Endependence Center, Inc. 2004 Annual Report

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Endependence Center, Inc. 2004 Annual Report
Endependence Center, Inc.
2004 Annual Report
“OPENI
NGDOORSTOOPPORTUNI
TI
ES”
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT
2004
6300 EAST VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD
NORFOLK, VA 23502-2827
(757) 461 - 8007 VOICE
(757) 461 - 7527 TDD
WWW.ENDEPENDENCE.ORG
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT
2004
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
1
Message from the President
2
Message from the Executive Director
3
Mission Statement/Center History
4
Independent Living Philosophy/Consumer Control
5
Center Services
7
Service Delivery Goals
8
In Memoriam
9
Annual Highlights
26
Funding Sources
28
Staff Disability Community Involvement
30
Participant Profile Charts
• Disability Type
• Age and Gender
• Goal Achievement
33
Budget Resources
34
Board of Directors/Consumer Advisory Committee
36
Staff
38
The Endependence Center Endowment Fund
39
“Fr
i
endsofECI
”
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
I hope you enjoy reading this 2004 Annual Report for the Endependence Center, your Center
for Independent Living in South Hampton Roads.
As I put pen to paper to write this message, I am reminded of a sermon I heard preached on
TV late one night. “Li
f
ehasmanyposi
t
i
ves”wast
het
heme.Thepr
eacherdi
dnotst
ar
tby
outlining the horrible, ugly, devastating aspects of life and then end by reminding us of how
thankful we should be that none of these things happened to us. Instead, he recommended
we look for the “si
l
verl
i
ni
ng”first. He encouraged us to open our eyes to the little joys in
l
i
f
e…t
hebright blue sky, the bi
r
d’
ssong and the smell of fresh honeysuckle, the laughter and
beauty of young children. I wish for each of you the complete enjoyment of the sights, smells,
and sounds of the holiday season. Ihopeyouf
i
ndmanyt
hi
ngst
obegr
at
ef
ulf
or
…j
obs,
f
ami
l
i
es,f
r
i
ends,heal
t
h…al
lofl
i
f
e’
s“si
l
verl
i
ni
ngs”.
The Endependence Center is a place in our community that we can be grateful for. Where
would we be without the hard work and dedication of the staff and management of the Center?
Their work has made a significant difference in the community and persons they serve every
day. I commend all of you on your motivation and performance. Excellent job! As always,
I would like to offer my personal gratitude to the all-volunteer Board of Directors of the Center.
Your desire to commit your time and talents to our worthy cause is noble and commendable.
In closing, I would like you to remember Tommie Bracey, Cyrus Bissell and Wanda Collins and
their families. Although these board members passed away this year, their time and talents
leave indelible marks on our work of service to the community.
Michael Wang
Michael Wang
1
MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The big news this fiscal year, of course, was the acquisition of a building for the
Endependence Center which gives us the opportunity to expand services, to network more
with community disability advocacy organizations and to operate in a fully accessible
environment with double the office space. We enjoy our new office space and are looking
forward to completing the final renovations in the near future.
This has also been a year of losses as three ECI Board Members have passed away. We will
greatly miss the presence of Cyrus Bissell, Tommie Bracey and Wanda Collins. They were
active, enthusiastic and committed Board Members as well as personal friends of many ECI
staff, Board Members and Center participants.
De-institutionalization remains the highest priority for ECI as we continued our efforts to
expand services to individuals in nursing homes and to create community supports that will
assist with living in the community. Staff were involved in extensive advocacy related to
funding for medicaid waivers and medicaid services.
Again this year we are excited about the efforts of young people with disabilities at ECI. The
youth support groups continue to expand and become more involved in systems advocacy.
Staff have been involved in outreach to the local schools and especially to those located in the
more rural areas of the region. Youth coordinators were hired to serve as role models for
participants and to provide services to transition age youth.
I would like to take this opportunity again to thank all staff, Board Members, volunteers and
Center participants for your involvement with the Endependence Center on our very important
mission of full integration of people with disabilities into the community.
Stephen L. Johnson
Stephen Johnson
2
MISSION STATEMENT
The Endependence Center, Incorporated (ECI) is a consumer controlled, community-based,
cross-disability, non-residential, private, non-profit Center for Independent Living (CIL)
operated by and for individuals with disabilities in South Hampton Roads, including the cities
of Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Franklin, Suffolk, Virginia Beach and Isle of Wight
County. ECI provides an array of independent living services to individuals with disabilities
and to the community. The purposes of ECI are two-fold; to prepare individuals, and to prepare
the community for full integration of persons with disabilities into society. These goals are
accomplished by the following strategies: (1) the provision of direct services to individuals
with severe disabilities, that result in a greater level of independence and community
integration/functioning (2) the provision of services/advocacy in the community that result in
a greater awareness of disability issues, physical and programmatic accessibility and systems
change.
CENTER HISTORY
ECI was the first non-profit CIL in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The original federal grant
was awarded in November 1980 to Handicaps Unlimited of Virginia (HUVA) and the Center
opened in February 1981 at the Tidewater Rehabilitation Institute building in Norfolk. In 1983,
the Center was incorporated and received 501(c)(3) status with the Internal Revenue Service
as a separate non-profit organization with 51% of its board of directors comprised of
individuals with disabilities. In 1984, the Center moved to downtown Norfolk on Plume Street,
where it also operated satellite offices in the cities of Chesapeake, Virginia Beach and in
Newport News. In 1988, the Newport News satellite received funding from the Virginia General
Assembly to establish as a separate community based non-profit CIL. In 1989, ECI moved to
the Janaf Office Building providing a more central location to the service area. ECI moved to
Interstate Corporate Center in March of 1994 and this new building in May 2004.
ECI is funded through federal, state and local governments, as well as through grants, private
donations and contract services to the public and private sector. ECI is part of a network of
16 non-profit CILs in Virginia and a network of over 400 CILs nationwide.
3
INDEPENDENT LIVING PHILOSOPHY
Most Americans take for granted opportunities they have regarding living arrangements,
employment situations, means of transportation, social and recreational activities, and other
aspects of everyday life.
What is Independent Living? Essentially, it is living just like everyone else--having opportunities
to make decisions that affect one's life, able to pursue activities of one's own choosing--limited
only in the same ways that one's neighbors who do not have disabilities are limited.
Independent living has to do with self-determination. It is having the right and the opportunity
to pursue a course of action. And, it is having the freedom to fail--and to learn from one's
failures, just as people without disabilities do.
There are many different types of organizations which serve people with disabilities. These
organizations provide valuable services and are important links in the network of services that
help people with disabilities maintain independent lifestyles. What makes independent living
centers very different from these other organizations is that centers have substantial
involvement of people with disabilities making policy decisions and delivering services. Why
this emphasis on control by people with disabilities? The basic idea behind independent living
is that the ones who know best what services people with disabilities need in order to live
independently are people with disabilities themselves.
(Taken from An Orientation To Independent Living Centers, published by ILRU Research and
Training Center on Independent Living at TIRR, Houston, Texas.)
CONSUMER CONTROL
Consumers (individuals with disabilities) control all aspects of the Center including decision
making, service delivery, management, administration and establishment of policy and direction.
The Board of Directors, which establishes policy and direction for the Center, is composed of
members from the local community, the majority of which are consumers. The Executive
Director and a majority of the management level staff are consumers. All of the peer counselors,
a majority of the direct service staff and the majority of the overall staff members are
consumers. There is a wide diversity of types of disabilities of Board and staff members
including sensory, physical and cognitive categories. The Center maintains working
relationships with, and staff are members of numerous consumer advocacy groups and
organizations on the local, state and national levels. This provides an opportunity to receive
additional input and feedback from consumers on the grassroots level.
A Consumer Advisory Committee, composed of active Center participants, evaluates and
provides feedback on Center services. The Chairperson of this committee serves as an ex
officio member on the Board of Directors. Center participants also provide feedback regarding
the services they receive through consumer satisfaction surveys and interviews. Center
participants are involved in every aspect of the services they receive from the Center and in
meetings related to their services.
To the greatest extent possible, the Center attempts to recruit and utilize volunteers, support
staff and instructors who are individuals with disabilities. The Center also secures business
from companies owned or operated by individuals with disabilities.
4
CENTER SERVICES
Peer Counseling
This one-to-one counseling model is based on the concept that a counselor with shared
experiences is the best guide to independence. The goal of peer counseling is to assist the
participant to attain his/her greatest level of independence. The Peer Counselor, who also is an
individual with a disability, provides motivation, emotional support, and is a role model for
achieving full potential. The peer counselor helps the participant to establish realistic goals for
independence and assists with self-exploration and adjustment. The peer counselor also makes
referrals to appropriate community resources.
Group Counseling
Monthly support groups provide a forum where individuals with disabilities explore common
problems and share individual successes. Participants build a peer support network and
engage in self-exploration and problem-solving activities.
Independent Living Skills Training
The purpose of independent living skills training is to provide participants with basic skills that
support their independent living goals. Training is provided in areas of need identified by
participants such as literacy, attendant management, decision making, self-advocacy, money
management, rights and responsibilities and assertiveness. Training is provided individually
and in a classroom setting.
Literacy
Individual tutoring is provided by trained volunteers to increase basic literacy skills. Deaf
literacy and braille instruction classes are held.
Housing Counseling/Placement
Staff coordinates with public and private housing agencies to secure housing options that are
accessible, affordable and suited to participant needs. Individuals receive services to assist
them to prepare for independent housing. Assistance is provided with emergency housing
needs.
Individual Advocacy
Assistance is provided to individuals with disabilities to resolve discrimination complaints in
all areas of life such as housing, education, employment, transportation, public accommodation
and community programs.
(continued next page)
5
CENTER SERVICES (Continued)
Adaptive Equipment
Assistance is provided to individuals to identify resources to acquire and receive training
in the usage of adaptive equipment. Equipment loan services are available for individuals
with hearing and visual disabilities.
Personal Assistance Services
Services are provided to individuals utilizing statewide PAS Programs including
assessment, attendant management training and PAS provider registry.
Hearing/Vision Disabilities Outreach Services
Technical assistance, training, equipment loan and disability awareness services are available
to the community regarding individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. An equipment
demonstration site is available for individuals with vision and hearing disabilities.
Information and Referral
Current information on programs, resources and equipment is provided to the public. Referrals
are also made to other community organizations and programs.
Community Education/Training
Speakers are provided to organizations interested in learning more about disability related
issues and Center services. Staff organizes and conducts training on disability related topics,
such as: housing law, building code, employment law, disability awareness/sensitivity training,
programmatic and physical accessibility, general disability issues, disability rights and other
specific areas of interest.
Technical Assistance
Staff surveys public and private facilities making recommendations for physical and
programmatic accessibility. Technical assistance contracts are established for a wide range
of other services.
Systems Advocacy
Staff members participate in various activities that result in positive changes and greater
accessibility to the various systems of government and bureaucracy on the local, state and
national levels. Staff engages in systems advocacy in the same areas as in individual advocacy
services.
6
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC.
SERVICE DELIVERY GOALS
2003 - 2004
1.
New Intakes
2.
Total Consumers Served (active)
3.
GOAL
TOTAL
ACHIEVED
-
278
477
1,053
Hours of Individual Peer Counseling
-
2,461
4.
Hours of Group Counseling
-
530
5.
Hours of Individual/Group IL Skills Training
-
2,696
6.
Participant Independent Living goals developed
673
1,389
7.
Participant Independent Living goals completed
304
1,374
8.
Units of Information and Referral to participants
-
375
9.
Hours of Individual Advocacy
-
5,008
10.
Individuals placed in housing
-
30
11.
Number of Volunteers
-
59
12.
Volunteer hours
-
871
13.
Individuals served through PAS Programs
-
137
14.
Hours of Community Services (see below)
5,108*
15.
Hours of Community Education/Integration
-
672*
16.
Hours of Collaboration/Networking
-
4,870*
17.
Hours of Community and Systems Advocacy
-
7,859*
18.
Hours of Information and Referral to Community
-
5,139*
19.
Hours of Maintaining Registries
-
3,305*
20.
Hours of Outreach to the Community
-
2,431*
21.
Hours of Development and Distribution of Publications
-
882*
22.
Hours of Resource Development
-
2,795*
The above figures reflect the time period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2004.
7
IN MEMORIAM
The Endependence Center will greatly miss the involvement of three individuals who had very
important roles as Board Members of the Endependence Center. We will miss not only their
expertise but the personal relationships we had with them.
Cyrus Bissell
On June 2nd we all lost a long time Board Member and supporter of the
Endependence Center. Dur
i
ngMr
.Bi
ssel
l
’
st
i
meser
vi
ngont
heBoar
d,
he displayed steady leadership by example and held several offices on
the Board of Directors. Despite health problems, he always went out of
his way to attend Board Meetings as often as possible. For many years
Mr. Bissell also served as a Braille instructor for participants with visual
disabilities at the Center. Many individuals are now able to utilize
Braille to read materials because of his instruction. We are pleased that
Mr. Bi
ssel
l
’
swife, Anita, is now serving on the Board of Directors and
look forward to her involvement in the future.
Tommie Bracey
On September 8th the Center lost one of the founding members of the
Board of Directors. Mrs. Bracey served on the Board for more than a
decade and Chaired the Membership Committee as well as other
leadership positions. Mrs. Bracey was a strong advocate for the
disability community especially as it related to services for individuals
with visual disabilities and in the area of accessible transportation.
Mrs. Bracey was not only an important supporter of the Center but also
became friends of many participants, Board and staff members over the
years. She was a very enthusiastic advocate who was willing to stand
up for what she believed in.
Wanda Collins
On November 22nd the Center lost a Board Member who brought energy
and enthusiasm to each Board Meeting. Mrs. Collins kept a very
positive attitude despite dealing with serious medical issues as she
survived her disability well beyond the normal life span that was
expected. She had a wide range of interests and spent most of her adult
life helping others through a variety of organizations in the community
including WHRO, SPCA and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Mrs. Collins
left an example of determination and strength that we will all benefit
from.
8
9
ECI HIGHLIGHTS FOR 2003 - 2004
THE ENDEPENDENCE CENTER ACQUIRES OUR OWN BUILDING
ECI is very pleased to acquire our own building this year and for relatively the same cost, we
were able to almost double the office space that we had when we were renting. This extra
space allows for having disability organizations with missions similar to ECI as tenants in the
building which increases networking with those organizations. Currently, the Autism Society
of America Tidewater Chapter and Down Syndrome Association of Hampton Roads are renting
space and operating out of this building. It also allows ECI the opportunity to make the
meeting and conference room space available to community groups who share the common
goal as ECI. The location of the new building increases visibility in the community as is
located on Virginia Beach Boulevard which is a main traffic artery between Norfolk and Virginia
Beach. It is centrally located in South Hampton Roads and provides easy access to interstate
travel. The building is located on a main bus line which makes it more accessible to
participants who travel independently.
The renovations to the building are almost complete and the
building is fully accessible to individuals with all types of
disabilities, exceeding the building code requirements for
accessibility. We appreciate a grant provided by Norfolk
Foundation which greatly assisted with the costs of renovating the
building. We were also hoping for final approval in the near future
for funding through the Norfolk Community Development Block
Program to further assist with the renovation costs.
Newly Acquired Building
COMMUNITY ADVOCACY CONTINUES TO BE HIGH PRIORITY
ECI again this year operated the Community Action Specialist Project with funding through a
federal grant administered through the State Independent Living Council. This project is
responsible for organizing local disability community advocates around important local
advocacy issues. The local group of advocates known as the Disability Advocacy Network was
involved in several activities including the identification of local disability issues through the
use of a questionnaire, developing a local listserv of disability organizations and advocates
throughout the region, providing training to the local disability
community on advocacy issues and encouraging advocates to be
involved in the political process. The local advocates also met
with legislators in their offices locally and in Richmond during the
General Assembly to educate them on disability issues and
funding. Advocates participated in State budget hearings and
testified at General Assembly Finance Committees. This program
is part of a statewide project of the 16 Centers for Independent
Visiting with Virginia
Living as efforts are coordinated to address disability issues not
State Senator
only on the local level, but also in sharing resources and
Yvonne Miller
information regarding statewide issues.
10
Center staff were also very involved with the Virginia Association of
Centers for Independent Living (VACIL) in efforts to provide systems
advocacy for medicaid services and funding, education and deinstitutionalization issues. VACIL coordinated systems advocacy
efforts statewide through the assistance of the ECI Director of
Advocacy/Services who is serving through a contract in this capacity
to coordinate the Virginia CI
Ls’efforts in educating General Assembly
members and participating in other statewide systems advocacy.
Visiting with Senator
Harry Purkey
ECI staff provided students and their parents information, guidance and advocacy training in
all areas pertaining to the educational rights of students with disabilities. Our staff focuses
on children from their start with the school system through their transition out of the school
system and into adulthood. We work with families to assist them in obtaining access to
appropriate educational services for their student under federal laws and state regulations.
Our assistance can be in many forms. Wer
evi
ew I
EP’
sandmaker
ecommendat
i
ons,wer
el
ay
information that will provide families with a strong foundation of knowledge that will allow
them to continue their advocacy efforts for years to come.
We maintain a high profile in the local school systems advisory
boards as well as on statewide committees. We stay current with
all legislation changes regarding special education, serving as a
watchdog committee for families statewide. We work to ensure that
the legislative reforms are designed to improve educational
opportunities for students with disabilities. Current amendments
to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) find us
facilitating rallies and meeting with local, state and federal
legislators to preserve the rights students have under current law.
Meeting with Virginia
We serve as a resource for students, families and educational
Legislators
professionals. Through our efforts and alliances with other
advocacy organizations we work to shape local education policy. Our participant families are
maintaining an advocacy group, Protecting Individuals with disabilities Education Rights,
(P.I.E.R) that works alone as well as networks with other groups to help educate families and
advocate for students and to address local system wide problems.
Our commitment to literacy goes beyond advocacy. We have a literacy program for adults with
disabilities who are unable to participate in literacy programs elsewhere. Literacy training is
provided by one-on-one tutors as well as in group settings. We strive to provide a program
that will help our participants develop enabling knowledge and skills giving them a better
foundation for expanding their quality of life.
10
ECI PARTICIPATES IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
HELP AMERICA VOTE ACT (HAVA)
Congress passed the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) in 2002. HAVA will provide Virginia with
federal funds to improve the election system. The Direct Recording Electronic voting machine
(DRE) will replace the punch card and lever voting machines and Virginia is working towards
having one in every precinct. The DRE voting machine will enable persons with a disability to
facilitate their own votes. In addition, HAVA will require that all polling places be accessible
to those with disabilities.
The State Board of Elections contracted the Department of Rehabilitative Services with HAVA
funds to conduct an Accessibility Survey for each of the 2,294 polling places in the
Commonwealth of Virginia by September 2005. DRS subcontracted with Centers for
Independent Living (CIL) statewide to meet with the general registrars and physically conduct
on site surveys of accessibility. The goal of the accessibility surveys is to have a better
understanding of which precincts were already physically accessible and which precincts
needed modifications.
ECI agreed to work with DRS and the State Board of Elections to conduct the Accessibility
Surveys after attending training in Charlottesville, Virginia during the month of April 2004. ECI
was responsible for checking all of the polling precincts for the cities of Norfolk, Virginia
Beach, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Suffolk, Franklin, and the counties of Southampton and Isle
of Wight. Some of the accessibility issues that were focused in the surveys were: parking, path
of travel-- outside barriers, curb/sidewalks, ramps, handrails, doorways, thresholds, door
hardware, path of travel--inside barriers and elevators. The total number of precincts in South
Hampton Roads surveyed by ECI was 275 during the five month project.
In September, ECI wasi
nvi
t
edt
ot
heVi
r
gi
ni
aBeachRegi
st
r
ar
’
sof
f
i
cet
ovi
ew f
i
vedi
f
f
er
ent
accessible voting machine presentations. ECI had the opportunity to evaluate each voting
machine. These accessible voting machines had a number of different features including:
audio, human speaking voice, adapted handheld box, phone keypad, Braille, keyboard,
headphones, large print, and color contrast. It was extremely exciting to see these new
accessible voting machines and have the opportunity to utilize them.
11
ECI ASSISTS INDIVIDUALS TO RESTORE THEIR RIGHT TO VOTE IN VIRGINIA
ECI knows the right to vote is an important civic responsibility and right, which is why ECI
started a new service this year to provide participants with information and assistance in
restoring their right to vote. The legalities regarding a criminal conviction on the right to vote
varies differently from state to state. The state of Virginia makes an individual ineligible to vote
if a felony conviction was entered, regardless of where the conviction took place. In order for
an individual to restore his/her rights to vote in Virginia, then he/she must request a “r
emoval
of political di
sabi
l
i
t
i
es”from the Governor of Virginia. Persons are eligible to apply to restore
their civil rights if they are free of any sentence, parole and/or probation for a minimum of three
(3) years and if all restitution, fines and court costs have been paid.
There are two different types of applications for restoration of civil rights. The first application
is a simple one-page application for Certain Non-Violent Offenders. This would include
misdemeanors such as drug possession. The second application is for Violent Offenders, and
this application is a long and lengthy process. A violent offense would be considered as any
convicted felony, drug manufacturing or distribution offense. The application for Violent
Offenders must accompany a number of required documents as outlined below:
1. A letter from one’
smost recent probation or parole officer outlining one’
s per
i
od of
supervision.
2. Acopyofone’
spr
esent
enci
ngorpost
sent
enci
ngr
epor
t
.
3. Cer
t
i
f
i
edcopi
esofever
yor
derofconvi
ct
i
oni
none’
sr
ecor
d.
4. Certified copies of every sentencing order.
5. Certified copies of any court order modifying any sentence, parole or probation.
6. Certified copies of proof of payment of restitution, fines, and/or court costs.
7. A letter of petition signed by applicant.
8. Three letters of references (family members or in-laws are not allowed to provide these
letters).
9. A personal letter to the Gover
nor
—out
l
i
ni
ngthe details of the circumstances surrounding
one’
sconvictions, how one’
slife has changed, if one is involved in any community
activities, and why one feels his/her rights should be restored.
10.
Notarization of application.
The Restoration of Civil Rights process takes six months from the time The Secretary of the
Commonwealth receives the completed application. If an application for restoration of rights
is denied, the applicant has no right to appeal, and may reapply after two years.
In September, ECI successfully helped a participant restore her right to vote, where she will
be able to vote in the 2004 elections. We are extremely excited to now provide this service at
ECI. Presently, we have three applications still pending.
12
ECI TAKES LEADERSHIP ROLE IN STATEWIDE ADA
COALITION AND TRAINING
The Endependence Center has a contract with the ADA Information Center of the Mid Atlantic
Region to provide training, resources and technical assistance on the Americans with
Disabilities Act throughout Virginia. In the last year, the Virginia ADA Coalition presented 8
regional trainings on the ADA to the disability and business communities. 107 individuals were
trained including individuals with disabilities, local and state government representatives,
business owners, educators, disability organizations and even representatives from the federal
government. The Coalition also provided training on accessibility in the hospitality industry for
50 people from the Virginia Beach Hotel/Motel Association. Trainings were also held with
several disability organizations in Tidewater and in Northern
Virginia. The Coalition co-sponsored the "Your Power, Your
Choices" conference at Old Dominion University and provided
training sessions on employment and the ADA and voting and
accessibility. The Coalition also provided materials and
information for diversity fairs at the Navy, the Prince William
County Fair and the Gloucester Disability Awareness Network.
Technical assistance was provided to more than 60 individuals
over the year. As a result of the Coalition's success, ECI has been
ADA Training
awarded the grant for the 2004-2005 year, as well.
DE-INSTITUTIONALIZATION EFFORTS CONTINUE - NURSING HOME
RESIDENTS LEARN ABOUT OPTIONS TO LIVE IN THE COMMUNITY
ECI continues to outreach to individuals living in nursing homes in South Hampton Roads to
ensure that these residents understand that they have an option between receiving supports
in the facility setting or in their own homes in the community. Most persons residing in
nursing homes are not aware of this option. ECI is pro-actively addressing the obstacles on
institutionalization by providing residents of facilities the informed choice and consumer
control to live independently. Teamwork exists within ECI through a process where staff joins
together to assist persons with a goal to move from a facility to the community with housing
options, Medicaid Waiver options, Independent Living Skills Training and peer mentoring.
Institutionalization is something that can be overcome. The process involves working with an
individual to overcome obstacles and to assist them with each step of the transition process.
Many individuals living in facilities express the will to become advocates for their own lives
and have the determination to pursue their independence. ECI provides individuals with
informed choices resulting in the individual being well informed of his or her options in ways
that are
13
14
meaningful to him or her. ECI staff facilitate consumer control; whereby the individual makes
the decisions about his or her transition planning. These concepts of self-determination are
core to independent living and core to the process of transitioning to community living. There
is an increasing understanding at state and federal levels supported by the Olmstead Supreme
Court decision and President Bush’
sNew Freedom Initiative that individuals with disabilities
have the right to make choices about where they live and how they receive their support
services just as any other American makes choices about their lifestyle.
Locating accessible and affordable housing continues to be the key that drives how quickly
someone can move out of the nursing home and into the community. Section 8 vouchers
offered by some of the local city housing authorities can make transition a reality for those in
nursing facilities. These subsidized housing vouchers allow persons with disabilities on fixed
incomes such as SSI to be able to afford rent and utilities. ECI works closely with local
housing stakeholders to increase options for persons seeking accessible subsidized housing
options.
ECI assists persons planning their move to the community to access services such as food
stamps, Medicaid Waivers or long term case management through DRS. The DRS OBRA
Program provides nursing home residents who acquired their disability prior to the age of 22
and who are determined eligible through a screening process supports to become as
independent as possible while living in the facility and assistance with the transition to
community living. Medicaid Waivers are another key service that make it possible for
individuals to live in the community. There are currently six Waivers in Virginia. Eligibility is
based on type of disability and level of services needed. Some Waivers have waiting lists and
others do not. Waivers provide a variety of critical supports including personal assistance with
a variety of activities a person with a disability needs support in accomplishing such as getting
out of bed, bathing, preparing meals or shopping.
In 2004, ECI was fortunate to receive a Quality of Life grant from the Christopher Reeve
Paralysis Foundation (CRPF). This grant paid for transition costs for nine individuals to move
from a facility to the community or to maintain their ability to live in the community. Because
persons living in nursing homes receive only $30.00 from SSI each month, it is almost
impossible for them to save money to buy furniture, household supplies, or to pay for utility
or rental deposits. ECI strives to obtain funding from grants, or donations from businesses
and private individuals to supplement these start-up cost needs for persons with the goal to
move out of nursing homes into the community. These types of funds are also used to modify
apartments or homes to which the facility resident is planning to move. Common
modifications include a ramp, a roll in shower rather than a bathtub, or installing automatic
door openers with intercoms. These types of technology allow even persons with more
significant levels of disability to live independently in their own apartments or homes.
14
If you or someone you know currently lives in a nursing home and would like information on
their options for community living, please contact ECI Nursing Facility Outreach Coordinator,
Melvin Jones.
SUPPORT COORDINATION AND CONSUMER-DIRECTED SERVICES EXPAND
Three years ago ECI began providing support coordination for individuals who are receiving
Medicaid services through the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver
(DD Waiver). The Waiver is used so individuals can move out and stay out of nursing homes
and other institutions. The DD Waiver provides services that include assistive technology,
attendant services, crisis stabilization, day support, environmental modifications,
family/caregiver training, in-home residential support, personal emergency response systems,
respite, skilled nursing, supported employment and therapeutic consultations. This year, more
than a hundred individuals are receiving support coordination through ECI. Each of these
individuals has developed a consumer services plan for the services they need. More than half
of these individuals have received Medicaid Waiver funding and are receiving the services
listed above.
The DD Waiver Support Coordinators also offer Consumer-Directed Facilitation for individuals
who are receiving consumer-directed attendant and consumer-directed respite services
through the DD Waiver. These services allow individuals to have control over their services
and recruit, hire, supervise and fire their staff directly rather than requiring them to use
traditional agencies for services.
Support Coordinators at the Center advocate with individuals who
are eligible for the DD Waiver and assist them with developing their
plans, researching and accessing providers, monitoring services,
submitting required Medicaid documentation and linking
individuals to services. Individuals who receive these services are
at least six years old, with half being under the age of 21 and having
autism. Other participants include those with brain injury, cerebral
palsy, spina bifida, epilepsy, spinal cord injuries and other
developmental disabilities. Several individuals have used the DD
Support Coordinator
socializing with
Waiver to get out of institutions. Supporting the decisions and
participant at
choices of the individual, staff have worked with them to develop
Holiday Party
services and to secure providers. Many children have used the DD
Waiver to obtain support and training so that they can achieve their goals and continue to live
at home with their families.
15
As individuals with disabilities and their families begin to learn more about the services
covered under Medicaid and Medicaid Waivers, they come to the Endependence Center for
guidance in understanding how to access services. Over the past year, ECI has assisted
participants and others in the community with individual advocacy issues concerning Medicaid
eligibility, understanding and accessing Medicaid Waiver services while waiting on another
Medicaid Waiver waiting list, obtaining needed Durable Medical Equipment (DME) and gaining
access to Early and Periodic Screening Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) services.
ECI provides service facilitation for Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Services (CD-PAS)
and Individual and Family Support Developmental Disabilities (DD) under Medicaid Waiver
programs. Currently, there are 62 CD-PAS and 67 DD waiver participants receiving service
facilitation for consumer directed services. There are three components of consumer directed
services under the DD Waiver; personal attendant services, respite and companion. Under the
CD-PAS program, only personal attendant services are available. ECI also oversees the
Department of Rehabilitative Services CD-PAS program in the South Hampton Roads area.
There are 34 people receiving consumer directed services under the program at this time.
Consumer directed services empower participants and their families to be in control of their
health care. It allows freedom of choice as to who they allow into their homes to provide
services, the times of day services are needed and how the services are provided. Most
individuals have had to rely on agencies in the past, therefore, consumer direction is a new
concept. Most people require training to learn the skills necessary to be effective employers.
Training is provided in areas such as hiring, firing and managing an assistant, paperwork
requirements and effective communication so consumers may be successful employers.
The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities funded a grant to ECI to establish a statewide
Medicaid Waiver Technical Assistance Center. Information, advocacy meetings and workshops
about Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waiver Services are available to people with
disabilities and their families. Advocates from 36 organizations statewide are collaborating
with the Center to become Medicaid Mentors. The Center is providing training and materials
for the Mentors to prepare them to assist people with disabilities and their families with Waiver
related issues and concerns. Community workshops are conducted by trained Mentors to help
people utilize Waiver services. Individual assistance through information and advocacy is
provided to assist with questions and problem solving. The Center has established a toll free
number to respond to questions concerning Medicaid Waivers. The Medicaid Waiver Network
was established as a systems advocacy venue for discussion of problems with existing Waiver
and planning for improvements to Waivers. The Network meets quarterly in the Richmond
area. An internet listserv was established for the discussion of Virginia Medicaid Waivers.
Materials such as the “Homeand Community-Based Servicesf
orPeopl
ewi
t
hDi
sabi
l
i
t
i
es”
guide, workshop handouts and fact sheets are developed.
16
OUTREACH SERVICES CONTINUE TO THE VISUAL DISABILITY COMMUNITY
Without proper technology, training, and support, having a visual disability can be an isolating
disability. The outreach program at ECI works to bring knowledge into individual situations
by providing a wide array of services. These services include one on one peer mentoring,
group counseling, braille tutoring, and adaptive software training.
The VIP (Visually Impaired Participants) Support Group provides participants with visual
impairments a one stop source of vital and useful information. The group is an advocacy and
networking forum. Various guest speakers present community resources to group members
and the group also provides outreach to educate the community about disability awareness.
This year the group wanted the public to be aware of White Cane Safety Day and with the help
of Janet Dunphy from the Beacon section of the Virginia Pilot an article was printed on October
14th of this year.
The braille and adaptive software training component of the outreach program provides a
sense of liberation to those who thought their computer days had come to an end due to
declining vision. Braille tutoring provided by ECI has enabled those who are blind to continue
in their joy of reading printed materials. Hours of Zoom Text and JAWS training have been
provided to individuals who thought they would never be able to read their email again yet
alone read a news article. Zoom Text and JAWS are examples of adaptive software that greatly
enlarges text or verbally speaks text to the user. These software programs allow individuals
with vision limitations to pay bills online, instant message loved ones, prepare monthly
budgeting, surf the web or write letters, the same tasks that someone who is sighted might
perform on a computer.
The Visual Disability Outreach Coordinator continues to reach out to the community by
speaking at community events, setting up demonstration tables throughout the community,
and providing information and referral services. ECI is fortunate to have an array of adaptive
equipment for display and training. Besides software programs, the demonstration equipment
includes items that assist persons with low vision or who are blind to be independent at work,
school or at home. This equipment includes a slate and stylus for brailling notes or letters, a
braille labeler that allows a person to put labels on music CDs, audio tapes, personal or office
files; Color Mates to identify the color of clothing, Type N Speak which is a note-taker that
verbally speak letters as they are typed, a low vision cutting board that is dark on one side and
light on the other to provide contrast of the food on the board, food identifiers to help identify
what is in a can of food, writing guides to help write a letter, and other adaptive devices that
can be used in the home or office. If you are interested in learning more about visual disability
resources or viewing the adaptive equipment in our demonstration kit, please contact Sandra
Baski
n,ECI
’
sVi
sualDi
sabi
l
i
t
yOut
r
eachCoor
di
nat
or
.
17
18
ECI CONTINUES OUTREACH SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HEARING
IMPAIRED DISABILITY COMMUNITY
ECI continues a contract with the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to
provide outreach services to the Cities of Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach,
Hampton, Newport News, Poquoson, Williamsburg, Smithfield, Suffolk, James City, York, Isle
of Wight and Southampton Counties. The 2000 census estimates there are 136,000 deaf and
hard of hearing residents in these areas. ECI outreach staff works closely with communitybased organizations, schools, medical facilities and other state and local agencies to develop
ways to provide better services to the hearing impaired disability community.
Workshops and forums educating and empowering individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing,
deaf/blind and speech impaired were offered on a variety of topics including, Visor Alert/Wallet
Communication Placards, FCC Regulations on Emergency Captioning, ADA & Deaf Rights with
V.O.P.A. Community education is provided to agencies and organizations in order to educate
them regarding Deaf Culture. Sensitivity training has been provided to hospitals, local
businesses, employers, co-workers and others.
ECI is one of seven demonstration sites where consumers can try out various equipment
before purchasing them from an independent vendor. These items include a baby cry monitor,
visual/audio smoke detector, pocket talker, FM loop system, door knocker sensor and a
television infrared system. Staff also assisted consumers with applying for the TAP Program
through VDDHH and a loan program for telecommunication and alerting devices.
Outreach Services include facilitating the Cochlear Implant Support Group and Happy Hands
Group meetings. St
af
fassi
st
edal
ocal
hospi
t
al
oneducat
i
ngt
heDeafcommuni
t
yabout“Deaf
Tal
k”and coordinated the Deaf/HOH Exchange Program. Staff serve on the TCC Advisory
Board - ASL Program, VBCPS Deaf/HOH Task Force, as a Youth Leadership Mentor and were
appointed to the Virginia Relay Advisory Council.
Making a presentation to the
Lord Mayor of Salford, England
Brenda Estes and Brenda Carper
In May 2004, two representatives from the local deaf
community and two ECI staff members flew to England for
ten days to participate in the International Deaf and Hard of
Hearing Exchange Program that was established between
the Endependence Center and Salford Social Services in
England in 2001. They attended a presentation and
luncheon at the Lord Mayor of Salford's office. They visited
several businesses that provides job training and
education for people with disabilities and gave several
18
presentations on ECI's services including outreach services for the deaf and hard of hearing.
They were guests of honor at an elementary school where they presented the school with
bookbags on behalf of the Virginia Relay. Plans are being made to host a group from England
in September 2005 and to return to England in the Spring 2006.
The Center provides Outreach Services to Peninsula residents who are deaf or hard of hearing
at the Peninsula Workforce Development Center under a One-Stop partnership agreement for
the provision of services to the community from various agencies serving persons with
disabilities.
ECI PARTNERS WITH THE ATLFA (ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
LOAN FUND AUTHORITY)
The ATLFA Loan Fund provides another way to obtain assistive technology, home
modifications, or adapted transportation. This program is for persons who can afford a monthly
payment toward the cost of the equipment or modification. ATLFA loans are at a lower interest
rate and over a longer pay back period so the monthly payments are lower than with traditional
loans and so may be more affordable than other ways to purchase equipment or modifications.
Bad credit due to disability reasons (medical debt, etc.) is also looked at favorably so many
people may qualify for ATLFA loans when they would not qualify for traditional loans due to
credit issues.
Examples of the types of items you can apply to purchase through an ATLFA loan include:
adapted lift quipped van, ramps, automatic door openers, computers with adapted software
or hardware, visual alarms or hearing aides, adapted equipment for persons with visual
impairments and items to allow you to work from home.
ECI is pleased to be a partner with ATLFA to provide this option for funding needed equipment
or home modifications. ECI staff are available to assist individuals who feel they need
assistance filling out the loan application. Interested persons can contact Lisbet Ward at ECI
to learn more about the loan fund or to seek assistance with the application.
19
20
ECI ADDRESSES HOUSING ISSUES THROUGH ADVOCACY AND TRAINING
ECI provides assistance to individuals seeking independent community living. The Housing
Coordinator works with the individual and their Peer Counselor to coordinate assistance the
individual may need prior to moving. The individual may need independent living skills training
such as budgeting, cooking classes, how to use transit, etc. The Housing Coordinator makes
individuals knowledgeable of the housing available in our area. Often participants are looking
for subsidized housing and this is in short supply. For individuals in nursing homes or other
institutional setting the coordination of services with housing is often very complicated and
requires coordination with other service providers. Individuals are instructed on how to apply
for waiting lists in both the public and private sector. We encourage participants to take
responsibility for the application process and selection of housing. During the past year ECI
assisted many participants to obtain housing.
ECI operated a Fair Housing education and outreach grant to provide fair housing tranings to
the housing community, disability community and general public. Project FAIR was a
collaborative effort among the 16 Virginia Centers for Independent Living. After receiving
training from the North Carolina Center for Universal Design, Ms. Clay and project staff
conducted a total of 67 Fair Housing trainings, with a total of 729 individuals who received fair
housing across the state. Project staff also assisted callers with information on fair housing
and with the complaint process. The Housing Policy Coordinator has been working with the
Chesapeake and Norfolk Homeless Consortium to make recommendations on the affordable,
permanent housing needs of homeless individuals with disabilities. She is a member of the
newly formed Virginia Beach Partner Group to address need for affordable housing
development in Virginia Beach. She continues to advocate with city departments to acquire
CDBG funds for home modifications for people with disabilities. She also continues to work
with the local public housing authorities to apply for Section 8 vouchers. Ms. Clay has been
facilitating the housing advocacy network, a subcommittee of the Disability Advocacy Network
consisting of Center participants, advocates and community agencies. She worked with
Portsmouth Redevelopment and Housing Authority in developing plans for a universal
designed home, which will be available for first-time home ownership. She continues to work
with the Hampton Roads Community Housing Resource Board to address fair housing issues.
To determine the number of available affordable, accessible housing compared to the number
of people with disabilities looking for housing, a housing survey was sent to public housing
authorities and non-profit housing providers.
ECI received a Community Development Block Grant from the City
of Norfolk to provide home modifications to citizens with disabilities
who met certain HUD established income guidelines. ECI, through
contractors, provided modification to 18 homes. Modifications
ranged from porch lifts, ramps, roll-in showers to grab bars.
Home Modification
20
ECI CONTINUES TO EDUCATE THE DISABILITY COMMUNITY THROUGHOUT
THE REGION ON BENEFITS AND EMPLOYMENT
The benefits, planning, assistance and outreach (BPAO) project staff provided benefits
assistance to approximately 600 individuals who are receiving SSI, and SSDI who are
interested in going to work. This project is funded through the Social Security Administration.
The BPAO Specialists provided information and referral to individuals with disabilities to assist
them in making informed choices relating to areas such as housing, TANF, Medicaid, and
other benefits which employment may impact. The benefits specialists explain which work
incentives social security beneficiaries may be eligible for and how the SSI, or SSDI check
amount may or may not change. BPAO assistance is provided to people with disabilities,
family members, and to service providers of individuals between the ages of 14 to 65.
ECI is the coordinating organization in the Hampton Roads area for this project. Individuals
living in Norfolk, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Virginia Beach, Suffolk, Franklin, and Isle of Wight
County received assistance from Frances Durham, BPAO Coordinator and Rena Lewis,
Benefits Specialist at ECI in Norfolk. On the Peninsula, Tecia Cogdell, Benefits Specialist,
provided services at the Peninsula Center for Independent Living to individuals who reside in
the cities of Hampton, Newport News, Williamsburg, James City County and Gloucester. Abra
Jacobs, Benefits Specialist, provided services on the Eastern Shore.
The BPAO Specialists also provided outreach services to
individuals with disabilities at the area One-Stop Centers where
employment services are available to the public. Presentations
were made to the Department of Rehabilitative Services staff, the
Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired staff and to service
providers of the Shelter Plus Housing Program. Staff participated
in career fairs for transition aged youth, provided information to
seven high schools, attended the annual Collaborations
Conference for disability service providers and attended the
Peninsula Center for Independent Li
vi
ng’
sannual conference for
consumers in Hampton.
BPAO Information Table
at Career Fair
YOUNG ADULT ADVOCATES CONTINUE ADVOCACY EFFORTS
IN THE LOCAL COMMUNITY
I
n2004,t
heTr
ansi
t
i
onAdvocacyTeam changedi
t
snamet
oY.
E.
A.
!–YoungEndependent
Advocates. This group is designed for young adults with disabilities in their twenties and
thirties and meets twice a month, once for an advocacy meeting and once for a support group
21
on issues related to being young and facing challenges of living with a disability. Many thanks
to the Y.E.A.! group leaders, Kathryn Gage, Charity Gray-Daigre, and Jennifer Thornburg for
their hard work facilitating the meetings over the year.
The Y.E.A.! Team’
sproject this year continues to be advocating with the Verizon Wireless
Virginia Beach Amphitheater to provide accessibility to the lawn seating area which currently
can be assessed only by steps. Team members were in communication with the manager of
the Amphitheater, and the department of Economic Development in Virginia Beach. The
Team’
sgoal is now to obtain community support and bring awareness about the lack of access
on the lawn. The Team has also collected over 250 signatures on a petition showing support
from the community for making the lawn accessible. I
fyou’
dl
i
ket
ol
endsuppor
tf
ort
hi
s
important goal, please contact the Y.E.A.! Team at the Endependence Center.
“Yout
hTr
ansi
t
i
ons”is our new group for middle and high school
students with disabilities and currently meets once a month on
Friday afternoons. The goal of this group to introduce youth to the
core concepts of independent living and to have a forum where they
can share goals and discuss challenges with each other. So far the
youth have learned about independent living centers, had an
adaptive technology fair, learned about the basics of the Americans
with Disabilities Act and began discussing what it is to be a leader
of your own life and for others. Youth Transitions staff are Elizabeth
Hollowell and Matthew Deans.
Youth Transition Staff
at a Y.E.A.! Team
meeting
ECI PARTICIPANT SUPPORT GROUPS OFFER OPPORTUNITIES
TO MANY PARTICIPANTS
The Youth Transitions Support Group is a group for middle and high school students with
disabilities. The group meets monthly and addresses issues aimed particularly to a younger
group of people with disabilities who are still in school. These
students are transitioning from youth to adulthood with energy
and enthusiasm. Group topics include IEPs, special education
rights and policies, and a wide array of independent living
issues such as assistive technology, service dogs,
communication skills, and self advocacy.
Youth are
encouraged to start thinking about their plans for after high
school and moving into adulthood. The format is a lively
discussion group with interactive activities, plenty of time to
Obtaining a Service Dog
share personal successes and struggles, and includes time for
parties and field trips.
22
Young Endependent Advocates! (Y.E.A.!) Support Group - for the twenty to thirty something
adult that focuses on being a young adult with a disability. This group teaches members about
their rights as persons with disabilities, and how to be a successful advocate for themselves
and their community. I
t
’
sa place to share both struggles and goals with new friends and work
on projects to make the community more accessible and accommodating. This is a lively and
goal oriented group that also has its share of parties and laughter.
The Men’
sSupport Group is a forum where group members build a
peer support network and discuss and explore common issues and
create successes through supporting each other to strive for
independence. The group discusses a wide range of topics from ADA
policy, leadership building, and community resources. Also, the
men’
sgroup throughout the year goes on outings that are designed
to increase socialization and bring about empowerment.
Men’
sSuppor
tGr
oup
The Women’
sSupport Group has been on break to be revised but will start in its brand new
format in January. This group is for women with many different kinds of disabilities to share
support, information, and build relationships. They learn about their rights, build self esteem
and encourage each other to reach their goals. It is a fun and lively atmosphere where women
can be women!
The Independent Riders Support Group is a forum for discussing
our experiences as persons with disabilities using public
transportation in Hampton Roads such as HandiRide, the HRT
buses or Medicaid transportation. Members share travel
experiences, such as using a wheelchair lift on a bus, finding
inaccessible bus stops, or locating the HandiRide van when you are
visually impaired and cannot see it. We share experiences, ideas,
andf
eel
i
ngsaboutour
sel
vesas“I
ndependentRi
der
s!
”
Independent Riders
Support Group
The Brain Injury Support Group is specifically for persons with any type of brain injury
including short or long term memory loss. The focus is to build a peer support network, share
experiences, goals, and struggles, and learn about resources and supports unique to persons
living daily with a brain injury. Meetings are focused on empowering members to increase their
independence through hosting guest speakers, watching disability informational films,
receiving training, and practicing recreation skills through planning some meetings at
restaurants, parks or the mall.
23
Visually Impaired Participants (VIP) Support Group - a peer support group to combat the
feelings of isolation and the need to develop new skills and find resources as one is adjusting
to losing their vision. Group members network with one another sharing important resources
for those with visual impairments or who are blind. VIP members are advocates who educate
the community about living with vision loss and help each other develop the skills, confidence
and access resources needed to continue to pursue goals and maintain independence.
PUBLIC BUS TRAVEL TRAINING CONTINUES
ECI has staff who are trained and skilled in providing one on one
travel training to equip persons with disabilities to navigate the
mainline HRT bus system. Over the past few years, ECI received
funding from HRT to provide travel training as a free service under
a popular program called Project RIDE. This funding ended in the
past year. However, some additional persons have received travel
training this year funded through DRS to support employment
goals. ECI travel training staff are available to provide training
when funding is available. This training teaches persons interested
in riding the bus how to read the bus schedule, to learn specific
routes including all transfer points, and how to access
accommodations such as using the wheelchair lifts, or
accommodating a visual, hearing, or learning disability in the bus
travel process.
Travel Training Meeting
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS CONTINUE TO BE A PRIORITY
ECI continues to engage in efforts to expand funding for core independent living services as
well as to acquire grants and contracts that result in valuable services at ECI. During the
upcoming General Assembly, the Virginia CILs will attempt to acquire increased funding for
services needed in South Hampton Roads and other localities across the State.
New funding sources for the Center during the past year included a contract with the State to
market the ATLFA Program, a contract with VACIL to coordinate Virginia CIL statewide
advocacy efforts and the Community Action Specialist Advocacy Project, a contract with the
Board of Elections to survey polling places in the region, an increase in the funding level of
three local government sources, a grant from the Board for People with Disabilities to
administer a statewide travel fund for the disability community, a grant from the Department
of Transportation to acquire a new fully accessible van for the Center and a grant from the
Norfolk Foundation for the renovation costs of the new ECI building.
24
ECI staff made presentations at local DRS and DBVI offices in this region in an effort to market
the Fee-For-Service Program for active State agency clients. ECI Independent Living Services
assisted individuals in being prepared to enter the work force. Efforts continued this past year
to market the new ECI Endowment Program. As a result of successful resource development,
ECI will have a budget for 2004-05 of approximately 1.8 million dollars.
STATEWIDE DATA COLLECTION SYSTEM IS BEING UPGRADED
FOR VIRGINIA CILS
The Endependence Center and CILs across the state continue to use the Independence Plus
data collection system to capture services rendered to consumers with disabilities at CILs.
Many queries and reports have been developed over the last year to provide information about
services rendered and for internal case management. Staff members continue to input their
own statistical information and verify the accuracy of their data through specialized reports.
The CILs will be changing their data collection system next year to a web-based system that
will offer more flexibility for staff with data entry. The Operations Manager is on the committee
established by the Virginia Association of Centers for Independent Living to work on the
development of the new data collection system.
25
ECI FUNDING SOURCES
2003-2004
I.
Federal
A. Department of Education (Rehabilitation Services Administration)
1. Part C - Independent Living Services (Core)
2. Part B - Coalition Building and Outreach
$ 322,800.
25,000.
B. Social Security Administration
1. Benefits Planning Assistance Outreach Grant
113,552.
C. HUD
1. Fair Housing Training
D. Norfolk CDBG - Home Modification
59,564.
122,371.
II. State
A. Department of Rehabilitative Services
1. Independent Living Services
2. Personal Assistance Services
3. Fee-For-Service
396,336.
1,500.
230.
B. Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1. Outreach
61,000.
C. Department of Medical Assistance Services
1. Consumer Directed Facilitation Contract
2. Support Coordination Contract
8,649.
146,107.
D. Virginia Board for People with Disabilities
1. Technical Assistance Center (TAC)
2. Consumer and Family Participant Fund
73,299.
5,098.
(continued next page)
26
ECI FUNDING SOURCES (Continued)
III. Local Government - Independent Living Services
A. Norfolk
B. Virginia Beach
55,232.
42,487.
C. Chesapeake
D. Portsmouth
33,119.
50,000.
E. Suffolk
F. Isle of Wight
G. Franklin
11,261.
2,742.
500.
IV. Foundations/Grants
A. Virginia Literacy Foundation
2,000.
B. Portsmouth General Hospital Foundation
(Family Services)
9,375.
C. Peninsula Center for Independent Living
(LINKS Project)
1,000.
D. Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority (NRHA)
(Emergency Housing)
E. Hampton Roads Transit - Contract
(Travel Training)
V. Technical Assistance Contracts
VI. Contributions
VII. Other
TOTAL REVENUE
27
945.
22,590.
30,851.
6,107.
50,855.
$ 1,654,570.
STAFF DISABILITY COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
2003 - 2004
LOCAL
 Building Bridges - Housing Advocacy Committee - Facilitator
Chesapeake Bay Council (local Chapter for Federation of the Blind)
Chesapeake Coalition for the Homeless
Norfolk Special Education Advisory Committee
Portsmouth FSS Program Coordinating Committee
 Self Help for Hard for Hard of Hearing- Virginia Beach Chapter - Board Member
TCC Advisory Board - ASL Program
Virginia Beach City Schools - Deaf and Hard of Hearing Task Force
Virginia Beach Housing Partner Group
Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Commission
 Virginia Beach Special Education Advisory Committee - Chairperson, Vice Chair
REGIONAL
 Association of Late Deafened Adults - Hampton Roads - Board
Autism Society of America - Tidewater Chapter
 Hampton Roads Chapter of Virginia Association for the Deaf
 Hampton Roads Coalition for People with Disabilities - Chair & Treasurer
Hampton Roads Community Housing Resource Board
Hampton Roads Housing Consortium
Hampton Roads Transportation Coalition for People with Disabilities
Parent Organization of Southside Virginia Training Center
 Protecting Individuals w/Disabilities Education Rights Coalition
South Hampton Roads Disability Services Board
 Spina Bifida Association of Tidewater - Board Member
Tidewater Association for Hearing Impaired Children
Tidewater Down Syndrome Association
 Tidewater Legal Aide Society - Secretary
Your Power Your Choice Disability Conference Planning Committee Member
 Virginia Assistive Technology System of Southeastern Virginia/Advisory Board Member
28
STAFF DISABILITY COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT (Continued)
STATE
 Association Late-Deafened Adults - Potomac
Commonwealth Autism Services
Executive Management Council
IPLUS Team (web based data collection system)
IPLUS Waiver Task Force
 Legal Advocacy Center - Board Member
Links Project Advisory Team
Medicaid Buy-in Work Group
MR Waiver Task Force
Olmstead Task Force
State Developmental Disabilities Waiver Workgroup
State PAS Advisory Committee
Virginia ADA State Coalition Coordinator
Virginia Association of Centers for Independent Living
 Virginia Association of the Deaf - Board Member
 Virginia Board for People with Disabilities - Executive Committee & Committee Chairperson
 Virginia Coalition for Students with Disabilities - Facilitator
Virginia Medicaid Waivers Network
 Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy - Chairman
Virginia Registry of Interpreters
 Virginia Relay Council Advisory Board - Vice Chair
Virginia Schools Deaf Alumni Association (VSDAA)
 Virginia Youth Leadership Forum - Mentor
Virginia Youth Leadership Forum Coordinating Committee
NATIONAL
 Association Late-Deafened Adults, Inc.
Autism Society of America
Families and Advocates Partnership for Education
National Association of the Deaf
 National Council on Independent Living - Chair, IDEA Committee
Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf
Self-Help for Hard of Hearing
Staff Leadership
LEADERSHIP POSITION
29
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
As of 09/04
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
MICHAEL WANG
President
DR. LAURIE LINDBLOM
Vice President
BEVERLY REID
Treasurer
BOARD MEMBERS
PATRICIA ANGELMAN
ANITA BISSELL
CHRIS DAILEY
LINDA DEW
TOM SWANSTON
ORRICK TOLIVER
BERNICE DAVIS
EX-OFFICIO BOARD MEMBERS
CHERYL DREWERY
Norfolk
STEPHEN L. JOHNSON
ECI Executive Director
LYNN KUSHNER
DRS
ANITA GOLDEN
Portsmouth
CARMEN MENDEZ
Virginia Beach
34
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC. STAFF
As of 09/04
ADMINISTRATION
STEPHEN JOHNSON
Executive Director
AMADEO SAN ANTONIO
Finance Director
CHERYL SIMPSON
Operations Manager
LONNIE SUBLETT
Network Administrator
DIRECTORS FOR ADVOCACY/SERVICES
RICHARD DiPEPPE
Director for Advocacy/Services
MAUREEN HOLLOWELL
Director for Advocacy/Services
LISBET WARD
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
TRACY BRIDGERS
Administrative Assistant
35
MARIE CAMP
Personal Care Attendant
CAROL CRABILL
Executive Assistant
TAMMY MANNO
Administrative Assistant
TRACEY SWAIN
Receptionist
BARBARA DIXON
Accounting Clerk
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC. STAFF
As of 09/04
COORDINATORS
SANDRA BASKIN
Visual Disability Outreach/
Service Coordinator
BRENDA CARPER
Deaf Services
Coordinator
COLLEEN CHARLTON
Systems Advocacy
Coordinator
VANTORIA CLAY
Housing Policy
Coordinator
ZOOM CLOKE
Individual Advocacy/Training
Coordinator
MATTHEW DEANS
Transition Coordinator
FRANCES DURHAM
Benefits Coordinator
Project ABLE
DEBBIE EDDINGS
Support Coordinator
DD Waiver
BRENDA ESTES
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Coordinator
TARRA FERGUSON-DAVIS
IL Services Coordinator
KELLY MAXWELL GONZALEZ
ADA Coalition
Coordinator
SANDRA HERMANN
Medicaid Advocacy
Coordinator
ELIZABETH HOLLOWELL
Transition Coordinator
MELVIN JONES
IL Coordinator
Nursing Facility Outreach
RENA LEWIS
Intake/Benefits
Coordinator
MICHELLE LIDDIE
Housing Services
Coordinator
36
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC. STAFF
COORDINATORS
LARISSA SAWYER
Support Coordinator
DD Waiver
37
CHERYL WARD
Educational Advocacy
Coordinator
CHRISTY WORLEY
Support Coordinator
DD Waiver
As of 09/04
The Endependence Center Endowment Fund Program
Ways To Support This Fund
Cash Contributions
Cash is the easiest and most popular form of
gift and offers the donor a tax deduction
equal to the full value of the gift.
Life Insurance Policy
The Endependence Center, Inc. is a
non-residential, community-based
Center for Independent Living that is
directed by and assists persons with
disabilities to lead independent,
productive lives.
This Means
Exercising the Right
and Opportunity
to Choose
a Lifestyle
an Education
a Career
The individual, the community and
the Center work together to create
expanded opportunities for persons
with disabilities.
You may donate an old policy to this Fund,
receiving an immediate tax deduction,
usually in the amount equal to policy cash
surrender value, or you might choose to
name this Fund as a beneficiary to your
insurance policy.
Charitable Bequests
A bequest is a gift of property or cash stated
in your will that goes to a person or
organization at the death of the person
making the will. A charitable bequest is
completely deductible from the donor
’
s
estate, likely lowering estate taxes owed.
This Fund continues your good work in your
name permanently, a living symbol of your
caring.
Gifts Of Personal Property
Through inheritance or investment, donors
may have accumulated personal property
that can be valuable- yet sometimes costly
to insure or sell. This could include art
collections, antiques, real estate (residential,
farm, developed, or undeveloped), even oil,
gas, or mineral rights may be converted into
assets to be given to this Fund.
Publicly Traded- Securities
You donate stocks and bond to this Fund
and get the maximum allowable tax
deduction for their full market value and ECI
receive continuing income from the proceeds
of the sale of these securities.
Gifts From an Estate or Trust
You as the executor or trustee under a will,
have instructions to allocate a certain amount
of money to charity. You may establish a
Memorial Fund, honoring the deceased and
with the approval of the court, if necessary,
you may arrange to have the charitable
portion of the estate paid to this Fund.
Your Contribution
With 35 years of combined service to their
community, the Endependence Center, Inc.
and the Virginia Beach Foundation are
pleased to announce their partnership in
providing an opportunity for charitable giving
that will assure services to the local disability
community continue far into the future.
Your gift will become a part of the principle in
a Fund that generates interest to support
Independent Living Programs and Services
provided by the Endependence Center to
persons with disabilities in South Hampton
Roads.
For further information or consultation, please
contact:
The Virginia Beach Foundation
P.O. Box 4629
Virginia Beach, VA 23454
(757) 422-5249
38
"FRIENDS OF ECI"
YOUR SUPPORT IS VITAL!
The Endependence Center, as a non-profit organization, is continually pursuing funds
necessary to serve the South Hampton Roads area. If ECI is going to maintain the level of
services it currently is providing, or if ECI is to expand services to more fully serve South
Hampton Roads, we must depend on contributions from supporters of independent living in
the community.
Individuals that believe in the work of ECI can show support by making an annual
contribution. Your tax-deductible donation can make possible the continuation and expansion
of needed services to individuals with disabilities in the community.
Any size gift is greatly appreciated. Please make check/money order payable to:
Endependence Center, Inc., 6300 East Virginia Beach Boulevard, Norfolk, VA 23502.
Thank you for your gift.
Sincerely,
Michael Kenneth Wang
President
ECI Board of Directors
39
ENDEPENDENCE CENTER, INC.
6300 EAST VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD
NORFOLK, VA 23502-2827
(757) 461-8007 Voice
(757) 461-7527 TDD
(757) 461-5375 OR (757)455-8223 Fax
[email protected]
www.endependence.org

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