I` md OI NG IT fOrmyfAmIly

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I` md OI NG IT fOrmyfAmIly
THE BEAT GOES ON
7 June 2012 # 024
R15,
R1
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incl)
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excl)
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exclusive
live’s new ‘it’ girl
luthando
AfrICA IS THE
NEW BIG THING
why & where
investMent
is flooding in
i’ve hit the big
tiMe – but no
weaves, please!
9
770419
767009
23024
the spear that
rocked the nation
‘It has disgraced us.
Why do they hate
us so much?’
exclusive
Lesbian weDDing
exclusive
Muvhango’s sindi dlathu on being a celebrity, her 17 years
of Marriage, privacy and her hope to have kids one day
I’m dOING IT
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fashion & beauty: fabulous new look for a druM reader
health: how to cut your risk of the most common cancers
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InsIde
7 June 2012 # 024
Cover stories
Articles
10
14
16
18
20
84
86
88
90
92
Sindi Dlathu
Live’s Luthando Shosha
Why the outrage – The Spear
Investment in Africa
Royal wedding
Here come the brides
Tumisho and Zozi Masha
Hip-hop’s Zakwe
The 4Ladies of 4Play
Highlights of the PSL season
Made of paper awarded the European
Union Eco-label reg.nr F1/11/1,
supplied by UPM.
10
entertAinment
56 Soapwatch
58 TV Guide
62 Chill Out
celeb WAtch
8
9
50
94
96
98
Snapped
Out & About
Poster: Orlando Pirates FC
Celebrity News
Showbuzz
Stylebuzz
94
86
DRUM
34
Fiction
68 The Feather
regulArs
6
Letters
64 Games: What’s the Vowel, Picture Puzzle
66
67
70
72
75
winners and solutions
Picture Puzzle
15 Questions
DRUM Protector Plan
Your Stars
Good Laughs
For the kids
76 In the Classroom: All about teeth
80 In the Classroom: Grade 10
82 Supa strika
Win
54
28
30
32
34
38
40
41
42
44
45
46
48
52
54
Shisa: best knits for winter
Fashion: makeover
Beauty: a new you
Food: back to the roots
MasterChef SA
Dr Nomteto
Health snippets
Health: cut your cancer risk
Sis Dolly
Testo-therapy with Bra Mo
Advice: how to be money-wise
Advice: test your relationship
Business with Nono
Entrepreneurs: a labour of love
24 Win one of many great prizes
for your dad
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Ed’s note
T
O BE black in South Africa every day is a test. Every day we’re reminded
of the limits of our “freedom”. I decided to put myself aside and ask my
25-year-old, private-school-educated, university graduate sister and
some of her friends how the past week’s events have made them feel.
In the end I was so emotionally exhausted I could have burst into tears.
This much is clear: it has become increasingly hard to move on from the
atrocities that colonisation and apartheid put us through when we’re dealing
with models who use the k-word and have nothing but a fluffy PR statement to
explain themselves, FW de Klerk’s nonchalance over apartheid and an increasing
number of blacks in corporate South Africa feeling marginalised in the workplace
because they are “just black” and are made to constantly explain every thought
behind their contribution to the business and to society.
I can understand the passionate and raw reaction black people have in these
instances.
The past few weeks have brought attention to certain truths. The Bill of Rights
highlights freedom of expression as being empathetic to all; freedom of artistic
creativity which does not extend to advocacy of hatred that is based on race,
ethnicity, gender or religion. That is the constitutional deal we struck.
I marvel at our ability to march on in spite of our ‘woundedness’. Many a
thought leader and academic have added to this discussion. One thing remains
certain – the painting known as The Spear has pierced through the scab of many
an unhealed wound.
My sister recently sent me some additional pieces of artist Brett Murray’s work
accompanied by a long essay on why Murray’s art is colonialist and racist. Her
point is that even though we are still in the process of a trade-off with many
things – because we are such a young democracy – there is nothing to explain
or justify such art and depiction of blacks. She adds that if he’s not racist, his art
certainly is.
Although I’m yet to be convinced of this I can see where she’s coming from.
We’re a nation with many wounds. Most of these – the deepest of them – were
not given enough time to heal. It’s as if we put a rainbow-painted plaster on
them and hoped for the best. It is evident in our daily interactions. My sister says
she feels it with most of her white friends – the carefully constructed list of topics
that accommodates everyone. “It’s as if I cannot be this person who comes from a
generation of people who’ve been through the absolute worst because it makes
them (whites) uncomfortable,” she says.
The Spear is not about Zuma’s “African traditional practices” or his
questionable private antics that somehow always find themselves the subject
of many a headline. It’s much deeper than that. The hurt it has caused may not
be dismissed as simply being “prudish”.
Advocate Gcina Malindi’s courtroom tears are testament to this. For him and
many other people The Spear saga brought back all the bad experiences of the
past. Centuries of being made to feel subhuman and ridiculed.
While The Spear is considered to be art by many, the hurt it has caused is
confirmation that South Africa has a long way to go before it can unconditionally
call itself a country made up of many different “we’s”. And yes, in African
culture, genitalia may not be gawked at regardless of whose they might be. It is
considered to be the lowest and most disrespectful of insults.
Why is this so difficult to understand?
Khosi
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6|
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com/drummagazinesa
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drummagazine
STREET TALK
A young South African girl whose family thought was
missing is in a Brazilian jail on charges of possession
of drugs. Are money-hungry SA youths not taking the
implications of drug trafficking seriously enough?
Write to us at PO Box 653284,
Benmore 2010, e-mail us at
[email protected] or SMS 32113
The winning leTTer receives R200 in cash.
leTTers should noT be longer Than 200 words.
PHAT AND FABULOUS
W
hen I saw the article on the three plus-size ladies who
are making a difference through their TV show about
big women, I was impressed and touched (Living a
phat life, 24 May). They are a true inspiration.
From an early age I developed a thick skin when
it comes to weight issues. As a child I was chubby
and remained so through adulthood. Ever since I could remember I was
subjected to labelling and name-calling. If it wasn’t people calling me
isidudla, fohloza, fatty etc, old men hit on me because of my size.
I used to get offended when someone called
me isidudla. Then I realised there’s nothing wrong
with me – people will talk about you whether you
I no
are thin, rich, beautiful or famous.
longer
Now I don’t apologise about my size. It’s not
that I condone an unhealthy lifestyle. I watch what
apologise
I eat, exercise, don’t smoke and drink and have
about my
regular medical check-ups. I’m fit as a fiddle!
size
MASADI PHIRI, E-MAIL
LEVERT MPHAHLELE, TEMBISA NO. The
kids that are caught or involved in drug trafficking
are ignorant and the majority don’t come from poor
backgrounds. They are too hungry for money and are
selfish. Their focus is money but they forget the other
things that they are blessed with and end up destroying
their lives and the lives of others.
JOHANNA MALULEKE, BRAAMFONTEIN
NO. These people who are involved in drugs do such
things on purpose. As kids we were all warned of the
implications of talking to strangers and being involved
in the wrong things. That’s is how these things start.
They talk to the wrong people, do favours and get
promised the world.
PHILANI SIBANYONI, PIMVILLE YES. You
wouldn’t be involved in something that dangerous
without knowing the consequences. They are underestimating the justice system. There are other ways of
making money and improving your situation. Drugs
should not be your only resort because you just end
up hurting the ones who love you the most.
ENYIOMA ENWEREM, MIDRAND YES. The
GOOD
ADVICE
MOB JUSTICE
I’ve just read
Bra Mo’s
advice to a
16-year-old
boy going
on his first
date (Testotherapy with
Bra Mo, 24
May).
I thought
the advice was precise, witty and
age-appropriate.
I’m glad young boys out there are
asking the right people for advice,
instead of asking their peers who
might mislead them.
Most of us are Christians, or claim
to be. We know it is morally wrong
to repay evil with evil but somehow
some people still believe in taking the law into their own hands
(Blood in the streets, 17 May).
Suspected thugs die at an alarming rate every year at the hands of
so-called Christians who stone them
to death over small offenses such as
stealing a loaf of bread.
Do you really think people would
steal if they had a choice? Let’s help
each other instead of killing each
other.
We need to trust our police officers enough to let them do their
jobs.
NqobILE N, E-MAIL
NS, E-MAIL
people who do this are in desperate need of money.
They probably come from a background where they
live with a single parent and selling drugs would help
their financial situation. They know about the risks but
they still do it to improve their lives. It’s tough but it’s
how their lives are.
ZANDILE THOBILE MBULI KALINDISA
YES. There is a tendency to believe that those
who get caught are stupid as some have done
it before and were not caught so u can do it
too. This is actually the wrong way of thinking
because a wise person makes no mistakes.
KHANYI BABYK NYATHI YES. Wrong is
wrong and there’s nothing to justify it. Poverty
is there yes but what if we all chose the easy
way out? There are street vendors selling stock
even on rainy days to make an honest living,
they are also faced with poverty.
TSHEPISO LEDINGOANE YES. They
tu
and Cosa
The ANC
the
called for
s
City Pres
boycott of
paper’s
e
th
to
e
du
blication
online pu
ear. Is this
Sp
of The
media
of
a form
ip?
censorsh
YES or NO
HAVE YOUR SAY
To vote on your cellphone go to our mobisite
by typing m.drum.co.za on your browser from
a WAP-enabled phone. Or at a once-off cost of
R1, SMS the word MOBI and your name to 32113
and we’ll send you the link to the site. Find the
poll on the mobi homepage and select Yes or No.
Q
KZN taxi drivers have requested traffic fines
be written in Zulu. Should traffic fines be
issued in vernacular?
YES 50%
NO 50%
aren’t serious at all. They are just after money
and forgetting about their lives. Easy money
isn’t good and what’s happening to our sisters
is going too far!
NTSINGISELO NGXUMALE YES. We all
want cash. I have even thought of hijacking
the cash trucks but no . . . it’s wrong, illegal
and would probably land me in jail. What’s her
excuse? If it’s poverty I don’t buy it, we are all
struggling financially.
find us at www.facebook.com/home.php/drummagazine
do you follow us on twitter? if not, follow us today
on http://twitter.com/drummagazine
DRUM snappeD
By sANelIsIWe MAlIZA
PICTUres: TUMelo leBUrU
Left: Zanele is a natural host. ABOVe: Zanele with her panel of
guests – from left Pastor Dick, hubby Bishop Nkambule and
Pastor Zondo. RIGHt: Zanele gets her mic checked.
GOSPEL SUPREMO’S NEW SHOW
T
here’s no stopping
gospel big shot ZANeLe
MBOkAZI. The Crown
Gospel Music Awards
founder, author and businesswoman is back on TV to host a
new show called Khwezela/ rekindle with Zanele Mbokazi.
We caught up with the Bishop’s
wife as she recorded the first
episode at Urban Brew studios
in randburg. “The show is about
our relationship with God and our
relationship with our loved ones,”
she explains.
“When I went through my
divorce I realised there was a lot I
could have done differently if I had
been better equipped,” she adds
in reference to her first husband.
“We’re not only going to rekindle our (personal) relationships,
but also our relationship with
God.”
The programme will feature a
number of guests, including her
swazi husband, Bishop Mpendulo Nkambule, and Ukhozi FM
presenter Pastor Zondo, who both
make an appearance on the first
episode of Khwezela.
The guests offer advice on topics such as dating someone who
doesn’t share your religious beliefs.
“My husband won’t be on every
episode. I just wanted him on the
first episode for support,” she says,
beaming.
The show has been a dream of
hers since 2007 and after years of
preparation the first episode of
ABOVe: Bishop Mpendulo Nkambule on
Khwezela/rekindle with Zanele
set to support his wife.
Mbokazi will be aired on sunday
10 June on sABC1 at 5.30 pm.
Left: fellow
church members
were also in studio
to support Zanele
while she recorded
her first episode.
Before they started
recording, they
opened with a
prayer. the show
is about rekindling
relationships –
with each other
and with God.
8 | 7 June 2012
www.drum.co.za
DRUM oUt & aboUt
toLo PULE
SIMPLY beautIfuL
T
sHIsA actress Mbali
MlotShwa couldn’t
have chosen a better
time to launch her
lifestyle blog – simply enhle.
The third season of the drama
has started on sABc1, so she’s
back in the limelight after taking time out to focus on other
things, including motherhood.
mbali was overcome with joy
when she officially launched her
blog at Atlas studios in milpark.
“simply enhle is just that –
simply beautiful. This is my
baby and it is about celebrating
life and style. It will celebrate
all things beautiful,” she said
in a speech at the intimate
gathering.
Friends and family were there
to support her, including her
mother Bongi mlotshwa, and
mbali’s husband, DJ blacK
coffee. “I’d like to thank
Nkosinathi maphumulo
mlotshwa,” she laughed
as she added her maiden
name to her husband’s
surname as a joke. “He has
supported me throughout
and has been my pillar
of strength and for that I
thank you, baby!”
And the obvious choice
on the decks was none other
than Black coffee. Just like the
name of the blog suggests, it
was a night of all things
beautiful. – NoNZwAkAZI CEkEtE
ciRcle: Mbali Mlotshwa looks just like her mom, make-up artist bongi Mlotshwa. aboVe faR left: Mbali with
husband black coffee. aboVe: black coffee’s protégé culoe de Song showed up to support to his friend’s wife.
Right: Marriage and pregnancy must be treating Miranda Mokhele well – she looked a picture of happiness.
toLo PULE
battLe of the beatS
I
T comes as no
surprise that the Red
Bull Beat Battle was a
high-flyer event. The
brand is famous for hosting adrenaline sports and
competitions such as kart
racing and surfing, but
this time it was the 2012
round of their popular
dance challenge, which
drew crowds to Bassline
in Newtown, Joburg.
People came to see eight
dance crews from across the
country battle it out.
The venue was packed but
organisers had the foresight
to have the competition
screened on big screens
outside the building for
those without tickets.
CELEB TWEETS
themba nofemele
@themzino51
Yoo I enjoyed
muvhango
tonight - i
think my friends delivered
especially meiki and sizwe,
mulalo and mulumisi! muthi
on everything.
The star-studded judging
panel included kwaito star
Kabelo Mabalane, Lorna
maseko, Vouks and SoMizi
“SoMgaga” Mhlongo.
Award-winning rapper aKa
was the energetic mc for the
night and renowned hip-hop
DJ Switch spun the discs as
dance crews and artists such
as Pro, TKZee and Ruffest took
to the stage.
celebrities such as Amu,
Tumi of Tumi and the Volume
and Zola of craz-e hung around
the VIP area.
By the end of the night,
soweto-based hip-hop dance
crew Reptilez were crowned
the winners. They will compete
at a similar Red Bull challenge
in Brazil soon. – SURPRISE MAZIBILA
oPPoSite:
Somizi
Mhlongo
added a spark
to the judging
panel.
faR left
and left:
aKa and
Kabelo
Mabalane
made sure
the good
times rolled.
ciRcle: DJ
Switch was
on the ones
and twos.
check out what some of Mzansi’s celebs had to say in cyberspace . . .
euphonik
@euphonik
These women
that sit on the
side of the
road begging with their
babies f***en annoy me.
Kids don’t deserve that sh*t!
lucia Mthiyane
@luciaMthiyane
I swear I have
ocD, the moment
I’m about to eat
somewhere besides my place,
I start wondering if the kitchen
where it was prepared is clean!
Relo Makhubo
@MrsRelo
A beggar just asked
me for imali ye drink.
DRINK!!!! Tjoooo
I thought they were starving
not thirsty smH.
zwai bala
@zwaibala
could not find
my car keys at
all this morning. Had to walk my son
to school in this freezing
weather. We were late!
Brown and white dress, Belt and coat, the space; shoes, europa art; accerosies stylist’s own
A
BLUE Audi A4 pulls up at the
Hala Eco Boutique Hotel and
Spa in leafy Bryanston, northern
Joburg.
The
sassy
actress steps out in style,
dressed in jeans and a khaki coat. Her
neat cornrows go with the striking
winter outfit.
Stares from guests and staff alike
gravitate towards the beautiful woman
they know as Thandaza on Muvhango.
“I’m sorry for being late,” says Sindi
Dlathu as she catches her breath. “I got
lost. I don’t really know this side of town
– I grew up in the south,” she adds.
As she glides gracefully across the
foyer to where her make-up will be
done she encounters more hotel staff
who instantly recognise her and greet
her with admiration.
They’re shy at first, half expecting a
snooty actress who feels she’s owed the
idolisation of her fans. They need not
worry. She humbly greets each one of
them and they glow with admiration
and newfound respect for a true star
worthy of the name.
When the stylist displays the clothes,
excitement is written all over Sindi’s face
as the collection meets her personal
sense of style. “I’m up for anything as
long as the outfits don’t make me look
like Thandaza,” she says in reference to
her serious character on the soapie,
which airs on SABC2 from Monday to
Thursday at 9 pm.
IT’S somewhat ironic how 38-year-old
Sindi doesn’t want to look anything like
her character when all she wants to talk
about is her work. “My personal life is a
no-go area,” she warns. “I’m known for
the work I do and that’s all I want to be
seen in the media for.”
Sindi is known for being one of the
most private celebrities in the industry.
She never talks about her personal life –
only her work. And today she lets DRUM
in on why she has always been so private
about her life, not allowing even a
glimpse of it to give her fans an idea
LEFT: Sindi Dlathu believes it’s important to
have strong cultural values. “It saddens me to
see how we’ve lost Ubuntu as South Africans.”
10 | 7 June 2012
www.drum.co.za

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