Summer 2014 - Street School

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Summer 2014 - Street School
STREET TALK
SUMMER 2014
FEATURES:
2014 Senior Class
1
From the Director
2
Welcome New Staff
3
Matt Travels to Mass.
4
Student Perspective
4
Student Store Grant
5
Louder Than a Bomb
5
Counseling Corner
6
Street Party 2014
7
A Friend for Life 8
2014 SENIOR CLASS 33 MEMBERS STRONG
Street School is honored to present the
class of 2014: Kennedy Barnes, Amber
Bell, Colton Bond, Monica Brown, Vianey
Bustos, Larissa Coble, Paige Davis,
Austin Ellis, Cassondra Florentine, Ruthie
Garcia, Bibi Gaytan, Alisabeth Harrison,
Roshawn Hilton, Michael Hunt, Indigo
Johnson, Amber Lewis, Johneisha McGee,
Kevin Mehloff, Destiny Menesini, Teressa
Neyman, Katy Nichols, Dakota Queener,
Priscilla Robles, Kyla Rogers, Jocelyne
Salazar, Shacoma Smith, Tennyson
Thompson, Emmy Towry, Cortez Warledo,
Jared Webb, Haley West, Matt Whiteman,
Raenie Wildcat. A commencement
ceremony was held on May 22, 2014 at
Will Rogers United Methodist Church.
Three seniors spoke at graduation, which
offered encouragement and humor.
“Seniors, I’m proud of us for making it this
far. I hope you follow your dreams. Even if
you are on the right track, you will get run
over if you sit there. Get out there and make
things happen! The world needs you,” said
senior Matt Whiteman.
82% of the senior class has plans to attend
Tulsa Community College and 18% will attend
Tulsa Tech to receive training in trades such
as welding, automotive and cosmetology.
Counselors and teachers worked tirelessly on
end-of-instruction testing to ensure seniors
met all state requirements to graduate. They
also ensured each senior had a plan after
high school for life after graduation.
“Many of our students panic when they
realize they are leaving Street School,” said
Lead Counselor Jana Emerson. “Neither they,
nor their families, have the “assumption
mechanism,” that assumes they will go
to college, assumes they will seek trade
training or assumes they have skills to land
a job. That is why Street School is a great
place to not only receive a diploma, but
enhance skills we know they have to lead to
something greater.”
Volunteers from the Junior League of Tulsa
served as volunteers at the graduation
ceremony handing out programs, assisting
with seating and serving refreshments postgraduation. Refreshments were provided by
T.D. Williamson.
STREET SCHOOL IS A NON-PROFIT ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL OF CHOICE AND THERAPEUTIC COUNSELING PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS IN
GRADES NINE THROUGH 12. STREET SCHOOL HELPS STUDENTS EARN THEIR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA IN A NON-TRADITIONAL SETTING.
FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
STREET SCHOOL BOARD OF DIRECTORS
PRESIDENT
Julie Blake, Jenks Public Schools
PRESIDENT–ELECT
Judy Gadlage, Community Volunteer
VICE PRESIDENT
John Villareal, Villareal & Associates
SECRETARY
Andrea Hoskins, Hall Estill
TREASURER
Elli Johannsson, 360 Engineering
STREET SCHOOL BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Jeff Barnes, Walsh:Barnes Interactive
Bo Davis, U.S. Beef Corporation / Arby’s
Howard Doak, Cityscape Home Mortgage
Lise Inman, The Berrywood Group /
Stonehorse Cafe
Donny King, Williams
Connie Lee Kirkland, WPX Energy
Todd Martin, BOK Financial
Sofia Nagda, Capital Homes
Kerry Painter, SMG Tulsa
Sara Royster, Frederic Dorwart Lawyers
David Stratton, JPMorgan Chase
Amy Stutzman, Opportune, LLC
STREET SCHOOL STAFF
Lori McGinnis-Madland, Ed.D.,
Executive Director
Lorraine McReynolds, NCC,
Associate Executive Director
The 2013 –14 school year was full of excitement, change, challenges and opportunity. Street School
celebrated its 40th year of service to this community. We remain Oklahoma’s longest–running program
serving at-risk youth. We remain the program that serves as a model to other districts, other states and
other nations. We realize that to stay future-focused, we must constantly reinvent ourselves and find
cutting–edge ways to best serve our constituents. We have not let this community down.
Perhaps you have noticed our new brand, which better reflects who we are and is meaningful to those
we serve. Thanks to the efforts of Walsh Branding, our new logo, website and printed materials have
been updated with the 21st century in mind.
We recognized that our students needed updated technology to be college and career ready.
Street School was fortunate to receive funding and support from the Charles & Lynn Schusterman
Family Foundation, the Tulsa Public Schools bond initiative and 501TechNet, all of which brought
exciting changes to the technology aspect of the program. Our building is equipped with wireless
Internet service, computers for EOI testing and classroom use have been updated and four pilot
classrooms are equipped with 1:1 iPad to student ratio. Without those partners we would not have use
of their knowledge, funding, infrastructure, or support. Our technology committee has worked diligently
to ensure that our youth are equipped with the tools they need for future success.
Though we wrapped up this school year, we look forward to 2014–15. We will introduce a career tech
classroom filled with Mac computers and software. Students will have the benefit of learning both
Windows and Mac platforms. We will continue to add iPads thanks to the TPS bond; our plan is for
every student to have access to an iPad in each classroom. Many other thrilling opportunities await
Street School youth, all of which make our community a great place to call home.
2
NEWS FROM THE CLASSROOM
STREET SCHOOL
WELCOMES NEW STAFF
Reid Barcus joined the Street School staff to
teach math. Prior to Street School, Barcus
worked at Tulsa MET alternative school for
four years. As he reflects on his first year
at Street School, he is most excited about
the good results of the end-of-instruction
Algebra I exam.
Reid Barcus
Christy Dancer-Busch
Mia Wright
Christy Dancer-Busch has been a teacher for
24 years. Prior to coming to Street School
to teach science, she was at KIPP College
Preparatory. Before that, she trained teachers
in educational technology overseas in Doha,
Qatar. She enjoys the challenge of trying
to maintain a sense of humor as she helps
students face challenges. “Science offers all
kinds of adventures. I enjoy finding lessons
that help our students make informed choices
that can affect all facets of life,” said Christy.
Mia Wright joined the Street School staff this
year as an English instructor for freshman
and sophomore students. She has taught for
nine years and prior to Street School, was a
full-time instructor at ITT Tech. Mia is enjoying
the ability to be creative in her teaching
approach and having a small class size to
build rapport with students. She hopes to
build a larger Louder Than a Bomb team next
year and get more students involved.
INSTRUCTORS
Laura Abbott, Art
Reid Barcus, Math
Kim Camp, Life Skills
Christy Dancer-Busch, Science
Valerie Hansen, Resource
Sheila Jones, NBCT, English
Matt Livingood, Social Studies
Milannie Siegfried, Internship
Mia Wright, English
COUNSELORS
Jana Emerson, MSW
Jenny Fitzgerald, LCSW
John Marlow, Ph.D.
Carroll Miller, LPC
Pam Sinor, LPC
Maureen TeRuki, MSHR
ADMINISTRATION
Michelle Hoffman, Counseling
Administrative Assistant
Glenda Lollis, Receptionist
Dawn Randall, Administrative Assistant
FREEDOM WRITER INSTITUTE INVITES SHEILA JONES
TO LONG BEACH, CA
Kelly McElroy-Wallace, Community
Relations Director
English instructor Sheila Jones was invited to present at the Freedom Writer Institute held in
Long Beach, CA. Hosted by author Erin Gruwell of, “The Freedom Writers Diary,” teachers from
across the United States received training in Freedom Writer Methodology and accompanying
curricula. Participants learned the components of transformative education through experiential
learning activities and real-life experience. Jones has been using aspects of Freedom Writer
Methodology for years, which empowers students to prepare for college and career and creates
a culture of tolerance and inclusion.
Sandra Thornton, Development Director
3
SUPPORT
Cynthia Cosper, Cafeteria & Nutrition
Martin Villavicencio &
Luis Candelaria, Custodial
MATT TRAVELS TO AMHERST,
MASSACHUSETTS
Social studies instructor Matt Livingood
traveled to Amherst, Massachusetts to study,
“Native Americans of New England: A Historical
Overview.” The three-week summer institute
was a program sponsored by the National
Endowment for the Humanities. Matt was one
of 25 participants to receive a full scholarship
to attend. The course-work included museum
visits and presentations by Native and
non-Native guest speakers. The class studied
Native culture, identity, citizenship and
sovereignty while learning about the struggles
LIFE SKILLS CLASS TRIES GOLF
and achievements of indigenous peoples.
“This opportunity helped me to bring fresh
perspective when teaching history, especially
Oklahoma history,” said Livingood.
“The other course participants were from
across the United States. This was a great
experience to collaborate with other teachers
from different backgrounds and learn,”
stated Livingood.
“I’m very thankful I was selected and get to
share my experience with Street School.”
STUDENT PERSPECTIVE
JESSICA SMART
What is your favorite class
and why?
“Art is my favorite class because I
can really express myself and how
I am feeling.”
Kim Camp’s life skills class participated in The First Tee program at Mohawk
Golf Course. The First Tee is a nationwide program reaching young people
through golf, integrating golf instruction, motor skill development, character
education and wellness.
“You can tell the students are gaining confidence and working on social skills
while they are on the driving range,” said Camp. “Not one of these kids had
been on a golf course until now. There is so much to learn, on many levels,
that most of us take for granted. I’m thrilled for this opportunity.”
4
GAVIN BOGLE
What is your favorite class
and why?
“I like Reid’s math class. He gets
on a one-on-one level to teach
and doesn’t act like he is above
everyone. Math isn’t my thing, but I
have learned a lot.”
DELANEY THORP
What makes Street School
different from your previous
high school?
“Because our classes are longer,
we have no homework. This means
for me, less stress and fewer panic
attacks. Since coming to Street
School, I am happier and healthier.”
JPMORGAN CHASE PROVIDES GRANT
FOR STUDENT STORE
LOUDER THAN A BOMB
Street School has converted a classroom into the
Street School Student Store. The store has three
areas: clothing, food and baby. The clothing area
has teen-appropriate clothes, shoes, accessories
and a supply of travel-sized toiletry items. The
food pantry has items you would typically see on
grocery store shelves in addition to cold-storage
items like milk, cheese, fresh fruits and vegetables.
For students who are parents, there is an area with
infant clothing, formula and toys.
The student store was created several years ago
and relied on any available staff to manage,
maintain and sort. Thanks to a grant from
JPMorgan Chase, the store had new resources
for the 2013–2014 school year to keep it in
tip-top shape.
Not only is the store a place for students to get
supplies they need for free, it also serves as an
internship opportunity. Milannie Siegfried is the
internship instructor and teaches students, among
other things, résumé writing, interviewing and how
the world of working and getting a job happens.
is a great in-house opportunity for students to
learn about retail, organization and customer
service,” said Siegfried. “They also can apply
creative skills, math lessons and leadership.
It is a win-win for everyone.”
The grant opportunity afforded the store to
hire a part-time manager. Holly Carroll has
been instrumental in keeping the store in
tip-top shape. “We receive clothing donations
frequently and it takes time to sort and hang
in the right location. I also remove items that
are not moving and take to Goodwill making
room for more clothes the students might
want to wear,” said Carroll.
Holly and the internship students also take
time to sack groceries from the food pantry
putting together entire meal options that are
balanced. Recipe cards are also included so
students know how to cook what is provided.
The Student Store accepts donations, Tuesday
through Thursday from 9:00am – 1:00pm or
by appointment.
“We often have students that are not quite ready
to get out into the community and tackle an
internship in unfamiliar territory. The Student Store
5
Louder Than A Bomb (LTAB) is the largest
youth poetry festival in the world. Started in
2001 in Chicago, the festival has become
a bridge for young people from different
backgrounds to come together and find
common ground.
Kevin Coval, founder of LTAB started the
festival after he started wondering, “are we
approaching teaching wrong? Since we
don’t ask kids how they think and we often
judge their intelligence, I don’t think we are
incorporating the reality of lives into their
education space. LTAB lets them paint their
community with words and get what they are
feeling out.”
The first-ever Street School LTAB team was
organized this year by English instructor
Mia Wright. Street School students competed
against other Tulsa area schools vying for a
chance to make it to the finals in Chicago.
Students worked after school to create,
practice and prepare. All members of the LTAB
team competed as a group and presented
individual poems. The staff and students were
thrilled when student Danielle Roche made it
to the Tulsa finals!
COUNSELING
CORNER
In addition to being a high school,
Street School is also a youth services
agency where therapeutic counseling helps
teens in need. The counseling staff works
with every student to ensure they are not
only meeting their education goals, but
also linking students to outside services
possibly needed to get their lives back on
track. More than anything, counselors are a
listening ear and caring advisor.
1. LIS
TEN
ING
TOP FIVE ITEMS
COUNSELORS ASSIST
STUDENTS WITH:
2. CO
PING
SKILL
S
3. GR
ADUAT
ION P
LANNI
4. S E
NG
TTIN
G GO
ALS &
PRIOR
5. AC
CESS
ITIES
& NA
VIGA
TION
TO RE
SOURC
ES
(credit c
hecks, fo
od, emp
loyment,
housing
, doctor
s, etc.)
Counselors also lead students in group activities
every Friday. Groups include yoga, parenting and
HIV/Pregnancy Prevention. These groups not
only provide a required extra-curricular activity
credit, they also allow students to experience
activities and information they may not have
considered before.
6
HAPPY BIRTHDAY STREET SCHOOL
STREET PARTY 2014!
The Cox Business Center in Downtown Tulsa was hopping on February 13, 2014 as Street
School celebrated turning 40 years old. The birthday themed Street Party 2014 was a
success where more than 400 guests attended and $319,000 was raised!
“Chairs Alison Anthony and Mark Wilson did an outstanding job,” said Street School
Development Director Sandra Thornton, “we had a great crowd and a good program. Chairs
are instrumental in a successful fundraising event and they could not have been more
generous and engaged. Street School is truly lucky to have worked with them both.”
There were many highlights of the evening, but two stood out: Bianca Gray and Danielle
Roche. These Street School students took the stage and courageously shared their
stories. The audience was moved by their presentations as was evidenced by a rousing
standing ovation.
THANK YOU SPONSORS FOR SUPPORTING
STREET PARTY 2014!
HONOR SOCIETY SPONSORS – $5,000
DTG Legacy Group
Hille Family Foundation
John Steele Zink Foundation
Joseph H. & Virginia L. Dibert Foundation
Opportune, LLC
Samson Energy Company LLC
SMG-Tulsa
United States Beef Corporation, dba Arby’s
WEBCO Industries
WPX Energy
Coretz Family Foundation
Drummond Law, PLCC
Annette and Bob Ellis
Fellers Snider
Miranda and Philip Kaiser
Connie and Donny King
Grant Thornton, LLP
Hall Estill
Libby and Michael Johnson
Family Foundation
Keener Oil and Gas Company
The NORDAM Group
Pendergraph Systems
Platinum Mechanical
Meredith Siegfried
Milannie Siegfried
Milann Siegfried
Jess L. and Miriam B. Stevens
Foundation
Stonehorse Cafe
T.D. Williamson
Walsh:Barnes Interactive
The Zarrow Families Foundation
CLASS OFFICER SPONSORS – $2,500
Alison Anthony and Mark Wilson
Bama Companies
BOK Financial
John Bolton
Bryan Close
MEMBER OF THE STUDENT BODY
SPONSORS – $1,000
American Tank and Construction
Services
Apache Corporation
Julie Blake
PRESENTING SPONSORS
George Kaiser Family Foundation
H.A. & Mary K. Chapman Charitable Trust
SALUTATORIAN SPONSORS – $10,000
David Chernicky – New Dominion
George Krumme & Aldean Newcombe
John C. Smith – TMA Systems
Jill and Robert Thomas
Susan and William Thomas
Williams Foundation
7
Capital Advisors, Inc.
Erin and Don Chappel
Chase Bank
Citizens Security Bank
Cityscape Home Mortgage
Gloria and Tom Cobb
Concrete Services Corporation
Barbara and Harry Dandelles
Paula and Wendell Ellis
Gay and Lesbian Fund of Tulsa
Great Plains Lending/
Otoe-Missouria Tribe
Sarah Hansel and Mike Cooke
KWB Oil Property
Terry and John Mabrey
Gwen and Steven Malcolm
Matrix Services Company
McDonald, McCann,
Metcalf & Carwile, LLP
Janet McGehee
NBC Bank
Ruth K. Nelson
Paragon Films
PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP
Street School Administration
Kelly Thornton, Sr.
David Williams
Peggie and Gary Woods
Debbie Zinke
OTHER CONTRIBUTORS
Campbell-Lepley Hunt
Foundation
Pat Chernicky
Kimberly Clark
Evelyn Nienhuis
Patricia Pape Savage
Susie and Don Wellendorf
HOLD THE DATE!
STREET PARTY 2015
FEBRUARY 27, 2015
, TULSA
COX BUSINESS CENTER
Non Profit
Organization
US Postage Paid
Permit #1254
Tulsa, OK
1135 South Yale Avenue
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74112
A FRIEND FOR LIFE
The day Kevin Mehloff graduated from Street
School, not only were members of his family
present, but his mentor was there, too. For
three years of Kevin’s experience at Street
School, Ray Maggard was right there every
step of the way. Coming to school nearly
once a week for three years, Ray has become
an important part of Kevin’s life.
Ray has been a Street School mentor for
more than seven years. “Being a mentor
to Kevin has kept me young. We like to eat
every two hours or less, tell tall tales and
play pool. I’ve gotten so much out of visiting
with Kevin and getting to know him as
a person.”
“Ray is like my grandpa. He has taken me
fishing and taught me things I can’t even
begin to list. Even though I’m graduating
I know he will be a friend for life,” said Kevin.
“I’m really going to miss seeing him once
a week.”
TALK TO US:
8
Street School, Inc.
1135 South Yale Avenue
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74112
918.833.9800 main | 918.833.9858 fax
streetschool.org
[email protected]