executive executive

Transcription

executive executive
VOL.13, NO.9
▼
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006
AssistedEXECUTIVE
Living
Family
BUSINESS
CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
TO MANAGE
EXPECTATIONS
WITH DEMENTIA
RESIDENTS
LEADERSHIP
Short-term Needs
vs. Long-term Goals
SPECIAL SECTION
2006 Buyer’s Guide
THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE OF ALFA: THE ASSISTED LIVING FEDERATION OF AMERICA
VOL.13, NO.9
▼
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006
AssistedEXECUTIVE
Living
Family
BUSINESS
CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
TO MANAGE
EXPECTATIONS
WITH DEMENTIA
RESIDENTS
LEADERSHIP
Short-term Needs
vs. Long-term Goals
SPECIAL SECTION
2006 Buyer’s Guide
THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE OF ALFA: THE ASSISTED LIVING FEDERATION OF AMERICA
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AssistedEXECUTIVE
Living
ADVANCING EXCELLENCE IN
S E N I O R L I V I N G O P E R AT I O N S & C A R E
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006
,
VOL. 13, NO. 9
Contents
FEATURES
12 COVER STORY—QUALITY RESIDENT SERVICES
Family Business BY ANYA MARTIN
A perennial challenge in dementia care is managing the expectations of
family members. Constant, open communication, education, and other
best practices implemented throughout a resident’s stay help ensure realistic
family expectations.
18 LEADERSHIP
Creative Compromise BY ADAM STONE
12
When short-term needs and long-term goals clash in the senior living business,
executives must utilize creative strategies that satisfy immediate requirements
without sacrificing the big picture.
21 SPECIAL SECTION
2006 Buyer’s Guide
The Assisted Living Executive Buyer’s Guide is the must-have products and
services resource for decision-makers in the senior living business. Use the
Buyer’s Guide to browse companies by category and make sound purchasing
decisions in 2007.
DEPARTMENTS
18
5
TOP OF MIND
BY RICHARD P. GRIMES
ALFA President and CEO
6
EXEC TO EXEC
Insights on the issues of the day
9
NEED TO KNOW
Industry updates and ALFA news
EXECUTIVE ROUNDTABLE
Dementia care strategies
36
38
ALFA PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL
Spotlight on member companies
39
COMPLIANCE CORNER
Arbitration agreements
41
RESOURCE LINK
Classified ads
42
PEOPLE & PLACES
Appointments and developments
43
AD & MEMBER INDEX
Guide to members in this issue
44
PRODUCTS & RESOURCES
New tools and solutions
21
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 3
Executive Publisher
Richard P. Grimes, ALFA President/CEO
Publisher
Debra J. Stratton
Editor/Associate Publisher
Angela Hickman Brady
Associate Editor
Marlene L. Hendrickson
Contributing Writers
Anya Martin, Whitney Redding, Adam Stone
Art Director
Becky McClimans
PUBLISHING OFFICES
Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.
5285 Shawnee Road, Suite 510
Alexandria, VA 22312
703/914-9200; fax 703/914-6777
E-mail: [email protected]
For circulation information, call 703/894-1805.
A D V E RT I S I N G S A L E S T E A M
Alison Bashian, [email protected]
Marianne Juliana, [email protected]
Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.
800/335-7500; fax 440/349-3447
Insights and critical review provided by the
A L FA O P E R AT I O N A L E X C E L L E N C E
A D V I S O RY PA N E L
Page Ensor, Regional Vice President of Business Development,
CaraVita Senior Care, ALFA Regional Director Executive Roundtable
Lisa Fordyce, Regional Director of Operations, Summerville
Senior Living, ALFA Regional Director Executive Roundtable
Jill Haselman, Senior Vice President of Organizational
Development & Culture, Benchmark Assisted Living
ALFA Human Resources Executive Roundtable
Justin Hutchens, Senior Vice President & COO, Summerville
Senior Living, ALFA Chief Operating Officer Executive
Roundtable
Jeffrey Jasnoff, Senior Vice President of Human Resources,
Sunrise Senior Living Inc., ALFA Human Resources Executive
Roundtable
Sharon Roth Maguire, National Director of Clinical Services,
Brookdale Senior Living, ALFA Clinical Quality Executive
Roundtable
Mark Mostow, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Silverado
Senior Living, ALFA Sales & Marketing Executive Roundtable
Jayne Sallerson, Vice President of Sales & Marketing,
Summerville Senior Living, ALFA Sales & Marketing Executive
Roundtable
Daniel Schwartz, Senior Vice President of Field Operations,
Sunrise Senior Living, ALFA Chief Operating Officer Executive
Roundtable
Sara Vadakin, Vice President of Quality & Clinical Services,
Assisted Living Concepts, ALFA Clinical Quality Executive
Roundtable
Published by THE ASSISTED LIVING FEDERATION OF
AMERICA, Alexandria, Virginia
Assisted Living Executive (ISSN 1553-8281) is published
monthly, with combined issues in January/ February,
September, and November/ December, by the Assisted Living
Federation of America, 1650 King Street, Suite 602, Alexandria,
Virginia 22314. Circulated to ALFA members only; a portion of
dues is for subscription. Periodicals postage paid at Alexandria,
VA, and additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO Assisted
Living Executive, 1650 King Street, Suite 602, Alexandria,
Virginia 22314; 703/894-1805. Printed in USA. Copyright
2006. Prior to photocopying items for educational classroom,
internal, or personal use, please contact the Copyright
Clearance Center, Customer Service, 978/750-8400, 222
Rosewood Dr., Danvers, MA 01923 or check CCC Online at
www.copyright.com. Assisted Living Executive will not be
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts or
photographs.
Serving professionally managed assisted
living communities for seniors by:
driving business excellence
ensuring a more informed public and
influencing public policy.
The Assisted Living Federation of America is continuously raising the bar for operational excellence in
resident-centered senior living. ALFA serves as the
voice for senior living and advocates for informed
choice, quality care, and accessibility for all Americans
needing assistance with long-term care. Through
the committed leadership of its member company
executives, state affiliates, and alliance partners,
ALFA is creating the future of senior living in America.
ALFA PRESIDENT/CEO
TOP OF MIND
Assisted Living Blogosphere?
ast spring, ALFA debuted live simulcast sessions from the 2006 Annual Conference
and Expo in San Diego. More than 400 executive directors across the nation
participated in these simulcast sessions via computer and telephone. These
remote participants were able to queue up to ask questions just like the people
who were physically in the room.
Following the conference, ALFA took this technology a step further and offered ALFA
members nearly the entire conference via online streaming or podcasting the recorded
sessions. As most of you know, podcasting simply lets you download an MP3 file onto an
iPod or MP3 player so you can listen to it at your leisure—during your morning walk or
jog, or commute to work, for example.
Will ALFA’s next technology foray be a blog? I don’t think so, but bloggers have
received a lot of attention in recent months for their influence on politics and public
affairs. I haven’t personally spent much time in the online blogosphere but I have
recently learned why those of us with a stake in senior living might want to pay attention
to blogs. Here are some sample excerpts from blogs I have read:
■ “And then, while she spoke of what her life once was and all that she feels she has
lost, and how she just wants to die, she began to cry. Not just watery eyes crying, but
really crying with big tears. … And my heart began to break, and I began to cry with
her. At that moment, nothing else was as important as loving Mrs. Jones and finding a
way to restore her hope.” —The Elderly Are Our Heritage blog
■ “That’s the strange thing about Alzheimer’s … you grieve a person’s death while
they stand there in front of you. It took me awhile to realize that I was going through
the process of grieving her death.That’s not always obvious when you’re talking to the
person on the phone.” —Mondays with Mom blog
A confluence of factors—including a suggestion that ALFA create its own blog, the lead
story in this month’s Assisted Living Executive on family expectations, and the numerous
Google blog alerts I receive via e-mail each day—have prompted me to surf senior livingrelated blogs for hours. To my surprise and delight, blogging in senior living is huge.
In addition to the supposed experts on senior living, many caregivers, family members
and even residents are blogging. And what they are writing about should interest senior
living companies: what they like and don’t like about their assisted living community;
what delights them and what irritates them; what they are feeling as their loved one
deteriorates mentally and physically; their family tension; how they struggle with the
health-care system or finances; why they are thinking about moving Mom or why they
would never leave.
If you spend just an hour on these blogs, I’m convinced you’ll get insight into how
you can make your company an even greater provider of services for the seniors who
are entrusted to your care. Here are a few links to get started: themomandmejournals.
net, yellowwallpaper.net, blog.fadingfrommemory.info, murphyjenn.blogspot.com/
2006/10/youth-may-be-our-future-but-elderly.html, journals.aol.com/nyboots/
AssistedLivingCenterActivity/.
If you find any blog sites especially useful, please share them with ALFA so we can
share them with other members. E-mail [email protected] or e-mail me directly.
L
Richard P. Grimes ([email protected])
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 5
EXEC TO EXEC
I N S I G H T S O N T O D AY ’ S I S S U E S — H U M A N R E S O U R C E S
What is an effective year-end strategy for reaching
out to community-level employees and getting
feedback about daily operations?
Jeffrey Jasnoff
Senior Vice President
of Human Resources
Sunrise Senior
Living
McLean,VA
Dawn Usher
Vice President/Chief
People Officer
Silverado Senior
Living
San Juan Capistrano,
CA
ne of the things we do
is the skip-level meeting.This is, for example, where
a regional manager may come
into a community and skip the
department heads and executive director and spend time
with the staff. That way the
regional manager gets unfiltered
information directly from them.
It sends the message that staff
members are important—‘One
of the regional managers is
coming in to hear what I have
to say.’ It’s any opportunity to
get some good feedback about
what’s going on at the community, and you can do that at any
level of the organization.An
executive director can skip the
department heads and go directly to the staff level, too. It’s good
to conduct these skip-level
meetings at least annually—
more often is even better.
You’re looking for things
about staff work life. How
“O
Jill Haselman
Senior Vice President of Organizational Development
& Culture
Benchmark
Assisted Living
Wellesley, MA
are things going day to day?
What are they seeing in terms
of service issues for residents?
This is an excellent year-end
strategy because you can target
what you can do better for
the next year. And it’s important
that after a skip-level meeting
you come away with an action
plan. You absolutely
need to follow up.”—Jeffrey
Jasnoff (jeff.jasnoff @
sunriseseniorliving.com)
here are multiple ways
to check in with your
employees about the realities
of daily operations. A formal
approach would be a yearly
confidential employee survey
asking the questions most
important to your organization,
implementing the appropriate
changes, and measuring the
results against prior years to
show whether or not the organization views the changes as an
“T
6 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
improvement. Other approaches include focus groups, informal face-to-face surveys, and
talking to the unofficial leaders
of each department to get feedback.
Once you have solicited feedback, you should implement the
appropriate changes and ensure
those changes are communicated to employees.”—Dawn
Usher ([email protected]
senior.com)
mong the things we do
is an annual satisfaction
survey. It’s custom made for
Benchmark and available in
print and online.We have the
surveys distributed just before
the holidays and get results
back in February—which is a
quick turnaround for a survey
of this scope.We’re evaluating
many aspects of daily operations, including supervisory
“A
effectiveness and teamwork.
There is an Associate Council
that evaluates the feedback.The
council is strictly non-management.The Associate Council
uses the data and makes recommendations about how management should use the data.Then
the management team must
review and analyze and come
up with at least three things
they are going to work on.This
process is unique because we
make managers do most of the
grunt work and then they are
giving their strategies to the
council for approval.
We’ve found that this annual
survey helps increase trust and
diminish fear among employees.
We’ve also seen dramatically
improved associate loyalty,
supervisor effectiveness, and
teamwork.”—Jill Haselman
([email protected] benchmark
quality.com)
QUICK TIPS
year-end review of community operations is a great source
of feedback as well as an excellent way to prepare for the new
year. The information you’ll cull can help improve resident care
and improve employee retention.
■ Go straight to the source. Have regional managers or executive directors speak directly to community-level staff for the sole
purpose of collecting feedback about daily operations. This can
be done as a group meeting with the opportunity for one-on-one
conversations or as individual meetings.
■ Benchmark strategies and changes. If applicable, review
the goals and strategies your company planned to implement at
this time last year. Does it look like an old challenge raised by
staff has not been resolved completely? How were other strategies effectively implemented since last year? Use this information
to effectively hone your strategies going forward.
■ Survey staff members. With input from your management
team, create a simple survey for staff members to complete.
The survey can be sent as part of an e-mail message or print
copies can be mailed to the community. If you have the
resources, an online survey is another possibility. ▼
A
I N D U S T R Y
U P D AT E S
&
A L F A
N E W S
NEED TO KNOW
PUBLIC POLICY NEWS
ALFA Members Converge on Capitol Hill
LFA made the business interests of
its members heard on Capitol
Hill in late September when a contingent of ALFA members and public policy staff met with key federal
legislators and their staffs, including
Senators Rick Santorum (R-PA), Jim
DeMint (R-SC), Lincoln Chafee (R-RI), Charles Grassley (R-IA), John
Cornyn (R-TX), and Rep.Tom Allen (D-ME), as well as key staffers
responsible for long-term care issues from the offices of Senators
Mel Martinez (R-FL),Ted Kennedy (D-MA), Elizabeth Dole (R-NC),
Bill Frist (R-TN), Judd Gregg (R-NH),Arlen Specter (R-PA), David
Vitter (R-LA), and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX).Top issues included
Medicare Part D co-payment legislation and organized labor issues.
This first-ever ALFA Advocacy Day in Washing-
A
Walking Test May
Predict Health Issues
ecent research published in the
May 3 issue of the Journal of
the American Medical Association
(JAMA) finds that a five-minute walking test may be an effective way of
predicting health issues in the elderly.
Researchers, led by an epidemiologist
at the National Institute on Aging, studied the ability of more
than 3,000 people in their seventies to walk a quarter mile
within five minutes, maintaining their pace and not stopping
to rest. One fourth of the participants could not complete the
walk within the time allotted. Researchers continued to study
this group and two years later found that of those who could
previously complete the task, another third was starting to
have difficulty.
Results of the study make a connection between staying
active, avoiding frailty among the elderly, and living longer
with fewer health problems. Regarding the walking test, the
findings state that for each minute beyond five, the risk of
dying in the next four years increases by a third, the risk
of having a heart attack increases by 20 percent, and the
risk of having a disability increases by half.
To read a free abstract of the JAMA article, go to
jama.amaassn.org and search the May 3 issue.
R
ton, D.C., drew great
interest that has
helped position
ALFA for further discussions in 2007.
For example,
Congressman Allen
will work with ALFA
to ensure that ALFA
members can have
Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) greets Brookdale
input into the agen- Senior Living Co-President Mark Ohlendorf.
da for the Long-Term Care Caucus next year. Sen. Kennedy’s
staff will arrange a follow-up meeting to discuss issues in more
detail.
For more information about ALFA Advocacy Day check the recent
press release in the Press area of ALFA Online (www.alfa.org).
Advocacy Central Launched
ow you can easily contact key legislators on the issues affecting the senior living business by clicking to Advocacy
Central—an interactive resource on ALFA Online.
A partnership between ALFA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce,
Advocacy Central allows you to quickly weigh in on upcoming legislative decisions by giving you direct access to key members of
Congress via e-mail letters, online campaigns, and election results.
By registering at www.alfavotes.org, you can immediately access
the site’s resources and act on ALFA’s current public policy priorities.
Registration is free.
N
ALFA Names Chief Programs Officer
LFA has tapped senior living
veteran Marilen King as
chief programs officer for the
association. King will be
responsible for overseeing the
development of ALFA’s executive programs to include ALFA’s
Executive Roundtables, Assisted
Living Executive magazine,
Executive Insights: Case
Studies in Operational
Excellence, Critical Issues in
Assisted Living teleconferences,
A
the ALFA Annual Conference
and Expo, and other programs
for senior living executives
designed to “raise the bar” for
operational excellence.
As part of an integrated effort
to continue to create value for
ALFA’s member companies, King
will oversee ALFA’s research
program, the development of
industry operations metrics, and
ALFA’s “Center for Operational
Excellence” at ALFA Online.
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 9
NEED TO KNOW
hanks to the support
received by ALFA’s
Hurricane Katrina
Disaster Relief Fund, seniors who live in the New
Orleans area now have
access to a new van that
transports them to and
from the Uptown
Sheperd’s Center, a place
where residents of senior New Orleans area residents helped celebrate the
arrival of a new van for the Uptown Sheperd’s
living communities and
Center. The van was funded by ALFA’s
other residential settings
Hurricane Katrina Disaster Relief Fund and chosen and delivered by Metro West Bus company.
can convene for meals,
classes, social activities,
and more.
Uptown Sheperd’s
Center was the first senior center to re-open
after Hurricane Katrina,
but an older van that
broke down frequently
made it difficult to transport its seniors.
Immediately following the hurricane, many seniors began living in
locations farther from the center due to residential damage
throughout the New Orleans area.
After receiving a request for assistance from the Uptown
Sheperd’s Center, ALFA worked with Metro West Bus company
to arrange for a 12-passenger van, paid for through contributions
made to ALFA’s Hurricane Katrina Disaster Relief Fund. The new
van was delivered to the center in September. Staff and seniors
held a small celebration to dedicate the vehicle.
“Everyone tells us that the old van rode like a truck,” Uptown
Sheperd’s Center Director Sylvia Warren wrote in a letter to ALFA.
“This one rides like a car. Our thanks and best wishes.”
ALFA’s Hurricane Katrina Disaster Relief Fund has been instrumental in assisting senior care providers in the New Orleans area.
The fund also recently made a contribution to the Villa Maria
Retirement Center in Lake Charles, Louisiana, to help the center
in its continued recovery efforts after Hurricane Katrina.
T
Correction
In the September 2006 issue
of Assisted Living Executive
("Software Providers Target
Assisted Living Needs"),
Yardi Systems should have
been included as an ALFA
member in a list of software
providers for assisted living.
Yardi Systems, Goleta, CA;
800/866-1144; www.yardi. com.
Services include financial/operations management, marketing/
lead tracking and management,
clinical care/service planning,
property/maintenance, and
resident accounts/billing.
10 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
«
ALFA Fund Purchases Van for Senior
Center Hit by Hurricane Katrina
ALFA Professional Resources
U
nless otherwise noted, visit www.alfa.org or call
703/894-1805 for more information about any of
these resources.
■ 2006 Overview of Assisted Living
This important research study gives
senior housing providers, associations, and other professionals essential facts and figures about assisted
living to use when defining the business to investors, media, consumers,
and others.The Overview is a collaborative research project of ALFA, the
American Association of Homes and
Services for the Aging, American Seniors
Housing Association, National Center for
Assisted Living, and National Investment Center for the
Seniors Housing & Care Industry.To order the $125 report,
call ALFA or visit the ALFA Store online.
■ ALFA Disaster Planning Guide & Tool Kit
Now available with this tool kit: resources for avian/bird flu
and pandemic flu planning, in addition to all the information
you need to help your communities prepare for a potential
disaster.This valuable resource is free for ALFA members.
Nonmembers may purchase a PDF of the guide for $99 at the
ALFA Store online.
■ Assisted Living Executive archives
Log in to the ALFA Web site with your member ID and password to access current and past issues of Assisted Living
Executive magazine. Read individual articles of interest without having to download the entire issue.
Recruit Senior Living Professionals
With the New ALFA Career Center
s the senior
living business has grown
over the last two
decades, so has the pool of available talent. Focused exclusively
on the senior living business,
the ALFA Career Center can help
you find the best and brightest
for your available positions.
Post a job opportunity, search
resumes for talented professionals to join your team, or even
post an anonymous resume.
A
Visit http://careercenter.alfa.
org and navigate to your area
of interest:View Jobs,View
Resumes, Post a Job, and
more.
Soon, the site will also
include free tips, articles, and
career advice, including recruitment and retention articles from
Assisted Living Executive. ▼
Q U A L I T Y
R E S I D E N T
S E R V I C E S
FAMILY Business
Creative solutions to manage
expectations of often
heartbroken and frustrated
families of seniors with
Alzheimer’s
By Anya Martin
12 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
W
hen Silverado
Senior Living Inc.,
which specializes
in Alzheimer’s and
memory care,
acquired several
new communities in Texas, you might have
expected family members of residents to
jump for joy. After all, the San Juan
Capistrano, California-based provider with
13 communities in California,Texas, and
Utah is highly regarded and known for transitioning residents off medications and
restoring them to a more active and alert
lifestyle. Surprisingly, the company found
itself greeted with skepticism and even
hostility.
“We started talking about bringing
in kids and pets and all the activities the
residents would be participating in, and
the families got angrier and angrier,” says
Stephen Winner ([email protected]
senior.com), Silverado’s chief of culture.
“One person said,‘I thought you guys
were experts on dementia. Don’t you
know about over-stimulation?’”
So President and CEO Loren Shook
loaded three of the family members who
were the biggest complainers onto airplanes and sent them to see the company’s
already established communities in
California.
“When they came back, they said,‘You
guys are going to love it, it’s just like they
said it is,’”Winner explains.
No matter what quality of care and activities a community provides for residents
with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms
of dementia, a perennial challenge remains
managing the expectations of family members who often are frustrated, exhausted,
and heartbroken, and lack key knowledge
of how to help a loved one who may not
even remember who they are. Constant,
open communication and education from
the minute a family walks in the door and
throughout a resident’s entire stay help
ensure family expectations are realistic,
say four assisted living providers that
offer Alzheimer’s and dementia care.
GUIDING FAMILIES TO THE ANSWER
At Elmwood Assisted Living at The
Shawhan in Tiffin, Ohio, the fourth floor of
this renovated historic hotel is a dedicated
“Reminiscence Neighborhood,” exclusive to
19 residents with mid- to late-stage
Alzheimer’s disease.The community, home
to 60 assisted living residents in total, also
includes many who don’t need full-time
care but are showing early stages of memory loss.To begin to manage the family discomfort that often comes with the need for
a loved one to move to a higher level of
care, staff starts to discuss that possibility
with them long before the time comes, says
Maria Paradiso Browne ([email protected]
woodcommunities.com), director of community relations.
From her first contact with families,
Paradiso Browne asks if the potential resident has any memory issues. If yes, she talks
about the Elmwood programs right away.
Such families also meet often with the
director of nursing and the director of the
Reminiscence Program, who can help the
family identify the signs and symptoms that
indicate the need for a move.
“If they understand [the disease process]
at the beginning, moving through the system is not as difficult,” she adds.“It’s still
devastating, but it’s more expected, much
less of a surprise.”
With education, Paradiso Browne says,
families themselves notice changes and
bring it to the community’s attention versus
the community dictating that a move is
needed.“We can walk that pathway together,” she adds.
To help families understand their loved
one’s status in terms of the disease’s progression, in addition to using the global
FAST FORWARD
✔ Start managing family discomfort
that may accompany the need for
higher- level care by discussing
the possibility long before the time
comes.
✔ Train staff to put themselves in
family members’ shoes, enabling
them to structure their communications with empathy.
✔ Train families in your company’s
techniques for care. They’ll better
understand why things are done a
certain way and may try techniques
themselves.
deterioration scale, Elmwood staff will correlate the disease stage with the age of a
child—information they learned in a training program.
In general, though, communication is
structured to mirror the family’s personality,
down to the Elmwood staff member who
takes the lead, Paradiso Browne says,
adding,“We’ve had families who are in
denial and feel like they know what to do
better than us. You don’t want to gang up
on them or you’ll alienate them. [Or] if you
have a family member who is very straightforward and wants everything to be black
and white, the department head with that
personality needs to deal with them.”
Throughout a resident’s stay, meet with
the families as needed, especially when anyone—staff or family member—notices a
behavior change, and ideally that meeting
should be in-person and not just over the
phone, Paradiso Browne advises.“We definitely prefer face-to face discussions
because we can hear what they say, but you
can also see the reaction on their faces.You
can see the body language—whether or not
they are squirming.You can see whether
they’re comfortable with what you’re saying.”
Residents are included in meetings as
long as they can understand and participate. If not, staff will gently suggest the
meeting be limited to family members.
TEACHING COMPASSION
Elmcroft Assisted Living LLC, which
operates 12 communities in the Midwest
and Southeast, recently redefined Heartland
Village, its Alzheimer’s care program, to
emphasize meaningful activities built
around a resident’s history, current abilities,
and interests.The Louisville, Kentucky-based
company merged this fall with three other
companies to form Senior Care Inc., a
transaction that will add 31 assisted living
communities in five more states to its portfolio, and it plans to begin rolling out its
dementia program to these additional communities in 2007.
Elmcroft conducts family and resident
satisfaction surveys twice a year to monitor
performance at the community level. But
after the implementation of the dementia
program, the company noticed a sharp
increase in the number of compliments
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 13
Q U A L I T Y
aimed at Heartland Village and its programming, says Anne W. McAfee ([email protected]
ElmcroftAL.com), director of risk management for Senior Care.
As part of the transition process, the
company sent its memory-care directors
and staff to a comprehensive two-day
training session. Everyone who works
with Alzheimer’s residents, from “leaders”
(Heartland program directors) to nurses to
frontline caregivers, down to any housekeeper who works exclusively in the
Heartland area, attended the program.
Having noted that occupancy rates in
the Alzheimer’s sections/wings were just
80 percent compared with rates in the low
90s in assisted living, Elmcroft took a hard
look at its program and tried to assess why
it was more successful in some areas and
less in others, McAfee says. To develop the
curriculum, McAfee attended numerous
seminars on Alzheimer’s disease to educate
herself on the newest care strategies.With
that, she decided that one of the six topics
covered had to be specifically about dealing
with families.
“It’s almost like experiencing a death
when a family member gets the diagnosis,”
she adds.“They go through a similar
process and can’t believe this has happened.They think,‘Maybe if I had helped
Mom more or helped her remember
more, it wouldn’t have progressed.’ But
every time it does progress, they lose
something of Mom.They are watching
R E S I D E N T
S E R V I C E S
Mom’s independence go away.”
During the portion of the training that
addresses families, staff learn to put themselves in family members’ shoes to better
understand why they might be upset or
frustrated, which enables staff to structure
their communications with empathy for the
person’s situation and concerns, McAfee
says. For example, family members may feel
a loss of control after having turned their
loved one over to the community. Or they
may be suffering from their own depression
or other health issues due to the overwhelming obligations associated with caregiving. The emphasis is on interactive training, with two to three problem-solving scenarios at the end of the section.
“With the scenarios that we use, there’s
no one right answer,” McAfee says.“We ask,
‘What does everybody think is going on
with that person?’”
The introduction of a new program can
also serve to reassure family members of
residents already in the community, McAfee
says. For example, when Elmcroft asks families to help them build a life history of a
resident at move-in,“it could be a perfect
opportunity to say we’ve just been trained
on this new program,” she explains. The
script could go like this: “We’re going to
spend a lot of time focusing on your father
as an individual with his own history, interests, and abilities. Otherwise, he would just
be Mr. Smith from the point that we met
him. We didn’t know that he was a captain
14 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
in the Army and served in World War II, so
we need this info.”
McAfee also realizes that staff can’t be
expected to learn everything about dealing
with families in a few hours. To ensure they
keep compassion for families at the top of
their minds, McAfee reintroduces the topic
regularly in monthly conference calls with
Heartland leaders. She also visits all the
Elmcroft communities regularly to view
first-hand that the program is running
smoothly.
EDUCATE FAMILIES, TOO
In Country Meadows Retirement
Communities’ Alzheimer’s care program,
the Meadows, even family members are
offered a variety of training seminars. The
Hershey, Pennsylvania-based company operates 10 communities in Pennsylvania and
one in Maryland. The Meadows Program
follows the validation methods and philosophy of Naomi Feil, author of such books as
The Validation Breakthrough, and became
the first U.S. organization to be authorized
by Feil’s Cleveland-based Validation Training
Institute Inc.
“When we work with the elderly, we
look at them holistically,” says Meadows
Executive Director Rita Altman ([email protected]
countrymeadows.com). “We look at the
whole person—their emotional background, their psychological background,
their life story. With validation, we believe
the older person with dementia is in the
they can focus on the person they are talking with,”Altman says.“We teach them to
take deep, cleansing breaths, which helps
to wash out all their stress.”
Another exercise is mirroring emotions
of the loved one,Altman says. Be happy if
Mom is happy. Or if she is sad, slow down
and express empathy through facial expressions and tone of voice. Family members
are taught to make eye contact, speak
slowly in calm reassuring tones, avoid
interrupting until the person is finished
talking, and rephrase what a person has
said back to them so that person knows
you heard him or her.
“One of our family members put it very
well,”Altman says.“When Mom would say,
‘Where’s Dad?’ one daughter would try to
bring her mother back to reality by saying
‘oh, Mom, Dad died.’ Now she has started
going where Mom is, and saying things like,
‘This would be the time you’d be starting
supper for Dad. You really miss him.’ It’s
made the daughter’s visits less stressful
and more enjoyable.”
Again, any effort to train and reassure
families has to be ongoing,Altman says.
After taking the seminar, though, she finds
that family members are more likely to call
Meadows coordinators and managers for
guidance in dealing with specific situations.
Country Meadows also offers monthly
support groups for family members led
by facilitators trained by the Alzheimer’s
Association. Communities may invite expert
speakers to discuss different aspects of
dementia, and anyone in the external community is invited to participate. In addition
to being a community service, the latter
exposes these caregivers to the Meadows
Program.
“Support groups give them an opportunity to connect with people who are
facing the same challenges,”Altman says.
“It gives them an opportunity to talk and
learn more about alternative options for
caring for their loved ones.”
DON’T JUST TELL, SHOW
As illustrated by all of these examples,
educating families about what you do and
why is key to managing realistic expectations for their loved one’s care, but it isn’t
always easy.
Silverado’s Winner notes that because
expectations start from the first moment a
family walks in the door, salespeople must
be completely honest and not over-promise
and exaggerate what you can really do. For
example, while Silverado has experienced
success getting people out of wheelchairs,
these strategies may not work for the
unique circumstances of every resident.To
a family member with hopes a parent will
walk again,Winner suggests the salesperson
should say something like:“We are going to
transfer your father out of his wheelchair
during mealtimes and activities.We’ve had
a lot of success doing that. If we can’t get
him up walking, we can certainly improve
Page 14 and 15 photos courtesy of Elmcroft Assisted Living
final life stage, called resolution, which is a
time for resolving things from the past so
that they may experience dignity and
peace.We educate caregivers to be exclusively there for that person, to help them
express their feelings.”
During a seminar called “Becoming a
Time Traveler,” family members receive
training in the “validation” techniques used
by Country Meadows so they understand
why staff encourage the resident to stay in
whatever moment of time he or she is
experiencing right now, she adds.
“Instead of saying to them,‘It’s 2006 and
you’re living at Country Meadows,’ we
encourage family members to go to wherever their loved one is—whether it’s World
War II, the ’50s, or the ’60s,”Altman says.
“[For example] if a father was in the military, and his son or daughter comes to visit,
instead of trying to jar his memory and
bring him back to today, have him talk
about it or sing a song about it. Although it
may not be the way they have always communicated, it is still a very meaningful way
to connect.”
While the one-hour seminar can’t teach
everything a person needs to know, family
members do come away with several tools
and techniques to help them communicate
better and listen without judgment to their
loved one, she adds.
For example, participants are taught a
“centering exercise to help them remove
internal dialogue from their mind so that
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 15
Q U A L I T Y
some function and get him stronger than he
has been.”
Sales staff also should avoid engaging in
“features-dumping” during an initial meeting
or tour—in other words, simply listing all
of the available services, from double-paned
glass to security key pads to the onsite
beauty shop,Winner says.“Instead, train staff
to listen for what the person is asking and
talk about the elements of the community
or the services that reflect their needs,”
he advises.“[For example], the person may
say,‘Mom likes to bowl.Will she be able to
still do that?’That allows you to talk about
outings.”
Sales staff also should take copious notes
on what’s important to the family and
R E S I D E N T
S E R V I C E S
record them to ensure the next person who
speaks to the family can address how your
program can help with those issues,Winner
says.
Once the resident has moved in, everyone
is going to be a little confused or anxious
because of the new setting, he adds. During
this time, people are statistically more likely
to have falls or wander off and get lost.“With
some people, if it looks like it’s going to be
a tougher settling-in period, we might
encourage the family to spend some oneon-one companion time with the caregiver,”
Winner says.“It used to be that some companies would ask the families not to come in
during the initial settling-in period, but
Silverado has never felt that.We want to
New Dementia Care Recommendations
Focus on Person-Centered Care
he Alzheimer’s Association released Phase 2 of its comprehensive Dementia Care Practice
Recommendations for Assisted Living Residences and Nursing Homes in September at its
Dementia Care Conference in Atlanta. Compiled with support from 26 leading organizations
representing residential care providers, professionals, care staff, and consumers, the Phase 2
recommendations cover three areas: wandering, falls, and physical restraints.
The goal of the overall project is to emphasize the value of person-centered care and
provide guidance in areas identified both as common challenges for care providers of people with dementia in residential care settings, and areas where the association believes
intervention could make a meaningful improvement in residents’ quality of life. The first set
of recommendations (Phase 1), released in 2005, focused on the basics of good dementia
care, food and fluid consumption, pain management, and social engagement.
“We wanted to make sure that the recommendations would represent the best dementia
care practices and at the same time be practical so that nursing homes and assisted living
residences could incorporate them into the daily care routines of
residents,” says Peter Reed Ph.D., interim
senior director, programs and outreach,
Alzheimer’s Association.
For example, Phase 2 recommendations
include ways residences can work toward a
physical restraint-free environment and
assess their own capacity to do so. Selfassessment includes: extent to which
restraint-free policies exist and are implemented; level of staff training and understanding of
restraint-free care; identification of residents
with restraints and conditions that might trigger
use of restraints; and the ability to consult with
experts when needed to eliminate physical
restraints.
Download the Phase 2 recommendations at
www.alz.org/qualitycare/dementia_care_
pract.asp. For a hard copy, call 800/272-3900.
T
16 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
bring the family together and not separate
them.We always tell the families to come in,
and at any time, and we’ll support them.”
Because family members may experience
a sense of loss when a resident moves in,
visiting can build up confidence that the
community is giving a loved one the care
needed so that the family members feel
they can relax and do some things for
themselves.The company also invites family
members to attend staff training sessions if
they want to, which Winner says is a powerful way to acknowledge some of your mistakes but also to communicate that you are
trying to resolve them.
“Most companies would find that threatening because then [families would] know
the things we could do better,”Winner says.
“What we have found is, more than anything, it gives the family member an understanding of why it’s more difficult to do
something, or that even though we’re not
doing something perfectly, we’re working
on it and trying. It’s never come back to
hurt us.”
Sometimes Silverado will pair a new family member with a family member of a longtime resident to help the former through
the initial move-in process and answer questions and concerns.“In some communities,
a committee of family members has taken it
upon themselves to be the welcomers of
new families,”Winner says.“That’s been very
successful. It means something more when
talking to another family member, and we
take great pride in that.”
Finally, when faced with a particularly
difficult family member, Silverado considers
it a challenge and is always open to trying
creative strategies.
For example,Winner remembers one resident’s daughter who didn’t like how her
mother’s bed was made, and nothing that
anyone could do would get her to calm
down about it. So Silverado invited her to
come teach a class to staff on how to make
a bed properly. The daughter accepted the
invitation and did just that.
“She then became our greatest ambassador for praising our caregivers when they
are making the bed right,” he adds. ▼
Anya Martin is a contributing writer to
Assisted Living Executive. Reach her at
[email protected]
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L E A D E R S H I P
CREATIVE
Compromise
T
here are the things we want to
do and the things we have to
do, and they don’t always play
nicely together. Save for tomorrow’s retirement or pay today’s
bills? Long-term plans and short-term needs
often butt heads. It’s the same in the world
of senior living, where long-term strategies
sometimes run at odds with daily business
needs.When that happens, it’s time for a
creative compromise.
Steven Vick is willing to meet the
short-term need, but only if he can simultaneously make an investment that will bring
that short-term move in line with his long-
range vision.“Your values, your mission,
your goals—all that is what you are striving
to do every day,” says Vick ([email protected]
signatureseniorliving.com), CEO of
Signature Senior Living in Dallas.“Then
you wrap your short-term goals inside that.”
PLANNING FOR FLEXIBILITY
Vick takes an example from the realm of
occupancy issues. Suppose the strategic
plan sets certain occupancy numbers at certain acuity levels, but demographics show
that you’ll have to take higher-acuity residents in order to make the numbers. Needs
and mission are now at odds.
18 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
“If you’re not capable of providing services to those people, then the benefits of
taking on those people in the short term
are lost in the long term when you cannot
deliver the promise you made to the customer,” he says.
The compromise comes in the form of
training.With properly trained staff, you can
take on the higher-acuity patients and meet
the occupancy numbers, while still staying
in line with the overall goal of service
excellence.“It’s easy to get into the trap of
hiring a warm body and putting them on
the floor untrained,”Vick adds.“You can
have that occupancy, but just make sure
When short-term needs compete with
long-term goals, both sides can win
By Adam Stone
FAST FORWARD
✔ Never focus solely on the immediate
need. If you stay in the short term,
you may not be around in the long
term.
✔ Short-term and long-term needs that
seem to conflict sometimes can be
brought into accord over the long
term.
✔ Adaptation sums it up; management
has to make adaptations on both
sides.
you have the trained staff able to meet that
challenge.”
At Bickford Senior Living Group ,
based in Olathe, Kansas, Senior Vice
President of Operations Alan Fairbanks
([email protected]) says financial conditions sometimes give him the
leeway to navigate between competing
interests. As a private company, he
explains, Bickford has greater freedom
to take the short-term loss than might
a publicly held enterprise.
That being said, it’s never a good idea to
focus solely on the immediate need.“If you
stay in the short term, I am not sure you are
going to be around in the long term,” he
says.
Often, the choice must be made when it
comes to the timing of taking on a new resident at one of Bickford’s 36 properties.
“We’ve had situations in the past where
someone is going to come in, but first they
have a house that’s going to sell,” he
explains.To fill that apartment, Fairbanks
has sometimes opted to leave a vacancy
while waiting for the house to sell.
“In the short term, you may be out three
or six months’ rent, but if all goes as it
should, you get someone who is going to be
with you as a long-term resident,” he says.
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 19
L E A D E R S H I P
“Your values,
your mission,
your goals—
all that is
what you are
striving to do every day. Then
you wrap your short-term
goals inside that.”—Steven Vick,
Signature Senior Living
Although
Bickford Senior
Living Group
has greater
freedom to take
a short-term loss because it is
a private company, it’s never a
good idea to focus solely on the
immediate need.“If you stay in
the short term, I am not sure
you are going to be around in
the long term.”—Alan Fairbanks,
Bickford Senior Living Group
When
Brandywine
Senior Living
went through
a corporate
realignment this year, skilled
nursing staff were retrained
for assisted living jobs. “If you
have a good team with the
right attitude, you can adapt.”
—Brenda Bacon, Brandywine
Senior Living
“We will forego the short term and look at
the long-term picture here.”
TAKING THE LONG VIEW
Sometimes government regulations or intervention will be the catalyst for a decision
point between long- and short-term planning.
As Fairbanks has learned, you can’t fight city
hall in the short term, but you can give it a
run for its money if you are patient.
Some time back, state authorities
approached Bickford with the news that half
a dozen residents would have to leave, on
the grounds that their care needs exceeded
what the organization could provide.
As a matter of short-term strategy, there
wasn’t much to be done except make the
adjustments the state was asking for. In the
long term, though, such state interference
was going to seriously disrupt the business
plan. Over time, therefore, Bickford took
suit against the state and succeeded in
stopping such practices.“So the short term
suffered, but in the long term, there was a
benefit to future residents,” he says.
Fairbanks points to this as a tidy example
of the ways in which short-term and longterm needs may at first seem to conflict, yet
in the long run can perhaps be brought
into accord.“You may think at first blush
that they don’t align, but I think if you continue to dig deep, you will find out that
things are not always as black and white as
they seemed initially,” he says.
STAFFING FLUCTUATIONS
Want to see priorities in conflict? Stick a
spade in the ground.
At Peace Village Circle Inn in Palos
Park, Illinois, administrators are in the midst
of a renovation.They’ll get a better facility
in the long run, but in the meantime, they
are down from 65 to 43 units and Assisted
Living Administrator Larry Cavin
([email protected]) is struggling to
keep his staff together.
“In the personal care team, we had about
25 individuals in the mix. But you can’t
afford to serve 40 people with that same
number,” he said.
Cavin needed a staff reduction for the
short term, but he didn’t want to just let
people go. He will need them again when
the residence is back at full capacity.
It’s been a balancing act. Some staffers
20 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
have gone willingly from full-time to parttime. Others went from part-time to on-call
status.“We were at least able to keep them
active on our employment list,” Cavin says.
As the project has stretched from an
anticipated three months to eight months,
16 of the original full-timers are still on
board, with nearly all the rest having
accepted some alternate status. Only three
have departed entirely.
At Brandywine Senior Living, based in
Mount Laurel, New Jersey, questions arose
during a corporate realignment. In the spring
of 2006, the company sold its nine skilled
nursing facilities and put the focus on its
remaining nine assisted living residences.At
the same time, the organization has gone into
growth mode, actively scouting out acquisition prospects and development possibilities.
The changes have left short-term gaps,
according to CEO Brenda Bacon
([email protected]), with workers
from a range of disciplines left at loose ends
by the closing skilled nursing facilities.
Short-term interest would say to cull the
excess headcount, but the growth effort is
pushing a bigger picture agenda.“When you
are acquiring properties and building properties, often you have to gear up your
staffing levels, and you have to invest a lot
in that activity.”
To balance those needs, Bacon is recycling. She’s training her skilled nursing staff
to reposition them for jobs in assisted living. Clinical staff are picking up new wellness skills, while accounting personnel shift
their expertise from Medicare and Medicaid
to subjects like valuations and acquisitions.
“The skills are still needed but they are
needed in a very different way,” Bacon said.
“If you have a good team with the right attitude, you can adapt.”
Adaptation may be just the term to sum
up the situation.When short-term needs butt
heads with long-term goals, management
needs to make adaptations on both sides.
It’s almost never a question of choosing one
priority over another, executives say. Rather,
the solution lies in compromise, in finding
ways to satisfy that immediate need without
ever sacrificing the big picture strategy. ▼
Adam Stone is a contributing writer to
Assisted Living Executive. Reach him at
[email protected]
S P E C I A L
S E C T I O N
2006
Buyer’s Guide
Products & services
for the senior
housing industry
T
he 2006 Buyer’s
Guide includes
sources for
everything you need to
run your senior living
communities.Whether
it’s an architect or
emergency call firm you
require, you’ll find some
ideas here. Please refer
to this annual guide as
you plan your ‘07 budget
and throughout the
year when you need
products and services.
Note that inclusion does not imply
endorsement from ALFA or Assisted
Living Executive.
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 21
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
ACCOUNTANTS
Moore Stephens Lovelace PA
18167 US Highway 19 N, Suite 650
Clearwater, FL 33764
Phone: 727/531-4477
Fax: 727/538-2154
ACTIVITIES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Accountants ..................................22
Activities .......................................22
Architects/Engineers/Interior
Design .......................................22
Banking and Lending Institutions....23
Computer Hardware......................24
Construction/Contractors..............24
Consultants...................................24
Executive Search/Staffing .............25
Financial Institutions/Investment
Brokers......................................25
Food Services ...............................26
Furniture and Equipment ..............26
Group Purchasing.........................27
Health Care ...................................27
Home Health .................................28
Hospice.........................................28
Housekeeping/Laundry .................28
Insurance ......................................28
Interior Finish Products ................29
Law Firms .....................................29
Management Companies ..............30
Management/Marketing/
Operations Software .................31
Marketing Services .......................32
Medical Forms and Supplies ........33
Pharmaceutical Companies ..........33
Real Estate ....................................33
Referral Agencies..........................33
Safety/Emergency Call ..................34
Training .........................................35
Transportation...............................35
Companies with names in BOLD are
members of ALFA.
22 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
Home Box Office
Judi Hark
1100 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10036
Phone: 800/426-1426
Fax: 212/512-1765
Web Site: www.homeboxoffice.com/
multifamily
E-mail: [email protected]
Home Box Office, America’s # 1 premium
TV service, offers your residents top-notch
entertainment. From Hollywood hits,
award-winning original series, and movies,
to HBO World Championship Boxing,
quality family fare, outrageous comedy,
and extraordinary special events, HBO has
something for everyone. To find out more
about providing HBO to all your residents,
log on to www.homeboxoffice.com/multi
family or call 800/426-1426.
LifeTrail
Julie Rearick
1000 Buffalo Road
Lewisburg, PA 17837
Phone: 570/522-9800
Fax: 570/522-3030
Web Site: www.playworldsystems.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Playworld Systems’ LifeTrail equipment helps
active, older adults improve balance, muscle
strength, flexibility, and overall cardiovascular
health through 10 wellness stations that offer
upper and lower body warm-up activities and
light strengthening exercises. Stations can be
placed along existing walking paths or clustered in groups. For more information, visit
www.playworldsystems.com.
NASCO Senior Activities Catalog
Judi Boyd
901 Janesville Ave.
Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
Phone: 920/563-2446 or 800/558-9595
Fax: 920/563-8296
Web Site: www.enasco.com
E-mail: [email protected]
NASCO’s Senior Activities Catalog offers a full
line of activity supplies and equipment to provide programming for an active lifestyle for
your residents, no matter their interests or
capabilities. The 108-page catalog features
products for exercise and fitness, mental and
memory stimulation, music, games, entertainment DVDs, and activity resources.
SportKAT LLC
4370 La Jolla Village Drive
San Diego, CA 92122
Phone: 858/866-3393
Fax: 858/866-3933
ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS/
INTERIOR DESIGN
Boulder Associates Architects
1426 Pearl Street, Suite 300
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone: 303/499-7795
Fax: 303/499-7767
Clean Air Systems Engineering
Inc. (CASE)
1632 Huckleberry Drive
Aiken, SC 29803
Phone: 803/641-6000
Fax: 512/727-3094
E-mail: [email protected]
Cornerstone Architecture
110-700 Richmond Street
London, ON N6A 5C7, Canada
Phone: 519/432-6644
Fax: 519/432-6737
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
EGA PC
MGA Interiors LLC
RDG Schutte Wilscam Birge
12 Auburn Street
Newburyport, MA 01950
Phone: 978/462-5515
Fax: 978/462-5525
E-mail: [email protected]
2907 E Chambers Street
Phoenix, AZ 85040
Phone: 602/276-8575
Fax: 602/232-2824
900 Farnam Street, Suite 100
Omaha, NE 68102
Phone: 402/392-0133
Fax: 402/392-0413
Mithun
SouthWood Corp
Brad Fanta
1201 Alaskan Way, Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98101
Phone: 206/623-3344
Fax: 206/623-7005
Web Site: www.mithun.com
E-mail: [email protected]
PO Box 38900
Charlotte, NC 28278
Phone: 704/588-5000
Fax: 704/588-5017
E-mail: [email protected]
Elness Swenson Graham
Architects Inc.
500 Washington Ave. S, Suite 1080
Minneapolis, MN 55415
Phone: 612/373-4618
Fax: 612/339-5382
Faulkner Design Group
3232 McKinney Ave., Suite 1170
Dallas, TX 75204
Phone: 214/922-8008
Fax: 214/922-0440
Gruzen Samton Architects
Planners & Interior Designers
320 W 13th Street, Floor 9
New York, NY 10014
Phone: 212/477-0900
Fax: 212/477-1257
Hart Freeland Roberts Inc.
7101 Executive Center Drive, Suite 300
Brentwood, TN 37027
Phone: 615/370-8500
Fax: 615/370-8530
Irwin/Pancake Architects
245 Fischer Ave., Suite B2
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
Phone: 714/556-5774
Fax: 714/556-1572
E-mail: [email protected]
JSA Architecture Planning &
Interior Design
55 Green Street
Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603/436-2551
Fax: 603/436-6973
Lees Carpets, a Division of
Mohawk Industries
500 Townpark Lane NW, Suite 400
Kennesaw, GA 30144
Fax: 678/355-5805
Morris Switzer~Environments
for Health
Jill M. Boardman
185 Talcott Road
Williston, VT 05495
Phone: 802/878-8841
Fax: 802/878-9350
Web Site: www.morrisswitzer.com
E-mail: [email protected]
The Haskell Co.
Thorn B. Himel Jr.
111 Riverside Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Phone: 904/357-4807
Fax: 904/475-7750
Web Site: www.thehaskellco.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Wallace Roberts & Todd
580 N 4th Street, Suite 660
Columbus, OH 43215
Phone: 614/429-6800
Fax: 614/429-6672
Amy Carpenter
1700 Market Street, 28th Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215/732-5215
Fax: 215/732-2551
Web Site: www.wrtdesign.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Newcomer Associates
Wattenbarger Architects
1105 Sheller Ave.
Chambersburg, PA 17201
Phone: 717/263-0101
Fax: 717/263-7380
E-mail: [email protected]
275 118th Ave. SE, Suite 208
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: 425/453-0606
Fax: 425/453-4772
Mosaic Ltd.
PDC Midwest Inc.
700 Walnut Ridge Drive
Hartland, WI 53029
Phone: 262/563-5250
Fax: 262/367-7712
Perkins & Will
6200 N Central Expy.
Dallas, TX 75206
Phone: 214/775-6200
Fax: 214/775-6201
BANKING AND LENDING
INSTITUTIONS
Arbor Commercial Mortgage LLC
1334 Park View Ave., Suite 100
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
Phone: 310/546-8114
Fax: 310/546-8115
Discover Network
2500 Lake Cook Road
Deerfield, IL 60015
Phone: 224/405-0900
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 23
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
GMAC
2801 Highway 280 S, Suite 305
Birmingham, AL 35223
Phone: 205/870-1124
Fax: 205/870-1041
Greystone Servicing Corporation,
Inc.
152 W 57th Street, 60th Floor
New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212/649-9700
Fax: 212/649-9701
Guaranty Bank
8333 Douglas Ave., Floor 10
Dallas, TX 75225
Phone: 214/360-2610
Fax: 214/360-1660
Prudential Huntoon Paige
Marie Head
100 Mulberry Street, 8GC4
Newark, NJ 07102
Phone: 800/852-2834
Fax: 973/367-8210
Web Site: www.prudential.com/
huntoonpaige
E-mail: [email protected]
com
R-B-J Schlegel Holdings Inc.
325 Max Becker Drive, Suite 201
Kitchener, ON N2E 4H5, Canada
Phone: 519/571-1873
Fax: 519/571-0947
Wachovia Bank
420 20th Street N
Birmingham, AL 35203
Phone: 205/254-4856
Fax: 205/254-4864
Wells Fargo Multifamily Capital
Allison Montalbano
2010 Corporate Ridge, Suite 1000
McLean, VA 22102
Phone: 877/734-5592
Fax: 703/760-4750
Web Site: www.wellsfargo.com/wfcm
E-mail: [email protected]
COMPUTER HARDWARE
The Dimension Group
10400 Bren Road E, Suite 100
Hopkins, MN 55343
Phone: 952/996-1000
Fax: 952/908-0570
CONSTRUCTION/
CONTRACTORS
Crown Builders Inc.
7323 E Shoeman Lane
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
Phone: 480/994-0200
Fax: 480/423-0763
IMC Construction
Joe Fazio
9 Old Lincoln Hwy., Suite 300
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610/889-3600
Fax: 610/889-3606
Web Site: www.imcconstruction.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Paul Davis Restoration &
Remodeling
Crandall Corporate Dietitians
PO Box 31060
Mesa, AZ 85275
Phone: 480/835-7072
Fax: 480/835-8860
E-mail: [email protected]
Dominion Due Diligence Group
4120 Cox Road
Glen Allen, VA 23060
Phone: 804/358-2020
Fax: 804/358-3003
Ferguson Advisors LLC
1294 Kinloch Circle
Arnold, MD 21012
Phone: 410/793-5051
Fax: 410/544-3436
Hospital & Healthcare
Compensation Service Inc.
Rosanne Zabka Cioffe
PO Box 376
Oakland, NJ 07436
Phone: 201/405-0075
Fax: 201/405-2110
Web Site: www.hhcsinc.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Art Dickerson
One Independent Drive, Suite 2300
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Phone: 800/722-1818
Fax: 904/899-6263
Web Site: www.pdrestoration.com
E-mail: [email protected]
HCS publishes annual compensation reports for
the long-term care industry. These include the
Assisted Living, Nursing Home, and CCRC
Salary and Benefits Reports. Data breakouts
include profit status, unit size, revenue size,
city, and state. The reports provide the most
reliable and comprehensive source of compensation information available.
The Haskell Co.
Jeanne Stolbach, Consultant for
Families
Thorn B. Himel Jr.
111 Riverside Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Phone: 904/357-4807
Fax: 904/475-7750
Web Site: www.thehaskellco.com
E-mail: [email protected]
CONSULTANTS
C.O.R. Services LLC
4 Housatonic Drive
Sandy Hook, CT 06482
Phone: 781/983-0863
Fax: 203/426-1530
24 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
G U I D E
38 Morseland Ave.
Newton Center, MA 02459
Phone: 617/965-0322
Fax: 617/969-8693
LTC Solutions Inc.
9098 Newcastle Drive
Mechanicsville, VA 23116
Phone: 804/550-1293
2 0 0 6
ProMatura Group LLC
Margaret Wylde
142 Highway 30 E
Oxford, MS 38655
Phone: 662/234-0158
Fax: 662/234-0288
Web Site: www.promatura.com
Specializing in age-qualified housing,
ProMatura Group LLC is an internationally
recognized market feasibility and consumer
research company. With 80+ employees, we
use cutting-edge research methods to determine the maximum and best use for developments. We delineate your market opportunity
and what consumers want and are willing to
pay.
Seniority Inc.
6120 Stoneridge Mall Road, Floor 3
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Phone: 925/924-7187
Fax: 925/924-7201
ServiceTRAC LLC
9188 E San Salvador Drive, Suite 205
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
Phone: 480/941-3121
Fax: 480/941-5246
EXECUTIVE SEARCH/
STAFFING
Druthers Agency Inc.
B U Y E R ’ S
LM Hurley & Associates
Formation Capital LLC
6660 Alcala Knolls Drive
San Diego, CA 92111
Phone: 858/277-8282
E-mail: [email protected]
101 West Ave., Suite 300
Jenkintown, PA 19046
Phone: 215/517-4900
Fax: 215/571-4970
FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS/
INVESTMENT BROKERS
1035 Powers Pl.
Alpharetta, GA 30004
Phone: 770/754-9660
Fax: 770/754-3085
and
Capital Funding Group Inc.
1511 S Highland Ave., Suite 204
Baltimore, MD 21224
Phone: 410/342-3155
Fax: 410/342-7101
GE Capital Healthcare Financial
Services
500 W Monroe Street, Floor 11
Chicago, IL 60661
Phone: 312/441-6925
Fax: 513/794-8332
Heavenrich & Co. Inc.
CapitalSource
Steve Gilleland
4445 Willard Ave., 12th Floor
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Phone: 301/841-2700
Fax: 301/841-2340
Web Site: www.capitalsource.som
E-mail: [email protected]
CapitalSource provides in-depth industry
expertise and rapid execution capabilities to
deliver innovative, flexible, and timely financing
solutions. Our diverse array of products range
from $2 million and up and include: Floating
and Fixed-Rate Mortgage Loans, Sale
Leaseback, HUD Financing, Revolving Lines of
Credit, Bridge Loans, Mezzanine Loans, and
Debtor-in-Possession Financing.
CAPMARK
13323 W Washington Blvd., Suite 301
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Phone: 310/827-4140
Fax: 310/827-4143
E-mail: [email protected]
707 E Main Street, Suite 1300
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: 804/780-9205
Fax: 804/644-8126
Govig Senior Care
63 Kendrick Street; One Charles River Pl.
Needham Heights, MA 02494
Phone: 781/707-9300
Fax: 781/707-9338
4800 N Scottsdale Road, Suite 2800
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
Phone: 480/941-5627
Fax: 866/266-6309
E-mail: [email protected]
G U I D E
CWCapital
Adam Heavenrich
203 N La Salle Street, Suite 2100
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312/558-1590
Fax: 312/896-1501
Web Site: www.heavenrich.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Irving Levin Associates Inc.
268 1/2 Main Ave.
Norwalk, CT 06851
Phone: 203/848-6800
Fax: 203/846-8300
Merrill Lynch Capital
222 N La Salle Street, Floor 16
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312/750-6321
Fax: 312/750-6226
MMA Realty Capital
2177 Youngman Ave.
Saint Paul, MN 55116
Phone: 800/824-6013
Fax: 651/644-7694
Smith/Packett Med-Com Inc.
4415 Pheasant Ridge Road, Suite 301
Roanoke, VA 24014
Phone: 540/774-7762
Fax: 540/772-6470
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 25
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
FOOD SERVICES
Hobart-Traulsen
701 S Ridge Ave.
Troy, OH 45374
G U I D E
Bio-Pro Research LLC
1701 Biotech Way
Sarasota, FL 34243
Phone: 941/358-9609
Fax: 941/358-9940
Delta Faucet Co.
Unidine Corp.
Christopher Chronis
One Gateway Center, Suite 751
Newton, MA 02458
Phone: 617/467-3700
Fax: 617/467-3571
Web Site: www.unidine.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Newton, Massachusetts-based Unidine
(www.unidine.com) is a privately held food
and dining management service specialist
serving senior living communities, hospitals,
and businesses. Unidine brings unparalleled
management and culinary expertise to deliver
customized, quality dining experiences while
maximizing operational and cost efficiencies.
Unidine has 1,000 employees at 70 locations
from Maine to Virginia.
US Foodservice
2055 Windward Point
Discovery Bay, CA 94514
Fax: 847/720-8340
FURNITURE AND
EQUIPMENT
American of Martinsville
128 E Church Street
Martinsville, VA 24112
Phone: 276/632-2061
Fax: 276/638-8810
ARJO Inc.
50 Gary Ave.
Roselle, IL 60172
Fax: 888/594-2756
26 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
55 E 111th Street
Indianapolis, IN 46280
Phone: 704/895-9196
Fax: 704/895-9197
Direct Supply
6767 N Industrial Road
Milwaukee, WI 53223
Phone: 800/480-7250
Fax: 800/770-1707
Web Site: www.directsupply.net
ff&e Specialty Group Inc.
John Flinn
PO Box 8696
Kansas City, MO 64114
Phone: 913/888-5892
Fax: 913/492-6411
Web Site: www.ffandespecialty.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Fiberglass Systems Inc.
4545 Enterprise Street
Boise, ID 83705
Phone: 208/342-6823
Fax: 208/342-6832
Home Depot Supply
10641 Scripps Summit Ct
San Diego, CA 92131
Phone: 858/831-2318
Fax: 800/352-5354
Kwalu
146 Woodlawn Street, PO Box 1870
Ridgeland, SC 29936
Phone: 800/405-3441
Fax: 843/726-9230
Web Site: www.kwalu.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Master Care Patient
Equipment, Inc.
Diane K. Walkowiak
2071 14th Ave., PO Box 1435
Columbus, NE 68601
Phone: 800/798-5867
Fax: 402/563-9102
Web Site: www.mastercarebath.net
E-mail: [email protected]
MasterCare Patient Equipment provides
ergonomic and economic resident bathing
solutions incorporating innovative features and
designs. Quality products and service after the
sale have made us a leader in this industry.
MasterCare is proud to distribute through a
chain of knowledgeable and professional representatives and distributors. Made in the USA.
Microfridge Inc.
10 Walpole Park S
Walpole, MA 02081
Phone: 401/821-3308
Fax: 401/821-3309
Pacific Coast Feather Co.
1964 4th Ave. S
Seattle, WA 98134
Phone: 360/653-3696
Prestige Products
International Inc.
Frank Hays
2215 Curtiss Street
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Phone: 800/648-5267
Fax: 630/824-0187
Web Site: www.prestigeprod.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Prestige Products International Inc. is a manufacturer of high abuse table and floor lamps as
well as framed art and mirrors. Our Dura-Lite
and Max High Abuse Lamps are virtually
unbreakable and available in many styles and
colors. Ideal for assisted living or Alzheimer’s
units. We offer several subjects and designs
in our framed art. All come with plexiglass
and security locks.
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
Safety Bath Inc.
Pat Krushen
504 5th Ave. NE
Ituna, SK S0A 1N0, Canada
Phone: 877/826-6666
Fax: 306/795-3533
Web Site: www.safetybath.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Safety Bath Inc. has been changing the way
people bathe since 1992 by offering safe and
accessible bathtub options. Products include
space-saving walk-in bathtub models for use in
private homes and assisted living facilities, as
well as regular-sized bathtub models designed
for those who want to bathe as well as shower
but cannot step over a bathtub wall. Safety Bath
meets the needs of the aging population by
making bathing safe and easy.
HPSI Purchasing Services
Rosemary Picon
1360 Reynolds Ave., Suite 101
Irvine, CA 92614
Phone: 800/223-4774
Fax: 949/852-1851
Web Site: www.hpsionline.com
E-mail: [email protected]
The Kinetic Group
ComForcare Senior Services
Stephanie Tercha
2510 Telegraph, Suite 100
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302
Phone: 800/886-4044
Fax: 248/745-9763
Web Site: www.comforcare.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Tom Breunig
3875 SW Hall Blvd.
Beaverton, OR 97005
Phone: 888/222-1167
Fax: 503/644-1009
Web Site: www.thekineticgroup.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Cornell
Tacony Corp. dba Powr-Flite &
CFR
HEALTH CARE
3101 Wichita Ct
Fort Worth, TX 76140
Phone: 817/551-0700
Fax: 817/551-0719
Brentwood Nursing Home
Cornell is the expert in providing effective
Emergency Response systems for Senior
Housing or Health Care applications. Our customers often select several of our integrated
Emergency Response, Access Control, and
Evacuation Assistance systems to improve the
communications, security, or efficiency within
their communities. Today’s product alternatives
are available in traditional wired and the latest
wireless technologies.
Suburban Manufacturing Co.
676 Broadway Street
Dayton, TN 37321
Phone: 423/775-2131
Fax: 423/775-7015
GROUP PURCHASING
BuyBetter Inc.
27481 Paseo Lindero
San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
Phone: 949/661-8114
Fax: 949/661-4068
Companion Radio
1 Fishers Road
Pittsford, NY 14534
Phone: 585/341-2000
E-mail: [email protected]
4000 Post Road
Warwick, RI 02886
Phone: 401/884-8020
Fax: 401/884-7977
Capital Health Authority
Supportive Living, Community
Care Services
Suite 406 10216-124st
Edmonton, AB T5N 4A3, Canada
Phone: 780/496-7596
Fax: 780/496-7557
Catalyst Healthcare
3471 Via Lido, Suite 211
Newport Beach, CA 92663
E-mail: [email protected]
Chelsea Jewish Nursing Homes
Janette Marien
7915 N 81st Street
Milwaukee, WI 53223
Phone: 800/558-8957
Fax: 414/351-4657
Web Site: www.cornell.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Edelweiss Village (Deutsches
Altenheim Inc.)
2220 Centre Street
West Roxbury, MA 02132
Phone: 617/323-6792
Fax: 617/323-7523
Fisher-Titus Medical Center
272 Benedict Ave.
Norwalk, OH 44857
Phone: 419/668-8101
Fax: 419/663-6036
17 Lafayette Ave.
Chelsea, MA 02150
Phone: 617/884-6766
Fax: 617/889-6176
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 27
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
United Methodist Homes
580 Long Hill Ave.
Shelton, CT 06484
Phone: 203/929-2107
Fax: 203/925-2667
E-mail: [email protected]
Grand Leigh Inc.
Jodi Richman
65 East Bethpage Road, Suite 400
Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 800/255-4836
Fax: 516/454-7663
Web Site: www.grandleigh.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Grand Leigh Inc. is a full-service national supplier to nursing homes, assisted living centers,
hospital systems, healthcare centers, and individual consumers. Based in New York, Grand
Leigh Inc. has provided medical products,
linens, draperies, furniture, janitorial, chemical
supplies, and incontinent supplies to the senior
community in the 48 contiguous states for over
25 years.
Kendal Outreach LLC
1107 E Baltimore Pike
Kennett Square, PA 19348
Phone: 610/388-5580
Fax: 610/388-5589
New Jersey Hospital Association
760 Alexander Road
Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone: 609/275-4010
Fax: 609/275-4005
West Virginia Health Care
Association
110 Association Drive
Charleston, WV 25311
Phone: 304/346-4575
E-mail: [email protected]
HOME HEALTH
Safety Bath Inc.
Pat Krushen
504 5th Ave. NE
Ituna, SK S0A 1N0, Canada
Phone: 877/826-6666
Fax: 306/795-3533
Web Site: www.safetybath.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Safety Bath Inc. has been changing the way
people bathe since 1992 by offering safe and
accessible bathtub options. Products include
space-saving walk-in bathtub models for use in
private homes and assisted living facilities, as
well as regular-sized bathtub models designed
for those who want to bathe as well as shower
but cannot step over a bathtub wall. Safety Bath
meets the needs of the aging population by
making bathing safe and easy.
SeniorBridge
Saint Anthony’s Health Center
PO Box 340
Alton, IL 62002
Phone: 618/465-4501
Fax: 618/465-4569
SCA Personal Care
2929 Arch Street, Suite 2600
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: 610/499-3700
Fax: 610/499-3396
Senior Transitions LLC
13223 Ventura Blvd., Suite E
Studio City, CA 91604
Phone: 818/380-0052
Fax: 818/380-0882
28 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
830 3rd Ave.
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212/994-6100
Fax: 212/664-4260
HOSPICE
VistaCare Hospice
4800 N Scottsdale Road, Suite 5000
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
Phone: 866VISTACARE (847-8222)
Fax: 866/383-0072
Web Site: www.vistacare.com
E-mail: [email protected]
VistaCare is a leading national hospice care
provider, with program offices in 14 states. Our
interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses,
social workers, nursing assistants, chaplains,
and volunteers provide their services wherever
the patient calls home—including assisted living communities. The hospice benefit is 100%
covered by Medicare for eligible patients.
VITAS Innovative Hospice Care
Holli Hallmark
100 S Biscayne Blvd., Suite 1500
Miami, FL 33131
Phone: 305/374-4143
Fax: 305/808-4160
Web Site: www.vitas.com
E-mail: [email protected]
VITAS Innovative Hospice Care provides
Intensive Palliative Care for the physical,
emotional, and spiritual pain/symptoms of
residents facing life-limiting illnesses. VITAS
Community of Care service features include:
Continuous Care for acute symptom management; after-hours VITAS Telecare service with
direct access to clinicians; educational materials/inservices; and grief and loss programs. 1800-93-VITAS, www.vitas.com.
HOUSEKEEPING/
LAUNDRY
Ecolab
1060 Thorndale Ave.
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847/350-5221
Fax: 847/350-1669
INSURANCE
Assurance Agency Ltd.
1750 E Golf Road; One Century Centre
Schaumburg, IL 60173
Fax: 847/670-7511
E-mail: [email protected]
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
Campania Management Co. Inc.
Lighthouse Underwriters LLC
111 Berry Street SE
Vienna, VA 22180
Phone: 703/242-9224
Fax: 703/242-3815
7630 Little River Tpke., Suite 200
Annandale, VA 22003
Phone: 703/770-3700
Fax: 703/770-3720
CNA HealthPro
CNA Plaza 26 S
Chicago, IL 60685
Phone: 312/822-4948
Fax: 312/817-1973
Nathan Sallop Insurance
Agency Inc.
25 New Chardon Street
Boston, MA 02114
Phone: 617/488-6613
Fax: 617/488-6601
PCH Mutual Insurance Co. Inc.
PO Box 101187
Pittsburgh, PA 15237
Phone: 412/318-4651
Fax: 412/318-4652
Continuing Care Risk Retention
Group Inc.
Nick Addleman
716 College Ave., Suite B
Santa Rosa, CA 95404
Phone: 707/571-7430
Fax: 707/571-7464
Web Site: www.ccrrg.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Continuing Care Risk Retention Group Inc.
(CCRRG) is a member-owned mutual insurance
company specializing in professional and general liability insurance for long-term care facilities serving the elderly. Leave the problems of
traditional carriers behind, and join our incredibly strong membership of quality operators.
Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co.
777 San Marin Drive
Novato, CA 94998
Phone: 415/899-2000
K&B Underwriters LLC
12010 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 875
Reston, VA 20190
Fax: 703/707-9696
Kirkway International Ltd.
Belvedere Bldg; 69 Pitt’s Bay Road
Pembroke, HM08, Bermuda
Phone: 441/296-5829
Fax: 441/292-5914
Senior Risk Solutions LLC
10402 Augusta Lane
Rowlett, TX 75089
Phone: 214/287-9827
Swett & Crawford
201 California Street
San Francisco, CA 94111-5002
Phone: 415/951-8418
E-mail: [email protected]
The IMA Financial Group Inc.
PO Box 2992; 600 IMA Plz 250 N Water
Wichita, KS 67201
Phone: 316/266-6229
Fax: 316/266-6254
Thilman Filippini
1 E Wacker Drive, Suite 1800
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312/527-9500
Fax: 312/527-9509
THOMCO Inc.
PO Box 440549
Kennesaw, GA 30160
Phone: 678/290-2100
Fax: 678/290-2200
G U I D E
INTERIOR FINISH
PRODUCTS
C&A Floorcoverings
311 Smith Industrial Blvd.
Dalton, GA 30721
Phone: 706/259-2609
Fax: 706/259-2666
InPro Corporation
S80 W18766 Apollo Drive
Muskego, Wisconsin 53150
Phone: 800/222-5566
Fax: 888/715-8407
E-mail: [email protected]
LAW FIRMS
Arent Fox Kintner Plotkin & Kahn
1050 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 400
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202/715-8410
Fax: 202/857-6395
Arnall Golden Gregory LLP
171 17th Street NW, Suite 2100
Atlanta, GA 30363
Phone: 404/873-8724
Fax: 404/873-8725
Barry D. Epstein, Attorney at Law
7887 E Belleview Ave., Suite 1100
Englewood, CO 80111
Phone: 303/228-2260
Fax: 303/362-7876
E-mail: [email protected]
Bob Lightfoot, Attorney at Law
Murphy Desmond SC
2 East Mifflin Street, Suite 800
Madison, WI 53703
Phone: 608/257-7181
Fax: 608/257-2508
E-mail: [email protected]
Brown McCarroll LLP
111 Congress Ave., Suite 1400
Austin, TX 78701
Phone: 512/703-5737
Fax: 512/476-1101
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 29
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC
Latsha Davis Yohe & McKenna PC
Blair Minton & Associates Inc.
700 Alexander Road, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone: 609/987-6800
Fax: 609/520-0360
1700 Bent Creek Blvd., Suite 140
Mechanicsburg, PA 17050
Phone: 717/620-2424
Fax: 717/620-2444
535 E North Street, Suite E
Bradley, IL 60915
Phone: 815/935-1992
Fax: 815/935-8380
E-mail: [email protected]
Duane Morris LLP
Martha Meng, Attorney at Law
380 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10168
Phone: 212/692-1058
Fax: 212/692-1020
Murtha Cullina LLP
2 Whitney Ave.
New Haven, CT 06510
Phone: 203/772-7721
Fax: 203/772-7723
E-mail: [email protected]
Epstein, Becker & Green PC
1227 25th Street NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20037
Phone: 202/861-0900
Fax: 202/296-2882
Foley & Lardner
777 E Wisconsin Ave., Suite 3800
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Phone: 414/297-2400
Fax: 412/297-4900
Hanson, Bridgett, Marcus, Vlahos
& Rudy LLP
Joel S. Goldman, Esq.
425 Market Street, Suite 2600
San Francisco, CA 94105
Phone: 415/777-3200
Fax: 415/541-9366
Web Site: www.hansonbridgett.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Hanson Bridgett is well-recognized as a national leader in providing legal and regulatory
advice to assisted living and other senior care
communities. We offer practical, creative
solutions to a wide range of assisted living
providers in areas including licensure and
operational issues, financings and acquisitions,
litigation, and employment law.
Hinshaw & Culbertson
4343 Commerce Ct., Suite 415
Lisle, IL 60532
Phone: 630/505-0010
Krokidas & Bluestein LLP
600 Atlantic Ave., Floor 19
Boston, MA 02210
Phone: 617/482-7211
Fax: 617/482-7212
30 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
Care Perspectives Inc.
1503 S Main Street
Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
Phone: 908/859-8500
Fax: 908/859-5151
McCumber Inclan
Heritage Management
Services Inc.
4830 W Kennedy Blvd., Suite 300
Tampa, FL 33609
Phone: 813/287-2822
Fax: 813/287-2833
11717 Burt Street, Suite 102
Omaha, NE 68154
Phone: 402/933-2561
Fax: 402/933-2673
Michael Best & Friedrich LLC
SeniorCare Network
100 E Wisconsin Ave., Suite 3300
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Phone: 414/271-6560
Fax: 414/277-0656
1215 Hulton Road
Oakmont, PA 15139
Phone: 412/826-6071
Fax: 412/826-6520
Quintairos, Prieto, Wood
& Boyer, P.A.
George F. Quintairos
9200 S Dadeland Blvd., Suite 825
Miami, FL 33156
Phone: 305/670-1101
Fax: 305/670-1161
Web Site: www.qpwblaw.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC
Loretta G. LeBar
300 W Vine Street, Suite 2100
Lexington, KY 40507
Phone: 502/419-2571
Fax: 859/246-3614
Web Site: www.skofirm.com
E-mail: [email protected]
MANAGEMENT
COMPANIES
Agemark Management
2614 Telegraph Ave.
Berkeley, CA 94704
Phone: 510/548-6600
Fax: 510/843-1665
Unidine Corp.
Christopher Chronis
One Gateway Center, Suite 751
Newton, MA 02458
Phone: 617/467-3700
Fax: 617/467-3571
Web Site: www.unidine.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Newton, Massachusetts-based Unidine
(www.unidine.com) is a privately held food
and dining management service specialist
serving senior living communities, hospitals,
and businesses. Unidine brings unparalleled
management and culinary expertise to deliver
customized, quality dining experiences while
maximizing operational and cost efficiencies.
Unidine has 1,000 employees at 70 locations
from Maine to Virginia.
2 0 0 6
MANAGEMENT/MARKETING/
OPERATIONS SOFTWARE
A.L. Wizard
Rose Lochmann
11230 Sorrento Valley Road, Suite 220
San Diego, CA 92121
Phone: 858/457-0566
Fax: 858/457-3104
Web Site: www.alwizard.com
E-mail: [email protected]
A.L. Wizard is an assessment driven software
program that is revolutionizing the operations
of assisted living. It provides the ability to accurately track costs of service, improve staff efficiencies, and manage risk, as well as manage
marketing needs and provide accurate resident
billing invoices and receipt of payments.
B U Y E R ’ S
Concurro Inc.
Momentum Healthware
Michael Sturm
1650 South Amphlett Blvd., Suite 310
San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: 650/969-2015
Fax: 650/240-0153
Web Site: www.concurro.com
E-mail: [email protected]
750 Old Hickory Blvd.
Brentwood, TN 37027
Phone: 800/435-1079
Fax: 615/296-9912
Web Site: www.momentumhealthware.
com
E-mail: [email protected]umhealthware.
com
Concurro is a provider of community management systems (CMS) for assisted living companies. Its Web-based and integrated modules
include lead and occupancy management, resident administration, care management, incident
management, multi-facility administration,
billing, reporting, and analytics. Concurro also
provides an interactive community Web site
and personalized family portals for residents.
Eldermark Software
10285 Yellow Circle Drive
Hopkins, MN 55343
Phone: 952/931-9660
Fax: 952/931-9661
Family Virtual Visits
Answers on Demand
Veronica Guzman
8100 N University Drive, 3rd Floor
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33321
Phone: 800/311-8252
Fax: 800/311-8248
Web Site: www.getaod.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Answers On Demand (AOD) is leading in the
development of software for the LTC market.
AOD software is comprised of completely integrated Financial, Clinical, and Operational modules, as well as integrated Rehabilitation, Home
Health, and Point of Sales. We truly partner
with our clients. Please visit us at
www.getaod.com or call 800/311-8252.
Audiotel Corp.
Lindsay Sutherland
15510 Wright Brothers Drive
Addison, TX 75001
Phone: 972/239-4486
Fax: 972/239-4511
Web Site: www.audiotel.com
E-mail: [email protected]
G U I D E
Geoff Meredith
6425 Christie Ave., Suite 280
Emeryville, CA 94608
Phone: 415/883-3500
Web Site: www.familyvirtualvisits.com
E-mail: [email protected]
IntraCare
7309 E 21st Street N, Suite 110
Wichita, KS 67206
Phone: 316/616-6200
Fax: 316/616-6210
Kronos/Unicru Inc.
Steve Earl
9525 SW Gemini Drive
Beaverton, OR 97008
Phone: 503/596-3100
Fax: 503/596-3269
Web Site: www.kronos.com/fyo/longterm
care
E-mail: [email protected]
Move-N Software
Jennifer Griffitts
2700-3 Brown Trail
Bedford, TX 76021
Phone: 817/282-7300
Fax: 817/282-7332
Web Site: www.move-n.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Move-N Software offers Marketing, Clinical, and
Resident Billing and A/R programs strategically
designed to increase census, deliver higher
quality resident care, and seamlessly capture
billable revenues. Created specifically for retirement, assisted living, Alzheimer’s, and CCRC
communities, programs may be used in any
combination on either your own server or
accessed via the Internet.
REPS Software
2803 W Busch Blvd., Suite 201
Tampa, FL 33618
Phone: 813/935-4465
Fax: 813/935-4504
E-mail: [email protected]
Retirement Software Solutions
1935 Dominion Way
Colorado Springs, CO 80918
Phone: 719/522-9222
Fax: 719/522-9297
E-mail: [email protected]
Stromberg, a Paychex Co.
Colleen Holuk
255 Primera Blvd., Suite 532
Lake Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 407/333-3282
Fax: 407/333-0754
Web Site: www.stromberg.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 31
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
Touchtown Inc.
215 Allegheny Ave.
Oakmont, PA 15139
Phone: 412/826-0460
Fax: 412/826-0155
Vigilan
Doug Fullaway
9375 SW Commerce Circle, Suite A1
Wilsonville, OR 97070
Phone: 800/443-1127
Fax: 503/682-4498
Web Site: www.vigilan.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Vigilan software provides a dashboard for
senior management, marketing management,
automated service plans from your current
assessments, training management, staff
scheduling, and billing. Customers consistently
see increased revenues and resident satisfaction scores. Customers tell Vigilan the software
is very flexible and easy to use!
Wagewatch Inc.
15300 N 90th Street, Suite 950
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: 480/657-6504
Fax: 480/657-6529
Yardi Systems Inc.
430 S Fairview Ave.
Goleta, CA 93117
Phone: 806/699-2040
Fax: 806/699-2041
You’ve Got Leads
Brian Trisler
2101 4th Ave., Suite 1750
Seattle, WA 98121
Phone: 866/333-1716
Fax: 866/285-4660
Web Site: www.youvegotleads.com
E-mail: [email protected]
You’ve Got Leads! is the most widely used
online lead-tracking system in the senior
housing industry and helps companies increase
occupancy. With You’ve Got Leads! enjoy the
ease of Web access from any computer and
the ability to see real-time reports. To learn
more, visit www.youvegotleads.com or call
866/333-1716.
32 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
G U I D E
MARKETING SERVICES
Canadian Housing Information
Center
700 Montreal Road
Ottawa, ON K1A 0P7, Canada
Phone: 613/748-2362
Fax: 613/748-4069
Cox CustomMedia
122 Smith Hines Road
Greenville, SC 29607
Phone: 8642977771x266
Fax: 864/297-7777
Crown Research Corp
24111 NE Halsey Street
Troutdale, OR 97060
Phone: 503/661-1999
Fax: 503/667-8253
Gerontological Services Inc.
1237A 3rd Street Promenade
Santa Monica, CA 90401
Phone: 310/393-0332
Fax: 310/393-1332
Goldman & Associates
Public Relations
129 W Virginia Beach Blvd., Suite 101
Norfolk, VA 23510
Phone: 757/625-2518
Fax: 757/625-4336
Integra Realty Resources DFW
12750 Merit Drive, Suite 801
Dallas, TX 75251
Phone: 972/960-1222
Fax: 972/960-2922
JK Designs
2 Executive Drive, Suite 130
Somerset, NJ 08873
Phone: 732/560-1177
Fax: 732/560-1525
E-mail: [email protected]
Kramer-Crosby Inc.
705 Melvin Ave., Suite 201
Annapolis, MD 21401
Phone: 410/268-3035
Fax: 410/268-4620
One on One
7820 Maryland Ave.
Saint Louis, MO 63105
Phone: 314/446-4111
Fax: 314/446-2040
Senior Housing Consultants Inc.
208 35th Street Drive SE, Suite 500
Cedar Rapids, IA 52403
Phone: 319/363-6094
Fax: 319/363-6145
Seroka Healthcare Marketing
N17W24222 Riverwood Drive, Suite 170
Waukesha, WI 53188
Phone: 262/523-3740
Fax: 262/523-3760
Trace Marketing Inc.
5560 Bee Ridge Road, Suite D5
Sarasota, FL 34233
Phone: 941/377-3700
Fax: 941/378-9015
E-mail: [email protected]
Turnaround Solutions for Senior
Housing
Stephanie Harris
3615 Olive Street, Suite 211
Saint Louis, MO 63108
Phone: 800/983-8876
Fax: 314/898-0433
Web Site: www.turnaround-solutions.
com
E-mail: [email protected]
com
Urbek
1833 N 105th Street, Suite 101
Seattle, WA 98133
Phone: 206/282-9300
Fax: 206/547-8094
2 0 0 6
MEDICAL FORMS AND
SUPPLIES
Briggs Corp.
Erica Kiefer
7300 Westown Pkwy.
West Des Moines, IA 50266
Phone: 800/247-2343
Fax: 800/222-1996
Web Site: www.briggscorp.com
E-mail: [email protected]
MTS Medication Technologies
2003 Gandy Blvd. N, Suite 800
Saint Petersburg, FL 33702
Phone: 727/571-1616
Fax: 727/573-0507
Zoll Medical Corp.—Wordwide
HQ
269 Mill Road
Chelmsford, MA 01824
PHARMACEUTICAL
COMPANIES
Arcadia Rx
3524 Park Plaza Road
Paducah, KY 42001
Phone: 270/422-4579
Fax: 800/555-5002
E-mail: [email protected]
Boehringer Ingelheim Corporation
(USA)
B U Y E R ’ S
Omnicare Inc.
Mannington Commercial
100 E Rivercenter Blvd., Suite 1600
Covington, KY 41011
Phone: 859/426-3000
Fax: 859/392-3370
PO Box 12281; 1877 US Hwy. 41 SE
Calhoun, GA 30703
Phone: 706/602-6506
Fax: 706/602-6497
Quality Drug LTC/Catalyst Health
Care
Marcus & Millichap
PO Box 4407
Laguna Beach, CA 92652
Phone: 949/715-9041
Fax: 949/715-9053
750 Battery Street, Floor 5
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: 415/391-9220
Fax: 415/296-0619
MedHoldings
Shore Pharmaceutical
11 Commercial Street
Plainview, NY 11803
Phone: 516/938-8080
Fax: 516/938-9812
3 Calle Orquidea
Guaynabo, PR 00966
Phone: 787/360-7585
Fax: 787/740-4035
Nationwide Health Properties Inc.
REAL ESTATE
CNL Retirement Properties Inc.
420 S Orange Ave., Suite 500
Orlando, FL 32801
Phone: 407/835-3201
Fax: 407/835-3232
Cushman & Wakefield of GA Inc.
1201 W Peachtree Street NW, Suite 3300
Atlanta, GA 30309
Phone: 404/853-5351
Fax: 404/874-8046
Health Care REIT Inc.
1 Seagate, Suite 1500
Toledo, OH 43604
Phone: 419/247-2800
Fax: 419/247-2826
610 Newport Center Drive, Suite 1150
Newport Beach, CA 92660
Phone: 949/718-4400
Fax: 949/759-6876
Sunrise Senior Living REIT
7900 Westpark Drive
McLean, VA 22102
Phone: 703/854-0400
Fax: 703/854-0405
Ventas Healthcare Properties Inc.
111 S Wacker Drive, Suite 4800
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312/660-3818
Fax: 312/660-3819
REFERRAL AGENCIES
A Place for Mom
Housing Facilities of Wisconsin
900 Ridgebury Rd., PO Box 368
Ridgefield, CT 06877-1058
Phone: 800/243-0127
146 Clover Street
Williams Bay, WI 53191
Phone: 262/245-1259
Fax: 262/245-1287
Forest Pharmaceuticals
JCH Consulting Group Inc.
909 3rd Ave.
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212/421-7850
Fax: 212/404-8490
E-mail: [email protected]
G U I D E
1245 N Huxford Lane
Anaheim, CA 92807
Phone: 714/693-0151
Fax: 714/693-2525
Sarah Bentz
2101 4th Ave., Suite 1750
Seattle, WA 98121
Phone: 877/MOM-DAD9
Fax: 866/285-4660
Web Site: www.aplaceformom.com
E-mail: [email protected]
A Place for Mom is the nation’s largest eldercare referral network serving as a marketing
resource for 11,000 long-term care communities. Each month our 200 family advisors help
over 10,000 families find the appropriate housing for their loved one. For more information
about partnership, visit www.aplaceformom.
com or call 877/MOM-DAD9.
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 33
2 0 0 6
B U Y E R ’ S
CaringFamily LLC
2752 47th Street
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: 303/442-2607
E-mail: [email protected]
Leaderstat
8181 Worthington Road
Westerville, OH 43082
Phone: 614/839-7828
Fax: 614/839-7827
Mature Living Choices/Senior
Selections
2305 Newpoint Pkwy.
Lawrenceville, GA 30043
Phone: 770/962-7220
Fax: 770/822-4334
New LifeStyles Inc.
4144 N Central Expy., Suite 1000
Dallas, TX 75204
Phone: 214/824-0022
Fax: 214/515-9202
Senior Housing Net
Brad Fuqua
7499 E Paradise Lane, Suite 100
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: 480/315-6301
Fax: 480/556-4740
Web Site: www.seniorhousingnet.com
E-mail: [email protected]
housingnet.com
Senior Living Alternatives
PO Box 833
Southfield, MI 48037
Phone: 248/350-0730
Fax: 800/350-0771
Seniors For Living
Howard Nevins
48 South Service Road, Suite 100
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: 631/465-2067
Fax: 631/465-2068
Web Site: www.seniorsforliving.com
E-mail: [email protected]
34 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
G U I D E
SAFETY/EMERGENCY
CALL
Avalon Technologies
Marilou Nagy
2501 Kutztown Road
Reading, PA 19605
Phone: 877/282-5660
Fax: 610/929-0738
Web Site: www.avalontechnologies.net
E-mail: [email protected]
IgeaCare Systems Inc.
Tom Tassiopoulos
9033 Leslie Street, Unit 7
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4K3, Canada
Phone: 905/707-1669
Fax: 905/707-1775
Web Site: www.igeacare.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Cornell
Janette Marien
7915 N 81st Street
Milwaukee, WI 53223
Phone: 800/558-8957
Fax: 414/351-4657
Web Site: www.cornell.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Lifeline Senior Living
Cornell is the expert in providing effective
Emergency Response systems for senior housing or health care applications. Our customers
often select several of our integrated
Emergency Response, Access Control, and
Evacuation Assistance systems to improve the
communications, security, or efficiency within
their communities. Today’s product alternatives
are available in traditional wired and the latest
wireless technologies.
Daniel Gold
767 Third Ave., 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Phone: 866/216-4600
Fax: 212/207-3219
Web Site: www.quietcaresystems.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Dwyer Precision Products Inc.
266 20th Street N
Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250
Phone: 904/249-3545
Fax: 904/249-1120
E-mail: [email protected]
Fargo Electronics Inc.
6533 Flying Cloud Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
Phone: 952/918-8621
Fax: 952/946-8493
E-mail: [email protected]
Guardian Systems Inc.
102 S 54th Street
Chandler, AZ 85226
Phone: 480/940-8900
Fax: 480/940-0748
E-mail: [email protected]
111 Lawrence Street
Framingham, MA 01702
Phone: 508/988-1000
Fax: 508/988-1363
Living Independently Group Inc.
QuietCare by Living Independently Group is the
leader in comprehensive behavioral monitoring.
It tracks client ADLs 24/7 through unobtrusive
activity sensors and proprietary software.
QuietCare alerts caregivers of changes in daily
activity that may be indicators of emerging
health conditions and is an extremely reliable
emergency notification system for falls.
Pioneer Electronics
2265 E 220th Street
Long Beach, CA 90810
Phone: 310/952-2786
Fax: 310/952-2470
PROTECT-ALERT Emergency
Response Systems Inc.
PO Box 160035
Altamonte Springs, FL 32716
Phone: 407/862-1288
Fax: 407/862-7796
E-mail: [email protected]
2 0 0 6
RF Technologies
Lorna Schaefer
3125 N 126th Street
Brookfield, WI 53005
Phone: 800/669-9946
Fax: 262/790-1784
Web Site: www.rft.com
E-mail: [email protected]
RF Technologies is a leading innovator of RFID
Solutions for senior care. Our Code Alert
Wandering Management, Wireless Call, and Fall
Management Solutions provide fully integrated
safety solutions that minimize risks to staff and
residents, maximize staff efficiency, and maintain the dignity of your residents.
Stanley-Senior Technologies
Jason Stevens
1550 N 20th Circle
Lincoln, NE 68503
Phone: 800/824-2996
Fax: 402/475-4281
Web Site: www.seniortechnologies.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Tel-Tron Technologies Corp
220 Fentress Blvd.
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
Phone: 386/255-3533
Fax: 386/258-3782
Vigil Health Solutions Inc.
2102-4464 Markham Street
Victoria, BC V8Z 7X8, Canada
Phone: 250/383-6900
Fax: 250/383-6999
E-mail: [email protected]
B U Y E R ’ S
G U I D E
TRAINING
TRANSPORTATION
Best Practice Analytics
Midwest Transit Equipment Inc.
222 S Manoa Road, Suite 250
Havertown, PA 19083
Phone: 610/853-9801
Fax: 610/853-9802
Tom Boldwin
146 W Issert Drive
Kankakee, IL 60901
Phone: 800/933-2412
Fax: 815/933-3966
Web Site: www.midwesttransit.com
E-mail: [email protected]
com
Dynamic Performance
International, Inc.
Traci Bild
8413 Stillbrook Avenue
Tampa, FL 33615
Phone: 800/640-0688
Fax: 877/890-8950
E-mail: [email protected]
Penumbra Group Inc.
Jennifer Shirkani
15 Constitution Drive, Suite 160
Bedford, NH 03110
Phone: 877/388-6764
Fax: 603/488-1749
Web Site: www.penumbra.com
E-mail: [email protected]
“America’s Super Store for Buses.” New and
used bus sales, service, parts, and leasing.
Featuring products by Braun Corp., ElDorado
National, Elkhart Coach, Goshen Coach,
Startrans Bus, Turtle Top, and Starcraft.
Capacities from 6 to 54 and wheelchair
accessible. We offer very competitive pricing
and exciting cost saving lease programs.
Penumbra Group is an employee training and
development firm specializing in customized
solutions to performance challenges designed
to raise employee productivity, decrease
turnover, increase resident satisfaction, and
more. Other services include Emotional
Intelligence applications for hiring, leadership
development, and organizational effectiveness.
We understand assisted living and are here
to help.
Silverchair Learning Systems
Mike Mutka
107 Edinburgh South, Suite 206
Cary, NC 27511
Phone: 866/805-7575
Fax: 919/481-3684
Web Site: www.silverchairlearning.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Silverchair is the leader in online training
exclusively for senior care employees. We
can reduce the cost and time spent on training
by 75% while making it more convenient and
effective—and you can eliminate the headaches
of compliance record keeping. Call us for an
online demonstration.
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
▼
NOV/DEC 2006 35
EXECUTIVE ROUNDTABLE
DEMENTIA CARE
Raising the Bar for
Dementia Care
Amid changing regulations, providers continue
to implement best practices to enhance care
for residents with dementia
BY WHITNEY REDDING
ementia is a fact of life for more
and more senior living residents—
and a developing business reality
for providers. Eight years ago, less than a
quarter of all assisted living residents had
a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or dementia,
according to ALFA research released in
1998.That proportion has increased to one
third of all residents, as reported in the
2006 Overview of Assisted Living, a collaborative research project of ALFA and four
other senior housing and care organizations. (See page 10 for details about the
2006 Overview of Assisted Living and
ordering information.)
Not surprisingly, state regulators have
started to more closely evaluate how care is
provided to assisted living residents with
Alzheimer’s or dementia in various states.
D
From California a few years ago,
to Massachusetts more recently, regulators have implemented various new rules
dictating who may be served, and more
details about how they expect that care to
be delivered.
“The game is changing.There are more
and more rules for dementia care,” says
Emily Meyer ([email protected]),
president of the Massachusetts Assisted
Living Association (MASS-ALFA).“In
Massachusetts, you must present a detailed
operational plan and have it approved.You
must be certified by the state to provide
special care services.”
“All across the states, I’m starting to see
the same thing.They’re starting to focus
more on the care provided,” explains
Budgie Amparo ([email protected]),
vice president of quality and risk management at San Ramon, California-based
Proportion of Residents With a Diagnosis of Dementia or Alzheimer’s
Standalone Assisted Living ■ 15%
Note: Sorted by type of assisted living community
Assisted Living Dementia Care ■ 89%
Assisted Living & Assisted Living Dementia Care ■ 54%
Assisted Living & Independent Living ■ 27%
Assisted Living & Nursing ■ 26%
Continuing Care Retirement Community ■ 34%
All Property Types ■ 33%
36 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
Source: 2006 Overview of Assisted Living
Summerville Senior Living.
Given the increased
presence of residents
with dementia and the
stiffening regulatory
climate, how are
providers enhancing
their dementia care
practices? What can
providers do to step
up care and services to
residents with dementia?
Members of the ALFA
Executive Roundtable on
Clinical Quality offer these tips:
■ Formalize your programming. If
you haven’t already done so, ensure that
you have a clearly delineated, dedicated
program for residents with Alzheimer’s or
dementia, says Brenda Abbott-Shultz
([email protected]), vice
president of resident and family services at
Benchmark Assisted Living, based in
Wellesley, Massachusetts.“If a community is
going to identify Alzheimer’s care as their
niche, there’s a responsibility to ensure a
quality dementia care program.”
When California intensified its dementia
care requirements a few years ago,
Summerville Senior Living responded by
developing a separate program for its customers with dementia called BEST, which
stands for Bonding, Environment, Sensory
Stimulation, and Therapeutic programming.
The effort took two years, but was well
worth it, according to Amparo.“You need to
bond and gain trust.You need a secured
area.You need activities that stimulate the
five senses, and you need activities specific
to dementia,” he explains.
Also key is the importance of assessing
your programming to ensure that it is truly
meaningful and addresses the needs of the
individuals served.To do so requires good
assessments of those individual residents
and what they need.
“That’s where states are catching people
and evaluating whether they are really doing
that,” says Robert Enloe ([email protected]
senior living.com), vice president of quali-
ty and clinical services at Irving,Texas-based
Signature Senior Living.“Is the provider truly
assessing residents’ life enrichment needs
and socialization needs as well as the program itself, or do they just offer a calendar
that’s not being followed?”
■ Engage residents. “Keep residents
cognitively engaged as long as possible,”
advises Sharon Roth Maguire (smaguire
@assisted.com), senior director of health
care and resident services at Milwaukeebased Brookdale Senior Living (formerly
Alterra).“There is some evidence the
longer you can keep people mentally and
cognitively stimulated, the more you can
stave off their decline.” State regulators
clearly agree, as some states require memory enhancement or similar activities on a
daily basis.
Abbott-Shultz believes the key to planning meaningful activities is to know individual residents as well as possible.
Benchmark’s initial resident assessments
probe beyond functional and behavioral
issues to learn about the person’s interests
and personality before they developed
dementia.That information is then incorporated into the programming.“It’s really simplistic but a lot of people don’t take the
time to do this,” she says.
Knowing a resident well and having
an open relationship with the family has
many benefits, adds Abbott-Shultz. If a
resident gets disoriented and starts calling for someone named Louise, she says,
then the staff should call family members
to find out more about “Louise.”“We
could eliminate or alleviate anxiety if
we could then talk about Louise with
the resident.”
■ Keep the family engaged, too. It’s
important to educate families on the pathways of dementia or Alzheimer’s, and on
what services can and cannot be provided
according to state regulations and company
policies.As a practical matter, also educate
family members who wish to control care
decisions about the difference between
being designated as the resident’s power
of attorney and actually having that status
legally activated.
■ Welcome house calls. If taking a resident with dementia to see his or her own
eye doctor or other specialist off-premises
is difficult and disorienting for the resident,
consider forming partnerships with external providers who serve seniors with
dementia and having them visit the community on a regular basis.“If getting Mom
to the dentist is requiring that she get
sedated before she goes, then this is something we can do,” says Abbott-Shultz.
■ Minimize problems with
medications. Work with pharmacists and
doctors to review dosages and minimize
polypharmacy that can lead to confusion
or behavior problems. Members of the
ALFA Executive Roundtable on Quality
Care met last spring with an advisory
board for a pharmaceutical company to
better understand their product and offer
feedback on their experiences with residents’ medications.“They were open to
honest feedback,” says Maguire, chair of
the roundtable.“We certainly don’t want
to be endorsing meds because a pharmacy company told us to, but I think it’s
good to communicate.”
■ Build in flexibility. When working
with residents who have dementia, offering
structure is key, but so is allowing for individual preferences.“Working with people
with dementia is stressful enough. Really go
with the flow with residents,” recommends
Benchmark’s Abbott-Shultz.“We create
structure, but allow flexibility.”
Assisted living providers who do not
seek to offer special care for residents
with dementia would do well to keep
vigilant for signs of dementia with careful pre-admission screening and ongoing
assessments. For providers who do serve
residents with dementia, having a dedicated program with well-trained staff is
critical. Abbott-Shultz says,“It makes
complete sense that if you’re going to
market yourselves as the experts on
dementia care, your staff has to be the
experts.” ▼
Whitney Redding is a contributing writer
to Assisted Living Executive. Reach her at
[email protected]
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 37
PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL
COMPANY SPOTLIGHT
Helping Senior Living
Providers Achieve
Operational Excellence
This page includes members of the ALFA President's Council.
Other members have been featured in previous issues and
Assisted Living Executive will continue to highlight additional
President's Council members in future issues. The efforts,
support, and contributions of these companies help senior living
providers achieve operational excellence. To join the ALFA
President's Council, contact Nathan Nickens at [email protected]
or visit www.alfa.org.
HEALTH CARE REIT INC.
One SeaGate, Suite 1500
Toledo, OH 43604
Contact: Mike Stephen
[email protected]
941/316-0201
Year founded: 1970
Health Care REIT has more than three
decades of experience in providing
capital to premier operators of senior
housing.We have detailed knowledge
of assisted living and would like to talk
with you about how we can be a part
of your capital plan. Learn the benefits
of partnering with a NYSE-listed company that is client-focused.
EPSTEIN BECKER & GREEN, PC
1227 25th Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20037
Contact: Michael H. Cook, Esq.
[email protected]
202/861-1865
Year founded: 1973
EBG is a national law firm comprised
of more than 400 attorneys, with
offices located in 11 cities.We have
among the largest concentration of
attorneys representing the health-care
industry. EBG represents numerous
companies—providers, lenders, and
private equity groups in health care
and life sciences—including real estate,
financing, and regulatory issues in the
senior living sector.
38 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
STANLEY-SENIOR TECHNOLOGIES INC.
1620 N. 20th Circle
Lincoln, NE 68503
Contact: Jason Stevens
[email protected]
402/475-4002
Year founded: 1985
Our company has been an industry
leader for over 20 years, providing
integrated offerings to help manage
wandering, respond to emergencies,
monitor residents, and increase staff
convenience. By adding the WanderGuard departure alert system,TABS
mobility monitors, and Arial wireless
communication system, you’re helping
create safer resident environments
while being supported by over 800
Stanley employee technicians.
CAPMARK FINANCE INC.
1055 East Colorado Blvd., Suite 320
Pasadena, CA 91106
Contact: John P. Fogarty
[email protected]
626/568-7406
Year founded: 1994
Capmark Finance Inc. is one of the
largest lenders to the health-care industry, providing financing for health-care
facilities such as independent and
assisted living, skilled nursing, CCRCs,
and medical office buildings. Capmark
Finance’s staff of experienced specialists fully understands regulatory and
reimbursement issues and can help
borrowers access every available
source of funds to meet their financing
needs.
A R B I T R A T I O N
Arbitration in Assisted
Living: Panacea or Pitfall?
BY MATTHEW J. MURER
ver the past 10 years,
arbitration has grown
in popularity among
assisted living providers. As the
risk of litigation has increased,
providers have looked for ways
to contain risk and add more
certainty to the process.
Arbitration has become a significant tool in managing claims
against assisted living providers
because it is usually more economical than standard litigation
and results in quicker decisions.
For example, a U.S. General
Accounting Office Report
found that medical malpractice
litigation took an average of 33
months to resolve in court, while arbitration took 19 months on average.The average arbitration hearing was found to last
two to four days while litigation averaged
several weeks. Arbitration also can be effective at narrowing the issues to be decided.
So is arbitration really a cure for the litigation blues?
When thinking about arbitration, it is
important to keep in mind that to stand
up to scrutiny, the party seeking arbitration
must be able to show that both parties
agreed to use arbitration as an alternate
means of settling the dispute. The agreement of the parties is critical because by
choosing to arbitrate, the parties give up
rights that they would otherwise have in litigation before a court.When arbitration
clauses and agreements are challenged in a
court of law, the primary argument raised by
residents is that they didn’t really agree to
give up certain rights or that they didn’t
understand what they were signing.You
COMPLIANCE CORNER
amount of case law that must be considered when drafting an arbitration agreement. Others have little or no case law
regarding the use of arbitration agreements
in the context of assisted living. In those
states, it is still best to consider what other
states have found problematic and avoid
those problems.
CLAUSES VS. AGREEMENTS
O
may have read that last sentence and
thought,“Wait a minute. Don’t you use arbitration agreements to stay out of court?”Yes,
arbitration agreements are meant to keep
you out of court, but they can often lead to
lawsuits challenging their enforceability.
COMPLYING WITH STATE LAW
Arbitration is governed by state law. In certain cases, it may also be governed by federal law. Because arbitration agreements are
subject to state law, it is imperative that a
provider that wants to use an arbitration
agreement ensure that it has considered the
requirements of the state in which the
agreement will be used. In addition to differences in state laws on arbitration, courts
in the various states have also reviewed
arbitration agreements and made decisions
regarding their enforceability. Some states,
like Florida, have had a significant amount
of litigation regarding the use of arbitration
agreements and, therefore, have a significant
One of the first decisions a provider must
make about arbitration is whether to put
the agreement to arbitrate as a clause in the
residency agreement or as a separate agreement. The first issue a court will study is
whether the resident was even aware that
he or she was signing an agreement that
waived certain rights.
Courts frown upon arbitration clauses
that are buried deep in a residency agreement. Some courts will simply refuse to
enforce such a clause, stating that the resident couldn’t be expected to have known
he was agreeing to arbitrate because it was
buried in the fine print of the contract. For
this reason, the agreement to arbitrate
should be a separate agreement that references the residency agreement. It should
also be clearly labeled as an agreement to
arbitrate.
The agreement must meet all of the state
law requirements regarding drafting, which
may include requirements regarding the
size of the font and the inclusion of specific
clauses and even specific language.
Providers may also want to include copies
of the arbitration rules that would be used
in an action.
When should a community have the resident sign the agreement to arbitrate? Several
courts have been reluctant to enforce arbitration agreements when it was shown that the
agreement was presented to the resident on
the day of move in. For these courts, the residents were not really given a choice in signing the agreement. On the day of move-in
furniture may be sitting on a truck, a house
may have been sold, and family from out of
town may have flown in to assist.
For these courts, presenting the residents
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 39
COMPLIANCE CORNER
with the agreement when they come to
move in puts them under tremendous pressure to sign.Therefore, the arbitration agreement should be given to the resident prior
to the move-in so that there can be no argument that the resident did not have time to
review the agreement and make an
informed decision about whether to sign it.
One issue that is occasionally overlooked: Who is the correct party to sign the
agreement? This is governed by state law.
Providers should be very careful when
allowing a party other than the resident to
sign an arbitration agreement. If the agreement is signed by an individual who does
not have the legal authority to bind the resident, the agreement will be unenforceable.
This issue should be reviewed with the
provider’s legal counsel.Any staff responsible for reviewing these agreements with
residents and their families should have a
clear understanding of who has legal
authority to sign such an agreement.
There are a variety of entities that provide arbitration services such as the
National Arbitration Forum. Each organization has its own set of rules and procedures
for conducting arbitration. Providers need
to be careful when choosing an organization because some organizations will not
arbitrate health-care claims. Some organizations will also have greater experience and
familiarity with claims against assisted living
providers, which can also be a benefit.
LIMITATIONS ON AGREEMENTS
Arbitration agreements are valuable because
they allow the parties to focus the proceedings and create a structure for resolving the
dispute. One of the biggest benefits of an
arbitration agreement is that it can be used
to manage discovery in a case. Discovery is
the process through which the parties seek
information to move their case forward or to
defend their position. One of the biggest
complaints about litigation in the courts is
how expensive and time consuming the discovery process can be. Some courts have
refused to enforce arbitration agreements
that restrict discovery too much. After
reviewing an arbitration agreement in
Pennsylvania, a court stated “the Court is
faced with an arbitration provision that limits
discovery so severely that it impedes plaintiff
in presenting her claims.” The court then
refused to enforce the agreement. Therefore,
providers should be careful in how discovery is limited in their arbitration agreement
or should ensure that they include a severability clause.
Obviously, one of the primary goals of
arbitration agreements is to limit the financial exposure assisted living providers face
from litigation. In an effort to limit this
exposure, some arbitration agreements contain limitations on the amount or types of
damages that the resident may be entitled
to as a result of the action. Several courts
have refused to enforce arbitration agreements that limit damages excessively or that
prohibit the resident from seeking punitive
damages.
Additionally, language that seeks to eliminate claims under certain theories like ordinary negligence may also be rejected by
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40 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
RESOURCE LINK
courts. Therefore, providers should review
any limitations carefully to ensure that they
will stand up to scrutiny if challenged in
court.
SEVERABILITY CLAUSES
As pointed out, some courts may view certain issues and limitations as being so unfair
that they refuse to enforce the agreement.
Some providers have avoided this problem
by including severability clauses in the arbitration agreement.These clauses provide
that if a court finds any part of the agreement invalid, then just that part should be
rejected and the remainder of the agreement should be enforced. Therefore, if a
court were to find that an arbitration agreement provided insufficient opportunity for
discovery but had a severability clause, it
could throw out the limitation on discovery
but enforce the rest of the arbitration agreement.
Other issues for consideration include
the following: 1) Should the agreement
include a right for the resident to rescind
the agreement within a certain time frame?
and 2) Should the agreement urge the resident to have the agreement reviewed by an
attorney? Both of these steps make it more
likely that a court will view the agreement
as enforceable.
Despite the sometimes negative reputation of arbitration, consumers who have
gone through the process tend to view it
very favorably. The U.S. GAO Report found
that 90 percent of consumers who were surveyed after participating in mandatory arbitration thought the process was fair and 91
percent would use it again. Arbitration can
help both parties resolve a dispute quicker
and more economically. To help ensure that
an arbitration agreement will be enforced,
providers need to work with legal counsel
to ensure that the agreement is drafted to
meet state law and to avoid legal challenges
to the greatest extent possible. And lastly,
keep in mind that this article is not intended
to provide legal advice. Parties interested in
drafting or reviewing arbitration agreements
should obtain the independent review and
advice of legal counsel. ▼
Matthew J. Murer is a partner with
Foley & Lardner LLP. Reach him at
[email protected] or 312/832-4568.
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Utilities Available
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STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP,
MANAGEMENT, & CIRCULATION
(REQUIRED BY USPS)
CONTACT:
Darrell Young, Broker
216.831.6900
[email protected]
REAL ESTATE ALLIANCE, LLC
CLEVELAND, OH
East Coast
Facilities
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(888) 448-8887
Title of publication: Assisted Living Executive
Publication No.: 1553-8281
Date of filing: September 29, 2006
Issue Frequency: Monthly, except for Jan/Feb,
July/Aug, and Nov/Dec
No. of issues published annually: 9
Annual subscription price: $145
Mailing address of known office of publication:
Assisted Living Federation of America,
1650 King St., Suite 602, Alexandria, VA 22314
Mailing address of general business office of the
publisher: Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.,
5285 Shawnee Road, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA
22312-2334
Names and addresses of publisher, editor, and
managing editor: Publisher, Debra J. Stratton,
Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc., 5285
Shawnee Road, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA
22312-2334; Editor, Angela Hickman Brady,
Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.,189 Mead
Rd., Decatur, GA 30030
Owner: Assisted Living Federation of America,
1650 King St., Suite 602, Alexandria, VA 22314
Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other
security holders owning or holding 1 percent
or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None
Tax status: na
Publication title: Assisted Living Executive
Issue date for circulation data: September
Extent and Nature of Circulation:
Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding
12 Months / Ave. No. Copies of Single Issue
Published Nearest to Filing Date
Total no. copies (net press run): 8,627 / 8,657
(1) Paid/requested outside-county mail subscriptions stated on Form 3541 7,304 / 7,688
(2) Paid in-county subscriptions 0 / 0
(3) Sales through dealers and carriers, street
vendors, and counter sales 0 / 0
(4) Other classes mailed through the USPS 57 / 58
c. total paid and/or requested circulation:
7,361 / 7,746
d. Free distribution by mail (samples,
complimentary, and other free) 361 / 0
e. Free distribution outside the mail 755 / 761
f. Free distribution 1,116 / 761
g. Total distribution 8,477 / 8,507
h. Copies not distributed 150 est. / 150 est.
i. Total 8,627 / 8,657
j. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation
87% / 91%
I certify that statements made by me above are correct
and complete. —Angela Brady, Editor/Associate Publisher
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 41
PEOPLE & PLACES
SALES & NEW DEVELOPMENTS
@ The new Highland Springs
Retirement Community in
Dallas opened its doors to more
than 220 new residents in late
September. Highland Springs is
the second community in Texas
for Baltimore-based Erickson
Retirement Communities.The
company’s other Texas community is Eagle Trace in Houston.
Toronto-based Sunrise Senior
Living REIT has acquired interests in two assisted living real
estate portfolios from Bahrainbased Arcapita, an international
investment firm. The portfolios
consist of assisted living communities in the United States and
were sold to Sunrise Senior Living
REIT for an aggregate transaction
value of about $525 million.
Sunrise Senior Living, based in
McLean,Virginia, in September
Highland Springs Retirement Community
completed its acquisition of six
Florida senior living communities operated under the Aston
Gardens brand name. Sunrise
acquired 25 percent ownership
and will manage the communities, which have annual revenues of more than $65 million
and capacity for about 2,300
residents.The communities currently are at about 95 percent
APPOINTMENTS & PROMOTIONS
occupancy. Chicago-based GE
Healthcare Financial Services,
Sunrise’s independent joint
venture capital partner for
this transaction, acquired the
remaining 75 percent interest
in the communities.
Newton, Massachusetts-based
Five Star Quality Care in
October announced its lease of
three senior living communities
from Senior Housing
Properties Trust, also based in
Newton, Massachusetts.The
communities—two assisted
living properties in Mississippi
and a CCRC in Georgia—feature
304 living units. The annual rent
payable by Five Star to Senior
Properties Trust for the three
communities will be about $2.6
million, with future increases
calculated as a percentage of
revenue increases. ▼
Send People & Places announcements to [email protected]
Oakdale Heights Management Corp.,
based in Redding, California, has named
Ann Wood vice president of operations
for the company’s western region.Wood
previously served as area manager of
operations for McLean,Virginia-based
Sunrise Senior Living.
Baltimore-based Erickson Retirement
Communities has named John Harned
executive director of Tallgrass Creek,
the company’s new community in the
Kansas City area scheduled to open in
2007. Harned is currently the associate
executive director at Erickson’s Eagle
Trace community in Houston.
Wood
Harned
42 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
Spring Lake Assisted Living and Memory Care Community in Paris, Texas, is
the first of several new communities operated by Irving, Texas-based Signature
Senior Living to open in that state. Spring Lake opened in September with 95 percent of its apartments pre-leased. Shown here is the community’s dining room.
AD & MEMBER INDEX
A L FA B O A R D O F D I R E C T O R S
Chair: Steven L. Vick, CEO
Signature Senior Living
Vice Chair: Michel Augsburger, President & CEO
Chancellor Health Care Inc.
Secretary: Tiffany Tomasso, COO
Sunrise Senior Living
Treasurer: John “Skip” Comsia, President
SRC Retirement Inc.
Immediate Past Chair: Thomas H. Grape, Chairman
& CEO, Benchmark Assisted Living
Evrett W. Benton, President, CEO, and Secretary
Five Star Quality Care
Beth Cayce, CEO
CaraVita Senior Care Management Services
Granger Cobb, President & CEO
Summerville Senior Living
Horace D’Angelo Jr., President
Caretel Inns of America
Joe Eby, President
Bickford Senior Living Group
Thomas J. Fairchild Ph.D.,
Director Special Projects on Aging,
University of North Texas Health Science Center
Brad Klitsch, Vice President of Market Development,
Direct Supply
Mark Ohlendorf, Co-President
Brookdale Senior Living
Ross Roadman, SVP for Investor Relations and
Strategic Planning
Brookdale Senior Living
Loren Shook, President, CEO & Chairman
Silverado Senior Living
Richard P. Grimes, President/CEO
ALFA
AAEC Representative:
Sally G. Michael, President
California Assisted Living Association
COS Representative:
Eric L. Johnston, President
Retirement Community Specialists Inc.
A L FA P R E S I D E N T ’ S C O U N C I L
CAPMARK, William P. Kauffman
Direct Supply Healthcare Equipment, Brad Klitsch
Epstein, Becker & Green PC, Michael H. Cook
Hanson Bridgett Marcus Vlahos & Rudy,
Joel Goldman
Health Care REIT Inc., Michael Stephen
Hinshaw & Culbertson, Alice Kush
HomeFree Inc., Joe Whitt
The IMA Financial Group Inc., John T. Baker
K&B Underwriters LLC, Bryan A. Baird
Lifeline Systems Inc., Casey Pittock
Lighthouse Underwriters LLC, Arthur B. Seifert
Michael Best & Friedrich, Jonathan Levine
Sallop Insurance, Elizabeth Finn-Elder
Quintairos Prieto Wood & Boyer PA,
George F. Quintairos
SCA Personal Care, Duane Gullickson,
Stanley-Senior Technologies Inc, Kevin Pope
Sunrise REIT, Douglas MacLatchy
Thilman Filippini, John M. Atkinson
Ventas Healthcare Properties Inc., Raymond J. Lewis
Yardi Systems, Bonnie Novella
To learn more about the ALFA President’s Council,
contact [email protected] or visit www.alfa.org.
AD INDEX
A PLACE FOR MOM Sarah Bentz, 206/285-4666, www.aplaceformom.com . . . . . . . . . . Cover Band
ASSISTED LIVING 101 Daniel Aaron Bernal, 800/730-4984, www.assistedliving101.com . . . . . . 37
CONCURRO SOFTWARE Teresa Murphy, 650/969-2015, www.concurro.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
DAKIM 800/860-7810, www.dakim.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
DIRECT SUPPLY HEALTH CARE EQUIPMENT 800/480-7250, www.directsupply.net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C4
HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE Holly Batchelder, 888/484-5759, www.homeinstead.com . . . . . . . . . 7
KWALU INC. 800/405-3441, www.kwalu.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
MOVE-N SOFTWARE Move-N Representative, 817/282-7300, www.move-n.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
REPS SOFTWARE (Formerly Ideal Software)
Dave Griffin, 813/935-4465 x 2157, www.repssoftware.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C3
SCSA-SOCIETY OF CERTIFIED SENIOR ADVISORS
Steve Warren, 888/828-9256, www.society-csa.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
SENIORHOUSINGNET Brad Fuqua, 888/525-2546, www.seniorhousingnet.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
YARDI SYSTEMS Bonnie Novella, 800/866-1144 x 184, www.yardi.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C2
MEMBER INDEX
Abbott-Shultz, Brenda........36
Altman, Rita.......................14
Amparo, Budgie.................36
Bacon, Brenda ...................20
Benchmark Assisted
Living ........................6, 36
Bickford Senior Living
Group ...........................19
Brandywine Senior
Living ............................20
Brookdale Senior
Living ............................37
Capmark Finance Inc........38
Cavin, Larry .......................20
Country Meadows Retirement
Communities ..................14
Eagle Trace ........................42
Elmcroft Assisted
Living LLC.....................13
Elmwood Assisted Living
at The Shawhan ............13
Enloe, Robert.....................36
Epstein Becker &
Green, PC......................38
Erickson Retirement
Communities ................42
Fairbanks,Alan.............19, 20
Five Star Quality Care .......42
Foley & Lardner LLP .........41
GE Healthcare Financial
Services.........................42
Harned, John .....................42
Haselman, Jill.......................6
Health Care REIT Inc. .......38
Highland Springs Retirement
Community...................42
Jasnoff, Jeffrey .....................6
Maguire, Sharon Roth........37
Massachusetts Assisted Living
Association ...................36
McAfee, Anne W. ...............14
Meyer, Emily ......................36
Murer, Matthew J. .............41
Oakdale Heights
Management Corp. .......42
Ohlendorf, Mark..................9
Paradiso Browne, Maria ....13
Peace Village Circle Inn ....20
Senior Care Inc. ................13
Senior Housing Properties
Trust .............................42
Shook, Loren .....................13
Signature Senior
Living.................18, 37, 42
Silverado Senior Living....6, 13
Spring Lake Assisted
Living and Memory Care .
Community...................42
Stanley-Senior Technologies
Inc.................................38
Summerville Senior
Living ............................36
Sunrise Senior Living
REIT ..............................42
Sunrise Senior Living ..........6
Tallgrass Creek ..................42
Usher, Dawn........................6
Vick, Steven .................18, 20
Winner, Stephen................13
Wood, Ann ........................42
Yardi Systems ....................10
Assisted Living EXECUTIVE ▼ NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 43
PRODUCTS & RESOURCES
F O R
S E N I O R
L I V I N G
@ Based in Duluth, Minnesota,
Treasure Chest Productions
Inc. offers a unique product in
pain relief. The Miracle Bear
Pain Reliever, released after 10
years of research, is a handmade
bear made of cotton and filled
with a blend of aromatic spices
and herbs to target muscle and
joint pain.The Miracle Bear
weighs 24 ounces and measures
11” tall by 8” wide with arms
and legs extended. Place the
bear in the microwave for 1-2
minutes to activate its pain and
stress relief properties. For
ordering information, call
888/511-7709 or visit miracle
bear.com.
,Santa Clara, California-based
Intel Digital Health Group
offers products with exteriors
that can be wiped clean with
disinfectant. The company’s
mobile clinical assistant platform is an Intel technology tool
that features the exterior casing
to support infection-control
measures in health-care settings.
The mobile clinical assistant
platform also features radio frequency identification (RFID)
technology for quick user and
resident identification, barcode
scanning for medication recordkeeping, and an optional digital
camera to enhance medical
record data. For more information, call 602/284-7490.
BOOKSHELF
Concurro Community
Management Systems, based
in San Mateo, California, has
released Version 1.5 of its
CareConnect Community
Management System software
package for assisted living and
long-term care communities.
The system is entirely Webbased, modular, and fully integrated.Version 1.5 includes new
modules in resident care, property management, marketing,
administration, billing, and a
family portal. It also provides
community executive directors
with a dashboard of operational
oversight, accessible in real time
from any place with an Internet
connection. For details or to
arrange for a demonstration,
call 650/969-2015 or e-mail
[email protected]
Information also is available at
www.concurro.com.
Based in Pottsville, Pennsylvania,
United Receptacle offers a line
of products that comply with
the Homeland
Security directive that
requires operators to remove
trash receptacles at certain
locations,
except for
clear plastic or
bomb-resistant
44 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ▼ Assisted Living EXECUTIVE
■ The Nature of Leadership: Reptiles, Mammals, and
the Challenge of Becoming a Great Leader
By B. Joseph White with Yaron Prywes
This book, written by the president of
the University of Illinois, examines the
universal qualities of well-known contemporary leaders as well as historical
figures—such as Abraham Lincoln,
George Washington, and Martin Luther
King Jr. For more information about this
200-page book ($21.95), visit www.the
natureofleadership.com. Ordering
details are available at www.amacombooks.org.
■ Untapped: Creating Value in Underserved Markets
By John Weiser, Michele Kahane, Steve Rochlin, and
Jessica Landis
According to the authors of this book,
communities that are made up of low- to
moderate-income consumers represent a
multi-trillion dollar opportunity that has
been largely ignored by most companies.
Untapped was included on Harvard
Business Review Reading List 2006—the
18 books HBR recommends managers
read.The 243-page book is available for
$28.95. For details and ordering information, visit www.bkconnection.com.
trash containers. United
Receptacles Homeland Security
Receptacles comply with this
directive and are available in
square and round models with
40- and 63-gallon capacities,
respectively. For details, call
800/233-0314 or e-mail [email protected]
unitedrecept.com. Information
also is available at www.united
recept.com.
Perception Strategies, a customer service improvement
firm based in Indianapolis, has
released a new training game
called Keep the Customer,
Healthcare Edition.The game’s
objectives include increasing an
organization’s quality of customer service and exploring
how customers are won or lost
based on employee decisions.
Players participate by using
question-and-answer cards that
focus on customer service, service recovery, and role-play scenarios.The game is available for
$397. A Healthcare Booster Pack
Edition is available for an addition $117. For more information, call 877/546-0970. Or visit
www.keepthecustomer.org. ▼
Send new Products & Resources
to [email protected]
Have more time to focus
on what is important.
Using an integrated software system to manage your
communities will give you the extra time to do what is
most important – filling your communities and serving
your residents.
REPS Software, the senior living industry’s leading integrated software solution
has helped more than 2,000 communities effectively manage and improve their
most important day-to-day functions including marketing, lead management,
resident care, assessments, billing and accounts receivable. With immediate,
web-based access to the vital information you need to serve residents and make
decisions, REPS allows you to run your communities smoothly and efficiently.
Contact us today to learn how REPS Software can help you build census,
cut cost creep, bill more accurately, and drive revenue.
0556=(;0=,:63 < ; 0 6 5 : - 6 9 :,506930=05. * 6 4 4 < 5 0 ; 0 , :
To attract new residents and keep current ones satisfied, create a dining experience that
serves up greater meal choice and remarkable ambiance.
Our team has details on all the latest trends in Senior Living dining:
Restaurant service
• Room service
•
Family-style dining
• Buffet dining
•
With one call to your personal account manager, you’ll learn which types of dining programs
will work best for your community, and how to get started right away. Call today.
1-800-480-7250
www.DirectSupply.net
© 2006 Direct Supply, Inc.

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