with some college or an
associate’s degree. (Ohio Association of Community
Action Agencies.) In addition, poverty rates triple in
populations living with disabilities (2007 Disability Stutus
Report).
Youth with disabilities or students at-risk for not
graduating high school find a safe place to learn,
grow and identify their aspirations at Easter Seals WRC.
Services include:
• Summer Youth Employment program assists youth
with exploringcareer options and developing real
career plans.
• Career Choices helps youth with disabilities learn
about career and life options.
• High School High Tech allows youth with
disabilities access to a host of different
technologies and learn skills in music editing,
programming and computer assembly.
• Career Plan-It gives at-risk youth an in-depth
personal look into careers in science and
technology.
• Work Force Investment Act programs offer youth
at risk for not graduating in-school and out-ofschool options for preparing for the workforce.
Youth Prepared to Work after High School
67%
75%
75%
Through
ESWRC
Services
0%
5
2004/05
20%
40%
2005/06
60%
94% of participating youth
remained in school.
80% of graduates moved on to
employment.
64% of graduates moved to
post-secondary education.
87%
50%
50%
50%
50%
Direct
from
School
135 youth participated in programs
funded through the Workforce
Investment Act.
90% of Technology Awareness Program
(TAP) graduates went to post-secondary
school or are employed.
11,046 Youth utilized Youth Zone
Resource Room.
80%
2006/07
100%
2007/08
When many 17-year-old high school girls were
thinking about homework and school dances,
Naomi Fairbanks was thinking about finding a place
to live and a way to pay for groceries. From the
age of 12, Naomi floated between different living
situations and finally found herself living on her own
while completing high school, working as much as
labor laws would allow.
She learned of the Easter Seals WRC school to work
program while looking for a job at the Youth Zone.
A survivalist who was used to fighting for everything
she got in life, it was apparent that while Naomi
was a person who expected much from others, she
never expected to receive it.
Easter Seals WRC refused to allow Naomi’s trust
issues overshadow her determination and potential.
They offered her a summer internship in customer
service. Quickly, Naomi learned the job and
became the “go to” person for many staff as well as
the students in the Summer Career Camp.
Now, you will find Naomi enrolled as a full-time
student at Northern Kentucky University studying
social work. She continues her connection with
Easter Seals WRC and is learning to accept help
and support from others to reach her goals.
Preparing Youth for Employment
6
Connecting People to Employment
Clever, outgoing and ambitious, Ryan possesses
many of the skills needed to succeed in the
workplace. Like many people with autism, Ryan
prefers a structured environment. When things don’t
go according to routine, Ryan may have difficulty
controlling his reactions.
At the age of 19, Ryan just wanted to experience
things other people his age were doing, like working
a part-time job. To do this, Ryan worked with Easter
Seals WRC staff who are familiar with the challenges
people with autism face and, together, the team
developed a plan to help Ryan get the job he
wanted; a bagger at Kroger.
The plan helped Ryan and his family focus on
developing coping and job skills and learning the
expectations of the job through trials and support
from Easter Seals WRC staff. Ryan was so prepared
for his interview with Kroger, they hired him on the
spot!
“I’m happy to have the experience of a job!”
remarks Ryan who enjoys saving the money he
earns. His family has seen a change in Ryan: he is
happier and extremely proud of himself and was
never so excited as when he received his official
blue Kroger uniform shirt.
Support from the Gap Foundation enabled Easter Seals
WRC to provide the added support needed to help Ryan
achieve this milestone of success.
7
Median income of households including any workingage people with disabilities is
$38,400, compared to $61,000
in households where no people
live with a disability.*
563 individuals left public assistance
due to employment.
73% of of participants with job
coaches remain employed after
90 days.
69% of jobs obtained through
placement services offer employee
benefits.
Success of Easter Seals WRC services
for employment of individuals with
disabilities contributed to an
estimated $1M net gain to the Social
Security system.
Employment obtained by participants
in Community Link programs saves
the welfare system nearly $1M.
Whether it is providing individuals receiving cash
assistance with access to the internet to conduct
a job search or assessing an individual’s aptitude
toward a job, Easter Seals WRC believes that when
people receive adequate support, they can succeed in the workforce.
Services available at Easter Seals WRC that open
doors for employment success include:
• Work Link, connecting people on cash
assistance to employment opportunities.
• Computer Resource Lab for participants
conducting a job search.
• Employment Placement services for individuals
with disabilities.
• Job Coaching and Follow Along services give
on-the-job support to people with disabilities.
Percentage of Jobs Obtained with Benefits
100
80
60
40
65
43
69
53
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
20
0
Average Wage at Placement
$10.00
$9.00
$8.00
$7.00
*According to the 2007 Disability Status Report from
Cornell University.
$6.00
$7.95
$7.18
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
$5.00
8
Green jobs are anticipated to grow fivefold in 30
years - from 750,000 in 2008 to
4.2 million in 2038*
Training
23 disadvantaged workers were
employed at Building Value as
retail and/or deconstruction
trainees.
In 2007, Americans spent more than $226 Billion on
remodeling. Remodeling generates jobs,
economic growth and thousands of tons of
materials entering the landfill. Building Value
helps contractors and homeowners “green” their
remoding projects by offering a way to salvage
quality materials for resale to the community.
Building Value LLC is a green enterprise
expanding the training mission of Easter Seals
WRC and generating unrestricted revenue for the
organization. As a non-profit building
materials reuse center and deconstruction
service, Building Value salvages materials from
demolition and renovation projects, making them
available for sale at its retail location.
Employees in Building Value gain job skills and
access to resources to move on to employment in
the community, especially in the retail and
construction industries.
Building Value Employment Rate
100%
80%
60%
40%
62%
42%
48%
62% of trainees found
employment.
102 individuals in Easter Seals WRC
programs received community
employment training and
assessment services through
Building Value.
Environmental Impact
Nearly 2000 tons of useable
building materials were
diverted from area landfills.
Revenue
Revenue increased 20% over prior year.
(All proceeds from BV support the Easter
Seals WRC mission).
In 2008, Building
Value updated
its brand to
more fully reflect
its environmental
mission.
20%
0%
9
*According to 2008 US Conference of Mayors research.
Sometimes, it’s not what you know, it’s
who you know. With Building Value as a
positive reference, Bobby had an advocate to
help him overcome employer concerns about
his background.
When hiring managers from CHC
Manufacturing Inc. presented at one of
Building Value’s training sessions, Bobby knew
that’s where he wanted to work. He seized the
opportunity and promised he was the kind
of employee they needed.
Seeing Bobby’s excitement and learning of
his experience at Building Value, CHC took a
chance on Bobby, one they haven’t regretted.
Today, Bobby works as a cut & punch operator
and welder and has seen increases in his pay,
benefits and responsibilities since winning his
second chance.
Building Futures with Building Value
10
2008 Financial Statement
Consolidated statement of activities July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008
Total
Easter Seals WRC Building Value LLC
Eliminations
Consolidated
REVENUES AND OTHER SUPPORT
Contributions
$334,308
$0
$0
$334,308
Donated goods and services
5,338
0
0
5,338
Work services
2,568,106
0
0
2,568,106
Career development
3,286,747
0
0
3,286,747
Placement and retention
330,983
-
0
330,983
Retail and deconstruction revenue
0
439,061
0
439,061
Rent income
66,000
0
(66,000)
0
Interest revenue
91,794
303
0
92,097
Miscellaneous revenue
0
18,214
0
18,214
Realized gain (loss) on marketable securities
21
0
0
21
Total revenue
6,683,297
457,578
(66,000)
7,074,875
EXPENSES
Work services
2,081,175
0
0
2,081,175
Career development
2,892,685
0
0
2,892,685
Placement and retention
410,510
0
0
410,510
Retail and deconstruction
0
474,513
(66,000)
408,513
Management and general
813,207
0
0
813,207
Fundraising
101,836
0
0
101,836
Unallocated payments to affiliate organizations
55,523
0
0
55,523
Total expenses
6,354,936
474,513
(66,000)
6,763,449
Change in net assets
328,361
(16,935)
0
311,426
Net assets - beginning of year (restated)
5,013,416
(108,067)
0
4,905,349
Net assets - end of year
$5,341,777
$(125,002)
$0
$5,216,775
During FY 2008:
T he inf o rma t io n in t his su mma ry c o mes fro m fina nc ia l st atements
a u d i t e d by Rudler & Associates Inc. Copies of the complete audit
a r e a v ailable upon request by contacting Chief Financial Officer
K elly Freyler at 513.386.6820. Easter Seals WRC is a 501(c)(3)
n onprofit organization that provides services to people with
disabilities and disadvantages.
1,215 People Employed
10,150 Individuals Served
21,877 Services Provided
11
(including through collaborations)
Community Partnerships and
Funding Sources
Revenue Sources
5%
21%
74%
Fee-for-service and
performance contracts
Self-generated revenue*
Public support*
* Self-generated revenue and public support provide
flexible funding for innovation and service delivery not
covered through fee-for-service contracts.
Functional Expenses
7% 2%
9%
3% 1%
7%
7%
Staff wages, benefits
and taxes
Trainee wages and
taxes (includes Building
Value trainees)
64%
Cincinnati Public Schools
City of Cincinnati
Council on Alcoholism
Crossroads Center
Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services
Hamilton County Mental Health Services &
Recovery Board
Hamilton County Board of Mental Retardation &
Developmental Disabilities
Hamilton County Job & Family Services
Jewish Vocational Service
Lighthouse Youth Services
Mike-An Group Homes
Ohio Department of Health and Human Services
Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence
(OCALI)
Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission
Recovery Link
Regional Autism Advisory Council
Residential Management Systems, Inc.
Southwest Ohio Regional Workforce Investment
Board
Super Jobs Center
Talbert House
University of Cincinnati Raymond Walters
College
Collaborations and
subcontracts
Equipment,
transportation, travel
and depreciation
Occupancy
Staff development,
recruitment and
consulting
Office and program
supplies, postage and
printing
Miscellaneous
12
Volunteers in Action
Volunteers contributed to the success of Easter
Seals WRC programs and services by making
possible projects that otherwise would not be
complete. As true partners to the organization,
volunteers work alongside participants and are
able to fully experience the feeling of doing
something positive for the community.
2007-2008
Highlights & Awards
ONE Award Recipient
In 2008, Easter Seals WRC was
recognized as the winner of the
ONE Award in the performance
category. This award presented by
the Greater Cincinnati Foundation
and the Cincinnati Business Courier
uses Baldrige Award criteria to
recognize best practices among
the region’s non-profit organizations.
Callie Amann receives
SWORA Manager of the Year
148 volunteers
859 hours donated by volunteers
Estimated value of volunteer time of
$16,759*
(*Based on research from the Independent Sector,
the 2007 estimated dollar value of volunteer time is
a rate of $19.51 per hour.)
Projects completed by volunteers included:
• UGIVE Cincinnati, a collaboration of Give Back
High and Give Back Cincinnati, chose
painting and building flower boxes for the
Walnut Hills community at Easter Seals WRC as
their first combined project.
• CVS volunteers staffed
the participant holiday
party
• Deloitte helped build
displays for Building
Value
• Key Bank employees
supported youth
services recognition
projects.
13
Easter Seals WRC work services
manager, Callie Amann, was
recognized in FY 2008 by the
Southwest Ohio Rehabilitation
Association (SWORA) as Manager
of the Year. Her tireless efforts and
ability to create positive change
makes a difference in the lives
of individuals with disabilities.
Tailgage Bash becomes
Easter Seals WRC’s largest
fundraising event ever
The 2007 Tailgate Bash presented
by Kroger raised $92,000 for Easter
Seals WRC programs and services.
The all-day event expanded the
past cornhole tournament to an
event for the whole family on
Fountain Square. In 2008, event
proceeds increased by 20%.
Easter Seals WRC brings
autism awareness to YouTube
As a local and regional leader in
autism services, Easter Seals WRC
works directly with employers who
hire individuals with autism.
Through Innovations like an
employer-centered video
available on YouTube, Easter
Seals WRC helps employers
connect with each other. The
project with the Ohio Center for
Autism and Low Incidence (OCALI)
explains workplace needs of
individuals with autism.
Thank You To Our
Corporate and Employer Partners
All listed partnerships, sponsors, employers, etc. are recognized below for the
Fiscal Year July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008.
Corporate sponsors and supporters
The Acanthus Group
Applied Mechanical Systems
Armour-Eckrich
Atkins & Stang
B105
Baron Engraving
Beck Hardware
CHC Manufacturing
Calvary Episcopal
Christian Moerlein
Cincinnati Favorites
Cincinnati Nature Center
CinWeekly
Coca-Cola
Colgate
Creighton Photography
CVS Pharmacy
D.A.G. Construction
Deloitte
Duke Energy Foundation
Esther Price Candies
Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.
Fifth Third Bank
Gap Distribution Center
GE Lighting
HC Nutting
HGC Construction
Hollander Manufacturing
Hormel
John Morrell
Johnson & Johnson
KAO Brands
KeyBank
Kroger
Local 12
Melink Corporation
Messer Construction
PTC Properties
Procter & Gamble
Rich’s
Sara Lee
Smithfield
Stacy’s Pita Chips
The Issac M. Wise
Temple
Time Warner Cable
Tyson
UGIVE/Give Back High
US Playing Card
Warnick Corporation
WearMagic
Zone Communication
Group
Employers Hiring Easter Seals WRC Graduates
A One Cleaners
Abbe Miller
ABM Janitorial Services
ABX Air
Accountants to You
Adecco
Advanced Home Health
Air Serve
American Eagle
Andy’s Mediterranean Grill
Arby’s
BAE Systems
Beck Hardware
Belcan
Berkeley
Bethesda North Hospital
Biggs
Blackstone Healthcare
Bob Evans
BP
Building Value
Burger King
BW3
Catholic Social Services
Cherish Your Children
Christ Hospital
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Cincinnati Marlins
Cincinnati Northern Kentucky
Airport
Cincinnati Recreation Commission
Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Sports Club
City of Cincinnati
Cool Blue Gardens
Crazy City
Critical Mass Media
Crown Services
Deveroes
Dual Manor
Dubois Book Store
Easter Seals Work Resource
Center
Family Dentistry
Foster Transformer
Fred Wolfe Co.
Fresh Market
Frisch’s
GOCO Inc.
Gold Star Chili
Good Samaritan Hospital
Great American Ball Park
Greater Cincinnati Digestive
Health
Heritage Spring Healthcare
Center
Honey Baked Ham
Honeywell
Horizons Today
Hyde Park Health Center
Ison Management
Jewish Hospital
John Morrell
Judson Homecare
Kaiser Foods
Kentucky Speedway
Kenwood Towne Center
KFC
King’s Island
Kroger
Lady Foot Locker
LaRosa’s
Lee’s Famous Recipe
Levi Strauss
Lifetouch NSS
Long John Silvers
Lynn Fair Community
Macy’s
Mapp Cleaning
McDonald’s
Meijer
Mother Hubbard’s Playhouse II
Norwood Service League
Office Team
Ohio Petition Company
Outback Steakhouse
Panera Bread
Party City
Pizza Hut
Pride Industries
Psychtemps
Red Lobster
Residence at Parkview
Resolve Staffing
Riverbend Music Center
Riverside Staffing
Scarlet and Grey Cleaning
Service
Securitas
Shell
Shriner’s Hospital
Skyline Chili
Smallworld Day Care
St. Bernard Soap Co.
St. Joseph’s Orphanage
Steak & Shake
Step-N-Style
Subway
Superior Environmental
Solutions
Swan
Taco Bell
TGI Friday’s
TJ Maxx
Topicz
Total Homecare Solutions
Tri-County Mall, Crazy City
Theme Park
TriHealth
Two Hawk
UC Physicians
United Dairy Farmers
United States Postal Service
UPS
US Bank
V&N Services
Value City
Vector Marketing
Veterans Security Patrol
VGS
Visiting Angels
Walgreen’s
Wal-Mart
Wendy’s
Wesley Community Service
White Castle
Winton House
14
Thank You
To Our Generous Donors
All listed donors are recognized below for the Fiscal Year July 1, 2007 through
June 30, 2008. Every attempt has been made to list donor names correctly.
We apologize for any omissions or errors.
President’s Council
Independence
$25,000 and above
The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr.
Foundation
Empowerment
$10,000-24,999
Fifth Third Bank
GAP Foundation
The Kroger Co.
Mr. & Mrs. Rodney McMullen
Paula M. Steiner Family Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Warrick
Opportunity
$5,000-9,999
Annoymous
GE Evendale Employees’ Comm.
Service Fund
Key Bank
LaSalle Bank N.A.
The Joyce Lorraine Wood Trust
Dignity
$2,500-4,999
Armour-Eckrich Meats LLC
Bardes Fund/ILSCO
The Clorox Co. (Kingsford)
Colgate-Palmolive Company
David and Lisa FitzGibbon
Esther Price Candies, Corp.
Frisch’s Restaurants, Inc.
GE
Gold Star Chili Commissry
John Morrell & Co.
Johnson & Johnson LLC
KAO Brands Company
LaRosa’s Inc.
Mitsubishi Electric Company
Clara E. Pfohl Irrev Trust
The Procter & Gamble Co.
Ribs King, Inc.
Rich Products Corporation
Sara Lee Foods U.S., Retail
Scripps Howard Foundation
Smithfield Packing Co.
Stacy’s Pita Chips
15
Additional Gifts
Ability
$1,000-2,499
Bartlett Foundation
Richard Beatty
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Becker
Calvary Episcopal Church
Ms. Kathleen C. Daly
Mr. & Mrs. Mark Daly
Craig Decker & Susan Haas
Dave and Dee Dillon Fund of The
Greater Cincinnati Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. David Dreith
Duke Energy Foundation
Dale Ehmke
Pat and Gene Ewing
The Friedlander Family Fund
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Gibbons
Robin Hays-Haun
Mr. & Mrs. Tom Heekin
Robert and Sandra Heimann
Mr. & Mrs. Fred (Judd) Heitzman
Hormel Foods Corporation
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Horstman
Interact for Change
Roger Johannigman
Jean and David Krebs
Denise & John Kuprionis
Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Lane
Dean Mathew & Neeta Patel
Nestle
Mr. & Mrs. Ed Owens III
Liane and David Phillips
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Prophater
John & Jane Reherman
Mr. & Mrs. James B. Reynolds
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene P. Ruehlmann
Mr. & Mrs. Frederic X. Shadley
Albert and Liza Smitherman
Mr. & Mrs. Peter S. Strange
Lawrence M. Turner
Tyson Foods Inc.
United States Playing Card Company
Mr. & Mrs. Warren Weber
Western & Southern Foundation
Wynndel C. Watts
Virginia K. Weston Assistance Fund
Doris A. Adams
Margie Adams
Annoymous
George Bagel
James and Brenda Baird
Paul W. Barney
Latasha Bell
Andrew & Cynthia Berman
Frances W. Bernard
J. Bhaskaran
Bonita Birch
Julien O. Boesinger
James D. Brady
Anne A. Brown
William S. Brown
Otto M. Budig
Nancy Bunn
Lynn M. Burch
Gregory & Karen Burkhart
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bushman
Denise Carl
Cassady Schiller & Associates, Inc
Helen H. Chatfield
Samuel Clark
CMB Cincinnati, LLC
Tom and Debbie Colvin
Charles Cooke
Larry Curless
Agnes Davis
John C. Deloach
Mr. & Mrs. William Derringer
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Desmond
Sally H. Dessauer
John Dettmer
Esther G. De Vore
David and Susan Deye
Thomas R. Dietz
Charles H. Doerr
Dianne Donlan
Lisa Doxsee
Donald F. Dufek
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Eagen
Michael Earley
Lalia Ederis
Robert A. Eisentrout
Ms. Rita Lori Elliott
Fellowship Church of God
Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Ferry
Meredythe Abramson Flynn
L. Frank Frable
Kelly & Jay Freyler
Joan M. Friedland
John B. Funk
George Galanes
GE Foundation
Frederic “Fritz” Shadley
1924-2007
Late 2007, Easter Seals WRC lost a beloved
founding father. Fritz Shadley served as
President and CEO upon the organization’s
(then known as STAR Center /Workshops for
Retarded Citizens) incorporation in 1976.
He retired in 1987, succeeded by Lisa
FitzGibbon, and remained involved as an
advocate and resource for organization
leadership and the people we serve.
Fritz, along with his wife Betty, was deeply and
personally involved in the lives of individuals
with disabilities served by the organization. His
dedication to bringing opportunities for greater
independence was recognized by many.
He was integral in sustaining the organization
when it was on the verge of closing early on.
He worked diligently alongside many other
supporters to keep it going and positioning it
well to adapt to the changing climate.
Fritz Shadley’s legacy continues to impact and
shape the organization. In his honor, dozens
of individuals and friends have given to Easter
Seals WRC to further his service to individuals with disabilities and disadvantages in the
Greater Cincinnati community.
Special Gifts
In memory of Frederic “Fritz” Shadley
Sarah Bernard
Dorothy Blatt
Juliann Brumleve
Elizabeth Conkin
Richard and Cynthia
Creighton
Roy Duff
Thomas and Frances
Eagen
Dr. Shirley M. Ekvall
Joan Epping
Robert and Lucy Gorski
Lauran Hoven
Ann M. Jendryk
Paul and Carita
Kollman
Evelyn Kruckemeyer
Sue and Reid Leboza
Mary Jane Meuleman
William Moulliet
Michael and Freida
Muscatell
Doug and Barb Perry
Stuart and Roselyn
Schloss
Phillip J. and Mary
Carole Schneider, Jr.
R. Patrick Shepherd
William and Bernarda
Simendinger
Edward L. Spetnagel
Ulmer & Berne LLP
Michael and Patty
Weber
Paul Wehner
George Winters
James and Dawn
Yunker
In memory of Margaret Morone Beatty
Richard Beatty
Jean Beirise
David & Lisa FitzGibbon
Calista Stone
In memory of Dick Crosset
Thomas W. Ginney
In memory of Zelma Egan
Denise Michels
In memory of Robert & Nell Quisno and
J. James Pearce
Pamela J. Feltner
In memory of Robert Rubendunst
Ruth Rubendunst
In honor of Dean Mathew
Duke Energy Foundation
In honor of Rodney McMullen
Cincinnati Financial Corp.
In honor of Dan and Cheryl Prophater
Robert C. and Martha Prophater
16
On the Horizon at
Easter Seals WRC
Easter Seals WRC continues to improve upon
current and past success to further meet the
needs of individuals with disabilities and
disadvantages. Many exciting initiatives are
already taking shape to expand current services
and offer new ways to assist individuals with their
employment goals.
A few activities that are planned for the coming
months:
Social Enterprise Expansions
Building Ability: The Building Ability woodworking
shop is undergoing a green expansion/renovation.
The renovation will double the current space and
incorporate green technology throughout the
design. This is funded in part through the 2008
Greater Cincinnati Benefits grant of $100,000 from
the Humana Foundation.
Building Value: Building Value is entering the
full-structure deconstruction market. This provides
greater training opportunities and more materials for
the retail store. Building Value staff is actively
working with Community Wealth Ventures in
developing a business plan to grow this portion of
the business.
Packaging & Fulfillment: The potential move of
Building Value will pave the way to expand our
packaging and fulfillment enterprise. An expansion
to this area of the organization means an increased
ability to grow customers to offer a greater variety of
job training experiences to more participants.
Youth and Family Transition Planning
Easter Seals WRC initiated an innovative approach to
youth transition services by offering family-centered
transition planning for youth in local public schools
through the Ohio Developmental Disabilities
Commission (ODDC). The program at Hughes High
School assists parents in becoming stronger advocates for their children’s future and enables them to
support others.
17
Additional Gifts (continued)
Katherine Geraghty
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas
Gerdes
Walter E. Geier
John Green
Kenneth J. Green
Pamela Green &
Landen Summay
John H. Habbert, III
Frederick D.
Haffner, M.D.
Donna Hancock
Thomas and Peggy
Hanrahan
E. Channing
Headley
Mr. & Mrs. Donald
W. Hengehold
Donald & Michelle
Hershey
Warren K. Hinsch
E. Paul Hitter, Jr.
James and Shirley
Hogshead
Susan Houchen
M. Marie Hughes
Kevin and Judy Jenkins
Carver L. Johnson
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A.
Johnson
Timothy and Lindsay
Johnston
Jennifer and Edwin Jones
Helmut and Connie Kientz
Janes Klosterman
Paul and Carita Kollman
E. J. Kovarik Philanthropic
Fund
KPMG, LLP
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Krebs
Marjorie L. Langenhop
Heidi Jo Lattire
George and Mary
Laughlin
Donald C. Luebbert
Mr. & Mrs. David Luecke
Kimberly Lynn
Nancy E. Lyons
Frances Mantooth
Kevin McDonnell
Martha H. McGraw
Derrick W. McIntyre
David B. Meakin
Jorge Mesquita
Messer Construction Co.
Suzanne E. Meyer
Tabitha Montgomery
Philip S. Moore
Christine Moran
Faye Morrison
F. Muddiman
L&L Nippert Charitable
Trust
Theresa O’Brien-Turco
Venus Owens
Mr. & Mrs. Jack Painter
Lou and Karen Penalva
Mr. & Mrs. John E. Pepper, Jr.
Betty L. Pflum
Richard R. Poling
Gary Prue
Phillip Quinn
Richard and Jennifer
Ratterman
Recovery Link
Christine E. Reed
Donald N. Retzsch
Gordon and Anne Rich
Dorothy Roth
Mrs. Ruth Rubendunst
Mary E. Ryland
Ericka Salter
Mary E. Sand
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Scallan
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip J. Schneider
George Schultz
Stephen and Victoria
Schwartz
Cammie Seymour
J.A. and Mary Sheldon
Debbie A. Smith
Mrs. Nicholas J. Stagge
Mr. & Mrs. John F. Steele, Sr.
Calista J. Stone
Mr. & Mrs. Joshua Svarda
John F. (Jack) Tepe
Ida M. Thomas
Ms. Brenda V. Thompson
Robert and Mary Ellen
Trunick
Kelly Vance
Harold Varnau
Robert and Carol Vidal
Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Voet
James L. Wainscott
Kristin M. Wainscott
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Waldvogel
Mr. & Mrs. Ross E. Wales
Robert Waterman
Lori N. Wellinghoff/ DIGS, LTD
Mark Wesling
Western Hills-Cheviot Lodge #140
Deborah Williams
Felicia Williams
Helen D. Williams
Charles J. Winger
James & Maribeth Wojcik
Jason and Christina Wolnitzek
Crystal & Ron Zemites
Joseph Zuckerman
2008-2009
Board of Trustees
Chairman
J. Wickliffe Ach (Emeritus)
President and CEO
Hixson Architecture,
Engineering, Interiors
Doreen Canton
Attorney
Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP
Kathleen C. Daly
Senior Vice President and CFO
Messer Construction Co.
Thank You!
Craig Decker,
(retired) Global DirectorRecruiting, Training and
Development
The Procter & Gamble Co.
Vice Chairman
Annette M. Franke
VP, Program Management
LexisNexis
David M. Giles
VP, Deputy General Council
The E.W. Scripps Company
Lucinda Heekin
Attorney-At-Law / Civic Volunteer
Judd Heitzman
President
Innergreen
Thomas Hellmann
Vice President/Director of
Architecture
& Interior Design
Hixson Architecture,
Engineering, Interiors
Ed Owens III,
Senior VP, Director of
Community Affairs
Fifth Third Bank
Secretary
Thomas A Johnson (Emeritus)
Tax Partner
Deloitte & Touche LLP
Shelly M. Martin
Surety Bond Account Executive
Schiff, Kreidler-Shell
Dean A. Mathew
Manager, Commercial Analytics
Duke Energy Investments
Rodney McMullen,
Vice Chairman
The Kroger Co.
Phillip J. Schneider Jr.
Director of Strategic Accounts
Cintas Corp.
Daniel Prophater
Director of Research and
Development
The David J. Joseph
Company
Treasurer
Liza D. Smitherman
VP Professional Development
Jostin Concrete Construction, Inc.
Wynndel C. Watts
Client Unit Director,
Communication Sector
IBM
Warren F. Weber
Development Chair
Senior VP & Corporate Banking
Manager
PNC Bank
Christopher J. Wilson
VP, General Counsel & Secretary
Cincinnati Bell Inc.
Robin Hays-Haun
Senior Tax Manager
Deloitte Tax LLP
Lisa J. FitzGibbon
President & CEO
Easter Seals Work Resource Center
18
www.EasterSealsWRC.org • www.BuildingValue-Cincy.org
Main Location
2901 Gilbert Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45206
513.281.2316
Walnut Hills Center
2601 Melrose Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45206
513.475.6791
Work Link
222 E. Central Pkwy.
Cincinnati, OH 45202
513.946.2360
Work Net
914 Main Str.
Cincinnati, OH 45202
513.723.1400
Building Value
2901 Gilbert Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45206
513.475.6783

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