Young People`s Self-Guided Art Tour

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Young People`s Self-Guided Art Tour
Susan Simmons Becker,
If I Were the King Pig
About Project Art
To the left of the Ulfert Wilke pieces, further
down the hall, is an oil pastel piece by Susan
Simmons Becker. Have you ever drawn a
picture with crayons? Oil pastels
are similar to crayons
except they are made
with oil instead of wax.
Notice the bright
colors she uses and
squiggly lines she
fills spaces with,
giving the drawing
lots of energy.
Project Art is a unique arts program that was
established by University of Iowa Hospitals
and Clinics in 1978. The mission of Project
Art is to create an environment that promotes
healing, and comforts and delights patients,
visitors and staff through the visual and
performing arts.
Calvin Jungarrayi
Martin, Janganpa Jukupa
(Opossum Dreaming)
5
For more information on any of the art or
artists featured on this tour, contact Project
Art at 319-353-6417 or stop by the Project
Art office in 8023 JCP. If you would like
to receive Project Art announcements of
upcoming performances, exhibits, or other
Project Art programs, please e-mail
[email protected]
with “subscribe” in the
subject area.
BOYD
TOWER
Past the Susan Simmons Becker drawings,
on the same wall, is a painting by Calvin
Jungarrayi
Martin. Look at
this painting
up close, and
then far away.
How does
it change?
How does
it suggest
a dream?
D
MAIN
LOBBY
CARVER
PAVILION
SKYWALK
E
F
G
6
Continue down the corridor,
around the corner. On the right is a large
print by Arthur Geisert. Do you know the story
of Noah’s Ark? Noah built a big boat, called
an ark, and filled it with two of every kind of
animal because a huge flood was coming. The
artist shows the
ark as a crosssection, as if it
had been cut
down the middle
so we can see
what’s inside.
Can you find
two of every
animal? What
else is going on
inside the ark?
Hello and
welcome to
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics,
home of Iowa’s most extensive public art
collection outside museum walls. This tour
highlights some amazing artwork in Project
Art’s collection of over 6,000 items. From
cartoons to paintings and photographs, from
sculpture and statues to glass and fiber arts,
art is truly everywhere! We think looking at
artwork helps people
to heal and makes
the environment
much more
pleasant.
What do you
think?
C
COLLOTON
PAVILION
H
HOSPITAL
PARKING
RAMP 2
HAWKINS DRIVE
Arthur Geisert, Ark V
B
GENERAL HOSPITAL
MAIN ENTRANCE
INFORMATION
SKYWALK
I
PAPPAJOHN
PAVILION
J
PAPPAJOHN PAVILION
SOUTH ENTRANCE
SKYWALK
N
M
POMERANTZ
FAMILY
PAVILION
L
K
HOSPITAL
PARKING
RAMP 4
Elevator
From Hwy
218 South
Melrose Exit
MELROSE AVENUE
From Hwy 1,
Hwy 6 East
Let’s go
have some
fun!
BRO0018
Diana Vezzetti
Lakes, Catching
Frogs & Feeding
the Rabbits
The
Tour
A
INFORMATION DESK
As you exit the
elevator,
you will see
Mindy’s
Dollhouse to
the left of the
Elevator lobby.
This dollhouse
was made for
Mindy by her
grandparents, Eleanor
and Gene Daniel. Does your
house look like this? How is your
house different? How many windows can you
find in Mindy’s Dollhouse? Can
you find any pictures of Elvis?
1
Youn
Peop g
Self- le’s
Guide
d
Ar t T
our
BN
HOSPITAL
PARKING
RAMP 1
SKYWALK
4
Mindy’s Dollhouse
e
on th t
n
i
g
Be
oor, a
fl
d
n
seco ator F.
Elev
Look on the
wall to the
left of the
dollhouse
to see these
paintings. Art
can be about
ordinary activities,
such as doing chores
and playing. What are
some chores you do?
What do you do for fun? Do you
do some of the same activities
2
as the kids in the paintings?
3
Ulfert Wilke,
Viking Ships
Orange Sky
Continue down
the corridor
to the left of
the Pediatric
Specialty
Clinic. On your right you will see a painting
by Ulfert Wilke. The Vikings were an ancient
group of people from Northern Scandinavia
who traveled by long ships, often raiding and
conquering other people. Does this look like
a real ship? How does Wilke suggest a Viking
ship using color and shape?
Chuck Richards, Tire Swing
Warren Rosser,
Reflex & Memory II
7
This painting is a little further down
the hall on the left. If it looks like a (big!) page
out of a book, it is because this artist illustrates
children’s books. This
painting appears in
his book, Jungle Gym
Jitters. Real life
and fantasy
coexist in this
painting - can
you find examples
of each?
Arthur Geisert,
The Balloon Race
You’ll find this
piece across from
Tire Swing, on the
right side of the
corridor. This piece,
along with the piece
we saw earlier in the
tour by the same artist, is a print. Do you know
what a print is? If you have ever stuck your
thumb in ink and then pressed it on to paper,
you have made a thumbprint! The artist created
this piece in a similar way, scratching into metal
with a special instrument and chemical acids,
rubbing ink on the metal, and then pressing it
on to paper. This technique is called intaglio
(in-taal-ee-o) printmaking. Because the image is
on the metal plate, the artist can print the same
picture over and over. Does this print remind
you of a comic book?
Why?
8
9
Sharon
BurnsKnutson,
Jack & the
Beanstalk
& Salmon
Sandwiches
Keep going down the corridor and look to
your left to find this painting. Do you know the
story of Jack & the Beanstalk? In it, Jack trades
his cow for magical beans that grow into an
enormous beanstalk. He climbs to the top and
steals a hen that lays golden eggs. Can you
find any of these things in the painting? How
about the salmon sandwiches?
10
This print is
further down
the hall on
the left. Do
you recognize
this character?
What does the
artist use to create
Mickey’s face? Why
might he create such a
well-known character out
of unexpected images?
16
On the right side of the corridor, across from
Elevator H, you will see this photograph by
Abelardo Morell. Do you know what book the
white rabbit comes
from? Here, the artist
has taken
11
a book
character
“outside”
of the
book - can
you think of
a new story
about these
things?
12
Just past Elevator H, on the left side of the
corridor, is this serigraph or silkscreen print by
Sara Lindberg. Do you have a t-shirt with words
or pictures on it? That t-shirt was printed using
silkscreen, which is also how the artist made
this piece. See
how the pigs
are the same
but facing
each other,
like they
are
looking
in the
mirror?
This is called
bilateral symmetry.
Chuck Richards, Sleepover
Straight ahead from the mosaics is
another Chuck Richards painting. Can you find
the man with a dog?
How about the kite?
What is similar
about this one
and the piece
you saw on
the second
floor?
What is
different?
Go back to
enter the
Elevator H
lobby and see
this sculpture
against the
window. How
is this piece
realistic? How is it
unrealistic, or abstract?
Why might the artist make
it look this way?
Take Elevator H to the
Third Floor.
Abelardo Morell,
The White Rabbit
Sara Lindberg,
Important Pigs – Green
Karen Strohbeen,
Untitled
13
14
Jane
Gilmor,
Windows
Take a right from
Elevator H. As you
continue down the
corridor you will
see several drawings and
writings on metal on the
right. The
artist, Jane Gilmor, worked
with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
pediatric patients and their families where she
invited them to draw and write on metal about
their hospital experiences. These pieces of
metal were then combined into a sculpture of
a house, reflecting how the UIHC was a “home
away from home.” Where is
your “home away from home?”
Barbara Keith,
Mary, Mary; Jack Be
Nimble; Little Boy
Blue; and Ella
Just down the
corridor on the left
are several pieces by
Barbara Keith. Did
you notice how these
pictures are made
up of many pieces of
colored glass and tile?
They are called mosaics
(mo-zay-iks). How many different
tiles can you find in one picture?
Can you recite these rhymes?
15
James Ochs,
Magician Suite: Magical Act #21
17
Continue down the hall, around the corner.
On your left you will see a watercolor by
James Ochs. Is this
painting done in a
realistic style?
Could the
events in
it actually
happen?
18
Richard
Ritter,
Red, Yellow
& White Murrini
Blankets and
Orange Cane
Continue walking toward Elevator F. How do
you think this glass sculpture was made? These
forms are created by taking molten glass (glass
so hot it is moldable) and blowing through it
with a pipe to give it shape. The colored shapes
you see are added and encased in crystal. Do
you notice the colorful, flat pieces that look
like flowers? These are called murrini (muhree-nee). They are made by stacking together
tubes of colored glass and cutting them, the
way you would a slice of bread. Each slice has a
beautiful pattern.
Thank you for taking the Young
People’s Self-Guided Art Tour!

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