CIDdferllhtini Servke - Southeastern Oklahoma State University

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Transcription

CIDdferllhtini Servke - Southeastern Oklahoma State University
ou eastern
UFjFI CIAL ORGA~ SO UTHEASTERN
'J:.A.TE COLLEGE
.
DURANT, OKLA., WED NE
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NO. 11
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·"T uesday Night Progrom
:CIDdferllhtini Servke
Depicts Christlnas.Story
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'· Sou heastem State CollE-ge's most impressive eel~
bration of the Christmas season will come Tu~ay night
with th_e traditional Candlelighting Service in
ntgomery
Auditorium:
,
The all-campus event, originated in 1921, is always of
wide interest throughout the area and represents many
types of talent and work on the part of students and sup. ervising
faculty m~mbers.
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di-..,_-_;...__________;____
rect~d by
. The Southeastern Chorale,
George Smith, will set j
the
service.
The first secbon of the program
will portray Christmas as seen
threugh ihe eyes at a child. The
second !fe.c tion will portray Christmas as i t · js revealed through
Students Erect
NQ t•IVI•ty sCei'Jeo
C~istian fait~\.
by the Art Club, is being assembl-
~n~ ~r ~(~ two-part
. '!J.'o
........ .B.rierSmall l
·11 Y01. S;eak Five Branlls
Byllarpretllrowa
live here.
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SDutheastern's RnMIAn atudenta
Mrs. Baalrfn 18 kept bUSX with
. . . that their teacher, Vluta three 80D8, tr. addition tP her
~. 1B not only attractive but teaching. She believes, though,
~e as an inatructor.
~t through her Ruuian. ~lasses
'-Quot linguas canes tot homines she "may be lr. a small way con~" a
Latin saying which tributing to preserving the demomea. you're worth aa many men crate way of life in these United
as JaDcuagea you speak, 18 par- States of ours."
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ti~y uproprtate in terms of
She finds her work with South1rlnl. Bealrfn She has reason to eastern students challenging and
appii!IClate both the practical and rewarding.
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the ·· cultural aspects of Jan.guage
atud,y.
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her native t.~oslovakia.
stress was placed on the
of both cla.a8ical and modem
All students had . to
semces ~lo e
Role of Religio
Band Heralds
Yule Season ·
With Concert.
aeW.,.........
The Nativit y Scene, sponsored
ed between the President's home
and the Library.
Tbis year m~rks the 11th seuon
the Nativity Scene has been. erected. Each year an effort has been
made to add a figure to tbe ecene.
Tb1a year, however, iB beiDg given
to repair, improved lightiDg and
costume&
The figures are made of paper
mache, and the framework is composed of a variety of materlale.
Theae tnc)ude meah wire, aluminum wtre, metal tubing, bloclta of
wood, and barrels.
The costumes are made from
water-proof dUCking, and broken
costume jewelry wbich has been
contributed by jewelry store8 and
students.
The added improvement abould
make this year's Nativity Scene
one of the most effective in the
history of SoUtheastern.
Classen And Slrold
Are Double
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AT liSa eo
To1111lllllll
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CI•ISeJl High School of Oldaboma City won the debate ~
and aweepetakes award Ill a.. A.
at the uuma1 SoutltNPem 8late
College High. Scbool Speecb 'l'allr-
nament.
ln Clua S, Stroud BJgb 8cllool
.... the doUble wilmer, captuJ:IDc
the debate priM &Dd tM ..eepataare. &wll!d.
Debate nmnera-ap ,..... LMr•
X aad 8traUald Ill
tea ·Ill Clal8
ClaiB.
DIINIIl. Oltlalao11111
Gifted Child NeeCis Chall
By Patay Keltll
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Second ClUs Postage Paid ,!lt Durant, ~~
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STAFF
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l!ldltor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Qeorge )iorrow
ButdDMe Maaacer ...................... .. ......... ~ . . Sue~ D180D
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.. .. , . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . .ta ~D
Socle&7 • . . . . . . ... • . • . • • . . . • • . . . • . . • • • . . . . . . • • • BaUa iAIID
Sport. .........•.. • • • . . . . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .
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Ty
MaiHD1f ........... , • .. .. .. .. .. .. • . .. • .. • .. .. .. • • •
Ooflultock
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~i!S:IIeUJ't:ma: ~ta
......... .ba.................
' f'*' N.,.,.,
BZI'O&'i'I&S -
......,., 8tllaJeJ
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II!IIID.J'
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IAibdter.
BOmb
' . . . ~--til,
8pefty, Dlaa ......P6Bob
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lte -itis
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., ••,. •eearwr
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Webb, Durant freah·
been cholen sweetheart
first semester Teke plqe
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crowned at a recent
tn the Teke houH,
~bli~~ted the eftlliJIC•
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The forebodiq lllDOUDcanent of th devel.lpmellit of
Ruaaia's new 60-mapt;on bolrib coupled th the Jl~lin ~lti­
matum has the Aaerican ~pie in an u roar. ~Dmb ~bel­
ten of any shape, aise or typ• are .b eing
died to ~ sc.red
public who has little knowledge or thou(ht of t)l~ prqtection afforded by JD&Il7 of th• sloppy c~nstruqtions. \
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The appealillg idea of crawling into!a hole, spen4ing
a few days underpound while bombs etplode' and *en
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:·emerging from thia alightly-inconvenient 1exisilce to --d
.a once-more normal life has sent a flood of Atil~rican+~ to
· the bomb shelter market.
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Inadequate Civil Defense leadership,! toge~her witlt a
misleading booklet, has led to a gener~l Phi\osophy ~ of
'every man for hintself and the devil.\&~ the Jtindmo~t."
Protection of one's family, however inadeqpate, naslbecqme
the foremost thought in the minds of almeilst everyone. H~
shelter even comes equipped with a gun 'l· to keEU> out ~he
more short-sighted neighbors' children. ,
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Little does he realize, or perhaps wan~ to rfalize, that
small family units afford no close-range jproteetion. C~il
Defense is th.e first to admit that "group spelters are m~re
effective for survival and reeovery than ~amil~ · shelteJii."
Even with further enlightenll)ent, the panip continu~s. The
reluctance of govemment ag~neies in taking ofer leadh·
ship only added ·to the present predicam;t. 0 vio1,1sly~ a
median progr~m is needed.
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At pres~nt, the administration seems !to b f6ilowi~g
the theory of Herman Kahn. In his book Ol;r THERMONUCLEAR WAR, Kahn states that (1) an a~equate civil defense in itself may invite a nuclear war w ile (2) an elaborate network of underground shelters co ld pro
\ voke oJ:le.
Obviously, a 1 median program is needed.
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With these ideas in mind, individual c~mmq.nity init~­
tive in construction of shelters would probf.
. bly iTe the bt$t
solution. This 4omestie program would not dd 1;() a :qatiopal preoccupatiQn with a nuclQar catastrop e an p~rhaj>s
!Vould relieve the American public of some of i m'O~e-li~e
Ideas.
j
v.iener rout. Welby
boDon.
pneented wlth a
neeklace wlth t h e
1L Attendallt. .Jan
Paula Sperry recelvbr&A~~e1ta.
Jay.
Wed$
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Passmore. ,
R~y
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W~dding vows were excb•d
by Spe Jay and Roy PIUISIIIiOftll'Jl
the~ctuary of tbe
tian
urch with the Rev.
Bre officiating·in the double
Clll-..•
CereiJtony.
Th~ bride is the daughter of
and Mrs. W. D. Jay, •U8 W.
The ~degroom is the eon
and lt(rs. John E. PMIDnore,
~·
Van Hoy wu the
of honor. Gloria '
Kanel. and Pat
were bridealaJda.
llarpret a,en aug ..0
lie Jle."
'1be ib rldepoom'l tatber
eel Jda· . . u beet JD&L
liP~ and Willen were
~• .Joe Tqlor, 8118de
wood. ~ Pld1 . . . . . . .
'Die paaple 18 Bww ill
wldle ~pletiltc deiNM at
eutem!
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('!E.,.... Art Club
Exhibits
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Japanese Prints
The gifted child face8 o.,..._,•• Need I• glftT
which the chUd of average a1IIJlQ
Potpourri
NEWS reports on
and radio say the
is sweepin' the nation.
people jus' haven't
here to SSC. Everycampus knows that
is old hat. The thing
"Bully-Gully." Yessir,
more like some kinda
cannibal rite then the
SPEAKIN' A DANCas how I can dance,
i!..'s conventional-type
t wasn't a sentence.)
was dancin' with this
n!ght. Pretty sharp
An alum of sse~
at-<, ... .,.~ callin' me "Ole
Ole Lady? It made
i t my wrinkles were
if he just thought I
was
because I
couldn
tht> "Hully-Gully". Or
what?
I'm not old. I do have
quite
oC mileage, though,
since
already been to two
rodeos,
goat-ropins and the
Dallas
BOY! THAT DALLAS Fair
all right. A little boy
asked me I knew why elephants
were grey Of course I bit and said
no. And
said, "So's you can tell
blueberries." I'll leave
f<·r you to meditate
usually doea not encounter. JlaD,y
times, for example, the 'gittecl cblld
is labeled aa being odd by other
children. others discourage bill talents because ~ey say they want
a well-rounded individual. Whether
or not this gifted .child becomea
this well-rounded individual and
more is an outcome determii:aed by the tJ'aining he teceives from
his teachers.
Hidden Talent
Is Discover.e.d
Did · you know that there are
many person8)ities on campus with
hidden talents and abilities?
Sometimes their talents and abilities don't exactly coincide with
their personalities.
Who would ever guess that assistant football coach, Wayne
Bower, can slt down at a plano and
play any type of music from classical to · boogie woogie?
That JoAnn Cavner, who has a
deep, resonant voice, can sing anything from torch songs to opera?
That Clabe Welch, who doesn't
look musically inclined, can pick
out just about any tune on his
guitar?
·That Georganne Wi.nn, who
looks most conservative as well as
charming, is an expert in the art
of doing "the twist" ?
And that Chick Lynch, who
looks like a most peaceful person,
is a big game hunter in his spare
time?
Life Starts
Explosio~
~
A newly-married Southeastern
couple seem to have started married life with a bang.
A fire truck, a po~ce car, and a
radio car were called to the scene
when _the car of ·Mr. and Mrs.
Do college students live in a vacuum? this ties ion ls Blackie B.-acken caught fire in
- unanswerable. Only observation can be ma~e.
' · ! Denison. ~
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A big percentage of tbe adult populatiop of tpe Uni~ The car talled at a stop light
sudde y became filled with
States is under the impre£Jsion that college ~tude!lts live ~ and
the strongj sntell of gas.- Then ..:
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a strait jacket of socializfng.
Blackle noticed ·smoke rising· from . ...
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hood aid was urgmg his Wife
The national pict.ure 1of ~ .typi~al colle~e stqdent ent- the
to safety ~
hE:n a laud explosion
braces a background of pubhc mus1c, supp9rted ~,by props shook the , ar.
·,
When th hood · was raised and
of coffe~ a.nd eiga.rettes. while the captio reams "HaV::e
flame
· guished, it was deyou .seen Paul' Newman's -~ ates~ movie?"
-~
1 the
cided that the only permanent
College students are ntore ~ware of current events than damage was ln. the wiring. Fortunany other gl'oup of people in the world. ?;heir ·:deas a~ ately, it d.n be repaired.
Above all the noise; M r s .
constantly being sharpened and rehewn wi~h the questiop Brack~n
(1:)-te former Wanda Mcof different philo opbies~ dif~erent theologies, ldiffereqt Coy) could be heard wailing, "But
political beliefs, and most important, different social cul- we just filled it with gas!"
In A
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Maca::.~e.wn
Sometimea Reond and thirdgrade children may seem to be
slighUy retarded. It is poulble that
they give this impression because
their teachers are not givblg them
work wfiichi8 81lfficiently challenging and difficult.
That was just one of the ideas
explored when the Southeastern
Reading Councu held a recent
meetirig on the campus.
"Our Gifted Readers 1n Southeastern Oklahoma" wu the toplc
discussed by a panel which waa
moderated by Dr. Lawrence Bafner, college director of nadine
studies. A n o t h e r Southeutenl
faculty member on the panel wu
Dr. Dorothy Biggtnbothem, had
of the speech clepa.rtm8llt.
The panel agreed tbat tile ~
child must be c:hallenpd. 'Die ~
son for thl8 18 that tbe ~
child 18 auperlor 1D 10 ~ . . , . .
He 18 partteularly euperlar Ill aD
areas of laaBU8C• denlo....-t. Iaeluding hie &bWty to artlaalate
sounda. He il al8o conoerMIII wttll
ethical va1uM and wlth JI'Ol'
concerninC lllt.ecratioD ua4 warld
peace.
A8 • cballeqe, the lifted e1dld
should be stven more work, .,.cl·
ally material wtnch wm
him to think. Bill currlcai1IID
should not be reatrtcted to 8C1Ioo1
The
Afrt Club of Southeaatem
featuring an exhibit' and ll&le
rare reproductioiUI of original lar
paneae pain~.
Included in these prints are
some brush stroke ori~ The
subjects depicted are of typt~
.Japanese! atmosphe.r e, tradltloilal
costume, 11andscape, and wildlife.,
These !Prints should make excellent &i!fts for Christmas and an
other ocdastons. The prices range
from . 50 pents to $5.75.
Anyon~· interested can see the
exhibit hich is currently being
shown in room 108 of the Administratfn Building.
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Col'le~el Players Elect \
Ba rne' To Presidency
The Cobege Players last week
elected .Tipl Barnes, Summerfield
sophomore, president. Jim had been
vice-presi~ent during the first part
of the semester. · He was also ontJ
of the student directors for "The
Matchmaker" and last spring played the part of Biff in ''Death of a
Salesman."
Carl Annstropg was elected Vice
president. 1Carl played Vandergelder in ~ Matchmaker" and is
one of th student directors for
"Southeas rn on the Air."
Plans w,re made for helping the
Speech DeJ~&rtment with the High
School S~hTournament.
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SER~CES
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SUCCe!
Fro1
the ~
by m~
Gir~
teams
Kant
Juana
Sandrt
Gwencl
ton, al
AVAILABLE
FOR ~uide for safari or
big game ~unting expedition quring holida~See Chick Lynch.
dAMPus
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tures. All of these tend to, produce an "enlightened" r r, ~t
the very least, an "interested" ln4ividual.
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Using the Latin .American countries and Franc~ anti
Japan as examples aa4 not qufstioning whether jthey a~e
right or wrong, but taJdDglinto consideration thalthey a~e
aware, answer this q eetion: Who is responsible or 1 mo~t
political :revolution 1
colle~ student. . .
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Does this not seqa
ib:~te an awareness · d
satisfaction with ';tJae
t
ue ?"The question
uaanswered and left
you to deeide. Do collegej1
live in a vacuum? '
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A man entered a Texas saloon
with a piece ot paper in his hand.
He explamed, "It's a list of all
the men I can whip."
''18 my' name on there?" demanded a bro9d-ahouldered ranch.
er menacingly.
"Yea."
"Well. you can't whip mel"
''Are ~ IIDIO abouL"tbatr.-"
- ''I right 1111re am," · Jae repUecS
u be rolled up bla IJeeYe.
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'"¥'817 weD," replied . the otller~ . . : ·' .
"I'D 'take ,ollr name ott the u.t." ·. · ·
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SOllf'BBASf'BBN. ~• .OHalo-
De~eat
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PhiUips, -Langdon ..
PAQB 'l'BIUIB
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Savages ·Post··TWo on1erence
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It was ·about like a drag ' race duced no less than lS9 fouls, 33
between a '62 Corvette and a tank being chatgea to the Savages and
Saturday night when the South- 26 to the Lions. However, the Sui•
eastern Savages took off like a ·uvans· topped the visitors in the
rocket then lib: rally 'coasted to a free 'throw department by a wide
tl0-55 victory over the helpless edge 38-~. · ·
Langston Lions.
The Savages also topped the
It was the seeond Oklahoma losers iD. the field goal category,
Collegiate Conference win of tli~ scot;ng 26 two-pointers to ~season• for coach Bloomer Sui- ton's 16. .
.
,
!ivan's hardboarders and their
At· one st~tch during · the first
fourth of the youthful cage 8e&-_ half, Southeastern held the invadson against a single defeat. ~- er8 scoreless for seven minutes, a
loss was Langston's second in, loop time dUring wliich it jracked up 17
play.
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ppinta i~lf.
At one time during tbe lop-aided . ' Denver Bearden played a whale
contest, the Savages boasted a C50 of. 5lefensive game, b,olding Lang-10 inargtn. this comllla with 2'7 aton's Donald ,JC4lell to a mere two
aecond8 rematnlng in the tlnlt balf. points; tboee comJDc on a "poeue"
6' 8" Connie McGuire led tbe shot from .0 feet out. At tlmM.
Southeastern offenaive with 21 JC)Dea probably felt like ju8t lwldpointa to lead an aconn. The lng . Bearden the bell ,8Jld bea'"ng
Stigler product wu joiJled by for the aowen.
three teammates in the ~4)
Southeaitem acored·tta !lnt conf1gurea colUDUL Rlcbud lludnw terence :~ctory . . . . . . Pldlllpa
came in MCOnd with 14 polat.l. Ullivel'ld~ l'rtday DIPt by a M-41
while BUly Medley &Dd Karvbi ~ I .
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Adams flnJibed with 11 aad 10
'!'be Sa~ grabbed an early
tallies, respectively. lead and beiCl em u IUdlard llalThe tlghtly-officlated game pro- drew ~ted' for
pobltll, and
ad
1e
IIICLPJllfG 'l'IIB M
. . . . tlllllr ..... willa ftBB&w
.................. A...... MJiedropala ... J £&~tile~.
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OPC Girls Win Tigers Fall \
Voilleyball Title To Savages
Oklahoma Presbyterian CoHege
girls were top Winners in women's
intramural volleyball.
OPC's No. 1 team placed first
the competition. Freshman
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The Southeastern Savages copp1
ed their first two wins of
1961-62 baSketball November ~5
and 25 as th.ay swept a week~'d
series ·from Ouachita Baptist~
Co
lege.
Fighters . placed second and were
Friday night the two teams m t
followed by OPC's No. 2 team.
in the SouthEAStern fieldho
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Represented in the tournament with the Savages coming dut Ofl
were OPC teams No. 1 and 2, top 53-39 befor~: a large holiday
Freshman Fighters
Misguided turnout. Leading scorer for thF
Missiles, Alpha Ta~ Plus, and Savages· was center Connie McV 'RA teams K, J, and B.
Guire wi~ 19. points.
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Mlere were more teams entered 1 It was Southeastern all the way
this year than in the past, which aSt Richard Muldrew hit a flel1
made for a more interesting and goal with only 14 seconds gonf
successful intramural.
in the game and the lead w~
From the eight teams entered never relinquished. Second. in scor
the all-school team was chosen ing was Marvin Adams W1th 13.
by majority vote.
Saturday night the •two team1
Girls chos"n for the an-school metj n Nasbville, Ark., for a benet
teams are Sulu Ulufale, Neenah fit game sponsored by the NashKaniatobe1 Brenda Wingert, Tia ville Booster CJub.
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Juana Hattenaty, Lilllan Tho.mas,
Again W was Southeastern ~
Sandra Austin. Jan Kennedy, command with a 67-53 win. Muli
Gwendolyn Glendale, Carolyn Skel- drew copped individual honors ~
ton, and Margie Battice.
he bucketed 22 points.
1:Jle
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tor
the
jgh
SIC FLIC
eomp.e McGuire chimed in with another 11.
THE BOX SOOBE
Laagstoli.
fg ft-fta pf tp
Wilson
5
3- 7
4 132
Williams
0
2- 8
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Rogers
• 1
0- 1
5
2
7
Townsend
3
1- 4
1
Austin
0
1- 1
3
1
Dixon
3
4- 6
S 10
Davia
1 11-13
2 11
Jones
1 0- 2 1
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.JohnSon
2
0- 1
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TOTALS
18 ZI..:H •
II
Soatbeutern
Adamll
Bearden
4
0
Walk•
2
2
JlcDUIIel
2
JluJdrew
KcOalre
8
2
)(ed)ey
JacJiaon
lfcl.more
11.utiJ1
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wmtauwon
staple8
1
0
1
0
1
'- 4
~- 4
2- 2
10-U
15- 1
'- 15
15- 8
7-
p1
tp
1
10
4
•
2
J
2 14
J
4
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a
o- o a
0
o
0- I
0- 1
o- 0
0- 0
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11
ll
1
1
1
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1
0
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T0'1'AL8
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llalftame Seore 880 ... ' · rta 1&
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en go oa tlae 1'.-d tlda Weeaa4 ·
for two more CIOIIIenDce ....._
They meet .,.......,.. Aall Fll,.,.
da.y. mpt. at. Goodwell. aad· .
Northweetem 8atarday Jdpt a& .
Alva. n wm be t1ae sa...-• . During ,the Thanksgiving· holitlrst came wttb PM""nd•e. new . days, · several Southeastern stu. dentS and one faculty member ento the coofereDce.
tered the woOds of southeastern
Oklahoma in pursuit o1l the elusive
·
deer. and caine· back successful.
The new spring class schedule
Troy~ McGovern. an. able hunter,
is out in a new fonnat. This year · was 'lbe only faculty member to
it's in a booklet form.
bag deer~ season;
: We wonder. if McGovern will enTeLoa Hode.r , .Joan Parker, Vi joy el\.ting tlte deer as much as
Whitfield, Royce Hull and Fran he will riding his unsuccessful
Terry, fonner Southeastern stu- hun tingo professors?
dents came back to see the Sav- · McGovem'.s buck was a 10-point
ages beat Ouachita over the and dressed out at 121 pounds.
Thanksgiving holidays.
" .
. Strikee AgalD
The great -white hunter, Doe
We nee41 teachers nen semester; Glinton, successful for the last
Salaries M.~·t8400 In fields ol tf!ree year's, collec ted again this
En gUsh, . Sp&D.Jslt, Math, Sclenee, fa.IJ.
The story goes that they don't
Girls' .t ~oys' P.E., IDdna. A.rtl,
Mnsle, Home Ee., Soc. Stadlea, ·know for sure if it was. a deer for
Ubrarr & ElementarJ'. In new when it was drE"ssed it r'eighed al11chool open next semester. Lee most 49. pounds.
Nix Teaeben ~gene7, D11r-~
. The nimor going around campus
Old&. Ph. W A. 4·000.
is that Doe &('tually killed Bambi.
· Don't worry,- Doe, e~ryone believes-. you when you say it had
eight points even though they were
still under his skull
.Rip :Van ·non Tucker woke up
long ·enough to miss a large buck
~t ,:wa.S" sqm<;lfng all of 15 feet
away. :
Don had a good reason · for his
misfortune• though. alibis, alibis,
for he clailped . the pattern of his
gun was too small f~r such close
range. _ . : .
.The guys who were on the camping ' trip With Don all agreed that
what. Don suffered from was an
old ailment kncwn as bUck fever.
Robert. (Pup) Wade was another
Broken Bow -native who tried for
a deer.
.
· The story goes that Robert stayed ' 'OUt a little late the night before and couldn:t stay awake opening d&y.
'
While sl~eping bestde a tree he
was suddenly awakened by thundering hoofs. He made a quick
dive for cover and was successful -in keeping from being trampled· by a big buck.
'. Robert ~ways was a pretty alert
a
ing, ate a big breakfast, and left
for the wood&
Jerry was~ not even seated wbeB
n big buck appeared on the BCeDe.
Immediately Jerry shot. Be
missed on· the first shot. Tbe deer
did not know where .Jerry was aad
circled back so Jerry C!)uld have a
second try.
The buck was an 11-point and
dressed out at 115 pounds.
Perhaps the funniest story of
all concerns Charles Lynch.
AD Prepared
Charles bought a new gun, aeveral boxes of ltigh powered shells.
three cleaning kits, , and two skinning knives to take on the hunting trip.
He stayed in the woods for five
days and never saw a deer.
Maybe Chicken should · have
bought a camera to take pictures
of the scenery.
Richard Orr bagged a 105-pound
eight polnt buck.
This should help to prove that
Broken Bow boys know where to
hunt.
Coll·e ge Graduate
Arrives In Germany
For Military Duty
0
or
1r-
3
sweeten
'
~ ft•tta.
·. Great White Hunters Pursue
·Defenseless Mc:Curtain Deer
BULLETIN ·
Saa~
w·11s
0
BAUMHOLDER, G E R ll ANY
(AHTNC)- Army Capt. Nonua
T. Morse, whose wife, Jo, 11-v. Ill
Durant, Okla., recently arrived Ill
Germany and is now antped -to
the 8th Infantry Division.
. A communications o~cer Ill
Headquarters of the division's 11th
Artillery tn Baumholder, C&ptala
Morse entered the Army in liNG
and was assigned to the u. s.
Army Recruiting Service•in Sacramento, · C&lif., before his an1V&I
overseas on this tour of duty.
The 38-year-old oficer, aon of
Charles Morse, 435 Taylor at., Top~ka, ·~an., is a 1940 graduate ot"
Topeka High School and a 1811
graduate of Southeasterp State
College in Durant, Okla.
Don Overton former ss~ audent and bas.ttetball ~ at Sul· ' Beetle Bangs
. Jerry •·Beetle" Bailey was the phur Sptings \7as sche<fuled to be
luckiest hunter in McCurtain inducted into the Anny December
county. ·· ·
the first but was deferred until the
· Jerry &"Ot up_late Friday mom- end of the basketball season.
~Y·
0
. .
.~
Flat-Top Headquarters For Texomaland
"Every-fra~rnity_ needs
·some kind otmascot..:' ,
.l
-l
- i s_-
.
··. JOH'N T·ALLEY'S
, M~IN_ STREET BARBkR SHOP
··
·Gharles Cindie
Turk Vaughan
John Talley
. Tues Thru Fri. 7 :30 - 5 :30 - Sat. 7 :SO - 6 :80
313 V(. Main
Air C~
WA 4·9DO
> •
•
THE StJf!TBEASTBRN,
WEDNESDAY, PECEMBER 6,
Medical School
Is On,Horrizon
For Molfeit
Some 110 highacbool e<l1UC~Ltoll'S4!~-------4-....:._--+---:-'-­
attended the conference
al fitness Friday in the S01ltbeastPatience a.nd perseverance have
ern gymnasium.
finally paid off for Thomas MofThe importance ot school-cenfeit with acceptance to the Oklat red physical activity was stres$homa medical school for the school
et.l by Henry Vaughan of the State
year 1962-63.
Department <'f EducaUen.
The Brownsbol'o, Texas, native
Im·itation-wa. ext.encledi
Vaughan recalled tbat a genere-carries
an over-all 3.7 grade point
tion ago this activity was taken bers of the SouUteastEirri
average at South~astern.
of
Pi
Omega
Pi,
uw:un•t::m
care of by the parents through
Ih addition to . his studies, he
nity, by Mr. and
household tasks.
works a full 40-hour week at the
b rt. both former
Now automation ~ea taakiB business education
Bryan Memorial Hospital.
away from the yow.,aters and two_
Moffett has had a m~cal career
Dallas business
delegates them to a. machines.
as a life-time goal and choae sse
The group vtsited
Watching television Ia
tbe strument~. where
because of the high rate of acmajor activi~y at home so the employed, and a dAtlfu•tm,..r.t
ceptance into medical school achschool is given the job of ~eepin• ternational DUIJIDeBS IMII.CIIIiJlE!S
ieved by its students.
the children physically iJt.
Acceptance comes after many
which Colbert is atlt11111Lte<1.
Demonstrations by glade-school
years
of work. For 11 years he
Business
majors
..
~~~AUl~
children of Ro})ert E. l.ee schOol
worked in the Kress chain store
and by the girls ph)'Bical edUC&• w e r e Marilyn
line and was manager of the Mction classes 0~ sse abowed how Hughes, .Joan -u .. ~...~~
Alester store at the time he enterber
on,
Dane
activity can be started early and
ed Southeastern.
Judy Rhoades,
maintained into adulthood.
Married and the father of \wo
Dr. Don Parham conducted the Ann Traxler, and
1
sons, Moffeit v.;ll be versed in the
program, Dr. Bernice Crockett
rigors of studying and should add
was in charge ot reglatration, and
another chapter to Southeastern's
Dr. Bertha Treadaway put the
success story.
energetic grade-schoolel'll and 004
eds through tl·~ir piOe8. She ~
as~isted by Ka~ Hogan and Jim·
The Teke hcuse h~ tak~n on a
An ailing Indian was visited by
mte Lemons, Southeastern phy- new look.
r·
,,
another Indian in the hospital.
sical educati~n majora.
.Jerry Brewer, Teke pled~ train- Asked how he felt, the Indian aner, directed the m+ in ria.inting swered how he felt, the Indian
· t e rior o f the h o e. rrll-the m
_: ·re walls answered, ''Ugh."
of the living room/ 'hall, ~ dining
" And how you like nurse?" the
room, and upstairs ~1 haye been other Indian asked.
painted grey with wtpte ce~lings.
''Ugh, ugh, ugh!" the ailing In·
A new couch ant chair were dian said.
bought by two of ~ meJitbers.
"I ask simple question," his
New rose C(lrduroy drap's have friend frowned. "Don't make long
. ·
were• held Baday for been ordered for ~e llvin~ room. speech."
now
Tekle Resi"-ce IGets
New Face Lifti. .
BapiiSflJIUI
I
Dedbtes
Ervtces
1
the dedication of tae . - Baptilt
Student Union CbapeL Tile bi·
vocation was giva flY 1Awla
Barker, BSU facuiQ advl8or.
Music chairman I«<nde J'anDer
Stringtown junJor, W ~
ttonal singing ,and Ol,ada CooP*.
=
REPRESENTING SOPHOMOJD:S In tbe Stulleat Senate
~SE ~
------,
d.-
Tareyton
delivers
the flavor... .
.,.pus
I
.-
Art Club ............
n ...
New
,.
....a
,.
~:
~
O.Nilm
WHITE
Tom Davis, •Spring gram.J;,
IS SATURDAY
visited the campus last week j d
The ballroom will be transfonn- to att~nd Tau Kappa Epsilon
ed Saturday night into a magical nual Red Carnation Ball.
Christmas lnnd for
the annual
formal dance of the Sigma Tau
1
Gamma fraternity, the White Rose
··
·
Ball.
Will power. ~ bee": ~tly
Music will be provided by a nine-~8Cribed as the ~ility to eat on~ 1
piece band ~ OSU.
salted peanut.
-
Hartahorne juntor, .... "Bleil
this Houee".
Principal speakera ~ sse
president Dr. A~ E. -.r, state
BSU director Cl)'CM
uul
Dr. L . L. Armstrong,
of the
First Baptist Church,
, Tellas. Dr. Armstrpna, ~ly of
First Baptist ChUrch, Durant, was
pastor-adviser of the
organization in 1962 wha the present student center balldlng was
dedicated
Current B S U putoio-advieer,
Rev. E. R. Cagle of J'air9lew Bap.
tist Church here, led tbe dedication prayer.
1
A committee of local c!lureh women headed by Mrs. ~Dwight,
wt1e of sse math prot1110r Dr.
Leslie Dwight, was In charge of a
reception held after the eervtce.
liN
McVay and Dale Wood.

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