Dueto musical entretiene en fiestas, bodas Bill would attract more

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Dueto musical entretiene en fiestas, bodas Bill would attract more
BILINGÜEBILINGUAL
GRATISFREE
www.vidaenelvalle.com
ENTERTAINMENT/ FARÁNDULA
SPORTS/DEPORTES
B-1
Ana de la Reguera is one of
many Mexican actors that have
opted to find a spot in Hollywood. Ana de
la Reguera es una de muchos actores
mexicanos que han llegado a Hollywood.
en el valle
Serving California’s Central Valley
B-1
Milton Blanco and the Fresno
Fuego are one charged up
soccer club. Milton Blanco y el Fuego de
Fresno llevan 22 partidos sin perder.
•••••
Week of July 20, 2011
Volume 21 • No. 29
LOCAL
Students
search for
solutions
Oswaldo
López, of
Madera, won
the 135-mile
Badwater
Ultramarathon./ Oswaldo
López, de
Madera, ganó
el Ultramaratón
Badwater de
135 millas.
Learn about economy
in fact-finding tour
By CYNTHIA MORENO
Vida en el Valle
F
RESNO — While some students
are riding the wave of the economic meltdown, others are looking to find solutions to the problem
— even if they have to use their entire summer vacation to do it.
“These are very interesting
times. We are witnessing a rise in
injustices and political structures
that are failing us,” said Maira
Pérez, 15, a sophomore at Kentlake
High School in Kent, Wash., who visited Fresno last week.
Pérez and 40 other students are
traveling to cities in the western
United States, including in California, Oregon and Washington, to
learn about the localized effects of
the economic crisis.
The 13-member group made a
pit stop in Fresno as part of its tour,
meeting with various community
leaders and organizations.
“Fresno definitely has a different
set of problems that set it apart
from other parts of the state that
we have visited so far,” said tour
participant Stephanie Martínez, 21,
a graduate of Oakland’s Castlemont
High School.
Pérez and Martínez decided to
forgo their summer fun to tour 11
cities in California that are suffering because of the economy. The
tour, which kicked off in early June,
is expected to last through mid-August.
The two were selected in the
spring to represent their communities as part of a collaboration be-
JUAN ESPARZA
LOERA
Vida en el Valle
Oswaldo López wins race, hearts
+ First of two parts.
By JUAN ESPARZA LOERA
B
Vida en el Valle
ADWATER — It is 102 degrees at
10 a.m. July 11 when Oswaldo
López steps up to the starting
line of the Badwater Ultramarathon, deemed the world’s most difficult
footrace.
When told the temperature would
soon reach 118 degrees, the 39-year-old
Madera resident simply relished the
thought.
“Hey, that’s great!” replied López.
Less than 24 hours later — after traversing 135 miles from the lowest point in
the western hemisphere (Badwater at
282 feet below sea level) to the Mt. Whitney Portal (the doorway to the highest
point in the contiguous United States at
14,994 feet) — López crossed the finish
line more than an hour ahead of secondplace Ryoichi Sekiya and a world-class
field that included former champions
Zach Gingerich and Marcos Farinazzo.
The trumpet player for Mariachi de la
Tierra clocked in at 23 hours, 41 minutes
and 40 seconds — the fourth fastest on
record and almost an hour faster than his
2009 time.
“I want to dedicate this race to México,” López said shortly after being chased
to the finish line by his six-man support
crew, who triumphantly waved Mexican
flags.
O
swaldo’s journey began in Chiquilistlán, Jalisco, about an hour from
Guadalajara. The second-oldest of five children of mariachi musicians, he began playing when he was 8 years old.
“We played all over the country,” said
López, whose favorite mariachi tune is ‘La
Pelea de los Gallos’ (The Cockfight) because of its emphasis that only the fittest
will survive and triumph.
López moved to the United States in
1991 to continue his music career, and
played trumpet for the Fresno-based Mexican band Faceta 4 for about four years.
Badwater race director Chris Kostman
calls López, who stands 5-6 and weighs
145 pounds, “the world’s thinnest mariachi.”
Kostman also sees López as the best ambassador the Badwater Ultramarathon
could have.
“Last year, he came in not longer after
the winner, Zach Gingerich, and he immediately ran over, shook his hand and hugged
him and gave him a Mexican flag,” said Kostman. “He’s such a sportsman, and has so
much class.
“His energy is amazing! Whenever I pull
up next to him in the car to take some pictures or something and I say ‘Looking
good!’ or ‘Good race!’ or something, in a
millisecond he’ll say, ‘THANK YOU
CHRIS!!!’
“His mother raised him well.”
I
t is not yet noon and López’s crew —
bunched inside a 1991 Ford Econoline
van that on other occasions ferries the
Faceta 4 band and its instruments — is
worried it does not have enough ice.
They quickly arrange for four bags of
ice at Furnace Creek, 17.4 miles from the
starting line. The temperature is already
approaching 120 degrees.
López passes by at 12:26 p.m., trailing
Gingerich, Sekiya, Farinazzo and Mike
Wardian.
Ahead are many other runners who
started at either 6 a.m. or 8 a.m. At Furnace Creek, the runners will be allowed
to have a pacer who can provide water,
Gatorade or words of encouragement.
That runner is not allowed to run beside
or in front of the runner.
STUDENTS ` A-8
Buscan
soluciones
económicos
F
RUNNER ` A-3
HEALTH/SALUD
Bill would attract more doctors to the Valley
By REBECCA PLEVIN
Vida en el Valle
S
ACRAMENTO — Dr. Rogelio
Fernández, a family-medicine
physician and associate medical officer at United Health Centers in
Parlier, knows firsthand the challenges of recruiting physicians to
the medically under-served San
Joaquín Valley.
A 2010 study by the California
Health Care Foundation revealed a
general shortage of physicians
statewide, with a shortage of primary-care physicians in six out of nine
regions.
Experts say that recruiting physicians to rural community clinics,
which might not pay as well as private health care facilities or hospitals, is particularly difficult. Finding
NEGOCIO/BUSINESS
doctors familiar with regional languages and cultures is also challenging.
Proposed legislation, however,
could help attract more doctors to
the San Joaquín Valley.
Assembly Bill 589, “Helping Doctors Provide Care in Underserved
Communities,” would create a
scholarship program providing as
much as $105,000 a year to medical-
Por MARTÍN E. MARTÍNEZ
Dueto musical S
entretiene en
fiestas, bodas
Vida en el Valle
ACRAMENTO — Con toda
una vida dentro de la música, el matrimonio OspinaHoyos es uno de los duetos en
Sacramento más reconocidos
dentro del ambiente de eventos y fiestas.
María Berenice Hoyos y
Mario Alonso Ospina conforman el dueto Osasis Musical,
con el cual ya tienen más de 9
BRIEFS • A-5 • BREVES
VIDA - VIDA - 1 - 07/20/11 ( A1 )
Printed 07/18/11 22:36
años tocando en eventos sociales y se conformaron como negocio hace un año y medio.
“Al principio nunca pensamos que al llegar a Sacramento
desde nuestra natal Colombia
íbamos a dedicarnos a la música profesionalmente, sin embargo, las cosas se dieron y
ahora esa es nuestra manera
de vida,” comentó Hoyos, de 44
años.
La pareja acude a todo tipo
de eventos como bodas, quin-
EVENTS • A-5 • EVENTOS
C MY K
school students who agree to practice medicine in one of the state’s
200 designated medically underserved areas upon graduation.
The bill, introduced by Assemblyman Henry T. Perea, D-Fresno, has
gained approval from the Senate
Health Committee, and faces consideration by the Senate Appropria-
DOCTORS ` A-2
ceañeras, y eventos privados.
En una semana pueden acudir
a tres diferentes eventos, lo
cual les provee todo lo necesario para estar bien económicamente.
Los dos cantantes ya se conocían desde Colombia y ambos
decidieron venir a Sacramento
para estudiar música en la Universidad Estatal de California,
RESNO — Mientras que algunos
estudiantes están siendo afectados por la crisis económica, otros
están buscando soluciones al problema – aún si tienen que utilizar
todas sus vacaciones de verano para
hacerlo.
“Estos tiempos son muy interesantes. Estamos siendo testigos de
un aumento en injusticias y en estructuras políticas que nos están fallando,” dijo Maira Pérez, de 15
años de edad, estudiante del doceavo grado en la escuela preparatoria
Kentlake en Kent, Washington.
Pérez, junto con otros 40 jóvenes, están viajando por varias ciudades de todo el oeste de los Estados
Unidos, incluyendo California, Oregón y Washington para aprender
sobre los efectos que la crisis económica ha causado a nivel local.
Apenas la semana pasada, su
grupo de 13 integrantes llegó a Fresno como parte de su gira y se reunió
con varios líderes comunitarios y organizaciones.
“Fresno definitivamente tiene un
conjunto de problemas diferente
que lo aparta de las otras partes del
estado que hasta ahora hemos visitado,” dijo la participante de la gira
Stephanie Martínez, de 21 años, graduada de la preparatoria Castlemon
de Oakland.
Ambas mujeres decidieron sacrificar su diversión de verano para visitar las 11 ciudades en California
que están sufriendo debido a la economía. Se espera que la gira, que inició a principios de junio, dure hasta
NEGOCIO ` A-2
EDITORIAL • A-11 • COMMENTARY
ESTUDIANTES ` A-8
++++++++
WEDNESDAY A1 VIDA-VIDA
Logical Page is VIDA/PAGES [A01]

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