valley - Great Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc.

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valley - Great Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc.
The Valley Times-News
Valley - Lanett - Fredonia - West Point - Shawmut - Langdale - Fairfax - River View - Huguley - LaFayette - Beulah - Cusseta
VOL. LVI NO. 147
NEWS AND ADVERTISING (334) 644-1101
GREAT LAKES BREAKS GROUND IN CUSSETA — On Monday morning, Great Lakes
Metal Stamping Inc. became the first company to break ground on a manufacturing plant in
the Cusseta Industrial Park in a special groundbreaking ceremony. The event was well attended by local dignitaries and residents. For more photos from Monday’s groundbreaking and luncheon, go to page 2 in today’s edition of The Valley Times-News. Shown above, from left:
Chambers County Commissioner Charles Hardage, IDA President Bobby Jones, Sen. Gerald
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2006
LANETT, AL — 14 PAGES — 50¢
Dial, Lanett Mayor Oscar Crawley, LaFayette Mayor Robert Finley, Rep. Richard Laird, David
Hutchinson of the Alabama Development Office, Keith Hettig of Great Lakes Metal Stamping
Inc., Betty Hettig of Great Lakes Metal Stamping Inc., John Averrett, Chambers County Commissioners Danny Kendrick, David Eastridge, Wayne White, Rosa Dunn and Debbie Wood and
Rep. DuWayne Bridges. (Photo by Patrick Sands)
Great Lakes Metal Stamping breaks ground in Cusseta
By PATRICK SANDS
VT-N Staff Writer
CUSSETA — On Monday morning local dignitaries and residents welcomed Great Lakes Metal
Stamping Inc. (GLMS) of
Bridgman, Mich., as the first
company to locate a manufacturing facility in the Cusseta Industrial Park with a
special groundbreaking ceremony.
GLMS
will
produce
stamped metal components
along with welded and
mechanically fastened sub-
assemblies for the rapidly
growing automotive industry in the South.
The facility will represent
an initial capital investment
of approximately $3.5 million
with
employment
expected to exceed 50 associates when fully operational.
It will occupy an estimated
10 acres within the Cusseta
Industrial Park and will initially cover 30,000 square
feet with expansion plans of
up to 80,000 square feet.
IDA President Bobby
Jones told Keith and Betty
Hettig of GLMS that after
Commissioners wrestle with 2007 budget
THE VALLEY TIMES-NEWS
LaFAYETTE — The
Chambers County Commission wrestled with its 2007
budget Monday during a
work session, and decided it
will take one more session
before a formal budget can
be adopted.
Following the passage of
the equalization sales tax
last week, some of the financial pressure on the budget-
ing process had been
relieved. However, commissioners are still dealing with
an unknown quantity (no
one is certain what the new
sales tax will generate) and
even when it joins the county revenue stream, the commissioners will be a third
through the 2007 fiscal year.
New County Manager
Don Hoyt told commissioners that he had worked up
some budget numbers based
on actual 2006 fiscal year
spending. The 2006 fiscal
year ends Sept. 30, so Hoyt
said the actual expenditures
to date will be very close to
the end-of-the-year numbers.
Hoyt pointed out that the
proposed budget prepared
by interim County Manager
John Dendy had been based
on
projected
revenues
applied to 2006 budget numbers, not necessarily 2006
actual expenditures.
Commission Chairman
Wayne White acknowledged
the work done by Hoyt, but
noted the commissioners
had been working with the
budget documents prepared
by Dendy and were more
familiar with that approach.
County Engineer Henry
Hawkins agreed with Hoyt’s
comment that the budget
can be adopted and then
•See BUDGET, page 3
today they “were no longer
guests.”
Chambers County Commission Chairman Wayne
White thanked the Hettigs
for choosing Chambers
County.
“The Chambers County
Commission will work with
you in any way that we can,”
he said. “We are glad to have
you here.”
State Sen. Gerald Dial
said that this day is an
example of what happens
when
everyone
works
together for one common
goal.
“This is just the beginning
for this county and area,” he
said.
Rep. Richard Laird said
that he looked forward to a
prosperous relationship with
GLMS.
He noted that the state
has people on the ground
making sure that the area is
ready for the opportunity
presented with Kia locating
just across the border in
Georgia.
“Thanks for the hard
work,” he said. “We are
ahead of the game and will
stay ahead of the game.”
Rep. DuWayne Bridges
thanked the Hettigs for having faith in the area.
“You’ll always be number
one,” he said. “We appreciate
the faith and trust you have
placed in us. Today is not the
result of one, two, three or
four, it is the culmination of
hundreds of people wanting
you to come to Alabama. We
are proud to have you as our
neighbor.”
Jones echoed Bridges
remarks about this being a
“team effort.”
“We received a great deal
•See GLMS, page 3
Valley to hold public hearing on cable TV franchise renewal
By WAYNE CLARK
VT-N News Editor
VALLEY — The Valley
City Council has unanimously approved a resolution calling for a public hearing to be held at Valley Community Center to allow citizens of Valley, Lanett and
the surrounding area to ask
a representative, or representatives, of Charter Communications questions about
the quality of service the
cable company is providing
to the local area.
“We’ve gotten a lot of complaints about their service,”
Mayor Arnold Leak said.
“I’ve talked to Mayor (Oscar)
Crawley and City Manager
(Joel) Holley, and they told
me they’d been getting complaints in Lanett, too. A public hearing would give citizens in both cities a chance
to ask questions and to
express complaints, if they
have any.”
County pushes bridge replacement
THE VALLEY TIMES-NEWS
LaFAYETTE — Chambers County is getting some
additional state funding for
road resurfacing and is asking the state for additional
help on what may be the
most dangerous bridge in
Chambers County.
County Engineer Henry
Hawkins told commissioners
Monday during their regular
meeting that the state has
approved an additional
$325,800 in federal aid funding for the resurfacing of
County Road 266 (Stateline
Road).
Hawkins said the total
project is estimated to cost
$845,427.14, with the county
responsible
for
almost
$170,000 of the total.
Hawkins said a letter
from District 3 Commissioner Danny Kendrick had been
instrumental in getting the
additional state funding. In
his letter, Kendrick noted
the road’s proximity to the
new Kia plant in Georgia
and that with associated
development County Road
266 would have additional
school bus traffic and extensive development.
The project will resurface
Stateline Road from County
Road 222 to County Road
278.
Commissioners
also
agreed to a resolution
requesting the state to
•See BRIDGE, page 7
Charter’s franchise in Valley is set to be renewed in
April 2007. City officials
want to have a good feel
from the public by then on
what direction to take – to
either renew Charter’s franchise with a clear commitment on their part for better
service or to go with another
service.
Most of the complaints
about Charter surrounds the
fact that there’s not a local
person they can talk to if
they have a question about a
bill, if they’re having prob-
lems with reception, or if
they want to know something about programming. If
they go to the local office,
personnel there will tell
them they’re just a collection
service; if they have a problem they have to call out-ofstate. This usually means
talking to a computer and a
long wait till someone gets
on the line.
Councilman
James
McDowell expressed some
frustration about this several months ago and told fel-
•See VALLEY, page 7
Mayor cautions citizens
about pie-in-sky rumors
By WAYNE CLARK
VT-N News Editor
VALLEY — Mayor Arnold
Leak is cautioning the public
to be wary of pie-in-the-sky
rumors they could be hearing. “I can’t tell you how
many times I’ve heard outrageous things. Sometimes it
doesn’t happen, and sometimes it’s better than the
rumors,” he said.
An example of an outrageous one was offered by
Planning and Development
Director Allen Hendrix at
Monday evening’s city council meeting. “It’s not true
that a high-rise housing
development is going to be
built on Shawmut Circle,” he
said.
Mayor Leak said that
rumors and wild speculation
can be expected to happen,
given the kind of growth
that will be going on locally
with the Kia auto plant coming to West Point. One example of what’s to come took
•See RUMOR, page 7
LaFayette City Council
approves 2007 budget
By PATRICK SANDS
VT-N Staff Writer
HEART WALK WILL BE NOV. 7 — Lanier Health Services sponsored the American Heart
Association Red Cap Breakfast to kick off the preparations for the annual Heart Walk on Nov.
7, 2006 at Rams Stadium in Valley. Chairperson Dr. Kris Reddy spoke to the group about heart
disease and Bill Scott talked about the importance of exercise and diet and healthy lifestyle
changes. Shown above, from left are Jennifer Horne of the American Heart Association, Patsy
Mckenzie, Bill Scott, Lanier CEO Bob Humphrey, Dr. Kris Reddy, Diane Adair and Nancy
Washburn. (Photo by Patrick Sands)
LaFAYETTE
— The
LaFayette City Council
voted
unanimously
to
approve the 2006-07 proposed budget at Monday
night’s regular council meeting.
The proposed expenses
are $11,692,217 with estimated
receipts
of
$11,264,200 and the depreciation
amount
being
$428,880, leaving a cash balance of $863. Funds were
included for another ambulance and an estimate for a
grant writer.
The council received an
update on the city park from
Chuck Blanton.
Blanton told the council
that the “Fun Festival” was a
success that was pulled off
with class and dignity. The
event came out ahead in
money and those funds will
be used for the first project
of replacing the shingles and
decking on the barbecue
grill.
He said that he envisions
a number of smaller barbecue areas throughout the
park.
Mayor Robert Finley told
Blanton that the council
appreciated everything that
GOOD
DAY
Bible Thought
Verily, verily, I say unto
you, He that heareth my
word, and believeth on him
that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come
into condemnation; but is
passed from death unto life.
John 5:24
Weather
Temperature
Yesterday’s High . . . . . . 75°
Yesterday’s Low . . . . . . 52°
Today at 8 AM . . . . . . . 54°
Rainfall
Yesterday’s Rainfall . 0.00”
Month to Date . . . . . . 5.15”
Year to Date . . . . . . 29.18”
More Weather . . . . . . . . . 9
Lake Elevation
West Point Lake
Today . . . . . . . . . . . . 630.19
Yesterday . . . . . . . . 630.83
Full Pool . . . . . . . . . 635.00
Generation . . . . . 2pm-8pm
(Generation schedule is subject to change without notice)
Water Temp . . . . . . . . . 82°
Lottery
Georgia Fantasy 5
7-10-18-30-38
Georgia Cash 3-Monday
8-0-3 (PM)
Florida Fantasy 5
16-20-25-30-33
Inside Today
Briefly Told . . . . . . . . . 12
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Crossword . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Dear Abby . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Lifestyles . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Stock Market . . . . . . . . 12
TV Schedule . . . . . . . . . 9
•See COUNCIL, page 5
Check out The Valley Times-News Online Edition at www.valleytimes-news.com
Page 2 — The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006
Scenes from Great Lakes Metal
Stamping Inc.’s
Groundbreaking and Luncheon
Monday, September 25, 2006
GREAT LAKES METAL STAMPING INC. BREAKS GROUND — On Monday morning at 10
a.m., dignitaries and local residents welcomed Great Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc. to the Cusseta Industrial Park in a special groundbreaking ceremony. Great Lakes Metal Stamping is the
first company to locate a manufacturing facility in the Cusseta Industrial Park. Based in Bridgman, Mich., Great Lakes will produce stamped components along with welded and mechanically fastened subassemblies for the rapidly growing automotive industry in the South. The
new Great Lakes facility will occupy approximately 10 acres within the Cusseta Industrial Park
and will initially cover approximately 30,000 square feet with expansion plans of 80,000 square
feet. Keith Hettig said that when he and his wife Betty met Chambers County IDA Director
Valerie Gray, that she “took our hearts.” He said that the company was looking for a place to
be at home and that this area was just that. “We are anxious to get started,” Hettig said. “We
look forward to being a part of your community.” (Photo by Patrick Sands)
BREAKING GROUND — Shown above, Keith and Betty Hettig (center and right) of Great
Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc. join David Hutchinson (left) of the Alabama Development Office on
Monday breaking ground at the Cusseta Industrial Park. Great Lakes will be the first company
to build a manufacturing facility in the Cusseta Industrial Park which is located on Interstate 85
at Exit 70. (Photo by Patrick Sands)
LOCAL DIGNITARIES ATTEND GROUNDBREAKING — Shown above are Chambers
County Commissioners Danny Kendrick, Debbie Wood, Charles Hardage and Rosa Dunn sitting front row as Chambers County Commission Chairman Wayne White welcomed everyone
to the groundbreaking ceremony for Great Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc. in the Cusseta Industrial Park. Numerous state, county and city leaders were in attendance on Monday morning.
(Photo by Patrick Sands)
FAMILY ORIENTED BUSINESS — Shown seated at the luncheon table Monday at the Valley
Community Center are Keith and Betty Hettig of Great Lakes Metal Stamping Co., which will
be the first occupant of the Cusseta Industrial Park. Keith is shown applauding, center, while
Betty has her back turned, left, and is also applauding. Joining them at the table is Keith’s
mother, at right. The Hettigs brought family and business associates with them to formalize the
groundbreaking Monday morning at Cusseta Industrial Park.
DIAL SPEAKS AT GROUNDBREAKING — Shown above is
Sen. Gerald Dial speaking at the groundbreaking at the Cusseta Industrial Park on Monday. “This shows what happens
when we work together for one common goal,” said Dial.
(Photo by Patrick Sands)
HETTIG PRESENTED WITH STATE SEAL — Shown above,
David Hutchinson, right, of the Alabama Development Office
is presenting Keith Hettig, left, of Great Lakes Metal Stamping, Inc. with an Alabama State Seal to commemorate the
company’s groundbreaking at the Cusseta Industrial Park.
(Photo by Patrick Sands)
THE HONOREES — Great Lakes Metal Stamping was the
honorees at a luncheon Monday at Valley Community Center,
but other people were recognized for their contributions to the
special day as well. Above, Valerie Gray, right, presents a
plaque to David Hutchinson of the Alabama Development Office
for his support of local economic development efforts.
FERGUSON RECOGNIZED — Drew Ferguson, right, who
was instrumental in bringing Kia to West Point, is shown
above being recognized at Monday’s groundbreaking by IDA
President Bobby Jones, left. Jones called Ferguson “Mr. Kia”
and said that he (Ferguson) was “just as proud of what is happening today as we are.” (Photo by Patrick Sands)
JONES THANKS IDA LEADERS — IDA President Bobby
Jones, center, is shown above thanking IDA Director Valerie
Gray, left and Tammy Johnson for their hard work and dedication that helped bring Great Lakes Metal Stamping to the
Cusseta Industrial Park. (Photo by Patrick Sands)
COMMENTS FROM HETTIG — Keith Hettig of Great Lakes
Meta Stamping thanked the community for its warm reception
at Monday’s luncheon. He said he was impressed that the
groundbreaking ceremonies began with prayer.
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006 — Page 3
Alabama Supreme Court to hear legislator grants arguments
By The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY,
Ala.
(AP) — The state Supreme
Court hears arguments
Tuesday on whether Alabama legislators can distribute
millions in grants to education projects in their districts.
Gov. Bob Riley and Attor-
ney General Troy King have
appealed a Sept. 20 ruling by
Montgomery County Circuit
Judge Truman Hobbs Jr.,
who found that the Legislature’s community service
grants law is constitutional.
The Legislature hopes to
distribute $13.4 million in
grants this fiscal year. Under
the community service
grants law — passed in April
over the governor’s veto —
legislators pick the grant
recipients. But the grants
have to be approved by a
four-member grants commission consisting of the lieutenant governor, state treasurer, agriculture commissioner and state superintendent of education.
BUDGET
Continued from page 1
amended as some of the
unknowns become clearer.
Commissioners
went
through a department by
department review of the
budget, and it became clear
that the budget before them
could not be adopted at the
regular meeting to be held
following the work session
because raises for the sheriff ’s department had not
been plugged into that
department’s budget.
The commissioners had
earlier approved a five-percent across the board raise
for all county employees and
an additional five percent for
the sheriff’s department, if
the equalization tax passed.
Commissioners agreed
that Hoyt needed to get with
Sheriff Sid Lockhart and his
staff and redo the sheriff’s
budget.
Commissioners did agree
to fund the Chattahoochee
Humane Society at $23,800,
the amount requested by the
society as the county’s share
of the costs of the animal
shelter the society operates.
Commissioners were not
in accord on funding for the
county volunteer fire departments. Steve Tucker, president of the county fire association, said the departments need $200,000 in
additional funding to meet
higher insurance and fuel
costs and to continue to
upgrade services to county
residents.
Commissioner
Danny
Kendrick said the volunteer
fire departments had been
led to believe they would be
getting $200,000 if the
equalization tax passed, and
now some commissioners
are talking about $50,000.
Kendrick
said
that
$200,000 might seem cheap
if the county wound up having to pay for services provided by the volunteer fire
departments, such as clearing roadways of limbs after
storms and directing traffic
after major accidents.
Tucker noted that the
budget includes $75,000 for
ambulances for Valley, Lanett and LaFayette, and said
that each time an ambulance rolls for a call in the
county, the VFDs are also
rolling as first responders.
Tucker said he had heard
comments from some commissioners about volunteer
fire departments not meeting minimum standards. He
said minimum standards
are great, but when a
department can’t meet its
daily expenses, it certainly
doesn’t have the resources to
upgrade its services.
Tucker said he didn’t
think it would be a good idea
to apportion funds to the
departments on a performance basis. “I think it
should be divided equally
until we get to the point the
volunteer fire departments
have the funds they need to
meet standards.”
Commissioner Charles
Hardage said he didn’t think
it would be a good use of the
equalization tax money to
appropriate $200,000 for the
volunteer fire departments
before the county knows how
much the equalization tax
will generate. He noted that
the industrial development
authority and the library
aren’t getting the funding
they requested either.
Hardage said he thought
it would be better to give the
departments $60,000 now
and then more later if the
tax collections allowed the
higher funding.
Responding to a question
about how much the new tax
would generate, Hardage
said the figure of a million
dollars a year has been
thrown around. “It could be
$1.2 million or it could be
$800,000,” Hardage said.
“We can’t honestly put it in
the budget not knowing
what the revenue stream
will actually be.”
When asked if the tax
should generate a million a
year, would the county fund
the volunteer fire departments at $200,000, four commissioners responded affirmatively — Hardage, White,
Kendrick and Rosa Dunn.
County Attorney Skip
McCoy noted that what the
volunteer fire departments
were asking amounted to 20
percent of the projected sales
tax proceeds. McCoy suggested that the commissioners might want to commit 20
percent of the collections to
the departments up to a
maximum of $200,000.
Hawkins said that would
not be a good idea, because
really all the county’s tax
collections go into the same
pot and money is disbursed
based on priority of needs.
“What the departments get
should be based on their
needs, not a percentage of
the tax revenue,” Hawkins
said.
Commissioners agreed to
hold a final work session on
the budget Monday, Oct. 2 at
3 p.m. EDT, prior to their 5
p.m. regular meeting. Under
state law the county must
have a budget in place by the
first meeting of the new fiscal year, which is the Oct. 2
meeting.
GLMS
Continued from page 1
of support from the state,” he
said.
David Hutchinson of the
Alabama Development Office
said that he was thrilled to be
in attendance for this great
day in Chambers County.
He pointed out that IDA
Director Valerie Gray developed an immediate relationship with the Hettigs and as
a result, the area is celebrating the birth of a new company.
“We are honored you gave
us the chance to compete,”
said Hutchinson.
Keith Hettig said that
they had talked of putting a
location in the South for
three years with those talks
becoming serious in March of
this year.
He said that they looked at
16 sites in Georgia and
Alabama with Chambers
County being the last stop on
the last day in the area.
“We walked in, met Valerie
(Gray) and she took our
hearts,” said Hettig.
He said that once she
started talking about how
the community would help,
he realized just how serious
they were about having the
company locate here.
“We were looking for a
place to feel at home,” said
Hettig.
He told the crowd that the
project was moving along and
that the site engineering
should be done by the end of
next week. Initial plans to
build a 25,000 square foot
facility have already been
altered to a 30,000 square
foot facility.
“We are anxious to get
started,” said Hettig.
He hopes that they can get
involved with supporting the
local schools soon.
“We look forward to being
a part of your community,”
said Hettig.
Jones told the Hettigs that
“you are the first and you’ll
always be the first.”
He recognized Drew Ferguson for his work in helping
to bring Kia to West Point.
“This is ‘Mr. Kia,’” said
Jones. “He is just as proud of
what is happening here today
as we are.”
Jones also recognized
Gray and Tammy Johnson of
the IDA for their hard work
on this and other projects.
Dr. Charles Otto stood up
and noted that Jones was the
“pile driver of the IDA.”
Following the program,
Chambers County Commissioners Danny Kendrick,
David Eastridge, Charles
Hardage, Debbie Wood, Rosa
Dunn and Wayne White;
Lanett Mayor Oscar Crawley,
LaFayette Mayor Robert Finley, Hutchinson, Laird,
Bridges, Dial and John Averrett joined the Hettigs to officially break ground at the
future location of GLMS.
In a brief filed with the
Supreme Court, lawyers for
Riley and King argued that
the law is unconstitutional
because Riley is the state’s
chief executive and he has no
role in how the money is
spent.
‘‘Because the grants commission is outside the chain
of command and treads upon
the governor’s ’supreme executive power,’ it is not fully
within the executive branch
and sets a dangerous precedent that would allow the
Legislature to transfer executive powers away from the
governor in favor of other
members of the executive
branch of the Legislature’s
choosing,’’ the brief said.
The Legislature’s attorney, Joe Espy, filed a brief
saying the executive branch
of state government consists
of more than just the governor, and everyone on the
grants commission is a member of the executive branch.
‘‘The Legislature has the
power to establish executive
commissions and prescribe
the duties of such commissions,’’ Espy wrote.
The Legislature passed
the new community service
grants law in April after the
Alabama Supreme Court
declared its old community
service grants program
unconstitutional in 2005.
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The Valley Times-News
Tuesday, September 26, 2006
LIFESTYLES
Page 4
Thompsons celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Aug. 27
Mr. and Mrs. Bradley
George Thompson Sr. were
honored on Sunday, Aug. 27
with a reception to celebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary at the Pleasant
Grove
Congregational
Christian Church in the
Union Hill community near
LaFayette.
Bradley and Mae were
married in the same church
50 years ago. Mrs. Clytie
Gray White was Mae’s maid
of honor and Richard Looser was his brother’s best
man. Bryon McEachern was
the soloist. Sue Sims Conyers and Bobbie Sims Lashley lighted the candles. All
of them were present to
help make it a special day
for the couple.
The Rev. Charles Whiton
presided over the exchanging of the rings during the
ring ceremony. On either
side of Bradley and Mae the
original white wicker baskets that were used at their
wedding on Aug. 23, 1956
held white gladioluses,
white fuji mums, greenery
and intertwined with yellow rose buds.
Beautiful cut flower
arrangements of summer
flowers
were
placed
throughout the room. Mrs.
Mary Jo Looser, sister-inlaw of the couple, and the
children of Bradley and
Mae arranged the flowers
throughout the fellowship
hall. Boston ferns on plant
stands were placed at each
end of the food table.
Hosts for the occasion
were their children, Brad,
Jennifer, Ashley, Aimee and
Bradley Thompson III,Tim
and Jeannie Cole, Leigh
Guy; Tim, Julia, Walt and
Grace Ann Davis, Birmingham; and Joel, Janice, Ben,
Davis and Carson Samuels,
Guntersville.
Walt Davis, Bradley
Thompson III, Ben, Davis
and
Carson
Samuels,
grandsons of the honored
couple, greeted the guests
at the door. Guests were
registered by Leigh C. Guy,
a granddaughter. The round
table was covered with a
white floor length cloth
overlaid with a gold cloth. A
fluted vase of white Calla
lilies graced the center of
the table.
On one end of the food
table was a two-tiered
chocolate cake topped with
green grapes. This cake was
served by Jennifer, Ashley
and Aimee Thompson,
granddaughters. On the
opposite end was a threetiered wedding cake topped
with a gold “50” nestled in
yellow rose buds. The food
tables were covered with
white cloths draped with
gold tulle around the edge.
The guests were served an
assortment of finger foods,
fruit, nuts and mints. The
wedding cake was served by
Jeannie Cole and a friend,
Kelle Tingle.
A round table covered
with a white floor length
cloth held the crystal punch
bowl. A silver coffee urn was
placed on this table. Grace
Ann Davis, a granddaughter, Janice Samuels and
Julia Davis presided at this
table. Mary Kathryn Norwood, Tim Davis, Tim Cole
and Brad Thompson assisted in the serving.
Pictures and memorabilia of their 50 years together
were placed throughout the
room.
Mrs. Cathy Pritchett
played soft recorded music
from the ’50s during the
hours of 2 to 4 p.m. The
tables where the guests
were seated were covered
with white floor length
cloths. Triple crystal vases
holding summer cut flowers
were placed in the center of
each table.
Guests calling to offer
best wishes to the couple
included Barry and Pat
Brooks, Helen Adams,
Tommy Denny, Clarksville,
Tenn.; Jim and Sue Ellen
Myhand, Pine Mountain;
Gene and Jewel Lovelace,
Conway, Ark.; Pat Foster,
Linda Foster, Jay and Dana
Willoughby,
Columbus;
Marilena
Willoughby,
Smiths; Jerry and Molly
Boswell, Dadeville; Lavelle
and Diane Jones, Daryl
Jones, Daviston; Bobbie
Dean
Black, Daviston;
Odean Moran Keel, Camp
Hill; Rusty, Mary, Trey and
Hanna Norwood, Northport; the Rev. and Mrs.
Charles Whitson; Linda
Willoughby, Phenix City;
Nellie
Royster,
Hazel
Smyrl, Marla Stephens,
Wadley; Cathryn S. Hadaway, Murfreesboro, Tenn.;
Johnny, Linda and Jessica
Langley, Valley; Dan and
Deanna Cox, Birmingham;
Harvey and Annie Mae
Thompson, West Point; Ellis
and Jean Estes, Louise Cox,
Anne Welch Spann, Virginia
S. Cantrell, Birmingham;
Jeffery and Tonnia Griffin,
Lanett; Kay Mitchell, Sue
Sullivan, Tuscaloosa; Diane
White, Duwayne and Mae
McDaniel, New Site; Herman and Carolyn Oliver,
Lou Duffie, Randy and
Amanda Brown, Ramona
Brown, Dustin Hughes,
Lanett; Bill, Debbie, Ali and
Chase Edge, Linda Harmon, Beverly and Rusty
Letson, Lanett; Donna
Easlick, Steve Burton,
Ralph and Larue Henderson, Lanett; Zelma Dodgen,
Phillip and Beaty Henderson, Lanett; Jack and Sara
McClawn, Birmingham; Joe
and Vickie Sanders, Maegan Brown, Christine Sims,
Reid and Brenda House,
Jimmy and Pam Brown,
Valley; Mike, Dale and Warren Cleaver, Floyd and Floy
Aikens, Lanett; Herbert and
Patricia Clark, Rodney and
Mary Harmon, Jack and
Jean Hill, Freddie Sims,
Sue Conyers, Bobbie Lashley, Mike and Vicky Coker,
Frank and Nellie Davis,
Sonny and Linda McGill,
Barry and Cathy Cupp,
Mobile; Cindy McGinty,
Chris and Sheila Potts, Ron
and Sissy Page, Dadeville;
Jerry and Clytie White,
Steve and Becky Powell,
Emma Blanks, Cynthia
Green, Sylvia Edmondson,
Sadie W. Sherum, April S.
Stewart, Daviston; Danita
and Kari Sims, Lanett;
Chris, Leigh, Josh and
Trevor
Harry,
Lanett;
Kathryn Barber, Hilson and
Linda Lisenby, Frankie and
Ruth Davis, Joe and Becky
Brown, Jay and Leigh
Wages, DeAnn and Blaine
Caldwell, Wadley; Kay
Gillenwaters, Doreen Hanlon, Betty Whaley, Eugene
and Vinelle Robertson Jr.,
Bill and Yvonne Masten,
Lanett; Calvin, Sharon,
Emily and Melissa Milford,
Lorene Milner, Jonathan
Cole, Douglas Hubbard,
Frank and Janice Burton,
Durward and Lee Burton,
Dadeville; Byron and Mary
Ann McEachern, West
Point; Curtis, Cathy, Chad
and Colby Pritchett, Lanett;
James and Ellen Burton,
Debbie Clifton and Michael
Clifton, Lanett; Faye Blackmon, Victory
Langley,
Gaines
and
Juanita
Williams, Donnie and Barbara Teel, Harvey and Ann
Sanders, Ned and Dovie
Burton, Dadeville; Royce,
Mike
and
Kaleb
Williamson,
Alabaster;
Randy and Hetty Cox, Lilburn, Ga; Woody, Debbie,
Thomas, Austin and Jessica
Harmon, Cecilia Newman,
Leroy Talley, Lanett; Olivia
and Brian Tolson, Coral
Springs, Fla.; Evelyn Tolson, Valley; Richard and
Mary Jo Looser, Northport;
Mary Will Austin, Pearline
Burton, Elma Harmon,
Render and Resa Ison,
Richie and Shirley Terry,
Lanett; Wayne Hay, Brad,
Jennifer, Ashley, Aimee and
Bradley Thompson III; Tim
and Jeannie Cole, Leigh
Guy, Valley; Tim, Julia, Walt
and Grace Ann Davis, Birmingham; Janice, Ben, Davis
and Carson Samuels, Guntersville; and Kelle Tingle,
Lanett.
MR. AND MRS. BRADLEY THOMPSON
Ray VanderLaan will return to WP FUMC for November seminar
MORNINGSTAR
TREATMENT Services is
asking for donations of the
following items: twin size
comforters,
personal
hygiene items (bulk), basketballs, soccer balls, frisbees, twin sheets, twin pillowcases, bath towels, washcloths, barbecue grills, Grated movies, video games
(sports), school supplies,
board games, arts and crafts
materials,
televisions,
VCRs, table tennis, clipboards, wall pictures, room
border, bookshelves, blinds,
dish towels, foosball table, 3tier carts and bathroom
décor.
Bring your donations to
the First Baptist Church of
West
Point.
TRINITY CHRISTIAN
School will be selling discount cards for $10 each.
They include discounts from
many restaurants, such as
Applebee’s, Cock of the
Walk, Jim Bob’s, a florist, a
computer specialist and
more.
Please contact me at
[email protected] or
334-559-4892 if you’d like to
purchase.
BEGINNING SEPT. 3
the West Point Presbyterian
Church will begin offering a
weekly worship service
called “At Christ’s Table.”
ACT will begin each Sunday
at 9 a.m. in the Sanctuary.
The ACT service will
include the Lord’s Supper,
scripture readings, and a
brief meditation. This service will offer those who
wish to participate in weekly communion the opportunity to do so.
For more information,
call the church office at 706643-7441.
FIRST
UNITED
Methodist Church of West
Point is excited to announce
that Ray VanderLaan will
return for a weekend seminar Nov. 3, 4 and 5, 2006.
There will be Friday night,
Saturday morning and Saturday afternoon sessions in
the Zachry Center. VanderLaan will also preach during Sunday morning worship. This will be a new presentation and there is no
cost.
For more information,
call Helen Zachry at 706645-1379 or e-mail her at
[email protected]
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS of America of the
Valley area needs tutors.
Generally, a tutor gives 4-5
hours a month with a very
flexible time slot. For more
information, call 706-643READ.
FIRST
BAPTIST
Church of West Point has a
Wednesday night youth service at 7 p.m. Chuck Peek is
the youth director and
invites local youth to attend.
WEST POINT Presbyterian Church will be broadcasting their worship service live each Sunday morning from 11 a.m. until noon
on WRLA 1490 AM radio.
Anyone who cannot attend
worship services in person
are encouraged to tune in.
THE
INTERFAITH
Food Closet is in need of all
kinds of food. The items
most needed are cornmeal,
flour, toilet paper, soup,
macaroni & cheese, dried
beans, canned fruit, canned
meat, peanut butter, pasta,
rice and any other non-perishable food items.
SPRING ROAD Chris-
Getting Married?
Engagement and wedding
forms are available at the Valley
Times-News office at 220 N. 12th
St in Lanett.
Completed engagement forms
should be turned in at least 30
days before the wedding and wedding forms should be turned in
within 60 days following the ceremony.
All engagement and wedding
announcements follow these
forms. They will be published on a
space-available basis.
Photographs may be black and
white or color. They may be picked
up at the VT-N office the day
after the announcement is published. They will be mailed only if
a self-addressed, stamped envelope
is provided.
For more information, call
Donna Sparks at (334)644-8104.
Findley’s West
Point Fare
Jill Potts
Jones
643-5921
tian Church has revised its
w e b s i t e ,
www.springroad.org.
REEDS CHAPEL Baptist Church has a new website, www.reedschapel.org.
FIRST
UNITED
Methodist Church has a
new website, www.west-
pointfumc.org. You can read
all about the ministries, programs, special events and
activities that are going on
in the church.
LONG CANE United
Methodist Church has a
new
web-address
www.ourchurch.com/member/LongCaneUMC. This
page contains links to a
church calendar, prayer
page, church history and
more!
HAWKES
LIBRARY
has the following new
books: “Can’t Wait to Get to
Heaven” by Fannie Flagg;
“Captive of My Desires” by
Johanna Lindsey; “Coming
Out” by Danielle Steel;
“Cover of Night” by Linda
Howard; “Telegraph Days”
by Larry McMurtry; “Angel
Falls” by Nora Roberts;
“Judge and Jury” by James
Patterson; “Sleeping With
Fear” by Kay Hooper;
“Water For Elephants” by
Sara Gruen; “One Mississippi” by Mark Childress;
“Break No Bones” by Kathy
Reichs; “Calder Storm” by
Janet Dailey; “Deal Breaker” by Harlan Coben; “End
In Tears” by Ruth Remdell;
“In the Dark of the Night”
by John Saul; “Lights Out
Tonight” by Mary Jane
Clark; “Pegasus Descend-
ing” by James Lee Burke;
“Places In Between” by Rory
Stewart; “Proof Positive” by
Phillip Margolin; “The
Traitor” by Stephen Coonts
and “Vanishing Point” by
Marcia Muller.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to
Mitchell Hamilton on Sept.
28 and Savanna Sanders
(16) on Oct. 3.
PLEASE SEND your
news, events, birthdays,
anniversaries,
church
events, community socials,
etc. to Jill Jones, P.O. Box
151, Opelika, Alabama,
36803. You may also email
me
at
[email protected]
The Lazy Daisy
Children’s Apparel Ages Birth to Junior
Styles from Classic to Trendy
Clothes, Shoes & Toys
We have a
Brand New
TOY DEPARTMENT
and a PLAY ROOM
to entertain your
children while
you shop!
Store Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri.
9:30 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Wed. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Visit Our New Location:
6 East Lafayette Square, LaGrange, GA
(706) 812-8813
[email protected]
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006 — Page 5
Area Deaths & Funerals
Alabama trends both positive and negative
As Submitted By Area Funeral Homes
By The Associated Press
MRS. KIRK
LANETT — Mrs. Kathryn Kirk, 72, of Lanett died Saturday, Sept. 23, 2006 at Florence Hand Home in LaGrange.
Funeral services will be held Tuesday, Sept. 26 at 11
a.m. at Johnson Brown-Service Funeral Home Chapel in
Lanett with the Rev. Donald Bailey officiating. Burial will
follow at Hillcrest Cemetery in Lanett.
Mrs. Kirk is survived by her husband of 51 years,
Charles Kirk; her daughter, Karen (Tim) Blanks of Lanett;
her son, Randall (Brandi) Kirk of Lanett; five grandchildren, Shane (Susan) Hale, Cierra Kirk, Landon Kirk of
Lanett, Jefferson Blanks and Jackson Blanks; one greatgrandchild, Steven Hale; three sisters, Carolyn (Luther)
Trussell of Phenix City, Presteen Miller of Columbus and
Myretta (Jack) Black of Kodak, Tenn.; and a nephew, Preston Trussell.
Mrs. Kirk was born Dec. 29, 1933 in Tallapoosa County,
Ala., the daughter of the late Preston and Vernie Sims of
Cowpens, Ga. She worked at Playtex Inc. and later retired
from WestPoint Stevens’ Fairview Plant. She loved family
history and her family, especially her grandchildren, who
affectionately called her “Big Mama.” Kathryn was a friend
to everyone and had a heart of gold. She was loved by all
and will be greatly missed.
The family will receive friends Monday, Sept. 25 from 7
until 9 p.m. at Johnson Brown-Service Funeral Home in
Lanett.
Johnson Brown-Service Funeral Home of Lanett is in
charge of arrangements.
MR NELSON
VALLEY — Funeral services are pending for Mr. Wyatt
Nelson, 63, of Valley, who died Monday, Sept. 25, 2006 at
George H. Lanier Memorial Hospital in Valley.
Johnson Brown-Service Funeral Home of Valley is in
charge of the funeral arrangements.
MONTGOMERY,
Ala.
(AP) — A new report that
looks at long-term cultural
trends in Alabama found several positive changes, like
more high school and college
graduates, and several troubling changes, like more
rapes and robberies and
more children born out of
wedlock.
John R. Hill, author of
‘‘Cultural Indicators 2006,’’
said Monday he hopes the
report helps public officials
figure out what programs are
addressing the state’s problems
and
what
new
approaches need to be taken.
Barbara Everett, wife of
U.S. Rep. Terry Everett, RAla., and chair of the Governor’s Task Force to Strengthen Alabama’s Families, said
the report will help the task
force shape its recommendations because it brings
together many different
trends.
‘‘It’s all here in one place,’’
she said.
Hill, director of research
for the conservative but nonpartisan Alabama Policy
Institute, compiles the report
every two to three years
using statistics from a variety of state, federal and private sources.
He reported that since
most years.
Alabama is following a
national trend in recording a
declining rate of murders
and assaults, but Alabama is
seeing a growing rate of
rapes and robberies, compared to a decline nationally.
Since 1986, the robbery
rate rose by 19.2 percent in
Alabama, but fell by 37.7 percents nationally.
The rate of rapes rose by
15.3 percent in Alabama but
fell by 16.8 percent nationwide, Hill said, but he said he
is not aware of any explanation why.
The researcher said longer
prison sentences are contributing to a decline in
crime nationwide. In Alabama, the average sentence has
increased from 14 years and
five months in 1991 to 14
years and 11 months in the
most recent statistics available.
In 2004, 0.58 percent of
Alabama’s population was in
prison, compared to 0.49 percent nationally. That gave
Alabama the nation’s sixthhighest incarceration rate.
One of the most dramatic
cultural trends in Alabama is
babies born outside of marriage, Hill said.
In 1970, 11.5 percent of
births in Alabama were to
unmarried women. By 2004,
that had grown to 36.5 per-
cent — or more than onethird of the births.
In 1970, 1.7 percent of
births to white women in
Alabama were out of wedlock. That grew to 21.7 percent in 2004. Among nonwhite Alabama women, the
rate of births outside wedlock
went from 27.9 percent in
1960 to 67.7 percent in 2004
— or two-thirds of the births.
Hill said that is troubling
because marriage is a significant predictor of whether a
family is in poverty. When
compared to married couples
with children, female-headed
households are more than
four times as likely to live in
poverty.
Hill noted that Alabama’s
marriage rate has been
above the national average
since after World War II, but
despite Alabama’s image as a
Bible Belt state, its divorce
rate has been above the
national average for 60
years.
Alabama’s
divorces
declined from 22,405 in 2004
to 22,076 in 2005, and Hill
said one factor may be more
churches requiring couples to
go through counseling before
they can have a marriage
ceremony in the church. But
even with the decline, Alabama still had the nation’s
eighth highest divorce rate,
Hill said.
Passengers adjust to new travel rules
COUNCIL
By The Associated Press
Continued from page 1
he was doing.
The council unanimously
approved a 2005-06 budget
amendment with the total
amended amount being
$393,114.69. Most budget
items did not change but
those that did were a state
site preparation grant for
Kardoes for $161,114.69, a
bucket truck purchase of
$75,000, EMS personnel
costs of $50,000 and purchased power expense of
$100,000.
Council members tabled
an agenda item to approve a
prisoners contract with the
county so more research can
be done on whether or not
there is an existing contract.
The council approved an
item for utility charge offs
for 2005-06 from the current
1970, the percentage of
Alabamians age 25 and older
with a high school diploma
has doubled, and the percentage of Alabama adults with a
college degree has gone up 84
percent. But in 2004, Alabama ranked only 42nd among
the states in the percentage
of adults age 25 and older
with high school diplomas
and just 47th for adults holding at least a bachelor’s
degree.
Alabama’s average composite score on the ACT college entrance exam in 2003
was 20.1, ranking it 21st
among the 25 states that use
the ACT as their primary college entrance test.
Alabama still spends less
than the national average
per pupil on public schools,
but Alabama has closed the
gap from spending 56 percent of the national average
in 1970 to 79 percent of the
national average in 2004.
From 1970 to 2004, inflation-adjusted spending on
public education in Alabama
has gone up 194 percent,
compared to 146 percent
nationally.
‘‘We’ve had more ground
to catch up for,’’ Hill said.
From 1985 to 1999, Alabama’s crime rate was below
the national average. Since
1999, Alabama has been
above the national average
accounts receivable and
transferred to non-current
listings of accounts as well
as being sent to a collection
agency. The total charge off
is $16,393.15 from a total
billing of $7.5 million.
Council members did not
take action on gas bids and
referred the bids to the
Finance Committee.
The council voted to offer
surplus vehicles and equipment for sale to the highest
bidder. Sealed bids will be
received by the City Clerk’s
office until 3 p.m. CDT on
Friday, Oct. 6. The council
will consider the bids at the
Oct. 9 council meeting.
Surplus items include an
International Farmall 140
tractor, a four-foot Bush Hog
BAPLO, a Mita DC4685
copy machine, an ALTEC
AA600 bucket truck with 50foot boom on a 1988 GMS
7000 chasis (minimum bid
$15,000), a 1989 model 416
Caterpillar Backhoe, a 1965
Mack Pumper Model C95FD
and a Ditch Witch Model
A220.
Councilman Allen Tucker
thanked Councilman David
Ennis and Mayor Robert
Finley for being at the Great
Lakes Metal Stamping Inc.
grand opening on Monday
morning at the Cusseta
Industrial Park.
“It looked real good for
us,” he said. “It was a good
start and we hope more
things are to come.”
The council approved paying the city’s $681,268.67 in
bills for the month.
Carpetile Inc.
ATLANTA (AP) — Travelers showed up at airports
with toiletries stored in ziptop plastic bags Tuesday as
they tried to comply with new
security rules allowing them
to carry on small amounts of
liquids and gels.
‘‘I was thrilled to hear yesterday that actually you can
carry mascara on the plane,’’
said Val Chamberlain of
Atlanta, who showed security
screeners a plastic bag filed
with mascara and small toiletries.
Beginning Tuesday, liquid
and gel toiletries in 3-ounce
containers or smaller are
allowed if they are in a clear
plastic, quart-size ziplocked
bag. Up to 4 ounces of some
items are permitted in carryon bags: eye drops, saline
solution,
nonprescription
medicine and personal lubri-
cants.
Drinks, liquids and gels
purchased in airport stores
inside security checkpoints
can be carried into passenger
cabins, while baby formula
and medications are allowed
but will be inspected.
Jim Smith of the Transportation Security Administration said most passengers
at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta
International Airport came
prepared and brought toiletries in plastic bags. But
others first learned of the
relaxed guidelines only after
arriving and scrambled to
throw away larger items or
find plastic bags for toiletries.
At Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport, Ginni and
Edward
Dewbray
were
stopped at the security line
and told if they wanted to
bring a small bottle of Oil of
Olay onto their flight to North
Carolina, they would have to
put it in a clear plastic bag.
Edward Dewbray asked several other travelers for a bag
and eventually found one.
‘‘It’s an inconvenience,’’
Ginni Dewbray said. ‘‘If
they’re going to stand there
and ask you to have plastic
bags, they should give them
out. They’re not that expensive.’’
Pat Henderson, of Palm
Coast, Fla., was among those
who did not want to bother
with the new guidelines,
throwing away the deodorant
and toothpaste in his carry-on
before entering the security
check line at the Atlanta airport.
‘‘It’s not worth the hassle,’’
he said. ‘‘I just don’t want to
deal with it.’’
By 8 a.m., a trash bin at a
TSA checkpoint was three
feet deep with discarded
water bottles and 16-ounce
bottles of toiletries.
Coupons Valid Only At:
2901 20th Ave.
Valley, Alabama
303 Vernon St.
LaGrange, Georgia
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
BUY ONE - GET ONE
FREE
1/4 lb. Single Hamburger
One coupon per car, per visit. Vaild with coupon only. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese, bacon and tax extra. Good thru
11/30/06 - Valley, Alabama & 303 Vernon Street, LaGrange only.
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BUY ONE - GET ONE
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Large Chili
One coupon per car, per visit. Vaild with coupon only. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese, bacon and tax extra. Good thru
11/30/06 - Valley, Alabama & 303 Vernon Street, LaGrange only.
BUY ONE - GET ONE
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Taco Salad
One coupon per car, per visit. Vaild with coupon only. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese, bacon and tax extra. Good thru
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Doonesbury
Page 6 — The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006
The Valley Times-News
GARRY TRUDEAU
OPINION
Letters to the Editor
Rambling reflections on the world at large
To the Editor:
There is a popular columnist who from
time to time writes a column of his Random Thoughts. I have these also, but not
wanting to appear to be imitating a real
writer, I am going to title my ideas as
“Rambling Reflections.” I have these
from time to time, sometimes when I am
asleep or half awake. I am sure most of
you have had the same experiences. Previously I just let them go, but for a while
now, I have been writing them down and
want to pass them on to give you readers
something to think about, to fuss at me
about or hoping some of them will amuse
you.
My wife and I sometimes lose little
things like keys, certain papers, etc., but
how can an agency of the government,
the Department of Commerce, lose
1,100 laptop computers? The VA was a
piker in losing only one laptop. It seems
they would be more careful of computers
which contain vital information. And this
has been going on since 2001. I knew our
government is slow about things — but
five years. Tsk, tsk, tsk. They once almost
court-martialed me when I was in the service and lost a pair of boots.
Are you aware that many people in
Latin America are being schooled in the
Chinese language? China has been courting some countries there to build up
trade, especially in oil, lumber, minerals
such as iron and copper and agricultural
products. The Chinese are allotting billions of dollars to these countries to
improve their roads and railroads in order
to enhance the movement of these products to Chinese markets. In order to help
Why some people choose to live here
To the Editor:
People often ask me why we in the Valley area have all these names for our little
areas. This comes from educated people
that live in such utopian cities as Opelika
and LaGrange but work here in the Valley
area.
So to answer this I’d like to give my
reasons for living in the Valley area rather
than one of those bustling centers of
commerce.
1. I live in the Valley area because of
Myers One Stop in Huguley where they’ll
pump the gas for you.
2. I live in the Valley area because of
Bradshaw Library and its several computers with free Internet access.
3. I live in the Valley area because of
Hardley Creek park where the small children feed ducks and fish.
4. I live in the Valley area because of
Nader’s store in West Point where you
can still buy records and musical instruments. 5. I live in the Valley area because
of the Rails to Trails bike path, especially
as it goes by our own Iron Man statue
and under the road by Langdale School.
These are only five reasons and sure
we’re only small areas with a mixture of
names that are holdovers from another
era but it’s enough to take pride in for me
and generations before me. Some people
would get rid of the name Shawmut but
that wouldn’t take away the delight of
going down Double Drive and around
the Circle to look at Christmas lights.
So please tell people about ourselves.
We may not have a Mall, Tiger Town, a
decent steak house or any of the other
things that mark civilization, but we have
so much more in my opinion.
Jeremy L. Crowder, Huguley
trading negotiations, the Latin Americans
are learning the Chinese language. Will
we soon be losing some of our trading
partners in that country? Is anyone here
learning Chinese?
You have heard the saying “It takes
one to know one.” And I have heard the
devil knows when he meets up with
one of his own. Seems like Hugo Chavez,
official from Venezuela, thinks he has met
up with a cohort in President Bush. The
original Lucifer would find it hard to do
any more damage to the economy of
Venezuela than Chavez has done.
Pakistan President Gen. Pervez
Musharaff claims in his book that the
Bush administration threatened to bomb
Pakistan “to the Stone Age,” if he didn’t
cooperate with the U.S. Seems he was
trying to play both sides, to go along with
the U.S., but wanting al-Quida and the
Taliban to think he was doing it only
because he was forced into it. The only
person I know who would go along with
this claim is Molly Ivins.
Our country is supposed to be “of the
people, for the people and by the people,” but never will be until we get politics and politicians out of the government.
It seems to me that the failure of the
Berlin Wall to keep a determined people
from leaving the country, would be a sign
to our politicians that a barrier across our
southern border would not stop a determined people from entering this country.
As the Wall did, it will be a hindrance, but
not a solution.
And lastly, if Senator Clinton should
happen to win the presidency, would the
chamber maids in the White House be
safe at home alone with Bill Clinton?
Dr. C.S. Otto, Valley
Are Americans willing to debate torture?
AUSTIN, Texas — Some country is
about to have a Senate debate on a bill to
legalize torture. How weird is that?
I’d like to thank Sens. John McCain,
Lindsay Graham — a former military
lawyer — and John Warner of Virginia. I
will always think fondly of John Warner for
this one reason: Forty years ago, this country was involved in an unprovoked and
unnecessary war. It ended so badly the vets
finally had to hold their own homecoming
parade, years after they came home. The
only member of Congress who attended
was John Warner.
A debate on torture. I don’t know —
what do you think? I guess we have to
define it, first. The White House has
already specified “water boarding,” making
some guy think he’s drowning for long
periods, as a perfectly good interrogation
technique. Maybe, but it was also a great
favorite of the Gestapo and has been
described and condemned in thousands of
memoirs and novels in highly unpleasant
terms.
I don’t think we can give it a good name
again, and I personally kind of don’t like
being identified with the Gestapo. How
icky. (Somewhere inside me, a small voice is
shrieking, “Are you insane?”)
The safe position is, “Torture doesn’t
work.”
Well, actually, it works to this extent —
anybody can be tortured into telling anything that’s true and anything that’s not
true. The more people are tortured, the
more they make up to please the torturer.
Then the torturer has to figure out when
By
Molly
Ivins
the vic started lying. Since our torturers
are, in George Bush’s immortal phrase,
“professionals” and this whole legislative
fight is over making torture legal so the
“professionals” can’t later be charged with
breaking the Geneva Conventions, Bush
has vowed to end “the program” completely if he doesn’t get what he wants.
(The same thin voice is shrieking, “Professional torturers trained with my tax
money?”)
Bush’s problem is that despite repeated
warnings, he went ahead with “the program” without waiting for Congress to
provide a fig leaf of legality. Actually, we
have been torturing prisoners at Gitmo,
prisons in Eastern Europe and Afghanistan
for years.
Since only seven of the several hundred
prisoners at Gitmo have ever been charged
with anything, we face the unhappy
prospect that the rest of them are innocent.
And will sue. That’s going to be quite an
expensive settlement. The Canadian upon
whom we practiced “rendition,” sending
him to Syria for 10 months of torture, will
doubtlessly be first on the legal docket. I
wonder how high up the chain of command a civil suit can go? Any old war crim-
inals wandering around?
I was interested to find that the Rev.
Louis Sheldon of the Traditional Values
Coalition is so in favor of torture he told
McCain that the senator either supports
the torture bill or he can forget about the
evangelical Christian vote. I’d like to see an
evangelical vote on that one. I don’t know
how Sheldon defines traditional values, but
deliberately inflicting terrible physical pain
or stress on someone who is completely
helpless strikes me as ... well, torture. And,
um, wrong. And I’ve smoked dope! Boy,
everything those conservatives tell us about
the terrible moral values of us liberals must
be true after all.
Now, in addition to the slightly surreal
awakening to find we live in a country
that’s having a serious debate on a torture
bill, can we do anything about it? The
answer is: We better. We better do something about it. Now, right away. What do
we do? The answer is: anything ... phone,
fax, e-mail, mail, demonstrate — go stand
outside their offices or the nearest federal
building in the cold and sing hymns or
shout rude slogans, chant or make a
speech, or start attacking federal property,
like a postal box, so they have to arrest you.
Gather peacefully and make a lot of noise.
Get publicity, too.
How will you feel if you didn’t do something? “Well, honey, when the United
States decided to adopt torture as an official policy, I was dipping the dog for ticks.”
As Ann Richards used to say, “I don’t
want my tombstone to read: ‘She kept a
clean house.’”
The inside report from the nation’s capital
HILLARY’S MANAGER?
WASHINGTON — The report in
Washington’s Hill newspaper that former
Democratic National Chairman Terry
McAuliffe will head Sen. Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign did not
sit well with many of her key supporters.
Bill and Hillary Clinton forced
McAuliffe, their financial angel, as chairman on reluctant Democratic National
Committee (DNC) members after Al
Gore’s defeat for president in 2000.
McAuliffe had provided loans for the
Clintons’ home purchases when they
were financially strapped after leaving the
White House.
Opposition to McAuliffe within the
DNC was largely based on his possible
future implication in labor and business
scandals. That did not materialize, but
reviews of his performance as national
chairman through the 2004 election were
mixed. Many supporters of Sen. Clinton
consider McAuliffe a crack fund-raiser
who should not take a prominent public
position in her campaign.
WHITE HOUSE PIQUE
Before reaching agreement Thursday,
the Bush White House was not happy
about the defection of Chairman John
Warner and two other Senate Armed Services Committee Republicans on the military tribunals issue, but was most upset
with Sen. Lindsey Graham.
Presidential aides claim that Graham
had been on board with the administration’s language until Sen. John McCain
opposed it in early September. They contend that Graham is aiming at being
attorney general in a McCain Cabinet.
As a House member, Graham defied
By
Robert
Novak
party leaders in his state of South Carolina in 2000 to support McCain in a losing
effort against George W. Bush.
GOP FOR LIEBERMAN
Republican money is starting to pour
into Connecticut for Democratic Sen.
Joseph Lieberman, running as an independent against multi-millionaire antiwar candidate Ned Lamont, the Democratic nominee.
Private commitments to Lieberman by
Republican contributors coincided with
announcement of a Nov. 1 fund-raiser at
the Manhattan townhouse of Michael
Bloomberg, the Republican mayor of
New York. Co-chairing the event is
another New York Republican, former
Sen. Alfonse D’Amato. Lieberman has
pledged to remain in the Senate Democratic caucus even if elected as an independent.
A footnote: Washington Redskins
owner Dan Snyder and his wife Tanya will
hold a $1,500-a-ticket fund-raiser Sept.
30 at his Potomac, Md., home for Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, the
Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate.
Snyder keeps a low profile politically but
contributed $25,000 to the Republican
National Committee in each of the past
two years and $4,200 to Sen. George
Allen of Virginia last year.
CHANGING GOP PRIORITIES
Republican fund-raisers in Washington
have changed their priority as the best possible Senate gain for 2006 from the state of
Washington to New Jersey.
Business tycoon Mike McGavick’s
prospects against Sen. Maria Cantwell in
Washington have nearly collapsed because
of the way he handled the revelation of a
13-year-old DUI charge. In New Jersey,
appointed Sen. Bob Menendez is slipping
against State Sen. Tom Kean Jr. because of
new scandal allegations concerning him.
A footnote: Michigan is a new possibility for a Republican takeover, with Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard narrowing the gap between him and Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow, who was previously considered an easy winner.
MURTHA’S ADVANTAGE
The long shot Republican chance to
defeat anti-war Democratic Rep. John
Murtha got longer still when Pennsylvania
Republican State Chairman Rob Gleason
canceled a Sept. 25 fund-raiser for
Murtha’s GOP opponent, Washington
County Commissioner Diane Irey.
Irey’s staffers accused Gleason of being
too close to Murtha, a fellow resident of
Johnstown, Pa. They claimed the Republican chairman has been talking down Irey’s
chances in Republican circles. Irey has
reduced Murtha’s big lead but still is far
behind.
“I told her that I spend all my time and
effort having fund-raisers for the Cambria
County GOP,” Gleason told this column.
“So to go back to the donors would be difficult.” He said the Irey campaign was asking too much of party donors and did not
understand “the way we operate up here.”
Sizing It
Up
By Cy Wood
Publisher/Editor
A new era has begun
Fall has arrived, and with the passing of the equinox days will
grow progressively shorter. The rays of the sun will reach us at a
more acute angle, and the haze born of summer’s heat that
obscures the horizon will fade away, granting us clarity suggestive
of purity as we look around us at the natural world slowing down
after the seasons of rebirth and growth.
Autumn is a wonderful time of the year. Temperatures are nearly perfect — warm days, cool nights, enough rain to keep the dust
down but not enough to curtail activity.
In our agrarian past, fall was the season of harvest, the time to
put aside food for the cold, unproductive months of winter. We no
longer organize our lives around the growth cycle of edible plants,
but fall certainly is a season that suggests a reduction in pace, a
need to relax and rest, a time of taking stock and planning ahead.
The Greater Valley Area was reminded Monday that this will
not be such a traditional fall. Groundbreaking ceremonies were
held at Great Lakes Metal Stamping Co.’s site in the Cusseta
Industrial Park. The event was well attended, as was a luncheon
following at which the community’s newest industry’s owners
were honored.
It’s not a big stretch to suggest that Monday’s ceremonies mark
the beginning a new era on the Alabama side of the Greater Valley
Area. The Georgia side had its epochal event March of this year,
with the announcement of the Kia Plant in West Point.
Great Lakes will be the first occupant of the Cusseta Industrial
Park. This is a park that didn’t exist a decade ago, and its nativity
was not without critics. The idea of investing scarce dollars in hundreds of acres of land good only for growing pine trees seemed the
ultimate folly to some, but it was part of a grand design, part of a
vision that looked beyond the steady decline of this textile-dominated community and saw in a changing economic landscape
opportunities for those who understand the concept of risk and
reward.
The industrial park had no utilities, needed better access and
was located in a county that wasn’t exactly a hotbed of economic
development. It did front along I-85, which is a lot like saying the
family’s ugly duckling has a nice personality.
The location was good, though, and the other amenities fell
into place, though not without the economic development equivalent of weeping and gnashing of teeth.
And then along came Great Lakes Metal Stamping. Keith Hettig owns that company, and he was looking for a site for a new
plant. His company is headquartered in Michigan, which is way on
the other side of the Mason-Dixon Line. Hettig found something
he liked here, and chose Chambers County for his new operation.
Listening to him speak at the luncheon Monday, I was
impressed by two things. Hettig liked the idea of the groundbreaking ceremonies opening with prayer, acknowledging the
importance of God in the affairs of his life and his company. Then,
when he spoke of his late father, he got that tightness in the throat
that I still get mentioning my dad 20 years after his death.
Like his new neighbors, Keith Hettig is a man who cares about
God and family, and on that basis alone, he and Great Lakes will
be a good fit for this community. But there’s more about his operation that will assure compatibility with the home folks.
Hettig is a “we” person. He includes his wife, Betty, his family,
his associates in Great Lakes and his new friends here in Chambers
County when he talks about the future of his company and what
he hopes to achieve here.
If all goes well, Great Lakes will be the first of many new companies that will soon be calling Chambers County home. There are
no guarantees that more companies will follow, but this community is superbly positioned to attract new industry.
For many years, as the Industrial Development Authority of
Chambers County worked so diligently to bring new opportunities to this community, it seemed like the IDA was destined to be
the eternal bridesmaid of Alabama economic development, the
perennial second-place finisher in the prosperity sweepstakes.
Those days are gone. Great Lakes Metal Stamping Co. has inaugurated a new era in the county. Now there’s a demarcation
between the post-textile past and the unlimited future. Welcome to
our community.
The Valley Times-News
NELL WALLS-COWART
President-CEO
CY WOOD
KATHY REEVES
CHARLOTTE BROOKS
PHILLIP JONES
WAYNE CLARK
WANDA ASKEW
Editor-Publisher
Graphics Supervisor
Accounting Manager
Advertising Manager
News Editor
Circulation Department
TOM WALLS
Editor-Publisher 1973-1985
Email address: [email protected]
Started publication as a daily newspaper March 2, 1950 as the result of
combining three weekly newspapers, THE CHATTAHOOCHEE VALLEY
TIMES, THE VALLEY TRIBUNE and THE WEST POINT NEWS. Published Monday through Friday by Valley Newspapers, Inc. 220 N. 12th
Street, P.O. Box 850, Lanett, AL 36863. SUBSCRIPTION PRICES: Home
delivery by carrier and motor route: $7.00 per month Alabama and Georgia. Office Prepaid 3 months $21.00, 6 months $40.00, 12 months $78.00.
Periodical Postage paid at the Post Office in Lanett. All prepaid subscription checks must be made to The Valley Times-News. POSTMASTER: Send address change to P.O. Box 850, Lanett, AL 36863.
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006 — Page 7
VALLEY
Continued from page 1
low council members that
he’d heard similar complaints from others. He said
then that maybe the council
should see to it that Charter
provided better service or
look for someone else to provide cable service for the
local area.
Councilman
Rodney
Mitchum wants everyone to
understand that this is not
an anti-Charter attempt on
the part of the city. “This
gives them a chance to work
out their problems before our
franchise is renewed next
spring,” he said.
City Attorney John Ben
Jones told the council that
it’s important to get something done before next April.
“Once it’s approved, it will be
in place for a long time,” he
said.
Jones said that the main
complaints about Charter
concern its quality of service
and its customer service. A
condition of the franchise
agreements both Valley and
Lanett have, he said, is that
BRIDGE
Continued from page 1
upgrade the bridge on U.S.
29 below Givorns in Valley.
Hawkins said this narrow
bridge puts local residents in
constant danger and should
be replaced with a four-lane
bridge with sidewalks. If the
bridge is closed by an accident, it requires a seven-mile
detour to get around the
obstruction, he said.
Hawkins said the narrow,
antiquated bridge has an
average daily traffic count of
8,350 vehicles.
Commissioners
also
approved
a
resolution
requesting state funding for
the resurfacing of Fob James
Drive in Valley. The resolution asks that the thoroughfare be resurfaced from its
terminus at Highway 29 in
Valley to the point where
resurfacing has already been
done in conjunction with the
Exit 77 bridge project.
Commissioners approved
the gasoline fund budget for
the highway department.
The
budget
calls
for
$4,406,865 in revenues and
expenditures.
Hawkins
noted that as previously
agreed with the passage of
the three-mill tax, the budget
now includes a $500,000
reserve fund for emergencies.
County Attorney Skip
McCoy told commissioners
they needed to make a decision on what agency would
administer the new equalization sales tax, because vendors need to be notified so
they can begin collecting the
tax in December.
Various taxes in the county are now collected by either
the Alabama Department of
Revenue or the private company Alatax, McCoy said. He
had no preference for a collecting agency, but said the
county should look at the
cost of collection with each
agency and make a decision.
Commissioners agreed to
have County Manager Don
Hoyt check on the collection
costs for both and make a
recommendation at the Oct.
2 meeting.
McCoy also suggested
that the county have a contract with the Chattahoochee
Humane Society for animal
shelter services. He said it
would be better, from an
auditing standpoint, for the
county to contract with the
society for those services and
the county’s two municipalities with more than 5,000
residents, Lanett and Valley,
to execute their own contracts. State law requires
counties and municipalities
with more than 5,000 population to provide animal control services.
Commissioners approved
a resolution to develop a separate contract with the society.
In other action at Monday’s meeting the commissioners:
•Approved annual contracts for the highway
department on a number of
items ranging from fuel to
asphalt and grader blades to
grease.
•Approved a contract with
the Department of Youth
Services for a juvenile facility bed.
•Were advised that no
word had been received on
the grant application for
County Roads 25, 26 and
174.
•Approved a $50,000 contract with Circle S Land
Enhancement to provide
right-of-way clearing services to the county. Hawkins
said the county will evaluate
the service for this year to
see if it is more cost effective
to have the service contracted or to try to do it inhouse.
•Approved
Thompson
Tractor’s bid of $163,963 for
a new excavator.
•Recognized
EMA/911
Director Donnie Smith for
his recent appointment to an
Association of County Commissioners of Alabama committee, the Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee. Smith is vice president of
the state 911 organization
and will ascend to the organization’s presidency next
year.
•Heard comments from
Commissioner Debbie Wood
that Monday had been a
great day for Chambers
County with the groundbreaking ceremonies for
Great Lakes Metal Stamp-
Charter must have “reasonable community standards.”
The resolution approved
at Monday’s council meeting
calls upon Charter to
respond to it, to improve its
service and directs the city
attorney to continue efforts
to legally challenge Charter’s
ability to operate outside the
franchise agreement and
“publicly declares its intent
to deny Charter Communications future operating
franchise
agreements,
should relief not be recognized.
Two other resolutions
approved by the council
Monday seek some needed
road improvements. Through
one of the resolutions, the
city joins the Chambers
County Commission in seeking funds to repair and
resurface Fob James Drive
from the I-85 bridge to Highway 29. In the other resolution, the council goes on
record in support of State
Rep. DuWayne Bridges’
efforts to have the Highway
29 bridge over Osanippa
Creek (near Givorns in Fairfax) replaced with a fourlane bridge.
Councilman Ray Edwards
thanked Rep. Bridges and
County Engineer Henry
Hawkins for the work
they’ve done so far on this
needed project. “It’s a very
dangerous bridge,” said
Mayor Leak. “It’s amazing no
one has been killed there.”
The resolution states the
need for a four-lane bridge
with pedestrian passing and
with better lighting at night.
A recent average daily traffic
count taken at the bridge
showed that 8,350 vehicles
go over it each day.
In other action, the council rescinded and modified a
lease agreement and authorized Mayor Leak to execute
two lease agreements involving space at Langdale Mill.
The modified lease agreement is with Will Easley and
his business, CPO, which is
relocating from the mill to
the city’s Public Works
Department building, located on Fairfax Bypass. Mr.
Easley’s home security business will be located in one
room at the former MidSouth building.
A local mortgage broker,
Arthur Flynn, is leasing
space in Langdale Mill’s
office complex. Also leasing
storage space is the Chattahoochee Federal Credit
Union, which will be getting
a 10-foot by 20-foot space to
store records from its four
business locations.
While not opposing the
ordinance, Councilman Jim
Jones expressed a concern
about “piecemealing parts of
the mill” that’s outside the
front office complex. Potential developers may frown on
that when they come in to
look at the mill, he said.
Mayor Leak said the city
is committed to being very
careful about what’s leased
at its mill properties. Also,
the leases have termination
clauses.
The city’s proposed budget
for the 2007 fiscal year was
an item listed on the meeting’s consent agenda. It was
removed from consideration
at the request of Council
Member Charlene Atkinson,
who chairs the Finance Committee. Atkinson said her
committee has just about
completed its work but
would like to have a work
session with the entire council to discuss some final
details .
The council welcomed
Connie Hensler, the executive director for the Troup
County-Greater Valley Area
Chapter of the American Red
Cross, and thanked her for
the support the Red Cross
has provided the local area.
Hensler thanked the council
for its support of the Red
Cross in offering Valley Community Center as a shelter
in the event of natural disasters and other such needs.
It’s particularly helpful,
she said, that the Community Center now has disasterrelated supplies in storage.
That will help by avoiding
transportation delays in the
event of a future hurricane,
tornado, flood, etc.
Long-time Red Cross volunteer
Bobby
Elliott
thanked the council for its
support. He said it was his
hope that the need wouldn’t
arise for the Community
Center to be needed as a disaster shelter but that if it did
take place he was confident
everything would be ready.
He said the current local Red
Cross effort started as a ministry from a local church. “It’s
grown from that and thats
where many of our volunteers come from,” he said.
Valley Parks & Recreation
Director Suellen Snowden
invited everyone to Saturday’s Chambers County
Health Fair, which will be
hosted by George H. Lanier
Memorial Hospital at the
Community Center. It will be
going on from 8 a.m. till
noon. Free health screenings
will be available, and the
bloodmobile will be there
taking blood donations. From
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday,
Oct. 2, flu shots and pneumonia shots can be taken at the
Community Center. The flu
shots are $25 each, and the
pnemonia shots $35. It’s free
to those on Medicare Part D.
Snowden is seeking a big
turnout at this year’s Trick
or Treat event, which will be
taking place at Ram Stadium starting at 6 p.m. on
Tuesday, Oct. 31. New city
employee Sheila Still is
heading up this event. “If
you’d like to volunteer to
help us out we’ll welcome
you aboard,” she said.
Police Chief Tommy Weldon told the council he’d be
taking part in several Neighborhood Watch meetings
that will be taking place over
the next several days. At 6
p.m. on Tuesday evening, one
will be taking place at the
River View School. Other
meetings are planned for the
Pine Forest Congregational
Christian Church in Todd
Addition, at the lodge building in Redlands Heights and
for the Greenberry Circle
area.
Planning and Develop-
By The Associated Press
ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia’s branch of the Christian
Coalition announced plans
Monday to change names
and split from the national
group — making it the
fourth state to leave the
socially conservative political group.
Director Sadie Fields
said the Georgia branch’s
board voted about two
weeks ago to make the
change, saying the national
group’s focus has shifted
away from the core issues
the Christian Coalition was
founded upon.
‘‘It’s
really
a
sad
moment,’’ Fields said Monday. ‘‘I deeply regret we have
been compelled to take this
action, but we felt like we
had no other choice.’’
RUMOR
Continued from page 1
place Monday with a
groundbreaking in the Cusseta Industrial Park for a
new plant for Great Lakes
Metal Stamping. “It’s the
first of quite a few such companies that will be coming
over the next few years,”
Leak said.
The mayor said the kind
of careful planning the city
has studied and implemented over the last decade or so
could pay off in a big way
with what’s about to come,
but he’s asking local citizens
to use some good commonsense judgement and not get
carried away with everything they hear.
“Don’t think that acre of
land you couldn’t get $1,000
for last year is suddenly
worth $100,000,” he said.
“Hang on, be patient. What
will happen will happen.”
Mayor Leak said that
developers have come in and
have been quite impressed
with what Valley has to offer
in the way of amenities such
as
the
Community
Center/Sportsplex area, the
CV Railroad Trail, and the
two mills the city has purchased.
Leak is quite confident
that new housing and new
growth will be coming to Valley and the surrounding
area. “We know the principles of good planning, and
we will be sticking to them,”
he said.
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COMICS
Tuesday, September 26, 2006
Frank and Ernest
Born Loser
Foxtrot
Snuffy Smith
Page 8
Beetle Bailey
For Better or Worse
Blondie
Garfield
Hi and Lois
The Family Circus
Arlo and Janis
Today
in History
‘Dear
Young mom’s desperate plight
Abby’ arouses outpouring of concern
By The Associated Press
Today is Tuesday, Sept.
26, the 269th day of 2006.
There are 96 days left in the
year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Sept. 26, 1960, the
first
televised
debate
between presidential candidates John F. Kennedy and
Richard M. Nixon took place
in Chicago.
On this date:
In 1777, British troops
occupied Philadelphia during
the
American
Revolution.
In
1789,
Thomas
Jefferson was appointed
America’s first secretary of
state.
In 1888, poet T.S. Eliot
was born in St. Louis.
In 1952, philosopher
George Santayana died in
Rome at age 88.
In 1980, the Cuban government abruptly closed
Mariel Harbor, ending the
“freedom flotilla” of Cuban
refugees that had begun the
previous April.
In 1981, the twin-engine
Boeing 767 made its maiden
flight in Everett, Wash.
In 1986, William H.
Rehnquist was sworn in as
the 16th chief justice of the
United
States,
while
Antonin Scalia joined the
Supreme Court as its 103rd
member.
Thought for Today: “That
the end of life should be
death may sound sad; yet
what other end can anything
have?”
—
George
Santayana,
American
philosopher (1863-1952).
DEAR READERS: On
Thursday, Aug. 24, I
printed a letter from
“Going Crazy in San
Diego,” the 26-year-old
wife of a member of the
military. In it she stated
that she had never wanted children, had failed to
bond with her baby girl,
and that her husband
refused to allow her to
be placed for adoption —
although he “couldn’t
stand” the baby, either.
She said that she was
afraid she might hurt
her infant. Her letter
was handwritten on
ruled binder paper, with
no contact information
such as name, address or
phone number.
If that young woman
is reading today’s Dear
Abby column, please
write me again at P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA
90069
or
w w w. D e a r A b b y. c o m .
Please give me a number
where I can reach you,
and trust me enough to
let me help you. Your
confidence will not be
violated.
Through the entire
history of Dear Abby,
including the many
years I worked beside
my mother, we have
never received offers of
help from our readers
like those generated by
this young woman’s letter. Readers, your outpouring of love and con-
cern has been overwhelming.
I
have
received letters and emails from men and
women nationwide saying this young mother’s
predicament
brought
them to tears.
Childless couples and
women
wanting
to
expand their families
have described their
“arms aching” to adopt
this child and give her
the loving home she
deserves. Women in the
San Diego area have volunteered to provide
respite care, baby-sitting
services and emotional
support.
William Fenton, chief
of clinical services of the
Fleet
and
Family
Support Center in San
Diego, wrote to say that
help is available from
the New Parent Support
Team, which provides inhome assistance and
counseling in many
areas. These services are
free and can be accessed
by contacting the FFSC
at the nearest naval
base.
Navy families can also
get assistance by contacting their sailor’s
command ombudsman
or by contacting Military
One Source at 1-800-3429647 — 24 hours a day,
seven days a week.
I also heard from
Tracey L. Jones, the
team leader for the Navy
New Parent Support
Home
Visitation
Program in San Diego.
She asked me to let
“Going Crazy” know that
her staff and colleagues
have a unique understanding of the stresses
that come with military
life and that they will
make every effort to help
her and her husband.
Tracey can be reached at
(619)
556-8825
and
[email protected]
What struck me the
most about this young
woman’s letter is how
completely isolated she
feels. Motherhood can be
a challenge, even when
the baby is wanted.
Overwhelmingly,
my
readers have asked me
to convey to her that
help is available if she
only reaches out for it.
Many
communities
have emergency nurseries for parents in crisis. A new mother who
feels she has reached the
breaking point should
contact her clergyperson or child protective
services.
I want to thank the
many thousands of my
readers who wrote to me
with offers to help for
“Going Crazy.” You are
the most warm-hearted
friends I could wish for.
If the young woman in
San Diego contacts me
again, I promise to let
you know. — Love, Abby
THE Daily Commuter Puzzle
Edited by Wayne Robert Williams
CMYK
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26 2006 — Page 9
Intelligence director rejects claim U.S. at greater risk
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) —
National Intelligence Director
John
Negroponte
acknowledged Monday that
the jihad in Iraq is shaping a
new generation of terrorist
operatives, but rejected characterizations stemming from
a leaked intelligence estimate that the United States
is at a greater risk of attack
than it was in September
2001.
Rather, he said, the highlevel assessment from the
nation’s top analysts doesn’t
‘‘really talk about’’ an
increased threat inside the
U.S. border.
‘‘We are certainly more
vigilant. We are better prepared,’’ said Negroponte. ‘‘We
are safer. The threat to the
homeland itself has — if anything — been reduced since
9/11.’’
Negroponte’s words came
at a dinner at Washington’s
Woodrow Wilson Center
after the disclosure of a
National Intelligence Estimate this weekend, which
gave new fervor to an election-year debate about how
the Iraq war has affected
national security threats.
The report, Negroponte
said, broadly addressed the
global terrorist threat, not
just the impact of Iraq. Yet
Negroponte acknowledged
that U.S. analysts believe
‘‘the Iraq jihad is shaping a
new generation of terrorist
leaders and operatives.’’
The report distills the
thinking of senior U.S. intelligence analysts working
throughout the nation’s 16
spy agencies. Its conclusions
are considered to be the voice
of the U.S. intelligence community.
The New York Times first
reported Saturday that the
highly classified assessment
finds that the U.S. invasion
of Iraq has helped fuel a new
generation of extremists and
that the overall terror threat
has grown since the attacks
of Sept. 11, 2001 — a conclusion at odds with President
Bush’s assertions that the
nation is safer.
But Bush administration
officials, including Negroponte, are contesting the
media accounts, saying they
describe only a portion of the
conclusions and therefore
distort the analysts’ findings
on trends in global terrorism.
The top Republican and
Democrat on the Senate
Intelligence
Committee
urged the Bush administration Monday to declassify the
intelligence assessment.
Chairman Pat Roberts, RKan., said the American people should be able to see a
public version of the report
and draw their own conclusions about its contents. So
far, he said, the public discussion has given the ‘‘false
impression’’ that the National Intelligence Estimate
focuses exclusively on Iraq
and terrorism.
‘‘That is not true,’’ Roberts
said, noting that the committee has had the report since
April. ‘‘This NIE examines
global terrorism in its totality.’’
In a letter to Negroponte,
West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller, the committee’s top
Democrat, said declassifying
the report’s conclusions
would provide a complete
picture of the report and
‘‘contribute greatly to the
public debate’’ on counterterrorism policies.
Negroponte said he would
consider the proposal in the
next several days, given the
serious interest in the document.
Generally characterizing
U.S. intelligence assessments, Negroponte said
counterterrorism
efforts
have seriously damaged the
leadership of al-Qaida, but
the group continues to pose
the most significant threat to
U.S. interests.
He said analysts believe
the global jihadist movement
is adapting to U.S. countert-
errorism efforts and is
spreading. The fuel, he said,
includes:
—Entrenched grievances
such as corruption and fear
of Western domination.
—The jihad in Iraq.
—The slow pace of sustained economic, social and
political reforms in many
Muslim nations.
—Pervasive anti-U.S. sentiment among most Muslims.
Negroponte, the former
U.S. ambassador to Iraq, was
asked Monday whether he
was surprised by the level of
violence between Iraq’s
Sunni and Shiite populations. He said he didn’t
expect the sectarian violence
to reach the levels it did, particularly with the intensity
that came after the February
bombing of a revered shrine
in Samarra, 60 miles north of
Baghdad.
He said the establishment
of the military and police
forces is ‘‘one of the great
challenges that one confronts
in these kinds of conflicted
situations.’’
‘‘How do you help build up
local capacity, whether it’s
military or police?’’ Negroponte asked. ‘‘Perhaps we
didn’t start soon enough with
that endeavor, but we are
certainly totally committed
to it now.’’
Photo voter ID law headed to Georgia Supreme Court
By The Associated Press
ATLANTA (AP) — The
state has filed an appeal to a
Superior Court judge’s ruling
which declared Georgia’s
photo ID law unconstitutional, blocking enforcement of
the law in this fall’s general
election.
The appeal was filed Monday by Attorney General
Thurbert Baker on behalf of
Gov. Sonny Perdue and the
state Board of Elections. Fulton County Superior Court
Judge T. Jackson Bedford Jr.
last week rejected the state’s
latest attempt to require vot-
ers to present a governmentissued photo ID at the polls.
The law has also been
rejected in federal court, and
has been the source of two
years of legal setbacks.
Supporters of the photo ID
law, including Republican
Gov. Sonny Perdue, have said
it is needed to protect against
voter fraud. Opponents argue
it disenfranchises poor, elderly and minority voters who
are less likely to have a driver’s license or other valid government-issued photo ID.
Also last week, the U.S.
House of Representative
passed a bill that would
TUESDAY EVENING
require everyone to present a
photo identification before
voting in federal elections by
2008. By 2010, voters would
have to have identifications
certifying they were citizens.
In response to criticism
that this would be a burden
for the poor, the bill stipulates that states must provide the identification cards
free of charge to those who
can’t afford them.
Bedford’s ruling imposed a
permanent injunction on the
Georgia law, meaning photo
ID will not be required at the
polls when Georgians vote for
governor, lieutenant governor
and other state races this
fall.
The state’s election board
said last week that it would
not ask the high court to rule
on their appeal before the
Nov. 7 election. Friday’s election board vote directs state
lawyers to appeal the ruling,
but not to ask a judge to
speed up a decision.
Top Georgia Republicans
said it may take a constitutional amendment to finally
get the law enforced. The new
law took effect July 1, but its
enforcement
has
been
blocked by three separate
state and federal judges.
C - Charter, K - Knology Cable
Local Weather
Chambers Forecast
Today, mostly sunny.
Highs around 79. Light
winds then becoming northwest 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon. Tonight, mostly clear.
Lows around 51. Light winds.
Wednesday, mostly sunny.
Highs around 79. Light
winds then becoming northwest 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon. Wednesday night,
mostly clear. Lows 54 to 55.
Light winds. Thursday, partly
sunny. A slight chance of
showers. Highs around 80.
West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Gusts up to 25 mph in the
afternoon. Chance of rain 20
percent. Thursday night,
mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. Friday, mostly
sunny. Highs in the lower
70s. Friday night, mostly
clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Saturday, partly cloudy.
Highs in the mid 70s. Saturday night, partly cloudy. A
slight chance of showers.
Lows in the lower 50s.
Chance of rain 20 percent.
Sunday, partly sunny. A
slight chance of showers.
Highs in the upper 70s.
Chance of rain 20 percent.
Sunday night, mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 50s. Monday,
mostly sunny. Highs around
80.
Georgia Forecast
Tuesday, mostly sunny,
except partly cloudy northeast and east central. Highs
in the mid to upper 70s north
and 78 to 85 central and
south. Tuesday night, mostly
clear. Lows 45 to 55 north
and central, with 55 to 60
south. Wednesday, mostly
sunny. Highs 75 to 80 north
and 80 to 85 central and
south. Thursday, partly
cloudy north with a chance of
showers and thunderstorms
Greater
Valley Area
CrimeStoppers
Call
756-8200
or
1-800-756-8282
during the afternoon and
evening. Partly to mostly
sunny south. Lows 50 to 55
most areas. Highs mostly in
the 70s north, 80 to 85 central and south. Friday, partly
to mostly sunny. Cooler. Lows
upper 40s to lower 50s north,
with 50s south. Highs 65 to
72 north, with 70s central
and south. Saturday, partly to
mostly sunny. Lows mainly in
the 40s north and central,
with lower 50s south. Highs
upper 60s to lower 70s north,
with mid to upper 70s south.
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News
Gospel Connection
Gospel Connection
Camera 33
Mary & Friends
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Classic Television Jake Sessions
Electronic
WCAG 15 2 Towne Fitness
Wheel of Fortune NCIS ‘‘Escaped’’ (N) (In Stereo) ^
The Unit ‘‘Extreme Rendition’’ (In Stereo) Smith ‘‘Two’’ (N) (In Stereo) ^
News ^
Late Show With David Letterman (N) ^ Late Late Show
WRBL 4 4 Jeopardy! (N) ^
Heroes ‘‘Pilot’’ (In Stereo) ^
Law & Order: Criminal Intent ‘‘Tru Love’’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ^
Every-Raymond
The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (N) ^ Late Night
WLTZ 5 8 Dr. Phil (In Stereo) ^
Dancing With the Stars (In Stereo Live) ^
Help Me Help You Boston Legal ‘‘New Kids on the Block’’ News
Nightline ^
Jimmy Kimmel Live (N) (In Stereo) ^
WTVM 7 10 Inside Edition ^ Entertainment
Entertainment
Heroes ‘‘Pilot’’ (In Stereo) ^
Law & Order: Criminal Intent ‘‘Tru Love’’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ^
News
The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (N) ^ Late Night
WSFA 12 12 News
Every-Raymond
Friends (In Stereo) Friends (In Stereo) Sex and the City ^ Sex and the City ^ Seinfeld (In Stereo) Seinfeld (In Stereo) Friends (In Stereo) Friends (In Stereo) Midnight Money Madness (Live)
WTBS 52 13 Every-Raymond
King of Queens
Gilmore Girls ‘‘The Long Morrow’’ (N) ^ Runaway ‘‘Pilot’’ (In Stereo) ^
Will & Grace ^
Will & Grace ^
Sex and the City ^ Sex and the City ^ The Nanny ^
Mad About You ^
WB
2 15 King of Queens
King of Queens
Gilmore Girls ‘‘The Long Morrow’’ (N) ^ Runaway ‘‘Pilot’’ (In Stereo) ^
Will & Grace ^
Will & Grace ^
Sex and the City ^ Sex and the City ^ The Nanny ^
Mad About You ^
WSWS 3 6 King of Queens
TT ‘‘Militia’’ (2000) Dean Cain. A federal agent must retrieve stolen anthrax missiles. WGN News at Nine (In Stereo) ^
Sex and the City ^ Scrubs ‘‘His Story’’ Scrubs (In Stereo) Becker (In Stereo)
WGN 21 14 America’s Funniest Home Videos ^
For the Record ^ Nova ‘‘Mystery of the Megavolcano’’ ^
Great Performances (N) (In Stereo) ^
American Masters ‘‘Satchmo’’ ^
For the Record ^ Tavis Smiley ^
WCIQ 9 5 News-Lehrer
Wild Chronicles ^ Nova ‘‘Mystery of the Megavolcano’’ ^
Out of the Ashes: Recovering
Kilimanjaro, A Naked Planet Special ^ Tavis Smiley (N) ^ Business Rpt.
Out of the Ashes: Recovering
WJSP 10 3 Georgia Weekly
Standoff ‘‘Partners in Crime’’ (In Stereo) News
Seinfeld (In Stereo) King of the Hill ^ The Simpsons ^ Paid Program
The Insider (N) ^
WXTX 8 7 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids House ‘‘Lines in the Sand’’ (N) ^
CSI: Miami ‘‘The Best Defense’’ ^
Bounty Hunter
Bounty Hunter
Inked (N) ^
Inked (N) ^
Dallas SWAT ^
CSI: Miami ‘‘The Best Defense’’ ^
A&E 38 49 Crossing Jordan ‘‘The Digger’’ ^
AMC 61 64 (6:00) TTT ‘‘What About Bob?’’ (1991) TTT ‘‘Cocoon’’ (1985) Don Ameche. Florida retirees feel young again after swimming among alien pods. TTZ ‘‘Cocoon: The Return’’ (1988) Don Ameche. Senior citizens return with their alien benefactors.
Animal Precinct ‘‘Just in Time’’ (N)
The Most Extreme Animal cleaners.
The Most Extreme ‘‘Gross Outs’’ ^
ANPL 53 71 The Most Extreme ‘‘Home Designers’’ ^ The Most Extreme Animal cleaners. (N) The Most Extreme ‘‘Gross Outs’’ ^
Hotwyred ^
TT ‘‘Civil Brand’’ (2002) Mos Def. Abused female inmates lead a prison uprising. ^ The Parkers ^
The Parkers ^
Jamie Foxx
Jamie Foxx
In Living Color ^ In Living Color ^
BET 40 35 106 & Park
Project Runway ‘‘Black and White’’ ^
Million Dollar Listing ‘‘Hollywood’’ (N) ^ Project Runway ‘‘Couture du Jour’’ ^
Project Runway ‘‘Black and White’’ ^
Million Dollar Listing ‘‘Hollywood’’ ^
BRAV 63 65 Million Dollar Listing ‘‘Hollywood’’ ^
Trick My Truck
Trick My Truck
Trick My Truck
Trick My Truck
Foxworthy’s
Foxworthy’s
Foxworthy’s
Foxworthy’s
TZ ‘‘Son-in-Law’’ (1993) Pauly Shore.
CMTV 41 61 Dukes of Hazzard ‘‘Double Dukes’’
Deal or No Deal (In Stereo) ^
Mad Money
The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
Deal or No Deal (In Stereo) ^
Mad Money
CNBC 34 41 On the Money
Paula Zahn Now ^
Larry King Live ^
Anderson Cooper 360 ^
Larry King Live
CNN 35 40 The Situation Room
The Colbert Report Mind of Mencia ^ South Park ^
South Park ^
Chappelle’s Show Daily Show
The Colbert Report Chappelle’s Show Reno 911! ^
COM 66 58 Scrubs (In Stereo) Scrubs (In Stereo) Daily Show
On the Run ‘‘Silver Bandit’’ (N) ^
Cops (In Stereo) ^ Cops (In Stereo) ^
COURT 65 59 Cops ‘‘Arizona’’ ^ Cops ‘‘Arizona’’ ^ Cops (In Stereo) ^ Cops (In Stereo) ^ Cops (In Stereo) ^ Cops (In Stereo) ^ World’s Scariest Police Chases 2 ^
Tonight From Washington
Capital News Today
CSPAN 20 76 House of Representatives
Tonight From Washington
Capital News Today
CSPAN2 14 77 U.S. Senate Coverage
That’s So Raven ^ Phil of the Future Kim Possible ^
DIS
43 45 Phil of the Future That’s So Raven ^ ‘‘Wendy Wu: Homecoming Warrior’’ (2006, Adventure) Brenda Song. (In Stereo) ^ Life With Derek ^ Phil of the Future Zack & Cody
Oil, Sweat and Rigs ^
Dirty Jobs ‘‘Shrimper’’ Shrimp season. ^ Fugitive Strike Force ‘‘Officer Down’’ (N) Dirty Jobs ‘‘Casino Food Recycler’’ ^
Oil, Sweat and Rigs ^
DISC 42 25 Dirty Jobs ‘‘Casino Food Recycler’’ ^
The Daily 10 (N)
That ’70s Show: True H’wood Story
Society Girls: True Hollywood Story
Girl Next Door
Girl Next Door
E! News
The Daily 10
Saturday Night Live (In Stereo) ^
E!
62 57 E! News (N)
2006 World Series of Poker ^
2006 World Series of Poker ^
The Contender (Live)
SportsCenter (Live) ^
ESPN 28 30 MLB Hometown Heroes
College Football: Southern Mississippi at Central Florida. (Live) ^
Baseball Tonight (Live)
Quite Frankly With Stephen A. Smith ^
ESPN2 29 31 Interruption
The Contender
Can’t Blame
Can’t Blame
Arliss ^
Cheap Seats ^
Boxing: 2005 Augustus vs. Oliveira
ESPNC 30 29 Stump the Schwab Mother’s Car Show Boxing: 2005 Augustus vs. Oliveira
Whose Line?
The 700 Club ^
Home Videos
Home Videos
FAM 26 20 7th Heaven ‘‘Tangled Web We Weaved’’ TT ‘‘Uptown Girls’’ (2003) A carefree woman becomes a nanny to an uptight girl. ^ Whose Line?
Unwrapped
Emeril Live Restaurant classics.
$40-a-Day ‘‘Aspen’’ Tasty Travels
Road Tasted
Bobby Flay
Good Eats
$40-a-Day
$40-a-Day ‘‘Aspen’’ Tasty Travels
FOOD 58 67 Good Eats
Nip/Tuck ‘‘Shari Noble’’
That ’70s Show ^ That ’70s Show ^
FX
55 53 That ’70s Show ^ TZ ‘‘Me, Myself & Irene’’ (2000, Comedy) Jim Carrey. A mild-mannered police officer has a vile alter ego. Nip/Tuck ‘‘Shari Noble’’ (N)
Hannity & Colmes (Live) ^
On the Record-Van Susteren
The O’Reilly Factor
Special Report
FXNWS 68 43 The Fox Report With Shepard Smith ^ The O’Reilly Factor (Live) ^
Totally Football
Poker Superstars Invitational
Best Damn Sports Show Period (Live) Best Damn Sports Show Period (Live) Around the South Final Score
Best Damn Sports Show Period (Live)
FXSS 46 32 Helmets Off
GAC Nights ‘‘Megan Mullins’’
Grand Ole Opry Live
On the Streets
More Music Videos
Edge-Country
GAC Nights ‘‘Megan Mullins’’
GAC
37 (6:00) Mainstreet Music Videos
Lingo ^
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ^
Chain Reaction ^ Starface ^
Greed ^
Match Game ^
I’ve Got a Secret ^ Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ^
GSN 98 18 Lingo ^
Top 15 Tour Shots Inside PGA
Natalie Gulbis
Big Break VI
Big Break VI: Trump National (N)
Golf Central
Best Ever
GOLF 59 28 Golf Central (Live) Golf With Style
TT ‘‘A Time to Remember’’ (2003, Drama) Dana Delany, Doris Roberts. ^
M*A*S*H ^
M*A*S*H ^
M*A*S*H ^
M*A*S*H ^
HALL 31 62 Walker, Texas Ranger ‘‘Small Blessings’’ Walker, Texas Ranger ‘‘Tribe’’ ^
House Hunters
Designed to Sell
Save My Bath (N) Decorating Cents Curb Appeal (N)
House Hunters
Buy Me (In Stereo) My Parents’ House FreeStyle (N)
Designed to Sell
Save My Bath
HGTV 57 24 What You Get
Mega Disasters Potential asteroid. ^
Mega Movers Plantation house moved. Modern Marvels Waterway. ^
Comets: Prophets of Doom ^
HIST 50 26 Modern Marvels Materials deflect bullets. Comets: Prophets of Doom ^
Green Acres
Green Acres
Mama’s Family
Mama’s Family
Charlie’s Angels (In Stereo)
Diagnosis Murder (In Stereo) ^
Time Life
Paid Program
Paid Program
Paid Program
i
16
Will & Grace ^
Frasier (In Stereo) Frasier (In Stereo)
LIFE 23 21 TTZ ‘‘Love Lessons’’ (2000, Drama) A 50-year-old woman finds she is pregnant. ^ ‘‘Choosing Matthias’’ (2001, Drama) A troubled orphan helps heal a grieving couple. Will & Grace ^
Hardball ^
Countdown With Keith Olbermann
Scarborough Country
The Predator Next Door Sex offenders. MSNBC Documentary
Countdown With Keith Olbermann
MSNBC 72
Little Talent
Little Talent
Two-A-Days
Two-A-Days
MTV Special (In Stereo)
Parental Control
Parental Control
Parental Control
Parental Control
MTV 32 36 Sucker Free (In Stereo)
SpongeBob
Mr. Meaty
Full House ^
Fresh Prince
The Cosby Show A Different World Roseanne ^
Roseanne ^
Fresh Prince
Fresh Prince
NICK 36 47 Fairly OddParents Jimmy Neutron
Soul of a Champion
Soul Champion
Boxing: Omar Nino vs. Brian Viloria.
Soul Champion
OUTD 75 27 Fight Night
Eureka ‘‘H.O.U.S.E. Rules’’ (In Stereo) ^ ECW (Live)
Eureka ‘‘H.O.U.S.E. Rules’’ (In Stereo) ^ Dead Like Me ‘‘In Escrow’’ (In Stereo) ^
SCI
51 56 Dead Like Me ‘‘In Escrow’’ (In Stereo) ^ Dead Like Me ‘‘Rites of Passage’’ ^
American Thunder Corbin’s Ride On Super Bikes!
Super Bikes!
Street Tuner
Redline TV
NOPI Tunervision Super Bikes!
Unique Whips
SPEED 67 33 (6:30) Monster Jam Pinks!
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ^
TTTZ ‘‘Lethal Weapon 2’’ (1989, Action) Mel Gibson. Riggs and Murtaugh battle drug-smuggling diplomats. (In Stereo)
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ^
SPIKE 49 38 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ^
Fulton Sheen
Behind the Scenes Joyce Meyer
John Hagee Today Bill Gaither ^
Praise the Lord ^
Primary Focus
Praise the Lord ^
TBN 11 63 Dr. Carl Baugh
TT ‘‘Death of a Cyclist’’ (1955, Drama) Lucia Bosé.
TTTZ ‘‘Viridiana’’ (1961, Drama) Silvia Pinal.
TTTT ‘‘Beauty and the Beast’’ (1946, Fantasy) Jean Marais, Josette Day.
TCM 39 50 (6:00) ‘‘Lonely Are the Brave’’ (1962)
Dinner Takes All
Rides A classic Cadillac is transformed. Overhaulin’ 1967 Chevy Chevelle. (N)
Miami Ink ‘‘Saver vs. Spender’’ ^
Miami Ink ‘‘The Family’’ ^
Overhaulin’ 1967 Chevy Chevelle.
TLC
25 23 Dinner Takes All
Law & Order ‘‘Deep Vote’’ (In Stereo) ^ Law & Order ‘‘White Lie’’ (In Stereo) ^ Law & Order ‘‘House Calls’’ (In Stereo) NYPD Blue ‘‘I Love Lucy’’ (In Stereo) ^
TNT
47 51 Without a Trace ‘‘The Line’’ (In Stereo) Law & Order ‘‘Girl Most Likely’’ ^
Foster’s Home
Grim Adventures Ed, Edd n Eddy
Camp Lazlo
Foster’s Home
Codename: Kid
Futurama ^
Futurama ^
Family Guy ^
Pee-wee Play.
Inuyasha
TOON 56 48 Squirrel Boy
Yin Yang Yo! ^
Power Rangers
Get Ed ^
Dragon Booster ^ Super Robot
Tick (In Stereo) ^ Digimon ^
Power Rangers
Power Rangers
Yin Yang Yo! ^
Power Rangers
TOOND 76 46 Jackie Chan
Taste of America Taste of America Made in America Made in America Inside the Mall of America Mega-mall. Taste of America Taste of America Made in America Made in America
TRAV 60 22 Walt Disney World Resort: Behind
ACC All-Access
MLB Baseball: New York Mets at Atlanta Braves. Turner Field.
TSTH 64 66 In My Own Words MLB Baseball: New York Mets at Atlanta Braves. Turner Field. (Live)
The Jeffersons ^ Generation Boom Suburbs. (N)
Three’s Company Three’s Company Good Times ^
Good Times ^
TVL
54 44 The Jeffersons ^ The Jeffersons ^ Little House on the Prairie (Part 1 of 2) Andy Griffith
Weather: Evening Edition ^
Storm Stories ^
Storm Stories ^
Weather: Evening Edition
TWC 33 9 Storm Stories ^ Storm Stories ^ Abrams & Bettes
TTZ ‘‘Final Destination’’ (2000) Death stalks the survivors of a doomed airliner. ^ Law & Order: Criminal Intent (In Stereo) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ^
USA 27 52 Law & Order: Criminal Intent (In Stereo) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ^
The Flavor of Love (In Stereo)
The Flavor of Love Ladies must agree. The Flavor of Love (In Stereo)
T ‘‘Showgirls’’ (1995) An ambitious dancer makes a bid for Las Vegas success.
VH1
48 34 Caught on Tape (In Stereo)
Secret Lives of Women ‘‘Cutters’’
Secret Lives of Women ‘‘Meth Addicts’’ John Edward Cross Country
WE
37 55 Dharma & Greg ^ Dharma & Greg ^ TTZ ‘‘Intersection’’ (1994) An architect is torn between his wife and his lover. ^
‘‘Riding Giants’’ (2004) Filmmaker Stacy Peralta chronicles the evolution of surfing. ‘‘The Corruptor’’ (1999) Cops in New York’s Chinatown are caught in a gang war. ^ Dead Leaves Cloning facility. ^
ACTN 755 387 (6:30) ‘‘Hooded Angels’’ (2000) ‘R’ ^
TTZ ‘‘RoboCop 2’’ (1990) The futuristic cyborg sets out to destroy a drug kingpin. ‘‘The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou’’
ENC 750 380 (6:05) TT ‘‘Mercury Rising’’ (1998) ‘R’ TTT ‘‘The Terminator’’ (1984, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ ^
Quicksilver (1986) ‘‘For Hope’’ (1996, Drama) Dana Delany. (In Stereo) ^
TTZ ‘‘My Life’’ (1993) A cancer victim confronts his illness and his past. ‘PG-13’ ^ ‘‘The Other Sister’’ (1999) Two mentally challenged individuals meet and fall in love.
ENCPX
TTT ‘‘Wedding Crashers’’ (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ^
Wait Til Next Year
Def Comedy Jam The Wire ‘‘Home Room’’ (In Stereo) ^
Conservative
HBO 500 68 (6:15) TTZ ‘‘Fever Pitch’’ (2005) ^
TTZ ‘‘The Siege’’ (1998) The FBI attempts to hunt down terrorists in New York. ‘R’ Boxing: Arce vs. Makepula
HBO2 501 301 (6:00) TT ‘‘Regarding Henry’’ (1991) ^ TT ‘‘The Ring Two’’ (2005) A journalist must protect her son from evil Samara. ^
HBO3 502 302 (6:30) TTT ‘‘The Phantom of the Opera’’ (2004, Musical) Gerard Butler. ‘PG-13’ ^ TTT ‘‘Spanglish’’ (2004) A housekeeper works for a chef and his neurotic wife. ^ TT ‘‘Love & Sex’’ (2000, Romance-Comedy) Famke Janssen. ‘‘One Fine Day’’ ^
TTZ ‘‘Flipper’’ (1996, Adventure) Elijah Wood. ‘PG’ ^
TTT ‘‘Paper Clips’’ (2004, Documentary) (In Stereo) ‘G’ ^
TTTZ ‘‘The Color Purple’’ (1985) Whoopi Goldberg. ‘PG-13’
HBOF 503 303 TTT ‘‘Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure’’ (1989) ‘PG’ ^
TTZ ‘‘Mumford’’ (1999) A man poses as a psychologist in a small town. ‘R’ ^
‘‘P.S.’’ (2004) A divorcee begins an affair with a student painter. Surviving Picasso
LOVE 753 385 (6:50) TZ ‘‘Up Close & Personal’’ (1996, Romance) Robert Redford. ‘PG-13’ ^
TTT ‘‘Red Eye’’ (2005, Suspense) Rachel McAdams. ‘PG-13’ TTT ‘‘Batman Begins’’ (2005) Christian Bale. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark Knight. ‘PG-13’ Ghost in Teeny
MAX 550 330 (6:45) TZ ‘‘Sliver’’ (1993, Suspense) Sharon Stone. ‘R’ ^
Sex Games Cancun (In Stereo) ^
Movie
MAX2 551 331 TT ‘‘Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous’’ (2005) Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ TT ‘‘The Grudge’’ (2004) Sarah Michelle Gellar. ‘PG-13’ ^
TT ‘‘Blade: Trinity’’ (2004) Blade and a pair of vampire slayers battle Dracula. ‘R’ ^ TTT ‘‘Miami Blues’’ (1990, Comedy-Drama) Alec Baldwin. ‘R’ TT ‘‘Gun Shy’’ (2000, Comedy) Liam Neeson. ‘R’ ^
MYST 752 386 (5:45) TTTZ ‘‘Die Hard’’ (1988) ‘R’ ^
Sexual Healing (iTV)
Weeds ^
The Underground TT ‘‘Soul Plane’’ (2004) Kevin Hart. ‘R’
SHOW 600 72 TT ‘‘Without a Paddle’’ (2004) Three friends embark on a calamitous canoe trip. ^ Brotherhood Irish wedding. ^
TT ‘‘Sleepover’’ (2004, Comedy) Alexa Vega. ‘PG’ ^
TT ‘‘Walking Tall’’ (2004, Action) The Rock. ‘PG-13’ ^
‘‘Slippin’: Ten Years With the Bloods’’ (2005) ‘NR’ ^
TTT ‘‘About Last Night...’’ (1986) ‘R’ ^
SHOW2 601 321 Ballad, Jack
TT ‘‘An Awfully Big Adventure’’ (1995, Comedy-Drama) Alan Rickman. ‘R’ ^
Monkey Dust
Dracula: Pages
SUN 310 360 (6:45) ‘‘Black Cat, White Cat’’ (1998) A gangster arranges a marriage for his sister. The Nominees ^ City of Men
TT ‘‘The River King’’ (2005, Crime Drama) Edward Burns. ‘R’ TT ‘‘Suspect Zero’’ (2004) FBI agents search for a murderer of serial killers. ‘R’ ^ ‘‘3-Way’’ (2004, Suspense) Gina Gershon. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ^
TMC 650 340 Sky Captain-World
TTZ ‘‘One More Train to Rob’’ (1971, Western) George Peppard. ‘GP’ ^
TTT ‘‘Johnny Guitar’’ (1954, Western) Joan Crawford. ‘NR’ ^ TTZ ‘‘Alias Jesse James’’ (1959, Comedy) Bob Hope. ‘NR’
WEST 751 384 Big Valley ‘‘Fall of a Hero’’
The Valley Times-News
Tuesday, September 26, 2006
Rice, Kelley & Clark
SEC players of week
By The Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — South Carolina wide
receiver Sidney Rice was named Southeastern Conference
offensive player of the week after catching nine passes for
161 yards and an SEC-record-tying five touchdowns in a
45-6 win over Atlantic.
Arkansas strong safety Randy Kelly earned defensive
honors Monday with a career-high 16 tackles, including 1.5
for losses and returning a fumble for a touchdown in a 2423 double overtime win over Alabama. Kelly was also credited with a quarterback pressure, one pass deflection and a
half-sack.
Auburn kicker Matt Clark was the special teams player
of the week with all six of his kickoffs being for touchbacks
in a 38-7 win against Buffalo. So far this season, 21 of
Clark’s 24 kickoffs have been for touchbacks, avoiding any
return.
Other weekly awards:
—Tennessee tackle Arron Sears was named offensive
lineman of the week after the Vols amassed 434 offensive
yards on 51 plays in a win over Marshall, an average of 8.5
yards per play, which is the second best average in the SEC
this season.
—LSU End Chase Pitman was defensive lineman of the
week after making four tackles with a sack and forcing a
fumble against Tulane.
—Georgia quarterback Joe Cox was the freshman of the
week after passing for 154 yards and two TDs in a 14-13
come-from-behind win against Colorado. His 20-yard TD
pass to Matrez Milner with 46 seconds left was the gamewinner.
SPORTS
Page 10
LANETT-LaFAYETTE WEEK:
DEDICATION OF MORGAN-WASHBURN
STADIUM, FRI., SEPT. 29, 2006
Spurrier’s Gamecocks
tangle with No. 2 AU
By PETE IACOBELLI
AP Sports Writer
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Steve Spurrier doesn’t like to
think about last year’s blowout loss to Auburn. If he does,
though, he doesn’t make excuses or hide behind the usual
problems of a building program.
‘‘We got about what we expected or deserved,’’ Spurrier
says with conviction.
Not much went right for the Gamecocks, who fell to the
Tigers 48-7 in one of Spurrier’s most lopsided losses. No
one, not even the ball coach, was blameless.
‘‘I told one of our coaches yesterday, not only were we not
into it, but coaching-wise, we all had a bad game ... I know
I had a terrible game as a coach,’’ Spurrier said.
Spurrier didn’t have a lot going for him that night. The
Gamecocks were already without starting quarterback
Blake Mitchell and had to rush freshman Antonio Heffner
in there to take over.
‘‘We had about 60 plays on the wristband for Antonio,’’
Spurrier remembered. ‘‘I couldn’t find them half the time
and he couldn’t get the signal half the time and we couldn’t even line up.’’
‘‘But anyway, that one is history,’’ Spurrier said. ‘‘You live
and learn and try and regroup from there.’’
South Carolina (3-1, 1-1 Southeastern Conference) gets
another crack at the Tigers (4-0, 2-0) at Williams-Brice Stadium on Thursday night, although things might not be any
easier than a year ago.
Auburn is No. 2 in the country and already on the fast
track for the Bowl Championship Series. The Gamecocks
have only recently shown signs of offensive life, struggling
to outlast Division I-AA Wofford 27-20 before last Saturday’s rout of Florida Atlantic, 45-6.
South Carolina’s offense has improved the past two
games since senior Syvelle Newton was put in for junior
Blake Mitchell. The team ranked 99th in overall offense —
and accounted for only one touchdown — its two opening
contests that included an 18-0 loss to Georgia on Sept. 9.
But Newton had led the Gamecocks to nine touchdowns
in the past two victories, including a school-record tying
five TD passes to Sidney Rice in the Florida Atlantic win.
The Gamecocks stand 58th nationally this week and
Spurrier assured everyone that Newton would indeed get
the call in the ESPN game.
For his efforts last week, Rice was named the SEC offensive player of the week.
The Gamecocks know the touchdowns won’t come as
easily against Auburn, which held LSU to three points and
has allowed only 24 points all season.
The team has talked about last year’s defeat, receiver
Mike West said. While it won’t be about revenge Thursday
night, the Gamecocks certainly will be motivated to make
•SEE AU-CAROLINA, page 11
LANETT-LaFAYETTE SHOWDOWN — Two of the key players for their respective teams Friday in the annual LanettLaFayette showdown will be a pair of standout seniors in Lanett’s Char Lane (73), an offensive and defensive tackle and
LaFayette’s all-state defensive tackle Cortney Ray (74). Lanett dominated the rivalry for many years but the Bulldogs
have owned the Panthers with four straight wins in the series, including a thrilling 22-17 win in 2005 aided by a pair of
goal-line stands in the fourth period. Lanett has not defeated LaFayette since the 2001 season under then coach Mitch
Hamilton, when the 3A region champion Panthers went 10-3 and advanced to the state quarterfinals. Lanett’s 2001 team
was led by Jamal Lewis, Derrell “Dough Boy” Greenwood, Buck Williams, Anthony Hines, Prinston Stanford, Marco
Cheeks and Franklin Lloyd, a Troy Trojan standout and perhaps future pro football player. (Photos by Scott Sickler)
Saints make grand return to the
Big Easy in routing Falcons, 23-3
By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer
NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
The New Orleans Saints
knew it would be a special
night, but the point was
really driven home when
they pulled into the parking
lot at the refurbished
Superdome.
Several hours before
kickoff, tens of thousands of
fans already were milling
about in the streets, ready
for a party that was a horrific year in the making.
Even quarterback Drew
Brees had a tough time finding his parking spot, resolving at one point to maroon
his car on an island before
someone showed him the
way.
No problem. After all
New Orleans has been
through, that hardly qualified as a hassle.
The Saints made a triumphant return to the Big
Easy on Monday night,
romping to a 23-3 victory
over the Atlanta Falcons
that — for several hours, at
least — helped this battered
city feel good about itself
again.
Instead of worrying about
insurance payments or
grieving for those died, the
fans cheered on Reggie
Bush is his first home game,
reveled in a defense that
battered Michael Vick, marveled at a special teams that
blocked two kicks, and
roared when the Saints
pulled off a trick play
known,
appropriately
enough, as ‘‘The Superdome
Special.’’
They even got a chance to
salute once-reviled owner
Tom Benson, who broke out
his parasol and bounced
around the field — just like
the good ol’ days before Hurricane Katrina changed life
forever.
‘‘From the moment I
signed with the Saints, I
was looking forward to this,’’
said Brees, who joined New
Orleans during the offseason. ‘‘It was a great night.
It’s something we’ll never
forget.’’
This one couldn’t have
been scripted any better for
a team that spent all of last
season on the road, and it
couldn’t have come at a better time for a city that is
still struggling to overcome
the devastation of Katrina.
After a Super Bowl-like
pregame show that included
a performance by supergroups U2 and Green Day,
the Saints wasted no time
turning their welcome-home
party into Mardi Gras: The
Falcons’ first drive went
three-and-out, and special
teams demon Steve Gleason
sliced through the middle of
the Atlanta line to smother
Michael Koenen’s punt.
The ball skidded across
the goal line, where Curtis
Deloatch fell on it for a
touchdown — the first given
up by the Falcons this season. Just like that, Saints
sent an emphatic message
to the NFL and the entire
country.
New Orleans is open for
business.
Deloatch ran over to the
stands and pointed at the
crowd of 70,003, as if to say,
‘‘Take that Katrina!’’
Undoubtedly, many more
were cheering around this
still-recovering city, some of
them vowing to set up televisions outside governmentissued trailers that pass for
homes more than a year
after the storm blew ashore,
the levees broke and the
water poured through.
‘‘That set the tone,’’ Brees
said. ‘‘That’s when we all
knew. This was our day, our
night.’’
The Saints dedicated a
game ball to the entire city.
‘‘It meant a lot to them
when the Saints didn’t leave
in their time of need,’’ rookie Reggie Bush said. ‘‘When
the people of New Orleans
needed something to look to
for confidence and something to be proud of, they
looked to the Saints.’’
The Saints (3-0) poured it
on against the Falcons (2-1),
who fell behind 14-3 in the
first quarter and never
recovered. Devery Henderson scored New Orleans’
second TD on an 11-yard
double-reverse, taking a
handoff from Bush and cutting inside the pylon with
help from a block by Brees.
How could that play not
work? When fine-tuning it
in practice, the Saints
dubbed their bit of chicanery ‘‘The Superdome
Special’’ — a tribute to the
stadium that was the scene
of misery and despair in the
days after Katrina, but has
come back to life with a
$185 million renovation.
John Carney kicked two
field goals in the second
period, including a 51yarder that cleared the
crossbar as time ran out.
•SEE SAINTS, page 11
Sports Correction:
THE NATION’S BEST WIDEOUT — Georgia Tech AllAmerican wide receiver Calvin Johnson (21) is shown
above sporting a late 1960s-style throwback uniform with
the white striped helmets and old gold jerseys in last
week’s win over Virginia. The 6-5, 235-pound junior from
Sandy Creek High (Tyrone, Ga.) is perhaps the best wideout in all of college football and a sure first-round NFL draft
pick if he decides to come out early. (Photo by Wayne
Clark)
Valley football coach Rog
McDonald played on the
Rams ’83-’84-’85 football
teams not the ’87-’88 Valley
High teams with future NFL
players in John Copeland,
Lemanski Hall and Marcus
Pollard. The VT-N apologizes
for the error and those
involved.
RED-HOT RAMS — Valley sophomore quarterback Brent Osborn hands off to Qualo
Dunn in running the Rambone offense in a practice session last week. Coach Rog
McDonald’s Rams are off to a super 4-0 start (3-0 5A-Region 2 and tie for first) and look
to move to 5-0 Friday when Valley hosts 4A Dadeville. Also shown on the play are Valley
backs in Labrandon Lockhart and Dee Dee Avery. The Rams rushing attack keyed one of
the school’s biggest wins in the last decade Friday in an impressive 35-0 blanking of previously unbeaten Charles Henderson. Coaches in the background include Marshon Harper (white shirt), Danny Walker (gray shirt) and Jason Phillips (blue shirt next to football).
(Photo by Scott Sickler)
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006 — Page 11
SCOREBOARD
OSU, AU and USC
1-2-3 in AP Top-25
The AP Top 25
By The Associated Press
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 23, total points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts
Pvs
1. Ohio St. (59)
4-0
1,617
1
2. Auburn (2)
4-0
1,513
2
3. Southern Cal (2) 3-0
1,491
3
4. West Virginia (2) 4-0
1,404
4
5. Florida
4-0
1,363
5
6. Michigan
4-0
1,318
6
7. Texas
3-1
1,196
7
8. Louisville
4-0
1,166
8
9. LSU
3-1
1,114
10
10. Georgia
4-0
972
9
11. Virginia Tech
4-0
945
11
12. Notre Dame
3-1
879
12
13. Iowa
4-0
864
14
14. Oregon
3-0
805
13
15. Tennessee
3-1
658
15
16. Oklahoma
3-1
613
17
17. TCU
3-0
563
16
18. Clemson
3-1
529
19
19. Florida St.
3-1
510
18
20. California
3-1
508
21
21. Nebraska
3-1
327
23
22. Boise St.
4-0
226
25
23. Rutgers
4-0
117
—
24. Georgia Tech
3-1
77
—
25. Missouri
4-0
70
—
Others receiving votes: Boston College 42,
Miami 37, Arizona St. 34, Purdue 34, Michigan St.
20, Texas A&M 20, Penn St. 19, Texas Tech 17,
Arkansas 13, Washington 13, Wake Forest 12,
Wisconsin 6, Houston 5, UCLA 5, Alabama 3.
N.L. National
Standings
League
At A Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
East Division
W L Pct
GB
x-New York
93 63 .596
—
Philadelphia 82 74 .526
11
Florida
76 80 .487
17
Atlanta
75 81 .481
18
Washington 69 87 .442
24
Central Division
W L Pct
GB
St. Louis
80 75 .516
—
Houston
78 78 .500
2 1/2
Cincinnati
77 79 .494
3 1/2
Milwaukee
73 83 .468
7 1/2
Pittsburgh
65 91 .417
15 1/2
Chicago
63 94 .401
18
West Division
W L Pct
GB
San Diego
84 72 .538
—
Los Angeles 82 74 .526
2
S. Francisco 75 81 .481
9
Arizona
74 82 .474
10
Colorado
74 82 .474
10
x-clinched division
———
Monday’s Games
Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Houston 5, Philadelphia 4
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 3
San Diego 6, St. Louis 5
Arizona 7, San Francisco 1
Tuesday’s Games
Houston (Pettitte 13-13) at Pittsburgh (Snell 1410), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Belisle 2-0) at Florida (Willis 12-11),
7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Myers 12-6) at Washington (Ortiz
10-15), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (O.Perez 3-12) at Atlanta (Smoltz
14-9), 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Villanueva 1-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Marshall 5-9), 8:05 p.m.
San Diego (W.Williams 10-5) at St. Louis (Carpenter 15-7), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Maddux 13-14) at Colorado
(Jennings 9-12), 8:35 p.m.
Arizona (Webb 16-7) at San Francisco (Morris
10-15), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Arizona (Vargas 11-10) at San Francisco
(J.Sanchez 3-0), 3:35 p.m.
Houston (Hirsh 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Chacon 2-3),
7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Michalak 2-3) at Florida (A.Sanchez
9-3), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-8) at Washington
(Astacio 5-5), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (P.Martinez 9-7) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 12-12), 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Bush 12-11) at Chicago Cubs (Hill
6-7), 8:05 p.m.
San Diego (Young 11-5) at St. Louis (Reyes 57), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lowe 15-8) at Colorado (Cook 914), 8:35 p.m.
N.L. Leaders
TODAY’S MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS
By The Associated Press
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING—FSanchez,
Pittsburgh,
.342;
MiCabrera, Florida, .336; Holliday, Colorado, .332;
Pujols, St. Louis, .328; Atkins, Colorado, .321;
Howard, Philadelphia, .316; Berkman, Houston,
.316.
RUNS—Utley, Philadelphia, 127; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 124; Beltran, New York, 121; Reyes,
New York, 120; ASoriano, Washington, 117;
HaRamirez, Florida, 115; Pujols, St. Louis, 113.
RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 145; Pujols, St.
Louis, 130; Berkman, Houston, 130; AJones,
Atlanta, 124; Atkins, Colorado, 114; Beltran, New
York, 114; ARamirez, Chicago, 114.
HITS—Pierre, Chicago, 196; Utley, Philadelphia, 194; Holliday, Colorado, 192; Reyes, New
York, 191; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 190; Furcal, Los
Angeles, 190; MiCabrera, Florida, 187.
DOUBLES—LGonzalez, Arizona, 52; MiCabrera, Florida, 50; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 50; Atkins,
Colorado, 47; Zimmerman, Washington, 46;
NJohnson, Washington, 46; Rolen, St. Louis, 46.
TRIPLES—Reyes, New York, 17; Pierre, Chicago, 13; DRoberts, San Diego, 13; SFinley, San
Francisco, 12; HaRamirez, Florida, 10; Sullivan,
Colorado, 10; Lofton, Los Angeles, 10; Vizquel,
San Francisco, 10.
HOME RUNS—Howard, Philadelphia, 58;
Pujols, St. Louis, 46; ASoriano, Washington, 46;
Berkman, Houston, 43; Dunn, Cincinnati, 40; Beltran, New York, 40; AJones, Atlanta, 39.
STOLEN BASES—Reyes, New York, 62;
Pierre, Chicago, 56; HaRamirez, Florida, 51;
DRoberts, San Diego, 45; FLopez, Washington,
41; ASoriano, Washington, 41; Freel, Cincinnati,
37.
PITCHING (18 Decisions)—CZambrano,
Chicago, 16-6, .727, 3.43; Webb, Arizona, 16-7,
.696, 2.95; Carpenter, St. Louis, 15-7, .682, 2.93;
TGlavine, New York, 14-7, .667, 3.94; BMyers,
Philadelphia, 12-6, .667, 3.94; DLowe, Los Angeles, 15-8, .652, 3.57; Trachsel, New York, 15-8,
.652, 4.97.
STRIKEOUTS—Peavy, San Diego, 208;
Harang, Cincinnati, 207; CZambrano, Chicago,
201; Smoltz, Atlanta, 200; Arroyo, Cincinnati, 181;
Carpenter, St. Louis, 178; BMyers, Philadelphia,
177.
SAVES—Hoffman, San Diego, 43; BWagner,
New York, 39; Borowski, Florida, 36; Isringhausen,
St. Louis, 33; Gordon, Philadelphia, 33; Lidge,
Houston, 31; Fuentes, Colorado, 29.
Los Angeles, .327; Johnson, Toronto, .324;
Morneau, Minnesota, .324; ISuzuki, Seattle, .320.
RUNS—Sizemore, Cleveland, 132; Damon,
New York, 113; Jeter, New York, 113; DOrtiz,
Boston, 111; ARodriguez, New York, 108; Thome,
Chicago, 108; ISuzuki, Seattle, 105.
RBI—DOrtiz, Boston, 134; Morneau, Minnesota, 129; Ibanez, Seattle, 121; Dye, Chicago, 119;
Hafner, Cleveland, 117; ARodriguez, New York,
117; VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 116.
HITS—ISuzuki, Seattle, 217; MYoung, Texas,
209; Tejada, Baltimore, 208; Jeter, New York, 205;
VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 197; Matthews, Texas,
191; Sizemore, Cleveland, 185.
DOUBLES—Sizemore,
Cleveland,
52;
MYoung, Texas, 50; Overbay, Toronto, 46; Lowell,
Boston, 46; Teixeira, Texas, 44; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 44; Matthews, Texas, 43.
TRIPLES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 15; Sizemore, Cleveland, 11; Granderson, Detroit, 8;
JoLopez, Seattle, 8; Figgins, Los Angeles, 8; Teahen, Kansas City, 7; Punto, Minnesota, 7; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 7.
HOME RUNS—DOrtiz, Boston, 53; Dye, Chicago, 43; Hafner, Cleveland, 42; Thome, Chicago,
42; Thomas, Oakland, 38; Glaus, Toronto, 36;
Giambi, New York, 36.
STOLEN BASES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 56;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 51; ISuzuki, Seattle, 44;
CPatterson, Baltimore, 44; Podsednik, Chicago,
40; BRoberts, Baltimore, 36; Jeter, New York, 32.
PITCHING (18 Decisions)—Halladay, Toronto,
16-5, .762, 3.19; Wang, New York, 18-6, .750,
3.57; JoSantana, Minnesota, 18-6, .750, 2.79;
Rogers, Detroit, 17-6, .739, 3.63; Garland, Chicago, 17-7, .708, 4.61; Mussina, New York, 14-7,
.667, 3.57; Schilling, Boston, 14-7, .667, 4.07.
STRIKEOUTS—JoSantana, Minnesota, 240;
Bonderman, Detroit, 196; Lackey, Los Angeles,
179; Schilling, Boston, 174; RaJohnson, New
York, 172; FHernandez, Seattle, 171; Haren, Oakland, 169.
SAVES—FrRodriguez, Los Angeles, 44; Jenks,
Chicago, 40; Street, Oakland, 36; TJones, Detroit,
36; Papelbon, Boston, 35; BRyan, Toronto, 35;
Nathan, Minnesota, 35.
A.L.American
Standings
League
National Football League
At A Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
PF
PA
New England 2 1 0 .667
50
51
N.Y. Jets
2 1 0 .667
68
60
Buffalo
1 2 0 .333
53
53
Miami
1 2 0 .333
36
54
South
W L T Pct
PF
PA
Indianapolis 3 0 0 1.000
90
59
Jacksonville 2 1 0 .667
47
38
Houston
0 3 0 .000
49
98
Tennessee
0 3 0 .000
33
76
North
W L T Pct
PF
PA
Baltimore
3 0 0 1.000
70
20
Cincinnati
3 0 0 1.000
85
47
Pittsburgh
1 2 0 .333
48
54
Cleveland
0 3 0 .000
45
68
West
W L T Pct
PF
PA
San Diego
2 0 0 1.000
67
7
Denver
2 1 0 .667
36
31
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000
16
32
Oakland
0 2 0 .000
6
55
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
PF
PA
Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667
86
64
Dallas
1 1 0 .500
44
34
N.Y. Giants
1 2 0 .333
81
92
Washington 1 2 0 .333
57
61
South
W L T Pct
PF
PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000
76
44
Atlanta
2 1 0 .667
37
32
Carolina
1 2 0 .333
45
60
Tampa Bay
0 3 0 .000
27
67
North
W L T Pct
PF
PA
Chicago
3 0 0 1.000
79
23
Minnesota
2 1 0 .667
51
48
Green Bay
1 2 0 .333
58
84
Detroit
0 3 0 .000
37
74
West
W L T Pct
PF
PA
Seattle
3 0 0 1.000
72
46
St. Louis
2 1 0 .667
47
44
Arizona
1 2 0 .333
58
64
S. Francisco 1 2 0 .333
71
85
———
Monday’s Game
New Orleans 23, Atlanta 3
Sunday, Oct. 1
Dallas at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Washington, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Cincinnati, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, 8:15 p.m.
Open: Pittsburgh, Denver, N.Y. Giants, Tampa
Bay
At A Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
East Division
W L Pct
GB
x-New York
94 62 .603
—
Toronto
83 73 .532
11
Boston
83 74 .529
11 1/2
Baltimore
68 88 .436
26
Tampa Bay
60 96 .385
34
Central Division
W L Pct
GB
z-Detroit
94 62 .603
—
z-Minnesota 93 63 .596
1
Chicago
87 70 .554
7 1/2
Cleveland
73 83 .468
21
Kansas City 58 98 .372
36
West Division
W L Pct
GB
Oakland
90 66 .577
—
Los Angeles 85 71 .545
5
Texas
78 79 .497
12 1/2
Seattle
76 81 .484
14 1/2
x-clinched division
z-clinched playoff spot
———
Monday’s Games
Cleveland 14, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 5, Boston 0
N.Y. Yankees 16, Tampa Bay 1
Minnesota 8, Kansas City 1
Seattle 10, Oakland 9, 10 innings
L.A. Angels 8, Texas 3
Tuesday’s Games
Tampa Bay (Hammel 0-4) at Boston (Schilling
14-7), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Penn 0-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Lidle 33), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (McGowan 1-1) at Detroit (Bonderman
13-8), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Vazquez 11-10) at Cleveland (Sabathia 11-11), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (O.Perez 6-8) at Minnesota
(J.Santana 18-6), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Harden 3-0) at Seattle (Woods 6-3),
10:05 p.m.
Texas (Tejeda 4-4) at L.A. Angels (Escobar 1113), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Tampa Bay (Corcoran 4-9) at Boston (Beckett
16-10), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Lilly 14-13) at Detroit (Robertson 1312), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Benson 11-11) at N.Y. Yankees
(Wang 18-6), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (McCarthy 3-7) at Cleveland (Carmona 1-9), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Redman 10-10) at Minnesota
(Silva 10-14), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Zito 16-9) at Seattle (Meche 11-8),
10:05 p.m.
Texas (Eaton 7-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 112), 10:05 p.m.
A.L. Leaders
TODAY’S MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING—Mauer, Minnesota, .349; Jeter, New
York, .340; Tejada, Baltimore, .332; VGuerrero,
NFL Standings
SAINTS
Continued from page 10
The Saints trotted to the locker room with
a 20-3 lead and a rousing ovation ringing in
their ears. The Falcons straggled off in the
opposite direction, as if they already knew
this wasn’t going to be their night.
‘‘As tough as it is to lose a game, I’d be
lying if I said there isn’t a little, little, little
piece of me that didn’t appreciate what this
game meant to this city,’’ said Falcons coach
Jim Mora, whose father is the winningest
coach in Saints history. ‘‘It meant a lot.’’
After Bono left the stage and former
President George Bush took care of the coin
flip, the Saints made sure the party lasted
all night.
They dominated on special teams, also
blocking a short field goal attempt by 46year-old Morten Andersen. They held the
Falcons, coming off a franchise-record 306
yards on the ground against Tampa Bay, to
just 117 rushing. And they contained Vick,
who completed 12-of-31 for 137 yards.
‘‘I never in my life heard a crowd roar so
loud,’’ Vick said. ‘‘They deserve it.’’
Any hopes of an Atlanta comeback were
snuffed out on the first possession of the
second half. New Orleans took the kickoff
and drove 73 yards in 12 plays, burning
more than 7 1/2 minutes off the clock before
settling for Carney’s third field goal from
20 yards.
‘‘Who dat? Who dat? Who dat say dey
gonna beat dem Saints?’’ the fans chanted.
Not the Falcons. Not on this night.
Alge Crumpler, the team’s normally
sure-handed tight end, dropped a pass in
the end zone with no one around him in the
first quarter. The referees chipped in by
picking up a flag on a dubious pass interference call that could have extended a Falcons drive late in the third quarter.
About the only wish New Orleans didn’t
get was a first touchdown for Bush. Still,
‘‘Saint Reggie’’ gave the fans several
chances to cheer their rookie sensation,
rushing for 53 yards and catching four
passes for 19 yards.
‘‘If we had lost, the fans still would have
been partying, they still would have been
happy, because the organization is still in
New Orleans,’’ receiver Joe Horn said. ‘‘But
we wanted to put the icing on the cake.’’
And what a cake. The Saints seized first
place all to themselves in the NFC South
while matching their wins from all of last
season. Forced to play in San Antonio,
Baton Rouge and East Rutherford because
of the Superdome’s massive damage, New
Orleans struggled to a 3-13 record as a
team without a home.
Now, they’re home for good.
Notes: Andersen, who became the second oldest-player in NFL history behind
George Blanda, made a 26-yard field goal
for the Falcons’ lone points. ... Atlanta DE
John Abraham missed his second straight
game with a groin injury. ... Saints WR
Marques Colston — the fourth-to-last pick
in this year’s draft — had seven receptions
for 97 yards.
Monday, Oct. 2
Green Bay at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
NHL Preseason
National Hockey League
Preseason Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 3 1 0 6 10 8
Pittsburgh
2 1 2 6 15 18
New Jersey 2 3 0 4 10 8
N.Y. Islanders 1 2 0 2 8 10
Philadelphia 1 3 0 2 10 12
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston
4 1 0 8 16 11
Buffalo
3 1 0 6 12 9
Toronto
3 2 0 6 14 12
Ottawa
3 3 0 6 19 21
Montreal
1 4 0 2 14 20
Southeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay
2 0 1 5 14 11
Atlanta
2 2 0 4 12 13
Washington 1 1 1 3 8 10
Florida
0 5 1 1 11 21
Carolina
0 3 0 0 9 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago
5 0 0 10 19 8
Nashville
3 1 0 6 20 10
Columbus
3 3 0 6 15 20
Detroit
2 1 2 6 17 17
St. Louis
1 3 0 2 7 11
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Edmonton
4 1 0 8 15 7
Calgary
3 0 1 7 11 7
Colorado
3 1 0 6 14 10
Minnesota
2 1 0 4 10 9
Vancouver
1 3 0 2 10 15
Pacific Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 3 1 0 6 16 10
San Jose
3 1 0 6 14 13
Anaheim
2 2 2 6 22 25
Dallas
2 3 0 4 15 17
Phoenix
1 3 0 2 5 13
Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss
or shootout loss.
———
Monday’s Games
Montreal 7, Ottawa 3
N.Y. Islanders 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Colorado 5, Detroit 4, SO
Los Angeles 5, Anaheim 4, SO
Tuesday’s Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Transactions
Monday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
SEATTLE MARINERS—Purchased the contract of RHP Jorge Campillo from Tacoma of the
PCL. Placed RHP Cha Seung Baek on the 60-day
DL.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with
INF Juan Castro on a two-year contract extension.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Announced an
affiliation agreement with State College of the
New York-Penn League through 2010.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Named Seth
Burton assistant director of communications.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed K Nate
Kaeding to a six-year contract through the 2012
season.
Sports
Briefs
Monday’s Sports In Brief
By The Associated Press
PRO FOOTBALL
KIRKLAND, Wash. (AP) — The Seahawks’
shield against the hex of the Super Bowl loser
has its first crack: Shaun Alexander broke his
left foot, and will be sidelined for at least a
couple of weeks.
Coach Mike Holmgren said that a bone scan
revealed Alexander sustained a ‘‘small crack’’
and ‘‘displaced fracture’’ on a non-weightbearing foot bone sometime during the Seahawks’ win over the New York Giants on Sunday.
Already nursing soreness in his foot from a
bone bruise, last year’s league MVP ran for 47
yards on 20 carries while wearing new shoes
with special inserts before sitting out the
fourth quarter.
Alexander missed two practices last week
because of the bone bruise from the season
opener at Detroit, which led to the small crack,
Holmgren said.
TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) — While Cardinals coach
Dennis Green didn’t say rookie Matt Leinart would
replace struggling veteran Kurt Warner for Arizona’s next game, he also didn’t dismiss the possibility.
Green’s noncommittal comments came in the
wake of Warner’s awful performance in Sunday’s
16-14 home loss to the St. Louis Rams. The 35year-old quarterback was intercepted three times
— once with the team at the Rams 1-yard line and
another at the St. Louis 14.
To cap it off, Warner fumbled a snap at the
Rams 18 with 1:46 to play as Arizona was positioning itself for a winning field goal.
ESPN.com reported that the Cardinals were
expected to start Leinart against the Falcons in
Atlanta on Sunday, citing team sources the Web
site did not identify.
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Tampa Bay quarterback
Chris Simms is out indefinitely after having his
spleen removed. However, the Buccaneers have
not ruled out his playing again this season.
In the meantime, rookie Bruce Gradkowski
becomes the starter. Tim Rattay will be the backup, and the Bucs will explore signing a veteran to
fill in as the No. 3 quarterback until Luke McCown
comes off the physically unable to perform list.
Simms had his spleen removed Sunday night
after absorbing several punishing hits during the
loss to the Carolina Panthers.
CINCINNATI (AP) — Coach Marvin Lewis
expects linebacker Odell Thurman to be suspended for the rest of the season following his arrest on
a drunken driving charge, making him the sixth
Cincinnati Bengal arrested this year.
Thurman, already serving a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy, could get an additional one-year suspension
from the league.
The arrest came less than a week after commissioner Roger Goodell visited Cincinnati and
reminded players of their responsibility to stay out
of trouble and represent the league honorably.
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Kicker Nate Kaeding
signed a six-year contract that will keep him with
the Chargers through 2012.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
HOUSTON (AP) — A Rice University freshman
football player died, a day after collapsing during a
light workout.
Dale Lloyd, a 19-year-old defensive back, collapsed on the field about 5 p.m. Sunday but was
conscious when taken to a hospital by ambulance.
He died about 9 a.m., school officials said.
Rice athletic director Chris Del Conte said
Lloyd collapsed while the team was doing some
light running. Although he didn’t complain of anything specific, he told team trainers he didn’t feel
right.
Braves stuck at home for
October, streak ends at 14
By The Associated Press
ATLANTA (AP) — The
ending was inevitable, but
no less painful for the
Atlanta Braves.
Right up until the end,
they held out hope of somehow making it back to the
playoffs — albeit as a wildcard team rather than a
division champion.
But their bid ended a full
week before the end of the
regular season, leaving a
meaningless homestand for
a team already looking
ahead to 2007. The Braves
can still avoid a losing year,
but only if they close with a
six-game winning streak —
something that hasn’t happened all season.
‘‘The way the season’s
been going, even though we
didn’t want to think we were
out of it, it would’ve been
tough,’’ Andruw Jones said.
‘‘Guys didn’t stay healthy.
Not doing the right job, not
playing good defense, not
hitting when we need to hit,
not pitching where we
should pitch.
‘‘It’s been a season like
that.’’
The Braves had not
missed the playoffs since
1990. The following season,
they went from worst to first
to spark a run of 14 straight
division titles, unprecedented for a major U.S. sport.
But a 6-21 mark in June
essentially finished off any
hopes of capturing another
NL East title. The Braves
were mathematically eliminated by the New York Mets
two weeks ago.
Atlanta’s wild-card hopes
officially ended Sunday,
when the Braves squandered an early seven-run
lead at Coors Field and lost
to Colorado 9-8 — their
third straight loss to the
Rockies.
An ugly finish to an ugly
season.
‘‘It’s frustrating, but these
last couple of games have
been very indicative of our
season,’’ Chipper Jones said.
‘‘Either we dig a big hole
early, fight all the way back
and come up one short, or we
get out to a big lead and just
can’t get outs late in the
game.’’
The Braves got a head
start on next season when
they re-signed closer Bob
Wickman last week, filling a
hole that plagued the team
much of the last two seasons. But there’s still major
work to do on the pitching
staff, which ranked 13th in
the National League with a
4.70 ERA.
‘‘We’ve done just about
everything you can do wrong
in one season,’’ said John
Smoltz, the stalwart of the
rotation at age 39. ‘‘It was
kind of a torturing process.’’
The hitting shows more
potential.
The Braves rank near the
top of the league with their
.270 average, 209 homers
and 809 runs. Burgeoning
young stars such as Brian
McCann, Adam LaRoche
and Jeff Francoeur provide a
solid nucleus for the middle
of the order, surrounding
longtime stalwart Andruw
Jones.
Chipper Jones put up
good numbers — when he
played. But the third baseman had another injuryplagued season, raising
more questions about his
durability.
Amazingly, the Braves’
postseason streak came to
an end in a year when the
wild-card team will qualify
with less than 90 wins.
Philadelphia (82-73) held a
half-game lead over the Los
Angeles Dodgers (82-74)
heading into the season’s
final week.
‘‘It’s definitely not going
to take that many games to
get in,’’ manager Bobby Cox
said. ‘‘That’s the sad part.’’
Smoltz is the only
holdover from the last
Braves’ team that failed to
make the playoffs. He’s not
sure if he feels as optimistic
about Atlanta’s chances
going into next season as he
did 16 years ago.
‘‘At the end of 1990, we
were thinking, ’Wow, we may
not be that far away,’’’ he
said. ‘‘We were going the
other way this year. That’s
why winning these last few
weeks would have been
nice.’’
AMAC Tire &
Service Center
Specializing In:
• Tires • Oil Changes • Brakes
• Flats Fixed • Tire Rotation
• Maintenance • Balancing
• Computerized Alignment
Highway 50, Lanett, Alabama
(334) 576-2248
AU-CAROLINA
Continued from page 10
things competitive and by ‘‘trying to put 48
points on them.’’
It doesn’t make sense to dwell on that
loss, West said, because it’ll cost you even
more games. ‘‘We just kind of put it behind
us,’’ he said. ‘‘They’re just another SEC
team.’’
A year ago, South Carolina looked lost
against the Tigers. But the Gamecocks
regrouped to have the school’s most successful SEC stretch ever.
Spurrier rallied South Carolina to five
straight victories, including landmark decisions at Tennessee and against Florida.
Sometimes, Spurrier says, the blowout
losses do you more good than the close
defeats. The ball coach figures that if you
get smoked badly, the players understand
how hard they have to work and are ready
not to be embarrassed like that anytime
soon. If you lose late or close, ‘‘those hurt
and carry on a long time.’’
Spurrier and his players haven’t given
up hope of surprising the Tigers.
‘‘Well, if the ball bounced our way, it
would be a big night for South Carolina,’’
Spurrier said. Then he asked if the Gamecocks had ever defeated anyone ranked as
highly as Auburn. When told no, he went
on, ‘‘OK, we’ve got a chance at history this
week; got a chance.’’
Bubba Hall
Bobby Laney
706-518-1876 706-773-4874
Locally Owned
~ FREE ESTIMATES ~
★ 5 Year Guarantee ★
Page 12 — The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006
Briefly Told
Vashti Chapter No. 431
Order of the Eastern Star
will have its regular
meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 28 at the Lanett
lodge. All qualified Eastern Stars are welcome to
attend. Refreshments will
be served at 7 p.m. EDT
with the meeting taking
place at 7:30.
•Mommy and Me Play
Group offers a chance for
stay-at-home moms and
kids to get together and
talk and play. If interested, call Tiffany McManus
at 334-756-5653.
•The Moonlight Ballroom Dance Club of
LaGrange will hold a
dance on Friday, Oct. 13 at
the West Georgia Christian Academy Gym on
Hamilton Road, LaGrange
across from the Shell station. Dress casual. IBM
Band. Visitor couples welcome, $15 per couple.
Enjoy swing, shag, foxtrot,
rumba, waltz, cha-cha,
tango, samba, slow dancing and more. For more
information or for dance
lessons. call 706-637-9295.
•Those interested in
riding
the
bus
to
Greenville, Ala. for the
Valley vs. Greenville
football game on Oct. 6
may contact Gertha Rudd
at 334-576-7576 or Terrell
Johnson at 334-576-2117.
The cost is $20 per seat
per round trip and the
money is due by Sept. 29.
The bus will leave Valley
High at 4 p.m. EDT.
•The Valley Chapter
ASU Alumni Association will meet Thursday,
Sept. 28 at 6 p.m. EDT at
the Bowen East Center.
Asking all members and
prospective members to be
present. Oscar Crawley is
the president and Theresa
Barnes the vice president.
•The Boys & Girls
Clubs
of
Chambers
County (Lanett Unit)
was recently awarded the
AmeriCorps Grant along
with four other partners,
the City of Lanett, Lanett
City Schools, Ebenezer
Baptist Church and Pilgrim Baptist Church. Positions open are for 10 certified teachers to serve as
tutors. For more information, please fax a letter of
interest to 334-644-0690 or
send an e-mail of interest
to [email protected] For more information contact Gwen Harris
Brooks at 334-644-4002 or
334-642-1323.
•Auburn University
Academy for Lifelong
Learners (AUALL) will
begin its fall 2006 term on
Monday and Tuesday,
Sept. 25 and 26 with 19
study groups. Most classes
meet at the Best Western
Conference Center, 1577
S. College Street, Auburn.
For more information, contact the Auburn University Outreach Program
office at 334-844-5101 or
check the AUALL website
at www.auall.org.
•The
Board
of
Adjustment of the City
of Valley will hold a meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 3 at
5:30 p.m. in the Planning
and Development Conference Room at the Langdale Mill complex.
•The Chambers County
Schools provide appropriate language services for students who
are limited English proficient. Please contact
your school principal or
Diane Sherriff at 864-9466
ext. 203 (Lafayette area)
or 706-86-1985, ext 203
(Valley area) for more
information.
•Lanett High football
game tickets are now $6.
•Woodmen Lodge No.
522 meets Monday, Oct. 2 at 8
p.m. EDT at the LaFayette
Branch of the Chambers
County Library for its annual
“Seniors Appreciation Dinner.”
Be sure to invite a senior
friend. All members are asked
to bring a covered dish.
•The Liberty Theatre,
821 Eighth Ave., Columbus will present “Dreamgirls,” which is loosely
based on the Supremes,
Sept. 22, 23, 29, and 30 at
8 p.m. and Sept. 24 and
Oct. 1 at 3 p.m. Adults,
$18; seniors, students, military, groups of eight or
more, $15; and children
under 12, $10. For more
information, call 706-6537566 or e-mail libertytheatrecolumbus.org.
•The Northeast Alabama Orchid Show and
Sale will be held October
21-22 at the Anniston
Museum of Natural History. For more information,
contact Linda Currie at
[email protected] or 256835-8646 or NEAOS.org.
•The Georgia Welcome
Center
has
received
coupons for the Wild Animal Safari in Pine
Mountain. Buy three
admissions and get one
free. Visitors can drive their
own car, rent a zebra van or
take a guided bus tour. The
discount is good until the
end of September. Come by
the center to pick up the
coupon or call 645-3354.
•Lanett High football
season ticket packages
for home games can be
purchased at the central
office or at the reserve
seat section for $36.
Reserve seat tickets must
be presented to sit in the
reserve seat section. Sponsored by the Lanett Athletic Booster Club. Membership, $5; reserve seat,
$5 and football tickets $6.
•Artists and photographers residing in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee are
invited to submit work for
Photo VIII, a competitive
exhibition emphasizing
photography as an art
medium by Sept. 29.
Forms are available by
calling the Auburn Arts
Association, 334-887-2832
P.O. Box 1862, Auburn,
36836. Amateur and professional artists and photographers 17 years old
and older are eligible to
enter three works produced by traditional and
non-traditional
photographic techniques. A
number of merit and purchase awards will be
given. The show will be on
view in the Art Gallery at
Dempsey Arts Center
from Oct. 4-Nov. 9.
•An account has been
set up at CharterBank
for Freddie Tyson to help
with medical bills and personal living expenses that
have incurred because of
his lengthy illness beginning with admission to
Lanier Health Care June
17. He was later transferred to West Georgia
Medical Center and then to
UAB. His medical and drug
bills have reached an astronomical amount. He was readmitted to UAB Aug. 16.
To make a donation, visit
your local Charterbank and
reference Freddie Tyson
Medical account.
•The city of Valley
encourages citizens to
check out its new website
at www.cityofvalley.com to
learn more about city services, committees and
employees.
•For drug problems,
call Narcotics Anonymous at 768-3612. Meetings are held on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 8 p.m.
and Sundays at 6 p.m.
•A divorce recovery
support group will meet
on Wednesdays at 5 p.m.
at
Huguley
United
Methodist Church. For
more information, call
576-3502.
•The Essie Lee Floyd
Day Care Center is currently accepting enrollment applications for toddlers ages 18 months-5
years of age. For more
information,
call 6443788 or come by the center
at 804 North Cherry Drive
in Lanett.
Teacher arrested
on a DUI charge
By PATRICK SANDS
VT-N Staff Writer
BEULAH — A Beulah
High School science teacher
was arrested on Monday
and charged with driving
under the influence.
According to reports,
Constance Rosenblatt, 60, of
Auburn was arrested and
charged with driving under
the influence of alcohol at
9:29 a.m. CDT after she hit
another
teacher’s
car
parked in the school parking lot. A deputy was called
to the scene and conducted
a field sobriety test, but she
was taken to the Lee County Detention Facility after
refusing to complete a
Breathalyzer test. A blood
sample revealed a bloodalcohol level of 2.56.
West Point reports
WEST POINT — The
West Point Police Department is requesting assistance in a robbery by force
that occurred on Aug. 25 at
approximately 6 p.m. EDT
at 1870 Highway 18 in a
rented motel room.
The victim was in the
room when he was physically
assaulted by two black males.
The offenders took an
unspecified amount of U.S.
currency from the victim.
After tying him up in the
motel room, the suspects left
the area in the victim’s
maroon Ford van and later
abandoned the vehicle in the
1900 block of Highway 18.
The first suspect was
described as being a black
male, 6’2 in height, weighing approximately 210 lbs.
and wearing a white button
up shirt with gray pants
and a muscular build.
The second suspect is
described as being a black
male, 5’5 to 5’8 in height
and weighing between 160
and 180 lbs. He was wearing a white t-shirt and blue
jean-type pants.
Anyone with information
that may assist in the investigation or in the identification of the suspects can contact the West Point Police
Department at 706-6453525,
Valley
Area
CrimeStoppers at 334-7568200 or other local law
enforcement agencies.
Valley reports
VALLEY — The Valley
Police Department is asking
for assistance in locating
seven stolen vehicles taken
from King Chevrolet in Valley during the early morning
hours of Saturday, Sept. 23.
The following vehicles
were stolen: a red 2006
Honda 600RR motorcycle, a
black 2006 Kawasaki Vulcan
1600 Mean Street motorcycle, a green 2006 Kawasaki
Bayou 250 ATV, a red
Kawasaki Bayou 260 ATV, a
red 2006 Kawasaki Brute
Force 750 4x4 ATV, a green
Kawasaki KFX80 ATV and a
camouflage 2006 Kawasaki
Prairie 360 4WD ATV.
Anyone with information
concerning the whereabouts
of the stolen vehicles or suspects in this case can contact
the Valley Police Department
(VPD) at 334-756-5200,
CrimeStoppers at 334-7568200 or 1-800-756-8282 or
other local authorities.
The VPD reported one
arrest and seven incidents
reported during the preceding 24 hours.
Alicia C. Dunlap, 35, of
Opelika was arrested and
charged with failure to
appear in court (FTA) - driving while suspended.
Bobby McCollough of Valley reported that on Sept.
24, an unknown person
damaged his car while it
was parked at Wal-Mart.
Officers with the VPD
reported that between Sept.
23 and 25, two vehicles
were damaged at King Ford.
Lori Valencia of Valley reported that on Sept. 25, someone
damaged her mailbox.
Latisha Jones of Lanett
reported that on Sept. 24, a
1990 Honda Prelude was
stolen while it was left in a
parking lot.
Brian Mitchell of Valley
reported that between Sept.
23 and 25, someone stole a
Pioneer CD player from his
vehicle with a value of $150
and caused damage to his
dashboard.
Richard Heath of Opelika
reported that between Sept.
22 and 25, an unknown person stole $300 in tools from
the toolbox on his truck.
Richard Ware of Lanett
reported that on Sept. 23,
an unknown person damaged his vehicle while it
was parked at Wal-Mart.
Lanett reports
LANETT — The Lanett
Police Department reported
two arrests and four incidents being investigated
during the past 24 hours.
Antonio
McCullough,
alias “Tony,” 40, of Lanett
was arrested and charged
with two counts of FTA receiving stolen property
third degree and criminal
mischief third degree.
Michael Dwayne Alvis, 40,
of Lanett was arrested and
charged with unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.
Darriel Dwayne Hooper
of Lanett reported an incident of criminal trespass
third degree.
Laruth Winston of Lanett
reported the theft of a bag of
aluminum cans valued at $25.
Monica Harper of Valley
reported the unauthorized
use of a 2001 Freightliner.
Tifton Dobbs of Lanett
reported that someone
broke into a vehicle and
caused $250 in damage to a
vent and window.
Chambers County reports
LaFAYETTE
— The
Chambers County Sheriff’s
Office reported four arrests
during the previous 24 hours.
Gereden Heard Ward, 54,
of Five Points was arrested
and charged with trafficking in cannabis.
Wayne Carl Ward, 45, of
Five Points was arrested
and charged with trafficking in cannabis.
Ester Vilma Osborn, 44,
of Lanett was arrested and
charged with negotiating a
worthless negotiable instrument (bad check).
Alicia Christine Dunlap,
36, of Opelika was arrested
and charged with being a
fugitive from justice.
A
sheriff’s
office
spokesman reported that 123
inmates were currently incarcerated in the Chambers
County Detention Facility.
Man pleads not guilty
in running over family
By The Associated Press
COVINGTON, Ga. (AP)
— The man accused of running down five family members and killing a 2-year-old
in the parking lot of a suburban Atlanta McDonald’s
restaurant pleaded not
guilty Tuesday.
Lanny Perry Barnes could
face the death penalty. Police
say Barnes’ car struck the
five, hit the restaurant, then
backed up and hit the victims
again. Witnesses said they
saw Barnes laughing behind
the wheel.
Two-year-old
Avery
Nichol King of North Carolina died of her injuries.
Her mother, Anita King, and
Covington
residents
Stephanie Casola and her
two sons Isaac and Jake,
are recovering from their
injuries.
Newton County Superior
Court Judge Eugene Benton
set a six month timetable
for Barnes’ attorneys to
investigate their client’s
mental history, but said he
may adjust it depending on
what experts advise.
Chris Adams, Barnes’
attorney, said it could take
as long as a year to research
Barnes’
medical
background. Barnes who has a
history of mental health
issues and is suffering from
leukemia.
Adam’s told his client to
plead the Fifth Amendment
when the judge asked him
whether he agreed with the
way his lawyers were handling the case. Barnes
answered: ‘‘I choose to
remain silent, I choose to
remain silent.’’
TODAY’S MARKET REPORT SPONSORED BY
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LET US ASSIST YOU WITH YOUR 401(K) ROLLOVER
Professional Advice - Personal Service
Leavitt F. Sanders, CFP, CLU, ChFC, CIMC
Certified Financial Planner
Certified Investment Management Consultant
Sanders Yearian Advisory Group, Inc. Registered Investment Advisors
1-800-299-9590
800 3rd Avenue
West Point, GA 31833
706-645-8201
Fax 706-645-8209
Securities offered through Financial Network Investment Corporation
(member NASD and SIPC)
The Market in Review
Stock Market Indexes
52-week
high
low
Name
11,670.19 10,156.46
5,013.67 3,550.55
443.49
378.95
8,651.74 7,211.14
2,046.65 1,555.08
2,375.54 2,012.78
1,329.35 1,168.20
818.87
665.23
784.62
614.76
Last
Dow Industrials
Dow Transportation
Dow Utilities
NYSE Composite
Amex Composite
Nasdaq Composite
S&P 500
S&P MidCap
Russell 2000
11,592.78
4,401.12
430.12
8,393.35
1,903.31
2,249.03
1,327.40
750.24
726.84
Chg
%chg
YTD
%chg
+16.97
+57.60
+1.47
-5.03
+4.41
-.04
+1.03
+.29
-.25
+.15
+1.33
+.34
-.06
+.23
...
+.08
+.04
-.03
+8.17
+4.89
+6.17
+8.25
+8.20
+1.98
+6.34
+1.65
+7.96
12-mo
%chg
+10.87
+21.66
+1.29
+11.19
+11.13
+6.27
+9.19
+6.57
+10.27
Stock Exchange Highlights
d
u
NYSE
8,393.35
-5.03
d
Amex
1,903.31
+4.41
Nasdaq
2,249.03
-.04
Gainers ($2 or more)
Gainers ($2 or more)
Gainers ($2 or more)
Name
Last
RelStlAl s 31.87
Wellmn
4.37
Epcos
14.98
Hanson
70.16
InlandRE 18.10
Systemax lf 14.64
DucatiM
8.90
Thai
9.88
DrmwksA 25.41
KatyInd h 2.99
Name
Last Chg %Chg
KFX Inc
9.85 +.58 +6.3
CanoPet
3.97 +.22 +5.9
EvolPet n 2.90 +.15 +5.5
YM Bio g
3.46 +.15 +4.5
NevGCas 5.20 +.20 +4.0
MS ebay06 n6.93 +.25 +3.7
OdysMar
2.59 +.09 +3.6
PcEn pfA 82.50 +2.54 +3.2
PcEn pfB 83.50 +2.55 +3.2
MidwstAir 8.10 +.24 +3.1
Name
Last
SigaTech h 2.08
AcordaTh n 11.47
EpiCept n 2.18
AngioDyn 22.37
CareerEd 23.95
FortuNet n 11.18
GeneticTch 8.20
Benihan 30.24
CritclTher 2.33
DG Fast rs 9.51
Chg %Chg
+2.65 +9.1
+.31 +7.6
+.93 +6.6
+4.27 +6.5
+1.00 +5.8
+.79 +5.7
+.44 +5.2
+.48 +5.1
+1.19 +4.9
+.14 +4.9
Losers ($2 or more)
Name
Last
AdvMOpt 40.20
Pentair
26.51
ChinaLfe 78.01
NwOriEd n 22.59
JacksnHew 30.57
PerotSys 13.81
PiperJaf 62.83
StrideRt 14.30
ChinaMble 34.73
PolyOne
8.79
Losers ($2 or more)
Chg %Chg
-6.10 -13.2
-2.59 -8.9
-4.99 -6.0
-1.39 -5.8
-1.58 -4.9
-.69 -4.8
-3.13 -4.7
-.64 -4.3
-1.52 -4.2
-.35 -3.8
Name
Xethanol n
Comforce
GamLk g
Cytomed
TgtLogis n
Ballanty
Hyperdyn
Simulat s
TutognM lf
Dyadic
Last Chg %Chg
2.65 -.23 -8.0
2.34 -.13 -5.3
11.55 -.47 -3.9
2.69 -.10 -3.6
2.65 -.10 -3.6
4.25 -.15 -3.4
2.76 -.09 -3.2
2.26 -.07 -3.0
4.55 -.14 -3.0
4.42 -.13 -2.9
Chg %Chg
+1.02 +96.2
+2.97 +34.9
+.48 +28.2
+3.12 +16.2
+2.80 +13.2
+1.12 +11.1
+.80 +10.8
+2.39 +8.6
+.18 +8.4
+.73 +8.3
Losers ($2 or more)
Name
Last
Merix Cp 10.65
TTM Tch 11.21
Innovex
2.39
AvidTch 38.66
PDI Inc
11.79
SORL n
5.84
ChipMOS 5.66
ChinaTDv lf 4.24
Aixtron
3.57
Channell
2.86
Chg %Chg
-3.40 -24.2
-2.23 -16.6
-.39 -14.1
-5.21 -11.9
-1.35 -10.3
-.65 -10.0
-.49 -8.0
-.35 -7.6
-.29 -7.5
-.23 -7.4
Most active ($1 or more) Most active ($1 or more) Most active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00)
Altria
97112
TimeWarn 88413
AdvMOpt 40240
FordM
37886
GenElec 33884
Mindray n 33135
CVS Cp 26800
Pfizer
25956
AMD
25524
AT&T Inc 24072
Last
75.65
18.33
40.20
8.26
35.04
15.82
31.90
28.32
26.28
33.18
Chg
-1.41
+.20
-6.10
+.11
+.15
...
+.80
-.03
-.49
-.31
Name Vol (00)
SPDR
60342
iShRs2000 36859
SP Engy 31808
SemiHTr 20593
OilSvHT 13411
iSh EAFE 8261
SP Matls 7994
iShEmMkt 7640
SP Fncl
6054
DJIA Diam 5852
Last
132.61
72.23
51.38
34.06
123.21
66.92
31.48
95.50
34.51
115.83
Chg
+.13
-.16
-.02
-.16
-.89
-.20
+.20
-.36
-.06
+.23
Name Vol (00)
Intel
124792
Nasd100Tr118078
Oracle
64694
Microsoft 64516
SunMicro 63945
PMC Sra 59868
AcordaTh n58701
Conexant 55676
AppleC lf 49733
Cisco
49191
Last
19.63
40.57
17.97
26.97
5.12
6.10
11.47
1.97
76.56
23.27
Chg
+.22
...
+.00
+.02
-.01
-.45
+2.97
+.05
+.81
+.04
Stocks of local interest
Name
Ex
YTD
Div Yld PE Last Chg %chg
AFLAC NY .52
AT&T Inc NY 1.33
AcordaTh n Nasd ...
AdvMOpt NY
...
AMD
NY
...
Agilysys Nasd .12
AirTran NY
...
Alcatel
NY .21
AlfaCp
Nasd .44
Allstate NY 1.40
Altria
NY 3.44
Amgen Nasd ...
AppleC lf Nasd ...
ApldMatl Nasd .20
BellSouth NY 1.16
BlackD NY 1.52
BrMySq NY 1.12
Brdcom slf Nasd ...
CVS Cp NY .15
CapCtyBk Nasd .65
Cephln Nasd ...
ChartrFn Nasd 1.80
Cisco
Nasd ...
Citigrp
NY 1.96
CocaCl NY 1.24
Comcast Nasd ...
CompsBc Nasd 1.56
Conexant Nasd ...
ConocPhil NY 1.44
CrwfdA NY .24
Dell Inc lf Nasd ...
Diebold NY .86
Disney
NY .27
DukeEgy NY 1.28
eBay
Nasd ...
ErthLink Nasd ...
Emdeon Nasd ...
EricsnTl Nasd .60
EsteeLdr NY .40
ExxonMbl NY 1.28
FannieM lf NY 1.04
Finisar
Nasd ...
FordM
NY .25
GenElec NY 1.00
GnMotr NY 1.00
Genta
Nasd ...
1.1
4.0
...
...
...
.9
...
1.7
2.5
2.3
4.5
...
...
1.1
2.7
1.9
4.5
...
.5
2.1
...
4.6
...
3.9
2.8
...
2.7
...
2.5
4.1
...
2.0
.9
4.2
...
...
...
1.7
1.0
2.0
1.9
...
...
2.9
3.2
...
14
20
...
...
28
12
38
...
15
19
14
32
35
21
26
12
17
...
20
19
36
59
26
10
21
59
17
...
5
16
18
43
21
23
38
10
45
...
35
10
...
...
...
22
...
...
45.71
33.18
11.47
40.20
26.28
13.71
10.39
12.04
17.45
62.03
75.65
71.48
76.56
17.48
43.64
78.90
24.98
29.83
31.90
31.58
59.68
39.56
23.27
50.07
44.46
36.25
57.33
1.97
57.25
5.91
21.97
43.63
30.39
30.47
27.12
7.05
12.08
34.69
39.56
65.02
55.20
3.62
8.26
35.04
31.08
.82
+.34
-.31
+2.97
-6.10
-.49
-.22
+.14
+.12
+.06
+.22
-1.41
+.26
+.81
+.13
-.41
-.10
-.09
-.53
+.80
-.53
+.78
+.32
+.04
-.01
+.06
-.34
-.20
+.05
-.06
-.11
-.19
+.05
+.23
+.08
+.90
-.02
+.44
-.16
-.14
-.04
+.26
+.16
+.11
+.15
+.48
+.05
-1.5
+35.5
+70.7
-3.8
-14.1
-24.8
-35.2
-2.9
+8.4
+14.7
+1.2
-9.4
+6.5
-2.6
+61.0
-9.3
+8.7
-5.1
+20.7
-7.9
-7.8
+10.8
+35.9
+3.2
+10.3
+39.9
+18.8
-12.8
-1.6
+1.9
-26.6
+14.8
+26.8
+11.0
-37.3
-36.5
+42.8
+.8
+18.2
+15.8
+13.1
+74.0
+7.0
...
+60.0
-44.1
Name
Ex
YTD
Div Yld PE Last Chg %chg
Hallibtn s NY .30
HomeDp NY .60
HonwllIntl NY .91
iShJapan NY .06
iShRs2000 Amex .73
Intel
Nasd .40
Intrface Nasd ...
IBM
NY 1.20
JDS Uniph Nasd ...
JPMorgCh NY 1.36
Level3
Nasd ...
LillyEli
NY 1.60
Lowes s NY .20
Merck
NY 1.52
MicronT NY
...
Microsoft Nasd .40
Mindray n NY
...
Motorola NY .20
Nasd100Tr Nasd .16
NokiaCp NY .46
Oracle
Nasd ...
PMC Sra Nasd ...
PepsiCo NY 1.20
Pfizer
NY .96
Rambus lf Nasd ...
SemiHTr Amex .31
SiriusS Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.55
SPDR
Amex2.33
SP Engy Amex .67
Staples Nasd .22
SunMicro Nasd ...
SunTrst NY 2.44
Synovus NY .78
TexInst NY .16
TimeWarn NY .22
Trchmrk NY .52
TotalSys NY .28
ValeroE NY .32
VerizonCm NY 1.62
WalMart NY .67
Walgrn NY .31
WarnerCh nNasd ...
WmsCos NY .36
Xerox
NY
...
Yahoo
Nasd ...
1.1
1.6
2.2
.5
1.0
2.0
...
1.5
...
2.9
...
2.8
.7
3.6
...
1.5
...
.8
.4
2.4
...
...
1.8
3.4
...
.9
...
4.5
1.8
1.3
.9
...
3.2
2.6
.5
1.2
.8
1.2
.7
4.3
1.4
.7
...
1.6
...
...
11 28.00
13 36.64
18 40.62
... 13.23
... 72.23
18 19.63
... 13.68
16 82.05
... 2.21
14 46.73
... 5.36
20 56.74
15 29.01
17 41.98
32 17.69
22 26.97
... 15.82
13 25.13
... 40.57
... 19.51
27 17.97
... 6.10
25 65.24
19 28.32
... 18.18
... 34.06
... 3.92
17 34.61
... 132.61
... 51.38
21 25.31
... 5.12
13 77.16
17 29.60
12 32.73
18 18.33
13 62.94
22 23.19
6 48.43
16 37.48
19 49.38
28 45.24
... 14.02
... 22.78
20 15.52
30 25.09
+.03
+.06
-.09
-.05
-.16
+.22
+.22
+.05
+.01
-.18
+.01
+.16
+.17
+.02
-.19
+.02
-.14
-.14
+.00
-.45
+.17
-.03
+.23
-.16
-.03
-.08
+.13
-.02
-.16
-.01
-.39
-.10
-.01
+.20
-.04
+.21
+.28
-.02
+.56
+.77
-.98
+.14
+.02
-.20
-9.6
-9.5
+9.0
-2.1
+8.3
-21.4
+66.4
-.2
-6.4
+17.7
+86.8
+.3
-13.0
+32.0
+32.9
+3.1
...
+11.2
+.4
+6.6
+47.2
-20.9
+10.4
+21.4
+12.3
-7.0
-41.5
+.2
+6.5
+2.1
+11.4
+22.2
+6.0
+9.6
+2.1
+5.1
+13.4
+17.2
-6.1
+24.4
+5.5
+2.2
-6.2
-1.7
+5.9
-36.0
Mutual Funds
Total assets
Name
Obj ($mlns)
American Funds A: BalA p
BL
33,535
American Funds A: CapIBA p BL
54,182
American Funds A: CapWGA p GL
54,026
American Funds A: EupacA p IL
51,834
American Funds A: FdInvA p LV
29,135
American Funds A: GwthA p XG
78,878
American Funds A: IncoA p BL
54,387
American Funds A: ICAA p
LV
70,545
American Funds A: N PerA p GL
40,303
American Funds A: WshA p LV
63,702
Baron Funds: Asset
MG
3,268
DWS Scudder Cl S: GroIncS LC
4,291
Dodge&Cox: Stock
XV
58,772
Fidelity Invest: Contra
XG
64,437
Fidelity Invest: DivIntl
IL
41,560
Fidelity Invest: GroInc
LC
29,049
Fidelity Invest: LowP r
MV
36,149
Fidelity Invest: Magelln
LC
45,004
Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p GM
6,341
Frank/Temp Frnk A: HYTFA p HM
5,136
Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p IL
14,261
Frank/Temp Temp A: GrwthA pGL
23,962
Lazard Instl: IntlEqIns
IL
696
Loomis Sayles: LSBondI
AB
4,544
Lord Abbett A: AffilA p
LV
15,654
MFS Funds A: EmGA
XG
2,096
MFS Funds A: StGrA
LG
415
Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis SG
5,971
Oppenheim Quest : QOpptyA MP
1,142
PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRt
IB
58,037
Putnam Funds A: VoyA p
LG
5,537
Putnam Funds B: NwOpB t
XG
567
Van Kamp Funds B: StrGwth LG
1,239
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml SP
41,610
Vanguard Fds: Welltn
BL
27,834
Vanguard Fds: WndsII
LV
29,416
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500
SP
67,976
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk
XC
35,056
Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx
SP
40,798
NAV
18.60
58.13
40.06
45.70
38.53
31.84
19.78
33.81
31.47
33.53
59.71
22.87
149.75
65.76
35.75
29.18
39.98
86.79
12.18
10.96
13.72
25.56
15.06
14.14
15.43
34.45
19.10
48.46
29.52
10.49
17.05
41.21
33.99
122.15
32.17
34.15
122.14
31.78
121.19
Total return/rank
Pct
Min init
4-wk 12-mo 5-year load
invt
+2.1
+8.7/B +49.6/A 5.75
250
+1.5 +14.6/A +79.0/A 5.75
250
+1.5 +18.6/A +116.1/A 5.75
250
+1.1 +21.6/B +107.4/B 5.75
250
-0.1 +14.4/B +74.4/A 5.75
250
+0.6
+9.8/B +63.1/A 5.75
250
+1.7 +13.5/A +66.8/A 5.75
250
+1.3 +12.9/C +53.3/B 5.75
250
+0.7 +16.7/B +83.3/B 5.75
250
+2.6 +12.9/C +48.4/C 5.75
250
+2.9 +13.0/A +95.2/A
NL
2,000
+2.7
+9.2/C +35.3/C
NL
2,500
+2.7 +15.2/A +96.0/A
NL
2,500
+0.6
+9.6/B +78.1/A
NL
2,500
-0.4 +18.0/D +122.6/B
NL
2,500
+1.7
+5.6/E +23.8/E
NL
2,500
+3.2 +10.7/C +123.6/A
NL
2,500
+1.1
+5.9/E +25.9/D
NL
2,500
+1.0
+4.6/B +29.2/A 4.25
1,000
+1.3
+6.3/C +35.1/B 4.25
1,000
+0.7 +12.4/E +92.7/C 5.75
1,000
+2.5 +15.0/B +95.1/B 5.75
1,000
-0.1 +17.8/D +77.5/D
NL 1,000,000
+1.8
+9.2/A +90.3/A
NL
100,000
+1.0 +14.7/A +58.1/B 5.75
250
+2.9
+5.2/D +30.1/D 5.75
1,000
+2.9
+2.9/D +17.0/C 5.75
1,000
-1.3
+2.0/D +108.6/A
NL
0
+2.7
+3.3/E +21.2/E 5.75
1,000
+1.5
+3.4/B +30.9/A
NL 5,000,000
+4.6
+2.6/D +13.1/D 5.25
500
+3.3
+6.4/C +32.9/D
NL
500
+2.2
-0.2/E
+2.8/E
NL
0
+2.6 +11.2/A +42.8/A
NL
100,000
+1.5 +10.7/A +58.4/A
NL
10,000
+2.6 +11.6/D +63.9/A
NL
10,000
+2.6 +11.1/A +42.2/A
NL
3,000
+2.6 +11.0/B +53.1/B
NL
3,000
+2.6 +11.2/A +43.1/A
NL 5,000,000
AB - Long-Term Investment-Grade Corporate BondBL -Balanced, GL -Global Stock, IL -International Stock, LC Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MT -Mortgage, SP -S&P 500, XG -Multi-Cap Growth,
XV -Multi-Cap Val.Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with
same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail.
NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Lipper, Inc. Mutual funds as of close yesterday.
Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf =
Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least
50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent
within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: x = Ex cash dividend. NL = No up-front sales charge. p = Fund assets used to pay distribution
costs. r = Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. t = Both p and r.
Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures as of 10:00 a.m. ET and are unofficial.
The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006 — Page 13
Tough interrogation techniques at heart
of congressional debate on torture rules
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — One
prominent feature is missing in
debate over President Bush’s
deal with Senate leaders on the
treatment of alleged terrorists in
custody: an open and explicit
accounting of interrogation techniques that may be used.
The deal, which the House
and Senate are expected to vote
on before Congress adjourns this
week, prohibits consequences
more than actions, and leaves
much open to interpretation. For
example, interrogators would
not only be barred from causing
captives ‘‘prolonged’’ mental suffering, as they are now, but
would be prevented from inflicting ‘‘serious and nontransitory’’
mental harm, whether the technique is prolonged or not.
Exactly what techniques may
and may not be used under such
strictures is unclear even to
those who negotiated the agreement. It gives Bush leeway to
interpret the language and to
produce regulations that senators say they can challenge if the
steps go too far. But it’s unlikely
Bush will lay out techniques in
enough detail for everyone to be
sure what’s allowed and what’s
beyond the pale.
Measures
used
against
detainees in secret CIA prisons
have not been fully discussed in
an open forum for fear of hampering interrogators or helping
terrorists train people to deal
with such steps. But a partial
picture has emerged in public
reports and conversations with
intelligence officials who have
discussed interrogation on condition they not be identified.
Among the tens of thousands
of people held by U.S. authorities
during the war on terrorism, 96
are thought to have been in
secret CIA custody.
A look at what’s known about
some of the more radical techniques and their possible fate
under the agreement:
—Sleep deprivation and disorientation:
These tactics are thought to
have been used in extraordinary
circumstances. Specific methods
may involve using loud noise,
such as clattering machinery or
blasting music, to keep captives
awake; interrogating them day
and night or moving them from
place to place to disorient them.
‘‘People who have gone
through this describe this as one
of the worst things that a human
being can experience because
sleep is such a fundamental
need,’’ said Tom Malinowski,
Washington advocacy director
for Human Rights Watch. He
was speaking generally about
the technique, not with specific
knowledge about how U.S. interrogators might have applied it.
—Temperature extremes:
Exposing prisoners to uncomfortable cold or heat for long
periods.
—Stress positions:
Prolonged, forced standing is
also believed to have been used
in some cases. Captives might be
threatened with beatings if they
sit, or shackled in a way to prevent sitting. Various other forms
of discomfort have been allowed.
—Simulated drowning:
Meant to induce panic, the
technique is commonly known
as waterboarding because it may
involve a prisoner being tied to a
board, head slanted down, a wet
towel placed on his face and
water applied to the towel. As
many as four prisoners are
believed to have been subjected
to this.
‘‘It’s a technique that we need
to let the world know we are no
longer engaging in,’’ said Sen.
Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., one of
those who negotiated the deal.
Republican Sen. John McCain
of Arizona, another broker of the
agreement, said the deal ‘‘could
mean’’ the prohibition of
extreme sleep deprivation,
hypothermia, waterboarding
and other steps that amount to
torture or come close to it. Yet he
acknowledged he has not been
privy to everything that has
been done with captives and
that the agreement’s practical
effects remain to be seen.
McCain, who was beaten as a
Vietnam prisoner of war, said
some forms of induced stress are
an important and valid tool for
interrogators.
The most extreme steps have
been clearly prohibited all along,
including closed-hand punching,
electric shock, terrorizing suspects with dogs, disfigurement
and sexual abuse, although
some were used in criminal fashion at Abu Ghraib, the U.S. military-run prison in Iraq. Openhanded slapping has not been
similarly banned.
An updated U.S. Army manual released this month, which
applies to all the armed services
but not the CIA, explicitly bans
withholding food and water, performing mock executions, using
electric shock, burning and causing other pain and waterboarding, among other techniques.
The deal between the administration and the Senate is
packed with imprecise adjectives.
It would make it a crime to
inflict extreme physical pain,
burns or physical disfigurement
of a serious nature, or impairment of the function of organs or
of mental faculty. Mental harm
that is ‘‘serious,’’ not just
‘‘severe,’’ would be prohibited.
Afghanistan’s leader calls on Pakistan
to close its extremist religious schools
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Afghanistan’s president is calling on Pakistan to close extremist schools and looking for support from President Bush in his
campaign against ‘‘places that
teach terror.’’
‘‘There will not be an end to
terrorism unless we remove the
sources of hatred in madrassas
and the training grounds,’’
Hamid Karzai said before Tuesday’s White House meeting.
Rising Taliban violence and
an unprecedented narcotics
trade were also on the agenda —
possibly along with a request for
more U.S. money to stabilize
Afghanistan.
Karzai said Sunday his country would be ‘‘heaven in less
than a year’’ if it received the
$300 billion the United States
had spent in Iraq.
As it is, Karzai said at a news
conference
Monday
that
Afghanistan has $1.9 billion in
reserves, up from $180 million in
2002.
In a speech at the Woodrow
Wilson International Center for
Scholars he expressed concern
— without elaboration — with
‘‘radical neighbors who have
very dangerous ideas’’ and said
narcotics had supplanted the
growing of grapes, raisins,
pomegranates, almonds and
other crops.
Struggling farmers need
more help, he said. ‘‘Give us the
roads and we will give you the
best grapes in the world,’’ Karzai
said with a smile.
Afghanistan has been suffering its heaviest insurgent
attacks since the Taliban regime
was toppled in late 2001 in a
U.S.-led war.
Karzai has engaged in some
sniping with Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf on countering terrorism. Musharraf has
complained Karzai had not done
enough.
But Karzai said, ‘‘There will
not be an end to terrorism
unless we remove the sources of
hatred in madrassas and the
training grounds.’’
His meeting with Bush sets
the stage for a three-way dinner
meeting Bush plans Wednesday
with Karzai and Musharraf.
Here last week to see Bush,
Musharraf
said
extremist
schools accounted for only about
5 percent of the schools in Pakistan. He acknowledged that ‘‘we
are moving slowly’’ against
them.
Karzai said he had no objection to madrassas that teach
Islam to young people. ‘‘We need
preachers in our religion,’’ he
said.
But he said it was up to
Musharraf to deal with the problem of teaching hatred to young
children. ‘‘Those places have to
be closed down,’’ he said.
While it is Pakistan’s job, the
United States could provide
some financial help to get it
done, Karzai said.
Musharraf, speaking in New
York City on Monday night, said
Pakistan was being blamed
unfairly for the Taliban’s resurgence. He suggested that Karzai
was partially at fault for disenfranchising the majority Pashtun ethnic group and warned
that the Taliban cannot be
defeated by military might
alone.
Musharraf praised Karzai,
calling him clearly the best
choice to lead Afghanistan as it
rebuilds after decades of war,
but he also slammed Karzai for
suggesting that much of the
recent violence in Afghanistan
was the result of cross-border
attacks from militants hiding in
Pakistan’s tribal areas.
‘‘The sooner that President
Karzai understands his own
country, the better,’’ Musharraf
told the Council on Foreign Relations, referring to alleged
favoritism toward ethnic minorities in the Northern Alliance
that fought against the largely
Pashtun Taliban. ‘‘We have a
problem with Pashtuns feeling
alienated.’’
Later, Karzai accepted an
honorary doctor of laws degree
from Georgetown University.
In brief remarks, he described
advances in the social sector in
Afghanistan since the fall of the
Taliban in 2001.
In contrast to the Taliban policy of denying education rights
to girls, he said girls now
account for 35 percent of total
school enrollment in the country.
He said 80 percent of Afghans
now have access to health services, compared with 9 percent
under the Taliban.
Siegelman, Scrushy seeking new trials
By The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP)
— Jurors who convicted former
Gov. Don Siegelman and exHealthSouth CEO Richard
Scrushy discussed the case in emails before reaching a verdict,
violating the judge’s instructions, defense attorneys said in
a motion Monday seeking a new
trial.
The motion cited a sworn
statement from a juror, who was
not identified, and copies of emails that attorneys said they
received by mail. In those emails, jurors express confusion
about evidence and indicate
they discussed the case among
themselves over the Internet,
the motion says.
‘‘I’ve never encountered anything like this in my career,’’
said David McDonald, one of
Siegelman’s attorneys. ‘‘We
expect to get what every defendant is guaranteed by the Sixth
Amendment and that is a fair
trial.’’
Chief federal prosecutor
Louis Franklin said he had not
had an opportunity to read the
motion and would not have any
immediate comment.
Siegelman and Scrushy were
found guilty after a two-month
federal court trial on bribery
and conspiracy charges in a
scheme where prosecutors said
Scrushy arranged $500,000 in
contributions to Siegelman’s
campaign for a statewide lottery in exchange for being
appointed by Siegelman to a
seat on an influential hospital
regulatory board.
The motion for a new trial
quotes the unnamed juror as
saying in the sworn statement
that at least one juror brought
information into jury deliberations that apparently came
from the Internet. In the sworn
statement, the unnamed juror
says the information brought
into deliberations was confusing.
‘‘I thought that the governor
had put money from HealthSouth in his personal account,’’
the unnamed juror is quoted as
saying. Testimony during the
trial was that Scrushy arranged
campaign contributions, but no
money went directly to Siegel-
man.
The motion said two jurors
wrote e-mails to one another on
May 29, a month before the trial
ended. The motion said the emails identified two other jurors
as being ‘‘still off trac.(sp)’’ One
of the e-mails says ‘‘some of the
kounts r confusing 2 our
friends,’’ using misspelled words
and abbreviations common in
Internet discussions, according
to the filing by attorneys for
Scrushy and Siegelman.
The motion cites another email conversation between two
jurors late at night on June 25,
four days before jurors returned
verdicts on June 29. In the text
of the e-mails, one juror
expresses concerns that the
penalty would be too severe and
that he or she is ‘‘still unclear on
couple of counts against pastor
& gov,’’ apparently referring to
Scrushy, who has a religiousbased cable television show, and
Siegelman.
McDonald said the e-mails
cited in the motion were
received in the Postal Service
mail from an anonymous
sender.
130 Child Care
PAM’S LITTLE ANGELS DAY CARE
has 3 openings, call
for prices. Phone
334-576-3519.
140
Help Wanted
DIETARY AID needed. Applicant must
have 6 months experience in commercial kitchen. Full time
benefit
package
available. New applicants need apply.
Position for WEEKEND Dishwasher
with some weekdays
also available. Apply
in person between
8:30-4:30 at Beverly
Healthcare, 702 S.
13th Street in Lanett.
NO phone calls will
be accepted.
DIRECTOR For Alzheimer Care needed to develop, coordinate and provide
therapeutic environment to work with
residents and staff.
Must have strong
leadership skills with
excellent oral and
verbal communication. Social services
experience
preferred. Resumes to
be faxed to 334-6443050.
OFFICE
HELP
NEEDED.
Please
send resume to: P.O.
Box 379, LaFayette,
AL 36862.
Needed LPN or RN
for Lakewood Senior
Living mornings only,
part-time.
Please
contact Diane White
at 334-756-3891 if
interested.
ATTENTION DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW! No
experience necessary. TMC Transportation needs entrylevel semi drivers.
Premium equipment
and benefits. Earn
over $40k first year
and get home weekends. For CDL
training and a great
future call today. 1800-642-7364.
NEEDED EXPERIENCED dump truck
drivers.
GOOD
M.V.R. Call 706-8843001.
170 Items for
Sale
ANTIQUE BLACK
Smith forge complete $1,500. MERCEDES 1983 240D
low miles $950. Call
334-644-3231.
APPLIANCES
For Sale
$75 each
Call 706-518-9382
ALMOST NEW red
mahogany Pearl River upright piano.
Asking $2,400, will
neg. If interested call
334-576-3282.
180 Items
Wanted
WE BUY
JUNK CARS.
Call 334-642-4280.
Ask for Paul.
195 Commercial
Property
COMMERCIAL
SPACES available
for lease, up to 2,800
sq. ft. Prime location.
Call for more details.
334-768-3182.
220 Boats
14 ft. like new Starcraft boat, live-well,
new tires & bearings,
carpet & seats, 18hp
Nissan motor $1,600
Call 706-773-3426.
YARD
SALE
ADS
Minimum 6
Lines $5.40
(15 Words
Total)
Each
Additional
line 90¢
Deadline
11A.M. The
Day Before.
334-644-8100
310 Services
Offered
Burkett Construction - New additions,
remodeling, plumbing & electrical work.
All types of decks.
Call 334-756-2951
or 706-773-1246.
BOOKER SEPTIC
Tank Company
Field lines installed
& pumping. Call 334576-2748.
Find it fast
in the
classifieds
410 Apartments
for Rent
CLEAN Apartments
most just reconditioned, 1 & 2 br,
“Quiet
Neighborhood”, live-in manager. “Good credit a
must.” For more info
call 334-642-2212 no
answer leave msg.
440 Mobile
Home Rentals
2 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent - Fireplace, C-H/A. $300
month plus deposit.
Call 334-756-7033.
3BR, 2 BATH double
wide in Fairfax. No.
calls after 8pm. 334768-0593.
510 Acreage
52 ACRES in Fredonia for sale. $3,300
per acre. Call 706773-4924.
3 Acres $19,500
10 Acres $42,000
30 Acres $110,000
Between Lanett &
Fredonia. Wooded.
Call 706-773-7143.
590
Automobiles
99 CHEVY Lumina,
low miles, only two
owners, A/C, PW,
Pioneer AM/FM, CD
player. $6,500. Call
334-497-1636.
Subscribe to
The
Valley Times-News
Ace Remodeling
“no job too small”
Bennie Daniel USAF retired
General Contractor
• Additions • Home Repairs
• Vinyl siding • Painting
• Ceramic Tile • Commercial
& Residential Window Tinting
FREE ESTIMATES
334-710-9535
Chattahoochee Federal
Credit Union
CD SPECIAL
1 Year Certificate of Deposit (CD)
Rate of 5.50%
Rate available for a limited time only
Call 645-7511 for more information
FOR SALE BY OWNER
460 Rental
Houses
LANETT - Brick 3br,
C-H/A, 1ba, fenced,
stove, dw, new floor/
cpt. $400 mo. $300
dep. Ref. Also brick,
C-H/A, 4br, 2ba, garage, k appl., hdw fl.
$500 mo., $400 dep.
Ref. 334-576-3298.
FAIRFAX - 505 Bailey St. - 1br, 1ba, CH/A, stove, washer &
dryer. No pets. $350
mo. $300 dep. Ref. req. 706-585-4044.
1120 Newton Rd., Valley (RiverView Comm.)
2300 Sq. Ft. Tri-Level on approximately
2.5 acres. 3/4 Bedrooms, 3 full baths,
newly remodeled kitchen. In-ground
pool and storage building.
Shown by Appointment Only.
Call 706-773-1955
$59,900 REDUCED $55,900
CABIN ON West
Point Lake minutes
from Kia Project.
Rent daily, weekly or
monthly. Call 706773-2029.
RENT TO OWN 2
bedroom in Valley.
$425 per month. Call
706-773-2893.
WHY RENT? Rent
To Own! 25-50%
Rent Credit. “One
Month FREE!”
Real Concepts
334-644-3350
RENT TO OWN:
1009 S. 2nd Ave.,
Lanett - 4BR / 2BA.
Call for details 334768-3168
470 Houses for
Sale
FOR SALE BY
OWNER $153,000 4br, 2ba, oversized
dining rm, totally remodeled. Call Cassi
Smith
706-5188529. 1059 Co. Rd.
193, Valley.
701 N. 3rd Ave., Lanett - 4BR, 2BA, LR,
DR, kitchen, hardwood floors, large
yard with rock garden & fish pond, two
car garage. Call 706590-3018.
BANK Foreclosure
618 South 3rd Avenue, Lanett, AL.
1,324 sq. ft. 2 bedrooms / 1 bath / .20
acre. Price $21,400
or make offer. Call
(850) 402-2475.
NO BANKS needed.
Bad Credit? Bankruptcy?
Foreclosure? Stop renting,
get in your home today! Call Real Concepts 334-644-3350.
LANETT - 4 br, 2 ba,
new carpet, paint &
roof. $59,500 financing assistance available. Call 706-7734461.
510 Acreage
7.1 ACRES off of
Stateline Road in
Five Points $28,000.
Call 706-773-0792.
3402 Columbus Road
Valley, Alabama
3BR/1.5BA Brick Home. C H/A
Robert W.
Gardner
Realtor
334-497-1812
or call toll free
877-673-5452
ACCEPTING BIDS
Our Agency is now accepting bids to provide
building materials for our Weatherization Program.
The Weatherization Program is designed to
reduce energy loss by making minor home
repairs and energy saving improvements.
Specs vary on a job by job basis.
If you would like to bid, please send your
name, address, and the name of the contact
person, and we will send you a bid sheet of
material.
Advertisement closing date will be September
27, 2006.
If you have any questions or need additional
information, please contact Calvin Canady @
(256) 825-4287 Ext. 19.
Legal Notice
Invitation to Bid
Contractors interested in bidding on
weatherizing homes in Chambers, Tallapoosa, Coosa, Russell & Macon Counties. Contract Labor Material & Labor.
The Weatherization Program is designed
to reduce energy loss by making minor
home repairs and energy saving
improvements. Specs vary on a
job-by-job basis.
Must provide name, mailing address and
telephone number to be placed on the
contractor mailing list.
Mail request to Attention:
Calvin Canady
Weatherization Coordinator
170 South Broadnax Street
Dadeville, Alabama 36853
If you have any questions or need
additional information, please contact
Calvin Canady at (256) 825-4287, Ext 19.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
CIRCLE C&L
Home Improvements
Residential Roofing & Repairs
5 year warranty on workmanship
FREE Estimates w/dependable
appointments. Valley, AL
706-416-0905
Page 14 — The Valley Times-News — Tuesday, September 26, 2006
SEC STANDINGS
EASTERN DIVISION
SEC
2-0
1-0
1-1
1-1
0-1
0-2
Florida
Georgia
S. Carolina
Kentucky
Tennessee
Vanderbilt
All
4-0
4-0
3-1
2-2
3-1
1-3
Top 25
1-0
0-0
0-1
0-2
1-1
0-2
PF
123
114
87
107
119
74
PA
34
25
44
106
76
70
©2006 Longwing Publications Inc.
WESTERN DIVISION
SEC
2-0
2-0
1-1
0-1
0-1
0-2
Auburn
Arkansas
Alabama
LSU
Mississippi
Miss. State
All
4-0
3-1
3-1
3-1
1-3
1-3
Top 25
1-0
0-1
0-0
0-1
0-0
0-1
PF
119
79
102
142
52
45
GAME OF THE WEEK
PA
24
92
58
20
117
91
Alabama at Florida
TEAM LEADERS
Average per game
RUSHING OFFENSE
Arkansas .
Auburn . .
Florida . .
LSU . . . .
Alabama. .
Mississippi
Vanderbilt.
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187.8
184.2
175.8
153.8
149.0
135.8
135.2
.
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289.8
280.0
249.8
247.0
232.0
225.3
182.8
.
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.
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.
465.5
403.5
395.0
381.0
367.0
351.8
345.5
PASSING OFFENSE
Florida . . . .
Tennessee . . .
LSU . . . . . .
Kentucky . . .
Alabama. . . .
South Carolina
Auburn . . . .
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TOTAL OFFENSE
Florida . . . .
LSU . . . . . .
Tennessee . . .
Alabama. . . .
Auburn . . . .
Arkansas . . .
South Carolina
.
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RUSHING DEFENSE
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.0
Auburn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83.0
LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83.0
Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86.0
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99.2
Miss. State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103.8
Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148.0
PASSING DEFENSE
LSU . . . . . .
South Carolina
Georgia . . . .
Auburn . . . .
Alabama. . . .
Tennessee . . .
Vanderbilt. . .
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102.2
110.8
145.0
153.0
168.8
177.0
186.8
TOTAL DEFENSE
LSU . . . . . .
Florida . . . .
Georgia . . . .
Auburn . . . .
Alabama. . . .
South Carolina
Miss. State . .
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185.3
229.3
231.0
236.0
268.0
287.0
324.8
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
RUSHING YARDS
Darren McFadden, Arkansas. . . .
BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Mississippi
Kenny Irons, Auburn . . . . . . .
DeShawn Wynn, Florida. . . . . .
Felix Jones, Arkansas . . . . . . .
Ken Darby, Alabama . . . . . . .
Anthony Dixon, Miss. State . . . .
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409
335
322
304
259
233
227
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1,066
1,065
. 931
. 916
. 913
. 684
. 504
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1,031
1,027
. 961
. 946
. 891
. 662
. 656
PASSING YARDS
Chris Leak, Florida . . . . . .
Erik Ainge, Tennessee. . . . .
Andre Woodson, Kentucky . .
JaMarcus Russell, LSU. . . . .
John Parker Wilson, Alabama .
Brandon Cox, Auburn . . . . .
Brent Schaeffer, Mississippi. .
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RECEIVING YARDS
Robert Meachem, Tennessee
Keith Brown, Alabama . . .
Dallas Baker, Florida . . . .
Sidney Rice, South Carolina.
Jayson Swain, Tennessee . .
Craig Davis, LSU. . . . . . .
Marcus Monk, Arkansas . . .
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420
410
406
356
314
293
277
TOTAL OFFENSE
Chris Leak, Florida . . . . . .
Erik Ainge, Tennessee. . . . .
John Parker Wilson, Alabama .
JaMarcus Russell, LSU. . . . .
Andre Woodson, Kentucky . .
Brandon Cox, Auburn . . . . .
Chris Nickson, Vanderbilt . . .
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Illustration by Bruce Plante © 2006
Tide rolls into Swamp
H
oping to show that adversity is opportunity in disguise, the
University of Florida begins one of the toughest four-game
stretches in the program’s 100-year history on Saturday
afternoon against visiting Alabama.
The fifth-ranked Gators have yet to play their best football, but
that could all change against a Crimson Tide team that knocked
them from the unbeaten ranks with a 31-3 victory last year in
Tuscaloosa. With Florida looking to exact revenge and generate
momentum for the rest of the stretch against nationally ranked
LSU, Auburn and Georgia, it appears that a reeling Alabama team
is walking into a trap.
I Records: Alabama 3-1 (1-1 SEC West); Florida 4-0 (2-0 SEC
East). I Coaches: Alabama’s Mike Shula (23-18); Florida’s
Urban Meyer (52-11). I Series: Alabama leads 21-12. I Kickoff:
3:30 p.m. ET Saturday. I TV: CBS.
Keys for Alabama: Kicking game. Leigh Tiffin missed three
field-goal attempts and the Crimson Tide’s extra-point attempt in
double overtime last week against Arkansas. . . . Fire off the ball.
The Crimson Tide offensive line yielded five sacks last week,
limiting the running attack to 118 yards on 52 carries.
Keys for Florida: DeShawn Wynn and Dallas Baker. Wynn is
coming off back-to-back 100-yard rushing games, while Baker,
who caught six passes for 119 yards last year against the Crimson
Tide, collected a career-best 148 yards on seven catches against
Kentucky. . . . Strong secondary play. Brodie Croyle torched the
Gators last year for 283 yards and three touchdowns, including an
87-yarder to Tyrone Protho and a 65-yarder to Keith Brown, on
14-of-17 passing.
The Rest of the Matchups
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36
36
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34
34
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27
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INTERCEPTIONS
Craig Steltz, LSU. . . . .
Jonathan Zenon, LSU . .
Simeon Castille, Alabama
Reggie Nelson, Florida. .
Five players tied with 2.
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3
3
3
3
Mississippi State at LSU
I Records: Mississippi State 1-3 (0-2 SEC West); LSU 3-1 (0-1
SEC West). I Coaches: Mississippi State’s Sylvester Croom
(7-19); LSU’s Les Miles (42-24). I Series: LSU leads 63-33-3.
I Kickoff: 11:30 a.m. CT Saturday. I TV: Lincoln Financial
Sports.
Keys for Mississippi State: Scheme and find ways to move
the ball against the nation’s second-ranked defense. . . . Defensive
players have to keep their hands up. The Bulldogs recorded two
interceptions and five pass break-ups against UAB.
Keys for LSU: Continued success in the red zone. Opponents
have failed to stop the Tigers from scoring on their last 41 trips
inside the 20. . . . Kick away from the Bulldogs’ Derek Pegues,
who ranks second nationally in kickoff returns and 23rd in punt
returns.
Central Michigan at Kentucky
I Records: Central Michigan 2-2 (2-0 MAC West); Kentucky 2-2
(1-1 SEC East). I Coaches: Central Michigan’s Brian Kelly
(130-49-2); Kentucky’s Rich Brooks (102-136-4). I Series:
Kentucky leads 4-0. I Kickoff: 6 p.m. ET Saturday. I TV: None.
Key for Central Michigan: A good start. Boston College
outscored Central Michigan 17-3 in the first half of its 31-24
season-opening victory and Michigan jumped out to a 21-0 lead
en route to a 41-17 win.
Keys for Kentucky: Know the roster. The Chippewas are
expected to use three quarterbacks in the game. . . . Protection for
Andre Woodson. The Wildcats rank dead last in the conference in
sacks allowed.
Auburn at South Carolina
Temple at Vanderbilt
I Records: Auburn 4-0 (2-0 SEC West); South Carolina 3-1 (1-1
SEC East). I Coaches: Auburn’s Tommy Tuberville (89-47);
South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier (152-46-2). I Series: Tied 5-5-1.
I Kickoff: 7:30 p.m. ET Thursday. I TV: ESPN.
I Records: Temple 0-4 (I-A Independent); Vanderbilt 1-3 (0-2
SEC East). I Coaches: Temple’s Al Golden (0-4); Vanderbilt’s
Bobby Johnson (72-74). I Series: Temple leads 1-0. I Kickoff: 6
p.m. CT Saturday. I TV: None.
Keys for Auburn: Stay on pace to break the school record of
45 sacks, which was set in 1984. . . . Take advantage of depth in
the backfield.
Key for South Carolina: Try to overcome what should be a
field-position disadvantage. Auburn’s Kody Bliss leads the
conference in punting and Matt Clark has booted a national-best
21 touchbacks.
Key for Temple: More yards after the catch. The Owls have
eight different players who average fewer than 35 receiving yards
per game.
Keys for Vanderbilt: When opportunity knocks, answer the
door. The Commodores squandered two early chances inside the
Tennessee State 2 last week. . . . Avoid being upset by one of the
worst teams in the history of college football.
Tennessee at Memphis
Georgia at Mississippi
I Records: Tennessee 3-1 (0-1 SEC East); Memphis 1-2 (0-1
Conference USA). I Coaches: Tennessee’s Phillip Fulmer
(131-38); Memphis’ Tommy West (68-65). I Series: Tennessee
leads 19-1. I Kickoff: 12 p.m. ET Saturday. I TV: ESPN.
Keys for Tennessee: Penetrate the line of scrimmage. Eight
different Tennessee players recorded tackles for loss against
Marshall. . . . Look out for the gadget play. Ryan Scott became the
third Memphis wide receiver to throw a pass this season when he
hooked up with quarterback Martin Hankins for a 31-yard gain in
a 38-20 loss to East Carolina on Sept. 16.
Key for Memphis: At least 25 touches for running back
Joseph Doss, who collected 124 yards on 23 carries and two
receptions against Mississippi. He also picked up 132 yards on 26
I Records: Georgia 4-0 (1-0 SEC East); Mississippi 1-3 (0-1 SEC
West). I Coaches: Georgia’s Mark Richt (56-13); Mississippi’s
Ed Orgeron (4-11). I Series: Georgia leads 28-12-1. I Kickoff: 8
p.m. CT Saturday. I TV: ESPN2.
Keys for Georgia: Make the Rebels abandon the run.
BenJarvus Green-Ellis carried the ball only 12 times in last week’s
loss to Wake Forest. . . . Find some stability at the quarterback
position.
Keys for Mississippi: Show up on third down. Wake Forest
converted 7 of its 12 third-down chances, while the Rebels
converted only 4 of their 14. . . . Defense has to go on the
defensive. The unit ranks 100th nationally in rushing defense and
106th in pass defense efficiency.
SCORING
Dicky Lyons, Kentucky. . .
Brad Lester, Auburn . . . .
John Vaughn, Auburn . . .
Leigh Tiffin, Alabama . . .
Brandon Coutu, Georgia . .
Sidney Rice, South Carolina
James Wilhoit, Tennessee .
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John Parker Wilson was
16-of-20 for 243 yards
and a career-best three touchdowns,
including a career-long 78-yarder to D.J.
Hall, in the Crimson Tide’s 24-23 double
overtime loss. In addition to being the
longest reception of his career, the
78-yard scoring pass allowed Hall to join
Keith Brown as the only active Alabama
players with 1,000 career receiving yards.
Safety Randy Kelly
returned a fumble 39
yards for a touchdown in the third quarter
against Alabama. “I was coming on a blitz
and got picked up by a lineman,” Kelly
said about the play that resulted in the
Razorbacks’ first forced turnover of the
season. “(Defensive end Antwain
Robinson) was able to strip the ball and I
saw it and picked it up and took it to the
house.”
Running back Kenny
Irons missed the Tigers’
38-7 victory over Buffalo due to a sprained
toe and ankle. Brad Lester ran for 83
yards and two touchdowns on a careerbest 18 carries, Tre Smith picked up 57
yards and a touchdown on eight carries,
and Ben Tate rushed for 114 yards and
two touchdowns on 18 carries.
Chris Leak was 15-of-26
for 267 yards and two
touchdowns in last week’s 26-7 victory
over Kentucky. The senior, who is 733-of1,203 since 2003, is the school’s all-time
leader in completions and attempts.
True freshman quarterback
Matthew Stafford threw
for 76 yards on 8-of-16 passing against
winless Colorado before giving way to
redshirt freshman Joe Cox. Cox rallied the
Bulldogs from a 13-0 deficit by completing
10 of 13 for 154 yards and two scores,
including the game-winner.
The Wildcats were
without the services of
their leading rusher, Rafael Little, last
week against Florida. The junior tailback
was left back in Lexington due to the
bruised knee and turf toe injuries that he
sustained on Sept. 16 in Kentucky’s 31-14
victory over Mississippi.
Wide receiver Early Doucet ran
for a 17-yard touchdown on a
reverse and caught two touchdown passes
in last week’s 49-7 victory over Tulane,
becoming the first LSU player in nearly
two years to score three touchdowns in a
game and the first Tigers receiver in nearly
five years to have a rushing touchdown
and a receiving touchdown in the same
game.
Wake Forest ran the
ball on 53 of its 58
offensive plays and collected 240 rushing
yards in last week’s 27-3 victory over the
Rebels. “We’re not very good up front and
teams know that,” Mississippi head coach
Ed Orgeron said.
Omarr Conner ran for
a 21-yard touchdown
on the game’s final play and the Bulldogs
snapped a 15-game road losing streak with
a 16-10 overtime victory over UAB. Conner
is the third quarterback to start a game for
Mississippi State this season, marking the
first time since 1992 that the program has
used three different starting signal-callers.
Sidney Rice set a
school record by
catching five touchdown passes from
Syvelle Newton in the Gamecocks’ 45-6
victory over Florida Atlantic. Rice, one of
several players who shared the former
school record of three touchdown
receptions in a game, is the first player in
school history to score five TDs in a game.
LaMarcus Coker’s
89-yard touchdown
run in last week’s 33-7 victory over
Marshall was the program’s longest run
from scrimmage since 1977, when Kelsey
Finch went 99 yards. “The offensive line
did a great job on the touchdown run, and
it was actually (quarterback Erik) Ainge’s
call,” said Coker, who finished with 146
yards on eight carries.
The Commodores
forced a season-high
four turnovers last week as they picked up
their first win of the season with a 38-9
decision over Division I-AA Tennessee
State. “Our defense came up huge for us,”
said linebacker Marcus Buggs, who scored
after intercepting a pass in the end zone.
“The fact that we were able to force a
couple of turnovers just changed the
whole game.”
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