President Celebrates First Anniversary

Comments

Transcription

President Celebrates First Anniversary
NON-PROFIT ORG
U S POSTAGE
PAID
OURANT.OK
PERMIT #117
Faculty
Cookout
Hot Weather
Attire
page 6
page 5
j
£11 he
Southeastern
Volume 80, Number 1
August 20, 1998
President Celebrates
Perfect Practice First Anniversary
N E W S Makes Perfect
Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, Oklahoma, 74701
IN THE
Discusses plans for coming years
Calendar
Marching band hard at work
August 20...
First Day of Class
4:30 p.m. IFC P C R
6:30 p.m. S G A P C R
10:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.
Street Dance on the Loop
President Glen D.
Johnson celebrated his one
year anniversary this July as
president of Southeastern
Oklahoma State University.
President Johnson's
wife, Melinda is a graduate
of Southeastern. After
moving away from Durant,
the couple still frequented
Durant.
"Melinda and I have a
deep appreciation for
Southeastern," Johnson said.
"We thoroughly enjoy it here.
The people are friendly."
President Johnson
came to Southeastern from a
August 26...
5:30 p.m. President's Club,
3rd floor Russell Auditorium
9:00 p.m. International
Student Welcome Party-
swc
August 27...
4:30 p.m. IFC P C R 6:30
p.m.
SGA
PCR
Panhellenic Rush Activity
for Sorority Rush
photo by Shay Jones
Shay Jones
August 29...
Panhellenic Rush Retreat
September 1...
2:00 p.m. Savage Softball
vs Connors JC, home IFC
Rush Activities
5:00p.m. Panhellenic P C R
September 2...
11:00 a.m.-1:00p.m.
Lunch on the Lawn Organization Fair Front Lawn
IFC Rush Activities
Southeastern
Marching B a n d D r u m
Major Jeff Anastasio looks
over his sheet music during
an
indoor
practice
Tuesday afternoon.
B e c a u s e of its
growing size, "The Spirit
of the Savages" marching
band must practice in
Montgomery Auditorium.
O v e r the past
couple of years the band
has grown from around 20
m e m b e r s to well over 100.
W e d n e s d a y
afternoon w a s the first day
the group w a s able to
practice in their newfacility.
The
September 3...
Rush Kickoff Party
4:30 p.m. IFCPCR 5:30
p.m. SGACanidate's Meeting
UC223
6:30 p.m. S G A P C R
new
Band
room can be found in the
building next to the Visual
Arts Building.
The Marching Band
is under the direction of
David Christy, Director of
Bands.
The Marching Band
is responsible for half time
entertainment at h o m e
football games.
The first h o m e
football
game
is
September 12, at 7:00
p.m. The Savages will go
up against Panhandle
State University.
C o m e out and root for the
Savages and the Marching
Band.
Landscape Weathers
High Temperatures
ITS H O T
W h a t ' s Inside
Clintons Life 2
Computing
Hike or Drive?
Less Clothes
Faculty cookout
Sports
Student Guide
3
4
5
6
7
8
students," Johnson said,
"Their success shows our
success."
Improvement plans
for Southeastern are n o w
underway.
According
to
Johnson, Vision 2 0 0 2
began last year and includes
five goals.
T h e first goal is
marketing. B y January
1999, Southeastern hopes
to develop and implement
a Marketing Plan for the
University.
"I a m a stron g
advocate of the planning
career in state legislation, that process," Johnson said.
included Speaker of the
According
to
House.
Johnson, Southeastern will
According
to market their strengths,
Johnson, being the Speaker which include smaller
of the H o u s e and the classes, in which students
President of Southeastern are don't get 'gobbled up',
very similiar in the fact that geography
and
the
they both must meet goals.
availability of professors.
"Being the president
Southeastern's
of Southeastern is a busy job," second goal is that of
Johnson said, "There are a enrollment. Vision 2002
multitude of things to do."
sees enrollment at its
According
to maximumcapacity (4,500 Johnson, he enjoys a "job 5,500 headcount) by the
w h e r e y o u can m a k e a year 2002.
difference."
"Renovation and
O n e of Johnson's expansion is one of our top
personal highlights from last goals," Johnson said.
year
include
teaching
B y January 1999,
freshman orientation.
Southeastern will develop
Johnson believes that, a plan to renovate the
"Southeastern
has
an campus infrastructure.
opportunity to m o v e to the
B y the year 2000,
next level."
Southeastern
will
" W e understand its implement its fourth goal
our job to open doors for our of technology resources.
President Glen D. Johnson
According to Johnson,
the goal is to ,"get technology
into the classroom."
"The library is already
web-based," Johnson said.
According to Johnson,
the last goal is that of
collaboration
among
disciplines and external
constituencies
through
research development and
academic innovation.
"This works only if
everyone believes in it and if
everyone believes they play a
part in it," Johnson said.
According to Johnson,
the collaboration goal will,
"ensure educational success
and save time and money."
Next
year.
Southeastern Oklahoma State
University will celebrate its
90th birthday. According to
Johnson, its time to start
thinking about that.
Conway To Head SOSU
Aerospace Department
Five year renovation plan in progress Immediate goal is to uphold solid reputation
Sarah Weibling
T a m m y Jo Baker
S O S U Weather Update
Shay Jones
The C a m p u s grounds of
landscape weathered quite well
during the drought of S u m m e r
'98. The Bermuda grass and St.
Augustine look a little brown
and dry due to the lack of rain,
according to Fred Hallman, Director of Maintenance at Southeastern. S o m e areas of brown
grass," indicate they are in a dormant stage." After w e receive a
good drenching rain the green
grass will return.
The drought has caused
watering in place of mowing for
the maintenance workers. Y o u
will notice the dilligence of these
workers in caring for the grounds
throughout the campus. The trees
have all survived well, the magnolias, pecan, and sycamore are
all drought tolerant species. The
shrubbery and pines have managed well under these extreme
conditions of heat.
According to Hallman,
a plan for January '99 will give a
five year plan for three areas of
the growing campus.
The first is renovation
of existing structural buildings.
The second area is in updating
(modern) technologies for the
entire campus. A n d the third is
additional buildings being added
to the existing campus.
One ofthe improvements being addressed today is the air
condtioning system for the entire
campus. Central air is provided
for the Visual Art, Morrison, and
the Science building. This provides the most convenient way in
removing humidity within the
building.
In other areas, such as the
Fine Arts Building, there are
chilled air system that stands
alone, controlled by low and high
fans to cool or heat.
The chilled air system provides temperature control ranging from 45% to 8 5 % in a twentyfour hour time frame. Day and
evening classes to meet in the
same room.
H a l l m a n feels the c a m p u s will b e able to benefit
f r o m "today's high technolo g y " as planned improvem e n t s are addressed.
Dr. David M . C o n w a y is a
new face among Southeastern faculty. H e is a n e w teacher in the
Aerospace Department.
Dr. Conway, 46, has a
wife, Cathy and a fifteen-year-old
son, Christopher. After serving
twenty years in the Air Force,
Conway retired and obtained an
Ed.d. at Oklahoma State University. H e then taught at O S U for
four and a half years.
Dr. Conway stated, " M y
immediate goal for the Aviation
program at Southeastern Oklahoma
State University is to continue to
uphold the solid reputation that it
already has, and maybe even make
it a little better. M y future goals
are to increase enrollment and to
modify the programs to meet current industry needs and provide
students with the tools they need to
get a job in aviation."
" M y teaching philosophy
is to provide students with every
experience possible, in a safe and
sane manner so that when they
leave here they're ready for any
situation," C o n w a y said.
Conway is pleased with Conway said.
"There is unlimited support
Southeastern as well as the town
from
the
administration and Presiof Durant.
"Southeastern is a place dent Johnson. The only limits w e
where the people are profes- have are our o w n individual levels
sional, hard working, and they of energy. That's very unique. l a m
really care about the students. very pleased with the school and the
It's a positive place to work," community."
photo by Sarah Weibling
Dr. D a v i d C o n w a y , is o n e of the m a n y n e w faces at
Southeastern this s e m e s t e r . C o n w a y is n e w to the
Areospace Department.
•
L
•
-
•
-
Opinions
The Southeastern
August 20, 1998
Clinton in the N e w s
Have we lost focus?
Letter from the Editor....
Guest column by Macy Nickles
Welcome back!
Well summer's over and it is time for another fun-filled school semester. For those of
you w h o were lucky enough to escape summer school you will soon find out that The
Southeastern has undergone massive cosmetic surgery.
Over the course of the summer the staff and I made several changes to the paper ranging from
layout and design to the contents.
Each week you will find a calendar of events and an index on the front page. Skyboxes (the
little pictures at the top of the front page) will give you a peek at what the main stories are inside
the paper.
A weekly opinion survey will ask a topical question and feature pictures of those few brave
souls who dare to answer. W e will also be surveying some of your personal choices, such as
where you eat locally (see tear out on page 4).
For those of you wishing to vent your hostilities, The Southeastern welcomes guest columns
and letters to the editor. However, all submissions must be signed.
Along with full-time staff members, Writing for Mass Communication students will be
required to write for the paper. M y advice to you, if you cannot get a hold of a regular staff
member, find one of these students if your club or organization is having a newsworthy event.
If you or anyone you know has a story or story ideas please call or come by. The Southeastern
newsroom can be found in the Fine Arts Building, Room 203. The staff can be reached at ext.
2696 or ext 2587 or by E-mail at southeastern®sosu.edu.
Bill Clinton, President of the United Stales, has been a prominent figurehead in the news
for the past few months. The scandal caused by his affair with Monica Lewinsky has been on
television, in newspapers,and checkout isle tabloids.
What we seem to have lost track of is why we should care about what the president, what
anyone, does in their private life.
• Has this scandal made him less of a president?
• Has it undone the good he has done for this country?
These questions are not meant to defend what he did. What he did, by definition, was wrong.
However, there are much more important things we could divert our attentions.
Recent embassy bombings, world poverty, and nationwide droughts.
Much of the time, money, and effort spent in investigating his actions,investigating his
history, and investigating the investigation could have been better directed toward other more
important matters. This matter is between the president and his family. His indiscretions should
remain personal. That he has recently admitted his wrongdoings in a nationwide address shows
that he has the integrity to admit his mistakes.
Thanks,
The Southeastern welcomes guest columns, opinion pieces and
Letters to the Editor.. All submissions must be signed and submitted
Shay Jones,
Editor-in-Chief, The Southeastern
by M o n d a y of each week. The Editor has the right to edit all
submissions.
"Do you think that President Clinton's personal life should be personal
or
Does the American public have the right to know?"
interview and photos by Shay Jones
4*
4*
Personal,...it's using up
the taxpayer's money.
Personal.
4*
« "
-Aaron Quarries
Sophomore
Business
Personal. It is nobody's
business.
—Erin Pearce
Sophomore
Studio Design
-Renata Queiroz
Senior
Marketing
n-
* * -
Private. It's wrong,
but w e don't need
to know about it.
-Laura Mitchell
Sophomore
Elementary Ed.
« •
*
Publication
Southeastern
MEMBER
Southeastern
Oklahoma
State University
Box 4237
Durant, O K
74701-0121
EXT. 2696
E-Mail:
Oklahoma Press
Association
[email protected]
Student Press Law Center
Oklahoma Collegiate
Press Association
Associated Collegiate
Press
St aff
Edit or-In-Chief Staff Writers
Sha
>'
Jones
Tammx Jo Baker
Advertising
&
Business
Manager
Jodie D u k e
Kisha Snider
Kara Stevens
Faculty
Advisor
Janet F. Reeder
Sarah Weibling
*
Policy
T h e Souiheastern is published as a leaching
instrument lor journalism siudenis under the
Department of Communication and Theatre on
Wednesday during the school year and biweekly
during the summer, except during examinations
and holidays
Opinions expressed in The Souiheastern do not
necessaril) represent those of the studem body,
faculty or administration Opinions appearing in
by-lined articles, columns or letters are those of the
individual writer. Opinions in unsigned editorials
are those oi the editorial hoard.
Letters to the editor inusi be signed, although
names m a y be withheld upon request to the editor
and the adviser A n o n y m o u s letters will not be
published Leuers musi also include the authoY s
address and lelephone number for verifU
The editor reserves the right to edit letters for space
limitation- and to comply with libel laws I w r y
effort w ill be m a d e 10 preserve the Integrity of ihe
letter Letters m a y be mailed or delivered to R n e
Arts 203 Subscriptions are S 1 0 per year
Advertising rate cards are available upon request
Computing
August 20, 1998
N e w Date Rape Drug Not O n
University of Arizona Campus
Education Bills Seek to
R e v a m p Loan Policies
Officials say
Omokhodion Iyore
The Daily Cougar (U.Houston)
(U-WIRE) HOUSTON, Texas — In the bid to
Liz Dailey
Arizona Daily Wildcat (U.Arizona)
(U-WIRE) TUCSON, Ariz. —
University Police and other officials say the newest date-rape drug
hitting campuses nationwide has
not made it to the U A , but poison
control officials would not back
that up.
Jude McNally, assistant director ofthe Arizona Poison and Drug
Information Center, said about 12
cases of G H B , the clear, liquid
date-rape drug, are reported in the
Tucson area each year.
"Most calls were from young
adults, in an age group consistent
with college students," he said,
adding that the center does not ask
for that kind of information.
But U A Police Lieutenant Brian
Seastone and Assistant Dean of
Students Veda Hunn say the n e w
drug has not cropped up on the
University of Arizona campus.
"There have been no reported
cases of G H B or any drugs similar
on [the U A ] campus," Seastone
said.
Hunn also said no incidents involving G H B , technically known
as G a m m a Hydroxybutyrate, have
occurred on campus, but that
doesn't mean the drug is not here.
"There have been a few reports
of sexual assault on campus, and
none involving G H B . Just because there are no reports of it,
doesn't mean it hasn't happened,"
she
said.
"Many victims are scared or embarrassed, and don't report the
crimes."
The University of Colorado's
newspaper, Campus Press, recently
reported high levels of G H B in an
alleged rape victim's lab results.
McNally said G H B has serious
side effects apart from its potential
use as a date-rape drug.
"It can cause dangerous cardiac
effects, and it can drop a person's
blood pressure," he said. "It can
certainly lessen resistance."
Part of the danger of the drug is
the difficulty to detect the substance in drinks. A slip of the
wrist, and the slightly salty substance can cause comas and seizures.
G H B was originally sold overthe-counter for a number of uses
until abuse ofthe drug surfaced in
the early 1990's. The Federal
Drug Administration yanked
G H B from pharmacy shelves after numerous reports of overdoses
in 1991.
"At first, G H B was showing up
in gyms - athletes were using it for
body enhancing purposes,"
McNally said. "Then it started
showing up in the night club scene
because of its euphoric effects."
A n Internet search turns up numerous sites to purchase kits for
the drug, atabout$100each. S o m e
W e b pages offer instructions on
how to make the drug, and others
contain easy on-line order forms
to have the ingredients sent to
whomever wants to make the drug.
University of Houston Students Face Dearth
of Core English Courses
The Southeastern
strengthen federal support for
higher education in the nation,
the Senate in July approved a
bill to re-authorize the Higher
Education Act of 1965.
With this development, student loans would fall to their
lowest levels in nearly two decades, and more students would
benefit from federal education
grants.
"The Higher Education Act
is the primary piece of legislature that supports higher education in the United States," said
Robert Sheridan, director of
scholarships and financial aid
at the University of Houston.
H e said there are two versions ofthe new bill, one in the
House and one in the Senate,
between which there are more
than 100 differences. Congress
has established a conference
committee to work out these
differences and attempt to come
to a compromise.
"Some additional amendments will probably be sponsored before the final version is
passed on to the president later
in the year," Sheridan said.
The new legislation would
reduce interest rates on student
loans to 6.8 percent from the
present 7.6 percent while borrowers
are in college, and to 7.4 percent
from 8.2 percent after graduation.
The cost benefit for students would
be great, but might lead to some
problems in the future, said Denise
Rossito of the media relations department at SallieMae, a major student loan establishment.
She said the student loan system
would be kept intact, but that "the
lending community will realize a 25percent cut in profitability. This will
lead to a reduction in the number of
lenders in the long run."
Another complication that might
arise is the provision of subsidies to
banks, which the Clinton administration views with skepticism, describing the susidies as potentially
"arbitrary and excessive."
The Congressional Budget Office
estimates the cost of these subsidies
at between $ 1 billion and $3.6 billion
over a five-year period.
"You should realize that the president m a y still veto the bill," Sheridan
s
a
i
d
.
"In fact, he made clear his intentions
to do so some time ago, although
he's beginning to reconsider that
decision."
If the bill is approved by the Clinton
administration, "the Department of
Education will then be responsible
for setting regulations," he said.
Under the bill:
A n amendment would allow welfare recipients to spend two full years
in college or technical school with-
out having to work simultaneously.
The m a x i m u m Pell Grant would
increase to $5,000 for the 19992000 academic year from the
$3,000 m a x i m u m set for 1998-99.
This amount would be increased
by $200 each ofthe following four
years.
Wider eligibility standards for
Pell Grants would be implemented
to include more students w h o are
independent of their parents and
more dependent students would
lose their grants if they remained
in school for more than six years.
A n extension in the amount of
time, from 10 years to 25 years,
that lenders must give students
w h o are more than $30,000 in debt
to repay their loans would be
granted.
Student loan debt would be forgiven up to $8,000 for college
graduates w h o teach for three years
in schools in poor areas.
A mandate would be implemented, with an attendant fine of
up to $25,000 for each failure to
comply, that colleges and universities disclose to the public more
detailed financial information so
students and their parents can make
more informed choices.
Colleges that need to improve
their facilities to better meet the
needs of disabled students and
maintain campus-based child care
for needy students will be authorized $10 million in grants to help
achieve those goals.
What the Heck is a Search Engine?
By Michelle Norton
The Daily Cougar (U. Houston)
(U-WIRE) HOUSTON,
Texas — D u e to a significant reduction in funds allocated for
Lower Division courses, numerous sections of sophomore English
classes and developmental writing courses have been cut from the
Fall 1998 course schedule, leaving
many students potentially unable
to take the courses they need.
According to estimates by James
Kastely, director of Lower Division Studies, only 1,775 places are
available for the 3,125 students
w h o need sophomore Enlgish
classes to fulfill semester requirements.
In a m e m o addressed to the University of Houston Community,
Kastely recognized the serious
nature of the problem. "I a m sure
that this situation is frustrating to
you; it is frustrating to m e and it is
frustrating to the staff of the Lower
Division, w h o would like to be
able to help You" he wrote. "There
is very little that they can do."
This is not the first time that the
issue of cutting course section has
been raised. At a Faculty Senate
meeting in June, senators argued
they were experiencing the results
of what they thought to be a 25-
encouraged to generate as many
percent budget cut.
Maria Gonzalez, an associate course sections as they can within
professor of English, claimed she their budget," he explained.
had to reduce the number of teach- "Funding one course over another
ing aides she could hire this year. because it is core would be un"The instructional budget is not fair."
While there seems to be very
where it is supposed to be, leaving
m y department in the midst of an little that can be done to help the
situation, students attempting to
institutional crisis," she said.
At the time, however, officials graduate and those w h o require a
believed the funding was not out of sophomore course will be given
line. Edward Sheridan, provost priority. But according to Kastely,
and senior vice chancellor/senior there may not be enough spaces to
vice president of r academic af- help even those groups of stufairs, maintained that each college dents.
T o help alleviate part of the
received the same amount of funds
as last year.
problem, students enrolled in
"Departments believe that their courses that have been cut were
funds have been cut because they notified of the situation. Others
do not have the same purchasing w h o needed the courses will be
power that they did last year," put on a waiting list.
Sheridan said in June. The Cougar
T o ensure that procedures are
could not reach him for comment fair, Kastely said that Lower Dion the present situation.
vision Studies will adhere strictly
Foreshadowing the effects of to the policy that students can
underfunding, Gonzalez also pro- only be enrolled through their ofjected that several sections already fice and not through the profesadvertised in the course schedule sor.
would be cut. She argued the uni" W e will try to ensure that evversity should base-fund core cur- ery section has the m a x i m u m numriculum.
ber of students that can be enBut Sheridan said classes con- rolled; however, w e will not oversidered to be core curriculum could enroll any section because that
not be given priority over other injures the quality of instruction,"
classes. "Department chairs are he wrote.
How Does it Run ?
Leroy Dickson
The Vanguard (U. South Alabama)
(U-WIRE) MOBILE,
Ala. — Information, informa-
engines have full-blown menus, with
categories and subcategories a surfer
can navigate through, this is not always as fast as going right to the
source — keyword searches.
But, h o w are they use? There are
several tips and tricks to pick up.
Here are some good ones that should
really help out a search:
O n e of the easiest ways to weed
out info on the net is a combined
keyword search. Attach a '+' (plus
sign) between words that must appear in result documents.
tion, information. It covers the
electronic fibers making up the
World W i d e W e b .
T o retrieve a certain piece of
it, however, one has got to know
where in the maze of networks
covering the world the information is kept. Search engines are
the key.
Surfing the w e b can be an
entertaining way to waste hours, For example, using Yahoo,
even days, of leisure time, but one of the most popular engines,
this unstructured hopping from 'University' gets "Search Result
page to page is not an effective Found 281 categories and 30,442
way to gather information. Most sites." Use 'University + Alabama'
college students know there is and get "Search Result Found 18
little time to waste before a re- categories and 284 sites." This desearch paper is due.
creases the amount of information to
The
glossary
at wade through to get to what is imporwww.whatis.com reports: "As tant.
the term is generally used, a
The exact opposite of '+' is of
search engine has two parts:
course, '-' (minus sign). This one is
* A "robot" or "crawler" that good for exclusion of unwanted magoes to every page or represen- terial. Try "University -Alabama" to
tative pages on the W e b and get info on universities not in Alacreates a huge index.
bama.
* A program that receives your
Use double quotes around words
search request, compares it to that are part of a phrase. This is great
the entries in the index, and for looking up names, specific events
returns results.
or specific phrases.
While many of today's search
Type, for example, "great barrier
reef (keep the quotes this time) to
get "Search Result Found 1 category and 118 sites". Without the
quotes, Yahoo and other search
engines come back with information on other barrier reefs, reefs,
barriers and anything that is proclaimed great.
The '*' (asterisk) is another
useful operator. It is called a
wildcard. It reports back with
partial matches. Use 'universit*'
to get back results of both the
plural and singular forms of the
word.
N o w the question is which engine to use. They all have their
advantages and disadvantages, far
beyond the scope of this article.
Since a page must be submitted
to the owner of the engine to be
listed in their database. It's always a good choice to stick with
the popular engines:
Yahoo - http://www.yahoo.com
Altavista
http:..www.altavista.digital.com
HotBot - http://www.hotbot.com
Webcrawler
http://
www.webcrawler.com
Clnet's Search.com - http://
www.search.com
There are hundreds of search
engines out there. Use one of
these to search for "search engines" for a more complete listing.
World Events matter just as much as Monica
Staff Editiorial
The Post (Ohio U.)
( U - W I R E ) A T H E N S , Ohio — Q u i c k quiz: W h o is Monica Lewinsky?
Almost all Americans would respond with the correct answer:
Lewinsky is the former White House intern w h o allegedly had sexual
relations with president Clinton.
Or, if people somehow didn't know her by name, they would
recognize her by the infamous beret-clad shot of her embracing Clinton
that has been splashed on television news stations since the allegations
arose earlier this year.
Another quick quiz: W h o is Slobodan Milosevic?
Don't know? Well, h o w about Laurent Kabila? Richard Gephardt?
Madeline Albright? Trent Lott?
If you don't know w h o these people are, you should. They are
prominent world and American leaders, whose names are in the news on
a consistent basis.
O K , what about places involved in recent news events? H o w about
the fight over Kashmir? N A T O threats of airstrikes in Kosovo? Ring
a bell with anyone?
Here's a brief description: Milosevic is the president of Yugosla- semen-stained dress has held the majority of Americans in a trance of sex
via, where civil war between the Kosovo Liberation A r m y and the and scandal, while also pushing out serious national and worldwide events
Servian Government simmers. The government is being accused of as the lead story.
ethnic cleansing, an act in which one faction attempts to expel a rival
faction from their homes to gain control over the territory.
We realize the threat of impeachment is on of the most newsworthy
Kabila is the new president of the Congo, and African nation events that could occur in the United States, but the vast coverage of the
where civil war looms. The Congo's small Tutsi minority is Lewinsky fiasco during the months leading to this point drained the
rebelling - after formerly backing Kabila.
American public. In recent polls, the majority of U.S. citizens still
The American leaders mentioned were Gephardt, House minority approve of Clinton, regardless of what he might or might not have done.
leader; Albright, secretary of state; and Lott, Senate majority leader.
In most stereotypes, there is usually one Lilliputian grain of truth.
The places mentioned above include Kashmir, a region being Americans are regarded worldwide as being ignorant not only of internafought over by Pakistan and India, countries that both recently tional events, but also domestic events.
gained nuclear technology and detonated nuclear bombs underThere is more to know besides with w h o m our nation's leader allegedly
ground.
had an affair. G o beyond what the media deems important and be aware
The threats of N A T O airstrikes in the Yugoslovian province of of other events going on within the world. Foreign events might not seem
Kosovo are a response to Milosevic's ethnic cleansing.
important to the average American, but you never k n o w what might hit
Like O.J. Simpson's white Ford Bronco, Lewinsky's alleged home.
N.
ews
The Southeastern
Aueust20. 1998
Enrollment U p T h a n k s to N e w Classes
Southeastern's Fall Schedule Is Flexible
To Hike or Drive?
Best suggestion is carpooling
Sarah Weibling
Tammy Jo Baker
During the '98 s u m m e r se-
"This enrollment increase re-
mester, Southeastern O k l a h o m a
flects the fact that Southeastern
State University's enrollment was
offers quality academic programs
up three percent.
at a reasonable cost," said
1,797 students
enrolled compared to last year's
1,745.
The first day of school and not a parking place in sight. So are r
w e suppose to walk a mile lugging 30 lbs of books or what?
According to campus police the convenience of parking
Johnson.
close is a matter of luck. A s fall semester begins, a conflict arises for
According to President Glen D.
H e also said that this indicates
progress in the area of new enroll-
Johnson, the greatest increase was
ment management, which is cur-
Is there any solution to this dilemma? For one, the Baptist
in the number of juniors and gradu-
rently under the direction of Rudy
Student Union offers parking in its parking lot and along the street.
ate students.
Manley.
The B S U is located across from the baseball field, behind the Choctaw
students to find a place to park and then stay.
dorm.
H e believes that this small but
A s for this fall's semes-
significant increase was partially
ter, an estimated 2,930 students
Parking is available in the gravel in the gravel lot area behind
because Southeastern has made an
have pre-enrolled. The recently
the Technology building which is located on ChuckwaSt. north of 7th.
effort to offer additional classes on a available phone enrollment has
more flexible schedule for the con- been used 1,726 times.
Then there is always the Gymnasium parking for a last resort, if you
are up to a good hike on 3 0 % incline.
According to Sue Dill in the
venience of its students. This caters
The best approach to this situation is carpooling after making
to students w h o lead busy lives, of- Student Affairs Office, many friends in m y class.
ten trying to balance home, job and classes are already full, with 457
According to the campus-police, it is best to walk when living
classes making it this fall.
school responsibilities.
in an apartment nearby, but be careful of parking near apartments.
There is a hefty fine to pay when not having a decal sticker on the car
for residency at these apartments. The other fines given are parking
Student worker (above)
makes I.D's for incoming
freshman. Hours to get an
I.D m a d e are from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. the first four weeks of
shcool. With an I.D., students
can receive discounts at
various local restaurants.
in fire zones and handicap areas.
Students will be hard pressed to find parking at the campus
police when applying for student I.D. pictures and parking permit.
The hours available for parking permit and student I.D.s are
8:00 a.m.—5:00 p.m., and 5:00 p.m.—8:00 p.m. for any special need
by appointment. Once the enrollment for fall semester settles down,
Enrollment this way. This
sign (right) let's n e w students
know the location of Fall
enrollment.
the hours will be 1:00-5:00 p.m. daily. A n enrollment receipt for your
parking permit is necessary.
Once the classes are rearranged, the parking dilemma seems
to wither away as do all the worries of a new semester.
photos by Sarah Weibling
& A ^ ^ & & & & & & &
* t > ^ •»^—»—*>••» *>«>*£• <S>—tf»> ^^- •<£. A A
Savage
^ < % ^ «»W%. If» ->-> -fr a^-^^^w .^-^f^w - g ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
98
-Q ^--0- -^
«».».» .>-» a » a » . » . » 0 » « » ' > » ^ . » . > < » < » « > < » , > » - « > < > . - < > .
Worth the Wait
"1
Cleaners and Laundry
'(§)
\ REAL P R O CUT. A REAL L O W PRICE.
4
0 1 w e s t Side Drive
Durant, O K 74701
(405)924-9029
Student Special
$1 O F F pro-cut with
c o u p o n or student I D
Open: M - F 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. to (-> p.m.
Take a Bible class
this semester!
i&SSi:
Next day service Monday-Thursday
Open: Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-6p.m.
Saturday 8a.m.-lp.m.
Alterations Available
L.
1115N. First
Durant, O K 74701
Student/Staff/Faculty Discount
580-924-5353
byob
1 0 % off any
item on the
m e n u with
this coupon.
Open: Tues
-Sat. (4:30
p.m.- 2:00
a.m.)
:#.'>3twsat«
You can study the Bible
and get credit towards
your degree!!
Monday / Wednesday 10:00 - New Testament Survey - S B C
W e d Night 7:00 - Old Testament Survey - 7th and Beech
*ta
0
**
* * Hopping Little* *
C h u r c h of Christ Student Bible Center
215 University or call us at 924-1386
See you there!!
•J ID
New Customer Special
FREE NEC EXEC Pa^Br
W i t h one year airtime
$
^T^
^
fl.e£
e
180
•
•
•
•
m
m
$
270
•
•
•
Large Coverage Area, Oklahoma and North Texas
A Systems,
m
Inc. a
o
120 W . Evergreen • 580-924-7906
•
moS
e&ta
•J-aiTTii' •. -i.
Buy O n e Regular Sub....
Get O n e For .99
Drive thru or call in.
All day August 28th
Not valid with any other offer,
promotion, or discount.
Excludes double meats
*SUBUJflY*
SHOULD BE.
4
'-'••
'-•• •
- "
•
!.'-..
•
.
.
*"<<
Car for sale.
1984 Chevy
Caprice, runs well,
cold air, good
condition, owned
by G M mechanic.
$1,500
ph.924-5031
News
August 20, 1998
The Southeastern
Beating the Heat by Wearing Less OSU Student and
How SOSU Students Dress for High Temps
Clll Id F G I l
T C I I Gfl 111
S a r a h Weibling
As we are all probably well
aware, s u m m e r temperatures in
our area have been at a record h igh
throughout the whole season. This
heat, which could be described as
almost intolerable , has affected
all of our lives in one w a y or
another.
It has caused individuals to be
less active all s u m m e r , preferring
to stay indoors in the air conditioning. Heat can be a very distracting factor, which most summ e r Southeastern students would
probably vouch for! But most of
all, these soaring temperatures are
causing students at Southeastern
O k l a h o m a State University to alter their style of clothing a bit.
N e w freshmen students
A m a n d a Bruce and A n n a Pesina,
both graduates of Rock Creek High
School, shared s o m e of their ideas
Car Accident
on heat relief.
Bruce said, " W e wear sleeveless shirts and short shorts."
Both girls said they like to wear
hats to keep their hair out of their
faces and sunglasses to shade their
eyes.
There is no k n o w n dress code at
Southeastern according to numerous students and faculty. This
makes dressing for the heat easy
for students.
Bruce and Pesina c o m m e n t e d
on R o c k Creek High's dress code.
Their shirts had to be two fingertips wide at the sleeve area and
shorts had to c o m e at least to their
fingertips w h e n their arms were
hanging at their sides.
T h e two freshmen students like
the n e w freedom of clothing and
hope to see the dress code at Southeastern stay just as it is.
From Staff Reports
Daily O'Collegian (Oklahoma State U.)
(U-WIRE) STILLWATER, Okla. - Funeral services have been set for an
O k l a h o m a State University student and her two children killed Sunday in a
traffic accident on 1-35 near Guthrie.
Sheri Gordon, 41, of Perkins, was a political science senior. She was president of the Perkins-Tryon school board and executive director of Perkins
Main Street Inc. Her two children were Robert Gordon, 15, and Olivia
"Dani" Gordon, 11.
Services are scheduled for 4 p.m. Thursday at Lost Creek United Methodist Church in Perkins.
Oklahoma State Highway Patrol officers said a pickup truck driven by
J i m m y Lee Pruitt Jr., 24, of Harrah w a s traveling north on Interstate 35
about 1:48 p.m. w h e n the truck blew a tire and crossed
the center median into southbound traffic.
The pickup hit Gordon's extended-cab pickup truck, and both vehicles came
to rest in a ditch where they ignited, officials said.
The Gordons were pronounced dead on the scene, along with Jimmy Lee
Pruitt Sr., 47, a passenger in his son's pickup. It is u n k n o w n whether the
Gordons were wearing seat belts.
Jason J.Ashby
Killed by a dninh driver
OT August 17. 1995
on Route 5 in
Grtai Mills. Maryland
get
keys
Jimmy Lee Pruitt Jr. and another passenger, Talon Pruitt, 15, survived the
wreck. Officials said they were both wearing seat belts. Sheri Gordon was
the sister of Perkins mayor R a n d v Hall.
Find out what
it takes to be a
better dad.
IF IT WEREN'T FOR COMPANIES LIKE YOURS,
THERE WOULDN'T BE COMPANIES LIKE THIS.
Call 1-800-790-DADS.
O W YOU CAN HELP
STOP CHILD ABUSE
BEFORE IT EVER STARTS.
Over 5 0 % ot our military lorces are in the National Guard and Reserve. But w e couldn't nave
National
Fatherhood
Initiative
I V tarl« P ity vhi ffcrrfc*>S r W d m i
liUaRflrLff Brtdr rtnbri <** 1*»«W"*I f ^ 5 * ^ ^
frt tfcon Hi Ihr rurt iM tnrrn^n >•>
a part-time military if it weren't for the full-time support of you and companies like yours.
THANKS FOR MAKING US VOUR BUSINESS. H F
%
lo iparn how you can help, coil iho taiKmal
Comrniui*e lo nrevRnl Child Abirsfi lotlnv.
frinfc <Sal Ut fritnth drtn druk
r^r-t
— — :
;
:
USEAUTTLERBTRAim'
WITH YOUR KIDS.
1-800-CHILDREN *
—
ni-l{VI)A\.Tll(HSVM)S(irKIDS
BRIM CI >S TO SCHOOL
find i.m ban fa p-i eiim
f for li.in.ls ofrliiMmi.
1-800-WE-PREVENT
YOU COULD LEARH A LOT BJOM A DUMIT •
BuctafYousarenBai
C«/K3
©
CBME^ *
Get On Staff @ The Southeastern
A
g + • »gfefeg.•» J» » ^ * g » »•*•^~.*>-
» •» •» » » . » . »
»
Live Remote KLBC
broadcast from 11:00 to
1:00 Saturday 8/22/98
$5 Haircuts will be given on
Saturday of the broadcast.
•» » » • » » • » • » • » • • » • » » » » » » ^
'fr^tfr ^ • » * » » ^- • » » ^ -^--^ » » » » » » • »
» » «> » *
MART PRINT S P0STIR
SHOWS SALE
GREAT
PRICESU-HUGE
SELECTION!
OVER
2000 IMAGES!!
Spice Girls
V a n Gogh's Night Cafe
Drawings for free haircuts for a year also shampoo & conditioner
deals. Tickets will be given away to Six Flags, White Water and
Arbuckle Wilderness. K L B C will be giving away hats and caps.
Thursday-Friday,
August 20-21
During the broadcast Taco Bell burritos and pop will be served.
j^fc
•
Belushi
I
Hallie McKinney
Student CenterOutside Coffee Shop
Kramer
10am-5pm
Sponsoted by
Southeastern Newspaper & Savage Yearbook
TRENT GRAPHIC!
Regular price cuts $8 - $10.50
Open 9-6 Mon. - Sat.
ph. 920-2002
At our new location next to Watsonburger
£ ART PRINT 8
H POSTER SALE
Titanic
South Park
Austin Powers
WWW.POSTERMART.COM
O
On the Loop
The Southeaste
rn
Ausust20, 1998
Annual Faculty Cookout is a Delicious Success
President Johnson (above) mingles at the faculty welcome back
cookout at which new faculty had a chance to meet veteran faculty
and their families.
Later Events at S O S U
August 20 (TOMORROW!): Steet Dance
10:00pm-l:00 am, on the loop!
August 26: President's Club meeting 5:30
p m , 3rd floor Russell Auditorium
Dr. Eggleton(above) converses over dinner with fellow
colleague.
August 27: Panhellenic Rush Activity for
Sorority Rush
•
Dee Dee Pena
(580) 931 -6303
Ryan Samuel
(580)931-6112
UNITED STATES
403 Westside Drive
s (East side of Wal-mart)
Durant, O K
M ® (580) 920-9090
Brenna Winship
(580)931-6111
DO
you
WIRELESS
COMMUNICATIONS
need more time?
MGUSTsp£c
lf)L
m
United States Cellular is giving
away
1200 BONUS MINUTES
with each new cellular line activated
on any published rate plan $29.95
or more!
That means for $29.95 you get 150
minutes a month for 12 months!!
Bills
Contracts
Credit Checks
$25.00 ACTIVATION
New equipment as low
as $89.00
Prepaid Wireless Servic
Plus w e are giving you
EuMffSBRT
ACTIVATION ($30 00)
TEST
ACCOUNT
UNITED STATES
Jl£ 0001 SSSS CELLULAR
32HbO
WIRELESS
COMMUNICATIONS
Thi way fisfk u/t
ll.'uti here-
r vv^s\vuv.vv^^
w
B
l
^^^Wi w^v^ A^vu\v>
Sports
August 20, 1998
The Southeastern
S O S U Women's Volleyball Team
Begins Their First Year
K a r a Stevens
This is the first year that
Southeastern State University
will have a women's volleyball
team. The Lady Savage Volleyball T e a m has been working
hard to get ready for their season.
B e c a u s e this is
Southeastern's first year at volleyball, they are ranked last.
According to the team, they
plan to prove themselves.
" W e can only go up," Coach
Cherrie Wilmoth said. "We're
certainly excited."
Lady S a v a g e W o m e n ' s Volleyball T e a m is practicing hard to prove themselves in their first year.
T h e ladies have overcome m a n y
obstacles to get this team started.
T h e y have been practicing in the
Activity Center. T h e heat has been
a tough factor in practice.
"There's not any breeze in here,"
sophomore, outside hitter, Andrea
Ramsay, said.
Southeastern wasn't equipped to
have a women's volleyball team. T o
m a k e a team possible, maintenance
has worked hard to provide the necessary facilities. The team should be
able to start practicing in the air conditioned g y m later this week.
"They're excited about the facili-
photo by K a r a Stevens
juimmiiniiiimn
imimi
- » ~ > » ~ > » — »
Want $25,000+
for college?
I FASHION CLEANERS
702 W. Evergreen
924-0206
1423 W. UNIVERSITY
924-6992
Fast Service
T h e A r m y Reserve can help you cake a big bite
out of college expenses.
How?
If you qualify, the Montgomery G I Bill could
provide you with up to $7,124 for college or
approved vo/tech training.
We'll also pay you over $107 a weekend to start.
Training is usually one weekend a month plus two
weeks' Annual Training. By adding the pay for
Basic Training and skill training, you'll earn over
$18,000 during a standard enlistment.
So, if you could use a little financial help
getting through school—the kind that won't
interfere with school—stop by or call:
SOSU Faculty, Students and Employee Discount Coupon (405) 223-8090
(405)223-8811
1 0 % off all dry cleaning and laundry
BE ALL Y O U C A N BE.
$5.00 minimum order with this coupon only
A R M Y RESERVE
« * » • » » - " « » - » » " » - - » » ~ » ~ » • »
<i
(
|
i\
<\
Work with Us:
< •
\\
@ The Southeastern
ii
<\
il
ic
Paid positions for two to ten hours weekly, !
if
experience helpful but not necessary
ii
«•
<•
<>
<•
.»«».*..•>.»•»«'>•'>«•*•'»
<»••«»«».»«•>-•»..•>.-»
XXX
Thompson College
Stores,Inc.
1335 N. Fifth
Durant O K , 74701
^
c o m
e back st0(/
W e offer a full line of
supplies for art classes,
teaching supplies,
scantrons, blue books,
SOSU t-shirts, hats,
backpacks, and other
apparel.
Students are allowed to
charge students loans
and grants with ualid
credit cards.
Free Trial
Packs
Competitiue prices
" ^ Creek \te^
m
y *
j;
<ii
Distribution, sports i»
writers, graphic artists,
ii
photographers,
iE
production gurus i
•»•»«»•<»
HUH
» ^ » " ^ " > » - » » • • » " »
i >~
Both locations open Saturday 9 to 1
Ask for S O S U discount card.
1111
" W e all have good attitudes,";
R a m s a y said. "We're mentally
there."
" W e have a lot of good girls in
here that are working hard and
working together," Wilmoth said.:
See September schedule on this
page. Other SDorts' schedules can
be found in the Student Guide, i
< •
www.goarmy.com
XXX
• » • »
ties and maintenance that has beeni
done to establish women's volley-i
ball at Southeastern," Wilmothf
said.
Overall the team is looking forward to a chance to prove themselves, and they expect a good sea-:
son.
v . v-v-%'
0 »v
s
•v^
•V
8
Student Guide
The Southeastern
Ausust 20, 1998
THE SOUTHEASTERN
The student newspaper
of the campus of 1000 magnolias
compliments of
Computer Lab Contacts for Fall '98
Recreation Center and Pool Hours for Fall '98
Computer Science Building: Dr. David Hoelzeman, EXT
2401
Science Building: Chris Moretti, EXT. 2776
Russel Building (two labs): Dr. Debbie Barnes, EXT. 2948
Morrison Building (three labs): Chuck Easttom, EXT.
2948
Contact Dr. Donald Parham, EXT. 2656
v
/
\
Library Hours for Fall '98
The Library also has 16 computers that are Internet accessible and two computers with Word.
Monday through Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to
Midnight
Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sunday: 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Lady Savage Volleyball Schedule, Fall 98
J
v
Time
Site
Opponent
6:00
Durant,
O
K
Dallas Baptist University
1:00
Lawton, O K
Angelo State University
6:00
Lawton, O K
Cameron University
7:00
Durant,
O
K
Sept. 8 Tues. Austin College
Southern Arkansas University Magnolia, A R 4:00
Sept. 11 Fri.
Magnolia, A R 6:00
Tarleton University
7:00
Durant, O K
Sept. 15 Tues. Midwestern State University
7:00
Durant, O K
Sept. 22 Tues. Texas A&M-Commerce
6:00
Durant, O K
Ouachita
Baptist
University
Sept. 24 Thurs.
2:00
Durant,
O
K
Harding University
Sept. 26 Sat.
7:00
Sept. 29 Tues. University of Central Oklahoma Edmond, O K
Oct. 2-3 Fri./Sat. Tournament-Henderson State Arkadelphia, A R T B A
Sherman, T X
7:00
Austin College
Oct. 6
Tues.
Durant,
O
K
6:00
Southern Arkansas University
Oct. 8
Thurs.
Wichita Falls, T X 7:00
Midwestern State University
Oct. 9
Fri.
7:00
Durant, O K
Texas Woman's University
Oct. 13 Tues.
7:00
Arkadelphia,
A
R
Ouachita Baptist University
Oct. 16 Fri.
11:00 a.m.
Searcy, A R
Harding University
Oct. 17 Sat.
6:00
Dallas,
T
X
Dallas Baptist University
Oct. 20 Tues.
TBA
Oct. 23-24 FriVSat. Tournament-Southern Arkansas Magnolia, A R
7:00
Texas Woman's University
Denton, T X
Oct. 28 Wed.
Texas A&M-Commerce
Commerce, T X 7:00
Nov. 3
Tues.
7:00
University of Central Oklahoma Durant, O K
Nov. 6
Fri.
2:00
Cameron University
Durant, O K
Nov. 7
Sat.
TBA
TBA
Nov. 13-14 Fri./Sat Lone Star Conference Tour
Date
Sept. 4
Sept. 5
Day
Fri.
Sat.
Information & Layout
by Kara Stevens
Opponent
McNeese State
Oklahoma Panhandle State
Texas A&M-Commerce
Eastern New Mexico
Harding University
Ouachita Baptist
Southwestern Oklahoma
Open
Northeastern Oklahoma
Central Oklahoma
East Central Oklahoma
Monday through Friday:
Breakfast: 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Lunch: 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Dinner: 4:45 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Saturday through Sunday
Breakfast: none
Lunch: 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Dinner: 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
>
Men's and Women's Basketball Schedule, Fall '98
Date
Nov. 16
Nov. 19
Nov. 21
Nov. 24 .
Nov. 27-28
Place
away
home
home
away
away
home
away
Dec. 1
Dec. 3
Dec. 5
Dec. 10-12
Dec. 15
Dec. 17
home
away
home
Jan. 7
Jan. 9
Jan. 14
Jan. 16
Jan. 18
Jan. 21
Jan. 23
Jan. 25
S O S U Softball Schedule, Fall '98
Date Day
Sept. 1
Sept. 8
Sept. 12
Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Sept. 26
Sept. 30
Oct. 3
Opponent
Tues. Connors Jr. College
Tues. Collin County
Sat.
Texas Woman's Tournament
Tues. Seminole Jr. College
Tues. North Texas JUCO
Sat.
Seminole Triangular
Wed. Paris Jr. College
Sat. Tulsa University Festival
Sunday through Thursday: 2 p.m. to
11 p.m.
Friday through Saturday: 2 p.m. to
2 a.m.
Student Union Hours for Fall '98
S O S U Football Schedule, Fall '98
Time
Date
7:00
Sept 5
Sept 12 7:00
Sept 17 7:00
Sept 26 2:00
7:00
Oct. 3
2:30
Oct. 10
2:00
Oct. 17
Oct. 24
2:00
Oct. 31
2:00
Nov..7
Nov..14 2:00
Visitation Hours for the
Choctaw and Chickasaw
Dorms for Fall '98
Jan. 30
Feb. 1
Feb. 4
Feb. 6
Feb. 11
Feb. 13
Feb. 18
Feb. 20
Time
Site
Durant, O K 2:00
Durant, O K 2:00
Denton, T X TBA
Durant, O K 3:00
Durant, O K 2:00
Seminole, O K 9:00
Durant, O K 4:00
TBA
Tulsa, O K
Time
Opponent
7:00/M
Southwest Missouri Baptist
7:00/M
Abilene Christian
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Angelo State
6:00/W, 8:00/M
St. Edwards
Savage Classic (Jarvis Christian,
Southern M only T B A
Arkansas, East Central, Southeastern
7:00/W
Texas Women's
Eastern New Mexico
6:00/W, 8:00/M
West Texas
6:00/W, 8:00/M
West Texas Tournament
W only T B A
St. Edwards
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Abilene Christian
6:00/W
Texas Wesleyan
8:00/M
Cameron
6:00AV, 8:00/M
Southwestern
6:00/W, 8:00/M
UCO
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Northeastern
6:00/W, 8:00/M
East Central
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Harding
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Ouachita Baptist
6:00/W, 8:00/M
USAO
7:00/W
Texas Wesleyan
7:00/M
East Central
6:00/W, 8:00/M
USAO
6.00/W, 8:00/M
Harding
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Ouachita Baptist
6.00/W, 8:00/M
Cameron
6:00/W, 8.00/M
Southwestern
6:00/W, 8:00/M
UCO
6:00/W, 8:00/M
Northeastern
6:00AV, 8:00/M
J
THE SOUTHEASTERN
and
SAVAGE STAFF
SUPPORT OUR SAVAGE
TEAM SPORTS
Place
home
home
home
away
home
away
away
away
away
home
home
home
home
home
away
away
away
home
home
away
away
home
home
away
away
away
away
home
home

Similar documents