SCHOOLNWSPPR_Indonesia

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SCHOOLNWSPPR_Indonesia
O C T O B E R
2 0 1 3
CONTENT

Greeting speech
from principal

Field Trip

Teacher and
student profile

Indonesian
Geography

Islamic corner

Language corner

Trivia facts

Students corner

Gallery
CREDIT TO
Designer:
Mohamad Arif Julianto
Contributor:
Agung Dewanto
Aldenita
Andini Surya R.
Arief Wicaksono
Darodjat
Dwi Wahyuningsih
Muliyana
Irawati Rahayu
Lutfi Andika F
Ratih Diana
Siti Aminah
Taty Maroyanti
Zakiah Hidayati
Greeting speech from principal
Welcome to the inaugural
newsletter. The first issue of
our newsletter will have
teacher & student’s profile,
school activities, Indonesian
geography, Islamic, student &
language corners, Trivia Facts
and gallery. This will be printed monthly.
The newsletter will be of
great help to disseminate
information on various activities taking place in D’Royal
Moroco International Islamic
School. This will also keep
the students and parents informed on the current and
upcoming events and issues.
The newsletter itself also
provides an interconnection
among DMIIS and our sister
Ms. Aldenita
culture. It could also help
them to comprehend Indonesian people. We do hope the
newspaper would maintain a
link between DMIIS and Tartastan’s school community.
Finally, I’d like to congratulate
the editorial team for their
great effort in publishing the
first issue. Hopefully they can
maintain and make newsletter
really worthy of the school it
represents.
school, Humanitarian gymnasium for gifted children Republic
of Tartastan . One of the
newsletter’s aim is to disseminate information about Indonesia especially Indonesian’s
Teachers of D’ Royal Moroco International Islamic School
PAGE
DMIIS Headline
2
We welcome you back to another
edition of DMIIS Headlines this
month!
ter, while the Secondary Social Students are having their Business Quarter.
As you can see, this month is far
from boring. All of the grades in
either primary or secondary
school are having their first quarter field trip for the 2013-2014
academic year. We have previously
planned each grade with a specific
task to be presented beyond the
field trip as Primary School students are having their Invention
Quarter, our Seven and Eight
Grade students are having Social
Quarter, Secondary Science students are having Engineering Quar-
Our Kindergarten (KG), First Grade,
and Second Grade students had a nice
trip to the local Domino’s restaurant
to learn about pizza making so that
they can make pizzas of their invention. Our Third and Fourth Grade
students had a trip to a recycle center
to learn how to make items made
from recycled materials. Our Fifth and
Sixth Grade students had a trip to a
cultivation center to learn about biofertilizers. Our Seven and Eight Grade
students had a trip to a neglected
tourist object in our capital city of
Jakarta which is the old famous seaport
called Sunda Kelapa to give out recommendation to improve based on their observation and their knowledge taught in the
class. In addition, Our Secondary Social
students had a trip to governmental institutions, stock exchange, franchise consultant,
and lawyer to learn about different types of
business organizations, while the Secondary
Science students went to the Science Museum to learn about light, lenses, and mirrors.
It is mandatory for these students to compile a report on the field trip in the form of
presentation which will the content will be
tested by a panel of teachers for each
group.
The Trip to Domino’s Pizza
The students were introduced by Domino’s Pizza’s spirited employees with the
restaurant’s history and profile. They even
gave out the ingredients of their secret
recipe.
Next, each of them was given a pre-made
pan pizza with nothing on it. The objective
for them was to decorate pizza of their
own creation by choosing their own topping.
Finally, the complete process in making
pizza was presented to them.
To assure that all students understand the
complete process of making pizza, the
teachers held presentation for them to
explain the process in front of a panel of
teachers on 4 October 2013.
PAGE
The Trip to Recycled Center
As the students arrived at the
center, they received a very
warm welcome by the owner
who is an activist in promoting
―Go Green‖ lifestyle. So, without further ado, she demonstrated the process to make
our own paper which is made
from recycled products.
After assuring that every student had understood the complete process, they were given a
chance to do it by themselves.
Copying the instructions of the
owner, the students finally succeeded in making their own
recycled paper. While in the
process, the teachers were
proud of them.
The students then were given
another opportunity to present
their own recycled paper at
school in front of a panel of
teachers and explain the chronological process in the making
on 11 October 2013
The Trip to Cultivation Center
Firstly, they were given explanation right away upon their arrival. As they listened carefully to the
instructors, they paid full attention to the process in making small scale compost. Once a while,
the students asked questions so that they did not miss any details.
After the students were checked and re-checked on their understanding of the topic and the process, they started to make their own compost for a practice. The students were eager as they
thought that this was an educative as well as exhilarating experience. The teachers couldn’t hide
their smile as they finished their creation.
The teachers took the liberty to hold a presentation for students to show their own creation of
small scale compost and explain the process in making it on 11 October 2013.
3
PAGE
4
The Trip to Science Museum
The site of the museum is within
the complex of Wonderful Indonesian Miniature Park (TMII) in our
lovely capital city of Jakarta. Several
gadgets are displayed in the museum concerning: Lenses, Refraction,
Reflection, Critical Angle and Total
Internal Reflection
As the study tour went by, finally
they were explained about periscopes which were their main target for the field trip. In doing so,
the students tried all of the dis-
played gadgets related to lenses
and light, such as kaleidoscope,
convex and concave mirrors, as
well as flat mirrors.
However, the students also tested other gadgets which did not
relate to their main target at the
museum.
For justification of whether the students understood the knowledge
during the trip, the teachers held a
presentation for the students to
explain the theory of lenses and light
as well as demonstrate their own
creation of periscope on 18 October
2013.
The Trip to Traditional Old Sunda Kelapa Seaport
„Field trips are not
boring. We can
learn everything
not only in the
class but also
outside”
Upon arrival, the students
received complete information of the ancient boats
which have been used since
1516 until now. As the tour
went on, they
arrived at the
nearby
Fisherman’s
Village.
The tour guide
explained about
the culture and
tradition as well
as the lives of
people who live
in the village.
Next destination
was the fish market which was right beside
the Fisherman’s Village. The
students, teachers, and the
tour guide reached the location by boat. Equipment
used for sailors are sold at
the market.
The pride of the village was
the ancient mosque which
has stood still since 1517 by
As time went by rapidly,
the students did not realize
that they had entered the
Oceanic Museum (Museum
Bahari) as it displayed all
ancient
ships
which were built
since the 1500s.
Finally, they went
up to top of Sunda Kelapa Port
Tower
where
they could see all
of the Sunda Kelapa Port area.
the name ―Prince Jayakarta
Mosque‖, adopted from the
name of the founder of
Jakarta.
As a media to
check the students’ understanding of the
tourist object, the teachers
held a presentation for the
students to explain to us
the complete information
PAGE
The Trip to Governmental Institutions,
Franchise Consultant, and the Stock Exchange
The students first went to the
Indonesian Ministry of Cooperative and Small Medium Businesses to receive an explanation on the process to form
a cooperative by one of the
government officials within
the ministry.
Then, they visited the Indonesian Stock Exchange to get
explanation on the process
of Initial Public Offering
(IPO) or famously-called as
go public which turns a private limited company to be a
public limited company.
Therefore, the company can
be owned by the people of
the whole nation.
Thirdly, the students were visited by a lawyer at school. The
lawyer explained to them about
the differences between sole
traders, partnerships, and private limited companies as well
as the process to form each
nation on the process of a company
turning to be either a franchisor or a
franchisee.
All in all, these Secondary
Social students ended with
presenting their report on
their field trip as well as explaining their understanding
of the topics or subjects
which were explained during
the field trip on 1 October
2013.
type of business organizations
one by one.
So, evidence tells that these
field trips in this month have
succeeded in giving a valuable lesson for the students.
Hopefully, maybe, one day
they could put these lessons
into good use for their benefit. Amin.
Finally, they came to a franchise
consultant to search for expla-
Secondary students
5
PAGE
6
Ms. Dwi Ramelan
Homeroom teacher
grade 1 B
Teacher Profile
Ms. Dwi entered the teaching
profession seven years ago and
has taught for four of those
years in D’Royal Moroco International Islamic School
since this school was established. She is the homeroom
teacher of grade 2 and also
coordinator of academic of
primary level. Her favorite
subject areas to teach are English, Geography, Math and
Science.
When not at school, Ms Dwi
enjoys spending time with each
others
family
and
friends.
Specifically when
school’s holidays, she enjoys
traveling together. “I like travelling because I can learn many
things from nature and other
people”, she said.
When asked what her favorite
teaching moment, Ms. Dwi
stated: “Every time I teach is
my favorite teaching moment,
because I devote my life for
teaching”.
Ms. Dwi has a passion for
early years education and one
of her favorite experiences in
education is seeing the growth
that young people develop in
their reading and writing
skills. “The early years are
vital to building a strong foundation” she said. Hopefully Ms
Dwi gives her best for DMIIS
and we wish Ms Dwi all the
best for her future. Aamiin
Student’s Profile
“I love DMIIS
where I feel
comfortable. It
has always felt like
NAME
: Adelia Puspa Maharani
PLACE/DATE OF BIRTH
: Jakarta/3rd April 2001
GRADE
: 7
EMAIL
: [email protected]
TWITTER
: @adeliaPuspaM
INTERESTS & TALENTS
: play piano, writing short stories, swimming, painting, singing, playing soccer/futsal, playing badminton, photography
my second home. I
can learn in a fun
ACTIVITIES
lesson
: keyboard lesson, photography course, futsal course, band
ACHIEVEMENTS
:
way. I really enjoy
many great
learning
experiences with
both friends and
teachers”
Best athlete 2012 (DMIIS)
1st winner of photography contest (Picture me course)
3rd winner of English speech (Arrahman School)
2nd winner of smart quiz (DMIIS)
1st winner of market competition (Picture me course)
PAGE
Indonesian Geography
Indonesia Map
The Indonesia has been shaped by
its geographic position, its natural
resources, a series of human
migrations and contacts, wars and
conquests, as well as by trade,
economics and politics. Indonesia is
an archipelagic country of 17,508
islands (6,000 inhabited) stretching
Batik
Batik is both an art and a craft,
which is becoming more
popular and well known in the
West as a wonderfully creative
medium. The art of decorating
cloth in this way, using wax and
dye, has been practised for
centuries. In Java, Indonesia,
batik is part of an ancient
tradition, and some of the finest
batik cloth in the world is still
made there. The word batik
originates from the
Javanese tikand means to dot.
To make a batik, selected areas
of the cloth are blocked out by
brushing or drawing hot wax
over them, and the cloth is then
dyed. The parts covered in wax
resist the dye and remain the
original colour. This process of
waxing and dyeing can be
repeated to create more
elaborate and colourful designs.
After the final dyeing the wax is
removed and the cloth is ready
for wearing or showing.
Kebaya
A Kebaya is a traditional
blouse-dress combination that
originates from Indonesia and
worn by women in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei,Burma, Sing
apore, southern Thailand, and
the Southern part of
the Philippines. It is sometimes
made from sheer material such
as silk, thin cotton or semitransparent nylon or polyester,
adorned with brocade or floral
pattern embroidery. Kebaya
usually
worn
with
a sarongor batik kain panjang,
or other traditional woven
g a r m e n t
s u c h
as ikat, songket with a colorful
motif.
along the equator in South East
Asia. The country's strategic sealane position fostered inter-island
and international trade; trade has
sinc e fundamentally shaped
Indonesian history. The area of
Indonesia is populated by peoples
of various migrations, creating a
diversity of cultures, ethnicities,
and languages. The archipelago's
landforms and climate significantly
influenced agriculture and trade,
and the formation of states.There
are 36 provinces in Indonesia
7
PAGE
Ramadhan
Ramadan (Arabic: ‎ ‫رمضان‬
‎
) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Muslims
worldwide observe this as a month of fasting. This annual observance is regarded as
one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The month lasts 29–30 days based on the visual
sightings of the crescent moon, according to numerous biographical accounts compiled in the hadiths. The word Ramadan comes from the Arabic root ramiḍa or arramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness. Fasting is fard "obligatory" for adult
Muslims, except those who are ill, traveling, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic or
going through menstrual bleeding.
While fasting from dawn until sunset, Muslims refrain from consuming food, drinking liquids, smoking, and engaging in sexual relations; in some interpretations they
also refrain from swearing. Food and drink is served daily, before sunrise and after
sunset. According to Islam, the thawab (rewards) of fasting are many, but in this
month they are believed to be multiplied. Fasting for Muslims during Ramadan typically includes the increased offering of salat (prayers) and recitation of the Quran.
During Ramadhan Our School conduct some activities such as dhuha praying together, reading qur’an, charity activity
Mudik Lebaran
Mudik is the activity of migrants/migrant workers to return to his hometown. Mudik in Indonesia is identical
with an annual tradition that occurs ahead of major religious holidays such as before Lebaran. At that point
there is an opportunity to gather with relatives scattered in the overseas, but of course also sowan with parents. Mudik tradition exists in some developing countries with Muslim majorities, such as Indonesia and Bangladesh.
The Lebaran etymology was derived from Javanese word, and according to Indonesian Muslim scholar Umar
Khayam, lebaran tradition was the result of acculturation between Javanese culture and Islam during the 15thcentury. According to Javanese traditions, the local lebaran tradition of Idul Fitri was first started when Sunan
Bonang, one of Wali Songo of Tuban in 15th-century Java, calls for the Muslims to elevate the perfection of
their Ramadhan fast by asking forgiveness and forgiving others' wrongdoings. The asking and giving for forgiveness during Eid ul Fitr is quite unique among Indonesian Muslims, that did not occur among Muslims of Middle East, Indian subcontinent or elsewhere. Most of world Muslims would only expressed Eid Mubarak (blessed
Eid).
Kebaya
A Kebaya is a traditional
blouse-dress combination that
originates from Indonesia and
worn by women in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei,Burma, Sing
apore, southern Thailand, and
the Southern part of
the Philippines. It is sometimes
made from sheer material such
as silk, thin cotton or semitransparent nylon or polyester,
adorned with brocade or floral
pattern embroidery. Kebaya
usually
worn
with
a sarongor batik kain panjang,
or other traditional woven
g a r m e n t
s u c h
as ikat, songket with a colorful
motif.
8
PAGE
ZAM ZAM WATER
In Islam, there is a water
that has been known for
its benefits. Many people
know that water has many
miracles. In a variety of
languages, the water is
known as the zam zam
water. Zam zam water has
been known since the
days of the prophet
Ibrahim Alaihissalam.
The Well of Zamzam
is a well located within
the
Masjid
alHaram in Mecca, Saudi
Arabia, 20 m (66 ft) east
of the Kaaba, the holiest
place in Islam. Islamic history states that the Zamzam Well
was revealed to Siti Hajjar, the
second wife of Ibrahim and
mother of Ismail. According to
Islamic tradition, she was
desperately seeking water for
her infant son, but she could
not find any, as Mecca is located
in a hot dry valley with few
sources of water. Muslim
traditions say that Hagar ran
seven times back and forth in
the scorching heat between the
two hills of Safa and Marwah,
looking for water. Getting
thirstier by the second, Ismail
scraped the land with his feet,
where suddenly water sprang
out.
Many people know the miracle
of zam zam, but some of them
doesn’t know the content of
zam zam water. Many scientist
has been doing experiment to
Let me sum up some of the features
of Zamzam water:
A. Never Dried Up
This well has never dried up. On the
contrary it has always fulfilled the
demand for water.
Same Salt composition
It has always maintained the same salt
composition and taste ever since it
came into existence.
find the content of zam zam
water. After many experiments,
one of many scientist named
Tariq Hussain from Riyadh
revealed the content of zam
zam water. The contents which
found by Tariq are:
CALCIUM & MAGNESIUM
IN ZAM ZAM WATER:
The differen ce between
Zamzam water and other water
(city water) was in the quantity
of calcium and magnesium salts.
The content of these was
slightly higher in Zamzam
water. This may be why this
water refreshes tired hajis.
FLOURIDE IN ZAMZAM
WATER:
But more significantly, the
water contains fluorides that
have an effective germicidal
action.
B. Portability
Its portability has always been
universally recognised as pilgrims
from all over the world visit Ka'aba
every year for Hajj and umrah,
but have never omplained about it.
Instead, they have always enjoyed the water
that refreshes them.
C. Universal taste
Water tastes different at different places.
Zamzam water's appeal has always been
universal.
D. No Biological Growth
This water has never been chemically treated
or chlorinated as is the case with water
pumped into the cities.Biological growth and
vegetation usually takes place in most wells.
This makes the water unpalatable owing to
the growth of algae causing taste and odour
problems. But in the case of the Zamzam
water well, there wasn't any sign
of biological growth.
In fact, the more you explore, the more
wonders surface and you find yourself
believing implicity in the miracles of this
water that Allah Ta’ala bestowed as a gift on
the faithful coming from far and wide to the
desert land for pilgrimage.
9
PAGE
10
Indonesia language (Bahasa) Phonics
Vowels and Introduction Conversation
Indonesia language consists of five
phonics vowels, namely: A or a as
in the word, come and hut; E or
e as in the words met and bread;
I or i as in the words with, meat,
and feed; O or o as in the
woords hot, taught, and toes;
and U or u as in the words food
and put. For the consonants are
Ca B or b as in he word book; C or
pti c as in the word chair; D or d as
on in the word doll; F or f as in the
word fish and phone; G or g as in the
word get; H or h as in the word hut; J
or j as in the word juice and germ; K
or k as in theword king; L or l as in
the word lake; M or m as in the word
man; N or n as in the word night and
knight; P or p as in the word piano;
Q or q as in the word queen; R or r
as in the word ring; S or s as in the
word soup; T or t as in the word
time; V or v as in the word vet; W or
w as in the word world; X or x as in
Vocabularies
Bahasa
Cap
tion
descri
bing
picture
or
grap
hic.
English
the word fix; Y or y as in the word
yam; and the last Z or z as in the
word zoo. Here some example of
vocabularies in Indonesia language or
Bahasa with English meanings and
the application in introduction conversation, see the table below.
Conversation
Bahasa
English
Siapa
Nama
Saya
kamu
What
Name
My
You
A: Siapa nama kamu?
B: Nama saya Albert.
A: What is your name?
B: My name is Albert.
Dari mana
Asal
Where
From
A: Dari mana asal kamu?
B: Saya dari Jakarta, Indonesia.
A: Where are you from?
B: I am from Jakarta, Indonesia.
Apa
Pekerjaan
kamu
Seorang
What
Your occupation
A or an
A: Apa pekerjaan kamu?
B: Saya seorang teknisi.
A: What is your occupation?
What do you do?.
B: I am a technician.
Dimana
Bekerja
Di
Sebuah
Perusahaan
Minyak
Senang
Berkenalan
Dengan
Juga
Selamat tinngal
Where
Work
At or in
A or an
Company
Oil
Glad, nice
Meet
With
Too
Good bye
A: Dimana kamu bekerja?
B: Saya bekerja di sebuah perusahaan minyak.
A: Where do you work?
B: I work at an oil company.
A: Senang berkenalan dengan
kamu.
B: Senang berkenalan dengan
kamu, juga.
A: Selamat tinggal!
B: Selamat tinggal!
A: Nice to meet you.
B: Nice to meet you too.
B: Good bye! / bye!
B: Good bye! / bye- bye!
PAGE
Schedule of Events
 7—10 : Mid Semester Test
 16 : Slaughtering qurban
OCTOBER 2013
Sun
Mon
 17 : Report Card Day
 21 : First day of second quarter
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Indonesian Traditional Food
Bubur sumsum biji salak
One more Indonesian delicacy for bright Sunday
morning, Bubur Sumsum Biji Salak ( Sumsum porridge
with snake fruit's seeds ) is a sweet porridge , it is
made by rice flour and palm sugar for the sweet taste,
and it's not really snake fruit's seeds, it's actually
Javanese jelly that made by sago flour with traditional
Javanese sugar.
cendol
The weather is so hot here.. so I think Ice
Cendol
would
be
good!
Cendol is similar to grassjelly, but the shape is
kind of different. With the combination of coconut milk and brown-sugar.
11
PAGE
12
Student’s Corner
NANDA, GRADE 9
This school provides me many values. With very interesting teaching methods, become a good challenge for me. School can be
a great place if we know how to take the advantage. Friends are also very important in a student’s life. I have teachers who
always help me in studying. I love D’MIIS.
RIFQA, GRADE 11
This school is pretty interesting through simple learning method, can make me more focus and get a good challenge. This
school gives me variety methods, although there is limited amount of students, but I could understand English and Islam
because all teachers are willing to help and direct me very well. I’m proud of you D’MIIS
CINDY, GRADE 9
I like this school because my friends are nice, and funny. The teachers are also creative and friendly. The facilities are good. I
like D’MIIS.
ARAKEL, GRADE 5
This school is awesome and the people are nice. My friends are really kind and awesome. The teachers are also awesome. The
extra class is nice.
FACHREL, GRADE 5
I like D’MIIS. It has a place for playing football and basketball. I like this school because it is Islamic school. My favorite subject
is Tahfidzh
SABRINA, GRADE 3
I like this school. I like the playground. I like friends, teachers, and the subjects. My favorite subjects are art and craft, science,
math, music, and English.
OMAR, GRADE 6
I hate bahasa time. I like math. I like soccer field. I like IT room. I love the playground.
KHARISYA, GRADE 5
This school is like the best one that I ever gone. I like the teachers and friends. Keep expanding. :)
PAGE
Gallery
13
D’ Royal Moroco International Islamic School
[D’MIIS]
Address
Radio Dalam Raya Jl. H. Salim III No. 7, South Jakarta
Telp: +62 21 728 00138
Visit our website
http://www.dmiis.net
Like our facebook fanpage
D'Royal Moroco International Islamic School
Follow our twitter
@dmiisjkt