Jefferson Hall Renovation Site Specific Safety Plan

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Jefferson Hall Renovation Site Specific Safety Plan
 Jefferson Hall Renovation
OHU-140005
Site Specific Safety Plan (SSSP)
Index
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................................. 2 PLAN FUNDAMENTALS ............................................................................................................................................... 6 I. Statement of Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Safety Policy ............................................................................ 6 II. Description of Project ................................................................................................................................... 7 III. Site-­‐Specific Safety Topics ........................................................................................................................... 7 IV. Project Directory ............................................................................................................................................ 9 V. Emergency Procedures ................................................................................................................................ 9 A. Emergency Phone Numbers 911 & Ohio University Police : 593-­‐1911 ......................................... 9 B. Evacuation Procedures ....................................................................................................................................... 10 C. Incidents Involving Severe Injury or Fatality ........................................................................................... 10 VI. Multi-­‐Employer Worksite Concerns ..................................................................................................... 10 VII. OSHA Inspections ........................................................................................................................................ 11 A. General Responsibilities .................................................................................................................................... 11 B. Inspection Process & Guidelines .................................................................................................................... 12 VIII. Responsibilities ........................................................................................................................................... 13 IX. Jobsite Safety General Requirements ................................................................................................... 16 A. Substance-­‐Free Workplace Policy ................................................................................................................. 16 B. Special Hazards & Considerations ................................................................................................................. 17 C. Hazard Determination ........................................................................................................................................ 18 D. Safety Task Analysis (STA) or CKE Action Plan ....................................................................................... 18 E. Training Requirement ......................................................................................................................................... 18 F. Job Safety Briefing (JSB) ..................................................................................................................................... 20 G. Hazard Reporting .................................................................................................................................................. 20 H. Contractor’s Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan .......................................................................................................... 21 I. Pre-­‐Start Meetings ................................................................................................................................................ 22 J. Enforcement of Safety ......................................................................................................................................... 22 K. Accident/Incident Reporting and Recording ............................................................................................ 23 SOME HAZARDS & EXPOSURES ............................................................................................................................. 24 X. Bloodborne Pathogens .............................................................................................................................. 24 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 24 B. Exposure Determination .................................................................................................................................... 25 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 3 XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. C. Compliance Methods ........................................................................................................................................... 25 D. Contaminated Equipment ................................................................................................................................. 25 E. Training ..................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Concrete & Masonry ................................................................................................................................... 25 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 25 B. Other Concrete & Masonry Requirements ................................................................................................. 25 Confined Space Entry ................................................................................................................................. 26 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 26 B. Entry Permits .......................................................................................................................................................... 27 Cranes and Rigging ..................................................................................................................................... 27 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 27 B. Recordkeeping ....................................................................................................................................................... 28 C. Rigging ....................................................................................................................................................................... 28 D. Signaling .................................................................................................................................................................... 28 E. Work Area Control ................................................................................................................................................ 29 F. Power Line Safety: CFR 1926.1408 .............................................................................................................. 29 G. Crane Safety Devices ............................................................................................................................................ 30 H. Operators .................................................................................................................................................................. 30 Electrical ........................................................................................................................................................ 30 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 30 B. Temporary Lights ................................................................................................................................................. 30 C. Other Electrical Requirements ........................................................................................................................ 30 D. Illumination ............................................................................................................................................................. 31 Ergonomics .................................................................................................................................................... 32 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 32 B. Other Ergonomics Suggestions ....................................................................................................................... 32 Excavation & Trenching ............................................................................................................................ 33 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 33 B. Competent Person ................................................................................................................................................ 33 C. Other Excavation Requirements .................................................................................................................... 33 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 34 B. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford’s Six-­‐foot Fall Protection Rule ........................................................................ 34 C. Conventional Fall Protection Systems and Alternative Systems ...................................................... 34 D. Holes ........................................................................................................................................................................... 35 E. Other Fall Protection Requirements ............................................................................................................. 35 XVII. Fire Prevention and Control .................................................................................................................... 36 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 36 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 4 B. Fire Prevention Procedures ............................................................................................................................. 36 C. Fire Extinguishers ................................................................................................................................................. 37 D. Temporary Heat .................................................................................................................................................... 37 XVIII. Housekeeping ............................................................................................................................................... 37 XIX. XX. A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 37 B. Other Housekeeping Requirements .............................................................................................................. 37 Ladders ........................................................................................................................................................... 38 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 38 B. Other Ladder Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 38 Occupational Health & Environmental ................................................................................................ 38 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 38 B. Hazard Communication (HazCom) ............................................................................................................... 39 C. Industrial Hygiene ................................................................................................................................................ 40 D. Monitoring or Sampling Procedure .............................................................................................................. 40 E. Occupational Health & Environmental Work Practices ....................................................................... 41 1. Silica ................................................................................................................................................................ 41 2. Asbestos ........................................................................................................................................................ 42 3. Lead ................................................................................................................................................................. 43 4. Portland Cement ........................................................................................................................................ 44 5. Mold and Other Biological Contaminants ....................................................................................... 45 6. Noise ............................................................................................................................................................... 45 7. Engine/Motor Exhaust ............................................................................................................................... 47 8. Sanitation ...................................................................................................................................................... 47 XXI. Scaffolding ..................................................................................................................................................... 48 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 48 B. Competent Person ................................................................................................................................................ 48 C. Other Scaffolding Requirements .................................................................................................................... 48 XXII. Stairways ........................................................................................................................................................ 49 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 49 B. Other Stairway Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 49 XXIII. Steel Erection ................................................................................................................................................ 50 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 50 B. Erection Plan ........................................................................................................................................................... 50 XXIV. Tools ................................................................................................................................................................ 50 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 50 B. Other Tool Requirements .................................................................................................................................. 50 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 5 XXV. Traffic, Vehicles & Motorized Equipment ........................................................................................... 51 A. General Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 51 B. Vehicles and Motorized Equipment .............................................................................................................. 51 XXVI. Appendix A: Site-­‐Specific Acknowledgment ...................................................................................... 53 XXVII. Appendix B: Acknowledgment of Competent Person ..................................................................... 54 XXVIII. Appendix C: Sample Safety Task Analysis Form ............................................................................... 55 XXIX. Appendix D: Sample Hazard Reporting Form .................................................................................... 56 SAFETY HAZARD REPORT FORM .......................................................................................................................... 56 No employee will be retaliated against for reporting hazards or potential hazards or for making safety-­‐related suggestions. ..................................................................................................................................... 56 XXX. Appendix E: Sample Incident Investigation Report ......................................................................... 57 XXXI. Appendix F: Pre-­‐Lift Requirements ...................................................................................................... 58 XXXII. Additional Notes .......................................................................................................................................... 59 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 6 PLAN FUNDAMENTALS I.
Statement of Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Safety Policy The Ohio University Jefferson Hall Culinary and Student Housing Renovation Project embodies the policies and procedures for prevention of injury, property damage, fire damage and occupational illness in order to protect the well being of students, facility, staff, general public and workers of this project. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford (CKE) has instituted an extensive, but not all-­‐inclusive, Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan (SSSP). We will comply with, and by signing the “Site-­‐Specific Acknowledgement” you, our contractor, agree to comply with, each pertinent provision of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, interpretation, and directives issued by the U.S. Secretary of Labor pursuant to the Williams-­‐
Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, as well as any rules required by the Owner, Owner’s Representative, and/or a CKE CM. Where there may be a conflict in requirements, the more stringent one shall apply. Each contractor is solely responsible for its own compliance with these standards and with any jobsite rule that may be stricter than these standards. This is a joint Ohio University and Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford policy to provide a safe place to work at all times and to conduct all operations in a manner as to provide protection for all individuals who might come into contact with these operations. CKE employees, Contractor and Subcontractor employees, Vendors and Suppliers employees and all others who come on site for any reason during construction, are expected to conduct work in a safe manner and are required to comply with the established safety programs. It is essential that supervisors study this Plan and enforce the pertinent provisions where applicable to their specific project. Any violation of rules, regulations, or procedures may result in disciplinary action, including discharge. In order to provide controls for protection to the life and health of employees and other persons; for prevention of damage to property, materials, supplies and equipment, and for avoidance of work interruptions in the performance of this contract, the contractor shall comply with all pertinent provisions of the SSSP and shall also take additional measures as for the Ohio University may determine it to be reasonably necessary for that purpose. If there is any question as to the steps employees should take, they should stop work and contact their supervisor or the CM Corna/Kokosing/Elford representative. It is understood that the SSSP may not address every condition or situation; however, job-­‐
specific details will be expected to be handled in a manner suited to the problems, facilities, students and personnel. Any safety requirements or measures needed and not outlined in this SSSP shall be properly implemented as required. With the cooperation, dedication and assistance of everyone, this will be a successful and safe project. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 7 II.
Description of Project The Ohio University’s Jefferson Hall Renovation Plan calls for renovation to the entire 140,000 GSF Jefferson Hall building including MEP, renovation of dining hall portion in “culinary phase” to include retail food market with a café’ component. The “residence hall phase” will be renovated as a residence hall with living/learning amenities. III. Site-­‐Specific Safety Topics A. PPE: Hard hats, safety glasses, cut resistant gloves, work boots, shirts with sleeves and denim or work pants will be worn at all times. Hard hats must be worn with the bill in the front and cowboy hard hats are not permitted. All associates that are exposed to traffic must wear safety vests. This includes all types of heavy construction traffic. B. 6’ Fall protection: All walking working surfaces 6’ or more above a lower level will require the use of guard rails, safety nets, fall restraint devices, warning line systems or personal fall arrest systems. This includes activities steel erection, roofing, use of scaffolding and articulating boom lifts. A monitoring system is not acceptable for fall protection. C. Tool Box Talks: Tool Box Talks are required on a weekly basis with all employees in attendance. Copies of the Topic of discussion and sign-­‐in sheets must be submitted to the Project Safety Supervisor within 24 hours after each meeting. D. Safety inspections: A Qualified Representative from each contractor is required to perform a weekly safety audit of their work area and employees activities and submit a completed inspection report to the Project Safety Supervisor. E. Safety Task Analysis: Foremen and Tradesmen must complete a Safety Task Analysis (STA) for all activities performed on site. Copies of the STA’s must be submitted to the Project Safety Supervisor prior to the start of work. If the task changes, conditions change or a new hazard is recognized a new STA must be completed, reviewed by employees involved and submitted to the Project Safety Supervisor. F. University Facilities: Any facilities designed for the use of Ohio University Students, Facility, Visitors and Staff will be off limits for all CKE employees, vendors, contractor and subcontractors working or affiliated with this project. This includes parking area, eating or dining areas, restrooms or common break areas. For a complete listing of restrictions, please see Exhibit M: Contractors Guidelines Code of Conduct. G. Courtesy: Employees shall observe standards of behavior and conduct themselves and their work in a manner to avoid offending Ohio University, students, facility and staff as well as coworkers. Fraternization with Students, Facility and Staff while working on this project if prohibited. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 8 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 9 IV. Project Directory •
Owner: Ohio University Address: Athens, Ohio Phone: Fax: Contact Name: Various Contacts •
Architect: URS/Hanbury Evans; BDT Architects and Interior Design Address: 277 West Nationwide Blvd. Columbus, Ohio 43215 Phone: 614-­‐464-­‐4500 Fax: 614-­‐464-­‐0588 Contact Name: Chris Shrodes •
Construction Manager: Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Address: 134 South Green Avenue Phone: 614-­‐212-­‐5816 Fax: Contact Name: Tom Simko; Project Executive V. Emergency Procedures A. Emergency Phone Numbers 911 & Ohio University Police : 593-­‐1911 •
Nearest Emergency Facility & Phone: •
Utilities: Before you Dig -­‐ 811 Electrical: Gas: Telephone: •
Elford Personnel: Project Manager’s Names: Brandt Quinn/Andy Kittle Phone: Mobile: 614-­‐332-­‐4912/614-­‐679-­‐2438 Superintendent’s Name: John Smith/Kevin Kerr Phone: Mobile: (614)679-­‐6276 / (614)207-­‐0492 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 10 Project Safety Manager: Joe Motil Phone: Mobile: (614)420-­‐5211 Corna-­‐Kokosing Safety Officer’s: Greg Black Phone: Mobile: (937)367-­‐9001 Elford, Inc. Safety Officer’s: Scott Ritter, CHST Phone: (614)545-­‐3178 Mobile: (614)989-­‐9181 B. Evacuation Procedures 1. Follow the exit signs and evacuation plan that are posted throughout the project. All associates must report to the designated assembly area specified by the project superintendent. 2. The supervisors for each company must account for their associates from their sign in sheets. Evacuation alarms will be located in the CKE Project Office and throughout designated areas of the construction site. The signal for evacuation and all emergencies will be one long continuous blast. C. Incidents Involving Severe Injury or Fatality 1. The following procedure shall used in the event of a severe injury or fatality occurring on the project site. a. Call 911 immediately. Eliminate hazardous condition, if additional personnel are subject to injury. b. Ensure proper medical attention is provided to the victim. c.
Contact the CM/CKE supervisory personnel shown on the emergency management contact list and implement the Construction Emergency Action Plan. i. Secure the area and witnesses so that a proper incident investigation can be accomplished. d. If there is a fatality or catastrophic event (i.e., three or more people have been hospitalized), the contractor shall on its own inform OSHA of the accident within eight hours; call (800) 321-­‐OSHA. VI. Multi-­‐Employer Worksite Concerns A. OSHA issued in 1999 a “Multi-­‐Employer Citation Policy,” which the courts have upheld and OSHA is strictly enforcing. It can be found at http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=DIRECTIVES&p_i
d=2024. In it OSHA defines four kinds of employers: Creating, exposing, correcting, and controlling. B. As stated in Section I, each contractor on this CKE jobsite is expected and required to comply with all OSHA regulations and with all CKE safety standards accordingly, unless Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 11 otherwise stipulated in writing by Corna/Kokosing/Elford: 1. If a contractor causes a hazardous condition, it is the “creating employer.” It is the responsibility of the contractor, not the CM’s/CKE responsibility, to correct the hazardous condition, regardless of whose employees are exposed to the hazard. 2. If a contractor’s own employees are exposed to a hazardous condition, it is the “exposing employer.” It is its responsibility of the contractor, not the CM’s/CKE responsibility, to exercise reasonable diligence to discover the condition. a. It is the contractor’s responsibility, not the CM’s/CKE responsibility, to take steps consistent with its authority to protect its employees. b. If the contractor has authority to correct the hazard, it shall do so. c.
If the contractor lacks the authority to correct the hazard, it shall do each of the following: i. Notify the CM Supervisor of the hazard; ii. Ask the creating employer and the CM/CKE Supervisor to correct the hazard; iii. Inform its employees of the hazard; and iv. Take reasonable alternative protective measures. 3. If a contractor is engaged by the CM/CKE in a common jobsite undertaking, as is an exposing employer, and is contractually responsible for correcting a hazard, this contractor is the “correcting employer.” (For example, this may occurs where an employer is given the responsibility of installing and/or maintaining fall protection equipment or devices, such as guardrails or anchor points.) a. As the correcting employer, it shall exercise reasonable care in preventing and discovering a hazardous condition and meet its obligations of correcting the hazard. 4. A contractor is a “controlling employer” when it has general supervisory authority over any part of the worksite, (e.g., a contractor’s subcontractor) including the power to correct safety and health violations itself or to require others to correct them. a. Control can be established by contract or, in the absence of explicit contractual provisions, by the exercise of control in practice. b. A controlling employer shall exercise reasonable care to prevent and detect violations on the site, for example by: i. Conducting periodic inspections of appropriate frequency; ii. Implementing an effective system for promptly correcting hazards; iii. Enforcing the other employer's compliance with safety and health requirements with an effective, graduated system of enforcement and follow-­‐up inspections. VII. OSHA Inspections A. General Responsibilities 1. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford will allow OSHA to conduct an inspection of the project (subject to review by CKE’s legal counsel, if necessary). CKE does not assume liability or responsibility for the presence of any alleged hazards or their Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 12 correction. 2. If a contractor wishes to assert its rights under the U.S. Constitution regarding inspection by OSHA (e.g., to require a warrant), then the contractor shall so notify OSHA prior to the start of an inspection. 3. The CKE Project Supervisor and Project Safety Manager will accompany OSHA’s compliance safety and health officer (CSHO) at all times and will make arrangements for meetings at the jobsite between OSHA, contractors, organized labor representatives (if any), and employees. 4. Contractors shall inform CKE superintendent and project safety manager of the issuance of any OSHA citations and provide a copy when requested. B. Inspection Process & Guidelines 1. Whoever first encounters the CSHO on the jobsite shall lead him/her directly to the CKE job office. (Remember: The CSHO is a federal officer.) 2. The CKE superintendent or designee will inform the on-­‐site contractors that OSHA is on-­‐ site. It is the responsibility of each contractor’s superintendent or foreman to contact its own office and safety department. 3. Opening Conference: We have a legal right to an opening conference before an inspection begins. a. If necessary, the CKE superintendent will request that the opening conference be delayed until our safety officer is present. The opening conference will begin immediately upon the arrival of either Corna/Kokosing or Elford, Inc. Safety Officer. b. The Project Safety Manager will be the facilitator of the opening conference. c.
Contractors shall be given the opportunity to be present when work attributable to them will be inspected. i. If a contractor needs a delay for any reason, it will have to secure it from the CSHO.) ii. Contractor’s employee representatives have the right to be present. d. We will ask concerning the purpose and nature of the OSHA inspection. i. If the inspection is a programmed inspection, we will ask that it be restricted in scope to no more than the four hazards described in OSHA’s “Construction Focused Inspections Initiative” directive—falls, struck by, caught in/between, electrical. http://www.osha.gov/Publications/Const_Res_Man/1926_C_inspection
s.html ii. If the inspection is based on a complaint by a contractor’s employee, we will ask that the scope of the walkthrough inspection be limited to that specific area of the jobsite. e. During the opening conference, the CSHO may review a contractor’s safety programs and other documentation (e.g., OSHA 300 forms). 4. Walkthrough Inspection: At the conclusion of the opening conference, the safety officers and superintendents of CKE and the contractors shall escort the CSHO on a walkthrough of the construction site. In principle: a. Be courteous and businesslike. Never argue with the CSHO. Always tell the Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 13 truth. Never threaten. b. The CSHO may ask to speak privately to employees to interview them. An employee can request that a union representative be present. c.
Notate all of the CSHO’s observations. Remember to photograph whatever he/she photographs. (OSHA will not furnish copies of their photos, although they will be available at any legal proceedings.) d. Show as little of the jobsite as possible. Insist that the CSHO not wander off alone. e. Give no information unless it is specifically asked for. Volunteer nothing. f.
Do not ask safety and health questions. (The CSHO is not your “trainer” in these matters.) Do not ask if something is or is not a violation. g. If possible, correct any deficiencies the CSHO notates before he/she leaves. (This indicates “good faith” and may be taken into consideration if fines are assessed.) 5. Closing Conference: At the conclusion of the walkthrough inspection, CKE will request that a closing conference be held onsite in the job office. We have a legal right to a closing conference. a. The CSHO will use this time to discuss what alleged violations were found and what citations may be issued. i. Contractors have the right to attend the closing conference, when there may be alleged violations against them. ii. Employees should not attend the closing conference. b. Ask the CSHO to explain any unclear violations. Ask how the alleged violation should be corrected, if it is not obvious. (If you believe any item is not a violation and that the CSHO is wrongly interpreting the standard, politely point this out; the CSHO might be convinced.) c.
Ask the CSHO to specify any citations that probably will be issued and how the violations will be characterized (i.e., de minimis, serious, willful, etc.) VIII. Responsibilities A. Construction Management 1. Control the entrance and exit of the Trade Contractor’s employees, Subcontractor employee and visitors to and from the job site 2. Examine and familiarize himself/herself with the job site and adjacent areas from the standpoint of access and facilities regarding safety. The job site should be explored with regard to installing and operating the construction plan and evaluation any difficulties that might be encountered in complete execution of the work safely. B. Senior Project Manager 1. Direct and Administer the Safety Program on this Project. 2. Establish a safety organization to assure the involvement of all personnel in the safety effort and to provide for their participation. 3. Evaluate individual subcontractor’s safety performance for compliance with all applicable Federal, State, Local, CKE and Ohio University safety requirements. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 14 C. Project Superintendent 1. Maintain active control and enforcement of the Project Safety Plan. 2. Plan and require all work to be done in compliance with the Project Safety Plan. 3. Make frequent inspections of the job site so as to initiate corrective measures to eliminate unsafe practices and conditions. 4. Shall immediately investigate all accidents or near miss accidents and take corrective actions to help prevent reoccurrence D. Project Safety Manager 1. Audit activities of the Trade Contractor’s safety program so that it conforms to the Site Safety Plan. 2. Make frequent inspection of the job site so as to initiate corrective measures to eliminate unsafe practices and conditions and document weekly written site inspections of the job site. 3. Notify the Trade Contractor’s of any unsafe practices and conditions for which they are responsible. 4. Review site inspections with the Management Team and the Trade Contractors Qualified representative during monthly safety meetings. 5. Provide all new Trade Contractors and Subcontractor’s employee with safety orientation before they start working on site. 6. Identify and maintain the location where MSDS/SDS provided by the Trade Contractors and Subcontractors can be found for the project. 7. Maintain required records and accident prevention materials at the job site so that an adequate history is maintained for the project. 8. Review injury and first aid records during the project to identify injury trends to take positive action to reduce or eliminate such injuries from continuing to occur on the project. 9. Collect and maintain a file, for each Trade Contractor and subcontractor, of Tool box talks and Safety Task Analysis (STA). E. Contractors 1. Each contractor is responsible for the monitoring of compliance and the enforcement of the safety rules and requirements outlined in the Site Safety Plan. 2. Will be held accountable and is responsible for the actions of their employees and the employees of their subcontractors and suppliers. 3. Each Contactor is responsible for ensuring that all people entering the project limits in anyway associated with their work, whether construction worker, visitors, delivery trucks drivers, inspectors or the like, will conduct themselves in accordance with the requirements of this Site Specific Safety Plan. 4. Responsible for conforming to OSHA and NFPA standards of fire protection and prevention practices. 5. Maintain compliance with all Federal, State and Local laws and regulations. 6. In the event a contractor utilizes employees whose primary language is not English, the contractor shall provide someone capable of interpreting to assure complete comprehension. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 15 7. Periodically analyze work methods in detail for the purpose of job simplification and for the establishment of safe work methods 8. Must contain all work activities to the confines of the work site. Any activities that require work to be performed outside of the work site must be coordinated with Ohio University through the CM CKE Management Team. 9. Shall ensure that supervisors are aware of their responsibilities. 10. Contractor Supervisors will perform or meet the following requirements: a. Have verification of an OSHA 30-­‐hour hazard recognition certification. b. Be certified as a competent person in the type of work being performed. c.
Have current First Aid/CPR certification. d. Explain to all employees applicable safe practice rules and regulations under their direct supervision. e. Ensure that each employee under their supervision has received the initial project safety orientation. f.
Be responsible for carrying out the procedures required by the Site Specific Safety Plan. g. Maintain continuous daily housekeeping in their areas of work and break. h. Determine, supply and maintain the safety equipment and PPE that is necessary for their employees to work safe and in compliance with the Site Safety Plan. i.
Report immediately all accidents, incidents or “Near Miss” incidents to the Corna/Kokosing/Elford Management team. j.
Conduct regular and frequent inspections for their employees and subcontractors employees. k. Manage the HazCom Program (MSDS/SDS) requirements of this Site Safety Plan as a representative for their company. l.
Supervise the instruction and training of employees through the coordination of Tool Box Talks, Safety Task Analysis and Safety Inspection reports and submit copies of the documentation to the Project Safety Supervisor. m. Notify the CM CKE if any hazardous chemicals or substances are brought or cause to have been brought on site. n. Ensure that all hazards created in an area as a result of work activities are addressed before the crew leaves the area, including breaks or lunch. F. Employees 1. No Employee shall be required or knowingly be permitted to work in an unsafe environment except for the purpose of making safety corrections and then only after proper precautions have been taken for their protection. 2. Each employee is responsible for learning and abiding by those rules and regulations which are applicable to the assigned tasks and for reporting observed or anticipated hazards to their immediate Supervisor. If the hazard is not immediately corrected, then affected employee will report the hazard to the CM CKE Supervisor. 3. Shall demonstrate a high standard of workplace behavior and conduct their work in a manner to avoid offending any Students, Facility, Staff or Visitors of Ohio Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 16 University or their coworkers. 4. Will wear a hard hat, safety glasses, cut resistant gloves, work boots with substantial soles at all times. All other personal protective equipment such as respiratory protection, face shields and eye protection, as appropriate to assigned tasks, shall be utilized in the proper manner at all times while there is exposure to the hazards. 5. Clothing suitable for the weather and your work shall be worn. Torn or loose clothing, cuffs or neckwear or jewelry which may be a hazard are not allowed. Shirts must have short sleeves and pants must be full length. (no short are allowed) 6. Must park vehicles in designated areas only. 7. The use, possession, distribution, or sale of any weapon, alcohol, illegal drug, or controlled dangerous substance by any contractor or contractor’s employee is prohibited. Offender will be removed from campus and/or reported to the Ohio University Police Department. 8. Must immediately advise their Supervisor of any injury on the project, “Near miss” or any non-­‐injury accident which results in the damage or property or equipment. 9. Shall conduct themselves in a professional manner, practical jokes, horseplay, scuffling, wrestling or fighting is prohibited. 10. Shall confine their activities to the areas designated as the work site. No interference with School Students, teachers or employees/faculty members of their duties is permitted. 11. No televisions, radios, CD players, MP3 or smart phone audio players are allowed. Personal cell phones may be used only during lunch time and breaks and shall be kept in contractor’s vehicles or lunch boxes. 12. Contractors and their employees are not permitted to use tobacco in or near any of the campus buildings. “Use of tobacco” shall mean cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, chewing tobacco, snuff, or any other matter or substances that contain tobacco, in addition to any other lighted smoking devices for burning tobacco or any other plant. 13. No photographs of any type (including digital images recorded by cameras built into cell phones) shall be taken on School property without the express written permission of the authorized School Project Representative. IX. Jobsite Safety General Requirements A. Substance-­‐Free Workplace Policy 1. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford is committed to providing a safe work environment and to fostering the well-­‐being and health of its employees. That commitment is jeopardized when any employee or contractor’s employee uses controlled substances, illegal drugs or alcohol on the job; misuses prescription medications; reports to work under the influence; or possesses, distributes or sells controlled substances or illegal drugs in the workplace. Therefore, CKE has established the following policy: a. It is a violation of policy for any employee to manufacture, possess, sell, trade, or offer for sale any controlled substance, illegal drug, or alcohol, or otherwise to engage in the use of controlled substances, illegal drugs or alcohol on the job. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 17 b. It is a violation of policy for anyone to report to work under the influence of any controlled substance, illegal drug or alcohol. c.
It is a violation of policy for anyone to use prescription drugs illegally. d. Violators of this policy are subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. 2. CKE recognizes that project partners and contractors may have their own substance-­‐abuse policy. If any CKE employee observes questionable activities on-­‐
site, CKE will notify the employer of the individual in question, requesting a response of actions taken. B. Special Hazards & Considerations 1. The following list indicates some special hazards and considerations that are especially associated with the work that will be performed on this site; it is not an all-­‐inclusive list. Because identifying and controlling hazards is a continual process, this portion of the SSSP may be modified as work progresses or scopes of work change. a. Hardhat and Other PPE Special-­‐requirements: b. Non-­‐English-­‐speaking Considerations: c.
Construction Access, Roadwork, Traffic Control: d. Fencing & Public Protection: e. Staging Areas: f.
Heavy Equipment: g. Fuel Storage Tanks: h. Excavation & Trenching: i.
Foundations: j.
Cast-­‐in-­‐Place or Precast Concrete: k. Cranes & Rigging: l.
Overhead Power Lines: m. Pre-­‐engineered Systems: n. Structural Steel Erection: o. Fall Protection: p. Masonry: q. Scaffolding: r.
Temporary Heating: s.
Multistory Floor Decking: t.
Roof Work: u. MEP: v. Interim Life-­‐Safety Considerations: w. Environmental Concerns (soils, wetlands, wildlife, asbestos, silica, lead, etc.): x. Process Piping: y. Confined Spaces: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 18 z. Security & Fire Alarms: 2. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Six-­‐foot Fall Protection Rule: Each contractor shall protect its employees with “conventional fall protection systems” or “alternative systems,” as described in the “Fall Protection” section of this SSSP, from the hazards of falling to a lower level from any elevated walking/working surface six feet (6') or more above the lower level. A monitoring system is not acceptable for fall protection. a. Note: This rule also strictly applies to: i. Work around excavations and trenches. ii. Work on scaffolds, including erection and dismantling. iii. Work during steel erection. b. Exception: Elevated work that can be accomplished safely from a ladder. C. Hazard Determination 1. CKE expects and requires each contractor to determine, assess and evaluate the hazards of its own operations and to provide appropriate, effective controls for each hazard. 2. Prior to beginning a job, each contractor shall prepare a hazard analysis that defines the activities to be performed, identifies the sequence of the work, determines the work’s specific hazards, and the clarifies which methods it will use to eliminate or control each hazard. D. Safety Task Analysis (STA) or CKE Action Plan 1. Each contractor shall submit STA’s to the CKE Project Safety Manager. Submittal shall be prior to the beginning of any work activities. a. The STA shall be written in a form acceptable to CKE. (An example of a STA form is attached at the end of this SSSP as Appendix C.) b. List each step of the job process. c.
Complete a hazard determination, including industrial hygiene monitoring or tested, if needed. d. Indicate what control measures shall be followed for each process step in the analysis, using the following “Hierarchy of Controls” when evaluating options. i. Best choice: Engineering controls. ii. Next choice: Management (administrative) controls. iii. Last resort: Personal protective equipment (PPE), used only if hazards cannot be engineered out or managed administratively. 2. When the scope of the work or conditions change, the contractor shall do further hazard determination and analysis. E. Training Requirement 1. General Requirements Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 19 a. Each contractor shall provide effective, documented, project-­‐specific, and task-­‐specific training to each employee according to OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1926.21. b. It is the contractor’s responsibility to limit certain job assignments to employees who are, as defined by OSHA, “certified,” “competent,” or “qualified” – meaning that they have had special previous training, in or out of the workplace. Furthermore, the term "designated" personnel means someone selected or assigned by the employer or the employer's representative as being qualified to perform specific duties. OSHA has published a non-­‐exhaustive document entitled “Training Requirements in OSHA Construction Industry Standards and Training Guidelines” at http://www.osha.gov/doc/outreachtraining/htmlfiles/osha2254.html. In it is a description of various regulations that require, for example, a “competent person.” c.
Each contractor shall make available to CKE the documentation of all training activities that occur on-­‐site. 2. Site-­‐Specific Training a. Before beginning work on-­‐site, each employee shall attend a Site-­‐Specific Safety Orientation (SSSO) training class. This will inform the employees of site-­‐specific hazards, emergency numbers, and evacuation procedures, as well as general safety regulations to be followed while on-­‐site. i. The Project Safety Supervisor will provide SSSO training to each contractor’s employees. ii. Each employee shall sign a training register/log. iii. CKE will issue a SSSO badge with a personal photo to each trained employee, which will allow the owner and the CM representatives to visually identify who has completed the safety orientation. b. In addition to the CKE SSSO, each employee shall review and understand his/her employer’s own site specific safety plan, prior to the contractor’s employee beginning work. i. The contractor shall provide documentation to the CM Superintendent that the employee has been trained by his/her employer for this specific project’s hazards and controls. 3. Authorized Operators a. In certain OSHA regulations, there are training requirements for authorized operators (e.g., heavy equipment, cranes, powered industrial trucks, powder actuated tools, etc.). Certification of training shall be submitted and available on-­‐site for review by the CM. 4. Other On-­‐site Training a. At times, other training classes may be offered during a weekday. Each employee on-­‐site may attend training sessions provided by the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) or equipment suppliers. On these occasions, this training may be submitted as the toolbox training for that week. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 20 F. Job Safety Briefing (JSB) 1. When applicable, each contractor’s foreman shall hold a safety briefing with his crew. For example: a. Hold a JSB with the crew prior to start of a work assignment or when conditions change that affect the safety of the work. Points of discussion may include, for example: i. What pre-­‐determined hazards have already been eliminated or controlled, so that they aren’t inadvertently reintroduced into the workplace as an employee exposure; ii. What remaining hazards are anticipated; and iii. How to control workers’ exposure to those remaining hazards. iv. The safety briefing may refer to a JHA for clarification (i.e., “we will face fall protection issues today, and we will tie off per the Job Hazard Analysis.” b. Hold a safety de-­‐briefing of that JSB with the crew, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the earlier JSB. A de-­‐briefing may be completed either at the end of the day, prior to the start of work the next day, or perhaps at the end of the work assignment, to discover, for example: i. Whether the job tasks went as planned; ii. How work might be performed differently the next time; iii. Whether there were any near-­‐misses; iv. Whether there were other safety hazards in the work area that had not been pre-­‐determined, anticipated, or controlled; v. How those hazards should be corrected next time; vi. Whether additional JHAs are needed; and vii. How housekeeping was at the end of the shift(s). c. Contractor’s foreman shall record his JSBs, either in his daily job report or by using his/her own form. G. Hazard Reporting 1. “Hazard Reporting” shall be a topic of discussion at each contractor’s site-­‐specific safety orientation. 2. If an employee sees an uncontrolled hazard, whether it concerns their own employer’s scope of work or another contractor’s scope of work: a. He/she shall immediately report it verbally to his/her own supervisor. i. The notified supervisor shall immediately contact the superintendent /foreman for the “correcting employer,” i.e., the employer who has the responsibility and capability to correct the hazard. (Most often, the “correcting employer” is also the “creating employer,” i.e., the contractor who created the hazard.) ii. The “correcting employer” shall make the necessary corrections. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 21 b. If the uncontrolled hazard is not corrected in timely fashion, the contractor who identified the hazard shall complete a written “Hazard Report Form” and call it in or fax it to his/her own safety officer or general superintendent. (A sample of a Hazard Report form is attached at the end of this SSSP as Appendix D.) This action establishes a permanent record. c.
If the uncontrolled hazard is still not corrected in timely fashion, the concerned employee or the notified supervisor shall notify the CM Corna-­‐
Kokosing/Elford Management Team. i. The CKE project superintendent or Project Safety Manager shall evaluate the hazard and complete a “Safety Violation Notice” on both the creating and correcting employer, if needed. ii. The “correcting employer” shall immediately make the necessary corrections. 3. If a hazard report form was created, then the last person to handle the matter and get resolution to it shall write on it the actions that were actually taken to correct the problem, and by whom, and file the form with their other project-­‐related safety documentation. H. Contractor’s Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 1. OSHA publishes a useful Fact Sheet entitled “Effective Workplace Safety and Health Management Systems” at http://www.osha.gov/Publications/safety-­‐health-­‐
management-­‐systems.pdf . 2. Each contractor shall submit, for review by the CKE Superintendent and the Project Safety Manager, a written Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan (SSSP) two weeks before its work begins. The contractor’s SSSP shall address all the elements of the CKE SSSP as they will be implemented by the contractor, its contractors, vendors and suppliers. 3. Based on the contractor’s hazard analysis, its SSSP shall provide at a minimum: a. A description of the scope of work the contractor will perform on this project. b. Potentially hazardous activities the contractor will perform (e.g., steel erection, confined space entry, excavation/trenching, etc.). c.
Industrial hygiene (IH) monitoring and/or sampling that may be a necessary component of the contractor’s hazard determination. d. The name and qualifications of the contractor’s competent persons for each hazard area of OSHA target enforcement (e.g., fall protection, electrical, scaffolds, silica, portland cement, etc.). e. Details of the contractor’s equipment and machinery that it will have on-­‐site and its specific maintenance/inspection requirements. f.
The Site-­‐Specific Safety Orientation training the contractor will provide its employees. g. The name and qualifications of whoever will conduct the contractor’s toolbox talks. h. Acknowledgment of the CKE six-­‐foot fall protection rule, and how the contractor will specifically comply with it during job activities (including scaffolding and steel erection). Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 22 i.
Acknowledgment of surrounding hazardous conditions (e.g., power lines, road traffic, pedestrian traffic, etc.), and how the contractor will specifically address these special conditions. j.
The contractor’s site-­‐specific personal protective equipment requirements. k. The contractor’s site-­‐specific emergency response procedures (including fall-­‐
rescue plans and who is its first aid/CPR responder). l.
A copy of the contractor’s jobsite inspection form, the frequency of planned inspections, who will be responsible to conduct its inspections, and what are their qualifications. m. Anything else the contractor can provide the CM CKE that will make the contractor’s safety program site-­‐specific. I. Pre-­‐Start Meetings 1. The CM Project Safety Manager will hold a pre-­‐start meeting with a contractor prior to its mobilization on-­‐site for activities such as steel erection, roofing, trench and excavation, confined space activities, scaffold systems, crane operations or any activity involving work that is high risk or out of the ordinary. The objective of this meeting is to clearly communicate CKE’s expectations and to coordinate activities. This is also an appropriate time to review the contractors training programs. J. Enforcement of Safety 1. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford requires, at a minimum, the best safety practices described in this SSSP. 2. The contractor shall develop and implement a disciplinary program to control poor performance, misconduct, negligence, and safety violations by both its employees and that of any of its subcontractors. 3. Each employee is solely responsible for subjects covered in the site safety orientation (SSO) and subjects the employee should be mindful of through his/her work qualifications. 4. Subcontractors are required to enforce disciplinary procedures with their associates when safety violations occur. As an expert in the Subcontractor’s field of work, the Subcontractors’ safety representative has sole control over all requirements for doing the work safely, and the Construction Manager (CKE) is not responsible in any manner for the safety of the subcontractor’s work. If the Subcontractor fails to correct unsafe procedures, acts, or conditions within twenty-­‐
four (24) hours of notification by the Construction manager or any public authority, Construction Manager may (but has no contractual obligation to do so) correct the unsafe practice and back charge the Subcontractor for these costs plus (10%) for Profit, and (10%) for a” safety premium”. This specifically includes but it is not limited to the cleanup of Subcontractor’s construction debris and the replacement of standard railings or barricades removed by Subcontractor’s employees. Repeated failures to correct unsafe practices will result in default and termination of this contract pursuant to Article 16 without any further notice to the Subcontractor. In the event the Construction Manager receives a penalty from OSHA as a result of a violation of OSHA Standards by the Subcontractor and Construction Manager is cited under the multi-­‐employer worksite rules, Subcontractor agrees to protect, defend, indemnify and hold harmless Construction Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 23 Manager from the imposition of any fines and/or penalties by OSHA. Construction Manager shall be further authorized to demand the removal of any employee, agent, representative, invitee of Subcontractor or its subcontractor, suppliers or material men who commit any unsafe practice on the Project site. First Violation: Written warning to subcontractor project representative. Second Violation: A fine will be assessed to the subcontractor (see Exhibit B Part I for examples of fines and monetary amounts). A deduct change order will be issued in the amount of the fine. All fines will be donated to a local Athens, Ohio Charity. Subsequent Violations (any or all of the following options): Option A: Additional fine based on the example of fines chart. Option B: Removal of the individual and/or supervisor from the project. Option C: Removal of the subcontractor from the project. Option D: Removal of subcontractor from CKE bid list. K. Accident/Incident Reporting and Recording 1. General Requirements a. Each contractor shall document all accidents/incidents, including dangerous near-­‐misses that occur on-­‐site, and provide the CKE project Superintendent and Project Safety Manager with copies of all accident/incident documentation. (A type of Incident Report form is attached at the end of this SSSP as Appendix E.) b. If an accident or dangerous near-­‐miss occurs that involves a contractor’s employee, the Principal/Owner of the contractor shall attend a “Principals” meeting at the project location to review the incident. CKE will conduct this meeting. 2. First aid-­‐only Accidents a. Each employee shall report any significant first aid injury to his/her supervisor, who shall report it to the CKE Superintendent. b. The superintendent and contractor are not required to fill out accident reports for all first aid cases; however, they should use good judgment in determining which injuries they should document. 3. Medical-­‐Treatment Accidents a. Each contractor shall document each medical-­‐treatment case and shall provide an incident investigation report the same day. b. Along with the Accident/Incident report the contractor shall provide witness statements within 24 hours of the incident or as soon as possible after completion. 4. Property Damage Accidents a. Each contractor shall document all property damage accidents involving others’ property and shall provide an incident investigation the same day. b. Along with the Accident/Incident report the contractor shall provide witness statements within 24 hours of the incident or as soon as possible after Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 24 completion. 5. Near-­‐Miss Incidents a. Each contractor shall document any dangerous near-­‐miss incident (i.e., one which could have resulted in serious injury, death, or property damage exceeding $1,500) and shall provide an incident investigation report the same day (It is important to include approximate loss if there is property or equipment damage.) b. Along with the Accident/Incident report the contractor shall provide witness statements within 24 hours of the incident or as soon as possible after completion SOME HAZARDS & EXPOSURES X. Bloodborne Pathogens A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.1030, the regulation for “Bloodborne Pathogens.” 2. For all intents and purposes, this general industry regulation also applies to the construction industry. OSHA has said in its Standard Interpretation entitled “Blood borne pathogens standard and the construction industry” at http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRE
TATIONS&p_id=20998: “Those employees engaged in construction activities who are occupationally exposed to the hazard of bloodborne pathogens (such as those workers designated as responsible for providing first aid or medical assistance) are afforded protection under several construction standards as well as the General Duty Clause.” This interpretation further states: a. “[29 CFR 1926.21(b)(2)] requires that the employer instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and in the regulations applicable to his or her work environment in order to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury. Under this provision, the employer is required to train designated first aid providers in the hazards of bloodborne pathogens. b. “29 CFR 1926.25 requires that containers be provided for the collection and separation of waste. This includes containers for sharps and other regulated waste which may be generated from rendering medical assistance. c.
“29 CFR 1926.28 requires the wearing of appropriate personal protective equipment in all operations where there is an exposure to hazardous conditions or where there is a need to use such equipment to reduce the hazards to employees. This includes the need to use gloves, gowns, masks, eye protectors, and/or resuscitation equipment when appropriate for rendering first aid or other medical assistance. d. “Lastly, Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act, which requires employers to furnish a workplace which is free from recognized hazards which may cause or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm, may be applied where appropriate to the construction industry. General duty clause citations must, of course, meet the requirements outlined in the Field Operations Manual, Chapter IV, and will be issued where there is a serious and recognized hazard Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 25 which cannot be abated by implementing an abatement method required by the above standards. It is under the General Duty Clause that OSHA may require, where appropriate, the provision of the hepatitis B vaccine to those employees who have occupational exposure.” B. Exposure Determination 1. Employers shall perform exposure determination to identify which employees have the potential to incur occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. This exposure determination shall be completed without regards to the use of personal protective equipment. 2. At this jobsite, the following positions have the potential to incur occupational exposure: Superintendent, foremen, and first aid responders. C. Compliance Methods 1. The contractor shall train each employee in blood borne pathogens safety and in the methods to protect themselves from exposure, as indicated below in PPE. 2. All first aid kits on this project shall include a blood-­‐spill cleanup kit containing latex gloves, pocket masks, or other barrier protection to reduce exposure to first aid responders. 3. The contractor shall require employees to use these protective devices in the aid of their coworkers. D. Contaminated Equipment 1. All equipment and materials contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious materials shall be disposed of in a bio-­‐hazard bag included in the first aid kit, found in the jobsite trailer with the first aid materials. E. Training 1. At the start of the project, the contractor shall train each employee regarding the risk of blood borne pathogens and other infectious materials, in blood borne pathogens safety, and in the methods to protect themselves from exposure. The training shall consist, at least, of the following elements: a. OSHA Standard 1910.1030 b. The “Good Samaritan” provision of the standard c.
Potential exposure hazards d. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment e. Where written blood borne pathogens programs can be found f.
Exposure control procedures XI. Concrete & Masonry A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart Q, the regulations for “Concrete and Masonry Construction,” and any other relevant regulations found in 29 CFR 1926. B. Other Concrete & Masonry Requirements 1. The following are other common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of best safety Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 26 practices required by CKE for concrete and masonry work: a. Special attention shall be given to protect employees from the health hazards of concrete and masonry, such as silica and portland cement. b. All protruding reinforcing steel and form pins onto and into which employees could fall, shall be guarded to eliminate the hazard of impalement. Unreinforced mushroom style rebar caps cannot be used for impalement protection. c.
Formwork shall be designed, fabricated, erected, supported, braced, and maintained so that it will be capable of supporting without failure all vertical and lateral loads that might be applied to the formwork. d. Adequately shore or brace structures until permanent supporting elements are in place or concrete has been tested to assure sufficient strength. e. Masonry walls 8 feet or taller must be braced to prevent collapse. The MCAA “Standard Practice for Bracing Masonry Walls Under Construction” must be used or a bracing procedure must be designed by a structural engineer. f.
The area on the opposite side of the wall under construction must be barricaded with DANGER tape, the height of the wall plus 4 feet. g. Do not use outriggers to stock materials on the backside of scaffolds. h. Construction loads shall not be placed on a concrete structure or portion of a concrete structure unless the contractor determines, based on information received from a person who is qualified in structural design, that the structure or portion of the structure is capable of supporting the intended loads. i.
Allow only those who are essential to and actively engaged in construction or lifting operations to enter the work area. i. Employees (except those essential to the post-­‐tensioning operations) shall not be permitted to be behind the jack during tensioning operations. ii. Signs and barriers shall be erected to limit employee access to the post-­‐
tensioning area during tensioning operations. j.
Employees shall not be permitted to work under concrete buckets while the buckets are being elevated or lowered into position. i. To the extent practicable, elevated concrete buckets shall be routed so that no employee or the fewest employees possible are exposed to the hazards associated with falling concrete buckets. k. Take measures to prevent unrolled wire mesh from recoiling, such as securing each end or turning the roll over. XII. Confined Space Entry A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1910.146, the regulations for “Permit-­‐required Confined Spaces” and any other relevant regulations found in 29 CFR 1926. 2. Prior to the start of any confined work the contractor is required to attend a pre-­‐
start meeting with CKE. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 27 B. Entry Permits 1. The contractor shall submit for approval prior to any entry, documentation of appropriate formal training for all involved in the confined space activity (entrants, attendants, supervisor, and rescue personnel). 2. The contractor shall develop and implement an entry procedure to be used when its employees will enter permit-­‐required confined areas or spaces. a. The contractor shall develop and implement procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services, for rescuing entrants from permit spaces, for providing necessary emergency services to rescued employees, and for preventing unauthorized personnel from attempting a rescue. b. The contractor shall complete its confined space entry permit and post it at the entrance to the confined space area. 3. At the conclusion of the entry operations, the contractor shall debrief its entry team (e.g., entrants, attendants, supervisors, and rescue personnel) and provide a written summary: a. Regarding the permit space program followed, and b. Regarding any hazards confronted or created in the permit spaces during entry operations. XIII. Cranes and Rigging A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart N and Subpart CC, the regulations for “Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators, and Conveyors”; 29 CFR 1926.251 and CFR 1926.1400, and CFR 1926.1404(r), the regulation for “Rigging Equipment and Material Handling”; and any other relevant regulations found in 29 CFR 1926. 2. Contractors whose activities require the use of cranes shall perform a Job Site Assessment of the areas where the crane will be operating and develop a Lifting Plan for all rigging and activities regardless of the equipment performing the lifting operations and submit documentation to the CM Corna-­‐Elford during the designated pre-­‐lift meeting. a. The contractor shall advise CKE of the lifting plan two weeks prior to the equipment’s arrival on-­‐site. b. Contractor’s shall provide CKE evidence of an annual inspection by a third-­‐
party inspection agency not under control or ownership of the crane owner and approved by the CKE Safety Manager. All repairs and adjustments noted on the inspection shall be corrected prior to the next use. No work shall proceed without evidence of such current annual inspection which meets CKE’s requirements. No claims will be accepted for losses sustained by the contractor for delays caused by failure to comply with these requirements. c.
Job-­‐specific details shall be covered in the pre-­‐start meeting, such as Inspections and reports, Job Site Assessment of ground conditions, the operators’ certifications, specialty cranes details, crane inspections, maintenance, etc. d. The contractor shall be responsible for their proper set-­‐up and operation. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 28 e. The crane owner shall designate one person as the Assembly/Disassembly Director. i. The A/D Director must understand the applicable assembly/disassembly procedures. ii. The A/D Director must review the applicable assembly/disassembly procedures prior to the start of assembly/disassembly. iii. When assembling or disassembling equipment (or attachments), the employer must comply with all applicable manufacturer prohibitions and must comply with either the Manufacturer’s procedure or the employer’s procedure to meet the requirements of CFR 1926.1406. 4. CKE requires, at a minimum, crane industry-­‐recognized best safety practices, such as those found in Appendix F at the end of this SSSP, entitled “Pre-­‐Lift Requirements.” B. Recordkeeping 1. All daily, monthly and annual inspections of the crane and its components must be done and documented in accordance with CFR 1926.1412. 2. All records pertaining to crane inspection shall be kept with the crane or in the trade contractor’s site field office. 3. If during any safety inspection, the operator or supervisor cannot produce the required crane inspection sheets, the crane shall be shut down as soon as possible until such inspections sheets are provided or a third party inspection occurs. C. Rigging 1. All rigging inspection shall be done as required and in accordance with CFR 1926.1413. 2. A certified rigger appointed by the contractor shall inspect all rigging equipment. Inspection shall be done and documented prior to each shift starting work. 3. All rigging equipment that is defective or damaged shall be immediately tagged and removed from the project site. 4. Chain slings are not permitted to be used for any lifting operation unless specifically designed for a unique application. 5. Wire rope slings shall bear a legible manufacturer’s capacity tag. 6. Tag lines shall be used on all loads. 7. All hooks used for overhead lifting shall be equipped with safety latches, or alternate lifting methods such as clamps will be used. a. Shake-­‐out/sorting hooks may only be used for unloading materials from trucks and will not be used for overhead lifting. D. Signaling 1. The employer of the signal person must ensure that each signal person meets the Qualification Requirements of CFR 1926.1419(c) prior to giving any signals. 2. Signaling method must be established prior to the start of lifting operations and understood by both the operator and the signal person. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 29 3. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the equipment or conspicuously posted in the vicinity of the hoisting operations. 4. If signaling operation involves two-­‐way radio or cell phones, the crane operator must be able to communicate with a “Hands Free” device. 5. Personnel used to signal the crane must be “Qualified” in accordance with CFR 1926.1419. E. Work Area Control 1. Swing radius protection shall be established prior to the start of assembly of the crane and shall remain intact until the completion of disassembly. 2. During assembly, disassembly and operation of the crane, only employees necessary to complete the work shall be allowed inside the “Controlled Work Area”. F. Power Line Safety: CFR 1926.1408 1. Before beginning work, the employer must perform Hazard Assessments inside the work zone. 2. Define the work zone as the area 360 degrees around the equipment up to the equipment’s maximum working radius. 3. Determine if any part of the equipment, load line or load (including rigging and lifting accessories), if operated up to the equipment’s maximum working radius in the work zone, could get closer than 10 feet to the power line. a. The employer shall identify the work zone by either: i. Demarcating boundaries (such as flags, or a device such as a range limit device or range control warning device) and prohibit the operator from operating the equipment past those boundaries. 4. If the operation of the crane is or will be within 10 feet of the power line, the employer will either: a. Have the power line de-­‐energized. b. Hold a planning meeting and established procedures which include: i. Dedicated spotter ii. Elevated warning line or barricade iii. Insulating link/device iv. Nonconductive rigging v. Range limiter (if equipped) vi. Nonconductive tag lines (if used) vii. Barricades – 10 feet from equipment viii. Limit access to essential workers ix. Prohibit non-­‐operator workers from touching above insulating link x. Properly ground the crane xi. Deactivate automatic re-­‐energizers xii. Insulating line cover-­‐up installed Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 30 G. Crane Safety Devices 1. The following safety devices are required on all equipment in accordance with CFR 1926.1415 unless otherwise specified: a. Crane level indicator b. Boom stops c.
Jib stops d. Locks for equipment that have foot pedal brakes e. Hydraulic outrigger jacks and hydraulic stabilizer jacks with integral holding device or check valve f.
Horn H. Operators 1. All operators must be “Qualified” in accordance with CFR 1926.1427. a. The employer must ensure that, prior to operating any equipment covered under subpart CC the operator is “Qualified” or “Certified” to operate the equipment. b. As of November 10, 2014 All crane operators must be “Certified” or “Qualified” in accordance with CFR 1926.1427. XIV. Electrical A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart K, the regulations for “Electrical.” B. Temporary Lights 1. A junction box is required for splices or junction connections, unless the circuit conductors are multiconductor cord or cable assemblies, and provided that the equipment grounding continuity is maintained with or without a box.” (Ref. NFPA 70 E 420.1 (B) (2) (f)—Splices) a. Most temporary light strings are of the two-­‐wire type and, therefore, do not have grounding capability and, therefore, need a box, which also needs to be supported. Open wiring (romex style) is not acceptable for temporary lighting circuits. b. There are temporary light strings of the three-­‐wire type available which have the grounding capability and do not need a box. 2. Do not connect two or more temporary light strings in succession, if the string of temporary lights has more than 15 light bulbs (assuming use of 100-­‐watt bulbs). C. Other Electrical Requirements 1. The following are other common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of best safety practices required by CKE for electrical work: a. Protect all temporary power with ground-­‐fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) with open-­‐neutral protection (i.e., GFCIs specifically designed to trip even if there is an open-­‐neutral condition). Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 31 i. Electrical Contractor must test permanently wired devices GFCIs monthly, and portable-­‐type GFCIs before each use. ii. Ground-­‐fault protection, such as GFCIs provide, is required in addition to (not as a substitute for) general grounding requirements. iii. GFCI’s must be used with all extension cords. iv. Install GFCI’s at the electric source. b. Prohibit work on new and existing energized (hot) electrical circuits until all power is shut off and grounds are attached. c.
Put into place a site-­‐specific and effective Lockout/Tagout system. d. Use flexible cords that are only three-­‐wire type and durably marked with one of the hard or extra-­‐hard service designation letters. (Look for some of the following letters imprinted on the casing: S, ST, SO, STO, SJ, SJO, SJT or SJTO.) Only use electrical tools that are properly grounded, unless the tools are double-­‐insulated. e. Promptly replace frayed, damaged or worn electrical cords or cables. f.
Protect flexible cords and cables from damage. For example, sharp corners and projections shall be avoided. g. Maintain all electrical tools and equipment in safe condition and shall check them regularly for defects, tagging and taking them out of service if a defect is found. h. Do not bypass any protective system or device designed to protect employees from contact with electrical energy. i.
Locate and identify overhead electrical power lines. Ensure that ladders, scaffolds, equipment or materials never come within 10 feet of electrical power lines. D. Illumination 1. The Electrical Contractor, or a CKE designated contractor, shall provide all construction areas, aisles, stairs, ramps, runways, corridors, offices, shops, and storage areas where work is in progress with either natural or artificial illumination that meets at least the minimum illumination requirements for specific work areas contained in OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1926.56. MINIMUM ILLUMINATION INTENSITIES IN FOOT-­‐CANDLES Foot-­‐
Candles Area of Operation 5 General construction area lighting, while work is in progress. 3 General construction areas, concrete placement, excavation and waste areas, access ways, active storage areas, loading platforms, refueling, and field maintenance areas. 5 Indoors: Warehouses, corridors, hallways, and exit ways. 5 Tunnels, shafts, and general underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-­‐candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading during drilling, mucking, and scaling. Bureau of Mines approved cap lights shall be acceptable for use in the Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 32 tunnel heading) 10 General construction plant and shops (e.g., batch plants, screening plants, mechanical and electrical equipment rooms, carpenter shops, rigging lofts and active store rooms, mess halls, and indoor toilets and workrooms.) 30 First aid stations, infirmaries, and offices. XV. Ergonomics A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with ergonomics-­‐related best safety practices. a. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which in essence is OSHA’s research arm, published a useful document entitled “Simple Solutions: Ergonomics for Construction Workers” at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2007-­‐122/pdfs/2007-­‐122-­‐full.pdf . b. The following is a link to dozens of ergonomic-­‐related Web sites, which have been compiled by the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America: http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=98BB51E9-­‐D56F-­‐E6FA-­‐
91F4133BB2617BC9. B. Other Ergonomics Suggestions 1. The following is “10 Tips to Improve Construction Ergonomics.” These are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, ergonomics-­‐related best practices. More details on each of these points can be found at http://www.scif.com/safety/ergomatters/ConstructionErgo.html. a. Choose tools that are more ergonomically correct. b. Avoid bending at the waist for prolonged periods of time. c.
Balance your tool belt. d. Don’t twist from the waist while working. e. If you have to lift, lift safely. f.
Minimize overhead work. g. Keep your wrists and arms in a neutral position. h. Push rather than pull. i.
Use good techniques when shoveling. j.
Identify difficult jobs, i.e., those tasks that require one or more of the above risk factors. By asking why these risk factors are there, the tasks can then be retooled or the work practices modified to reduce risk. k. The following are some tasks that have been identified as high risk, ergonomically: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 33 i.
Framing ii.
Drywall iii.
Masonry XVI. Excavation & Trenching A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P, the regulations for “Excavations.” 2. Corna/Kokosing/Elford six-­‐foot fall protection rule applies to excavations. B. Competent Person 1. The contractor’s competent person, as defined by OSHA, shall directly supervise all excavation/trenching work performed on-­‐site. 2. This competent person is responsible for completing daily inspections of excavations, adjacent areas, and protective systems for evidence of a change of conditions that could result in a cave-­‐in. The inspection shall occur at the start of the each shift and throughout the shift as needed. C. Other Excavation Requirements 1. The following are other common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of best safety practices required by the CM Corna-­‐Elford for excavations and trenching: a. If there is a potential for cave-­‐in, or if the excavation is more than 5 ft. deep and not entirely of stable rock, the excavation shall be provided with a protection system, or the excavation shall be properly sloped or benched. i. Support systems and shield systems shall be installed and removed in a manner to protect workers from cave-­‐ins, structural collapse, or from being struck by members of the support or shield system. ii. Workers shall not be allowed in shields when shields are being installed, removed, or moved vertically. b. Surface encumbrances that are hazardous to employees shall be removed or supported. Adjacent structures, sidewalks, etc. shall be properly supported to protect employees from possible collapse. c.
Workers shall not be permitted to work at excavation levels above other workers. d. Excavated materials and other objects shall be kept at least 2 ft. from edge of excavations. e. If oxygen deficiency or hazardous atmosphere exists or could expose works, proper respiratory protection or ventilation shall be provided, and emergency rescue equipment shall be available and attended. f.
A warning system or barricade shall be used when equipment is operated adjacent to an excavation and the operator doesn't have a clear and direct view of the edge. g. No worker shall be permitted underneath loads handled by lifting or digging Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 34 equipment. h. Stairway, ladder, or ramp shall be located in excavations 4 feet deep (or more) with 25 feet (or more) lateral travel to it. i. Ladders shall extend above the surface by at least 36 inches. ii. Ramps for access and egress from excavation shall be designed by a competent person. i.
Underground installations in open excavations shall be protected, supported, or removed. j.
Diversion ditches, dikes or other suitable means shall be provided to prevent water from entering or accumulating within the excavation. k. Workers shall not be permitted in excavations with accumulated water unless adequately protected against those hazards. l.
Workers shall be protected from the hazard of cave-­‐in when entering or exiting the areas protected by shields. m. Shields of the vertical trench wall shall extend at least 18 inches above the lowest point where the excavation face begins to slope. n. Excavation shall not be permitted at a level more than 2 ft. below the bottom of a support or shield system, unless it is specifically so designed. o. Walkways and bridges shall be provided across excavations greater than 6 feet, if workers or equipment are required or permitted to cross them, and walkways/bridges have standard guardrails. p. All excavations and trenches must be barricaded that present a falling or tripping hazard. XVII. Fall Protection A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart M, the regulations for “Fall Protection.” B. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford’s Six-­‐foot Fall Protection Rule 1. Each contractor shall protect its employees with “conventional fall protection systems” or “alternative systems,” as described below, from the hazards of falling to a lower level from any elevated walking/working surface six feet (6') or more above the lower level. a. Note: This rule also strictly applies to: i. Work around excavations and trenches. ii. Work on scaffolds, including erection and dismantling. iii. Work during steel erection. b. Exception: Elevated work that can be accomplished safely from a ladder. C. Conventional Fall Protection Systems and Alternative Systems 1. “Conventional fall protection systems” include guardrail systems, safety net systems, and personal fall protection systems (i.e., personal fall arrest systems, positioning systems, and fall/travel restraint systems). 2. “Alternative systems” include warning lines, controlled access zones, safety Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 35 monitoring systems, and similar systems. a. Alternative systems are only permitted when conventional fall protection systems are "infeasible or create a greater hazard." Alternative systems are allowed only in special work situations: roofing (and work being done on a roof), leading edge work, and precast concrete work. b. Before a contractor can use an alternative system, it shall submit a written "Fall Protection Plan" to the CKE Management Team. 3. Warning tape or flag-­‐line is not a conventional fall protection system. Neither tape nor flag-­‐line is permitted for separation of workers from holes or open sides on floor decking/edges, no matter how far back the warning tape or flag-­‐line is set. D. Holes 1. A “hole” is a void or gap 2 inches or more in the least dimension in a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface. 2. Each contractor shall protect all holes, at a minimum, as outlined below: a. Each employee on walking/working surfaces shall be protected from falling through holes (including skylights) more than 6 feet above lower levels, by covers or by conventional fall protection erected around such holes. b. Each employee on a walking/working surface shall be protected from tripping in or stepping into or through holes (including skylights) by covers. c.
Each employee on a walking/working surface shall be protected from objects falling through holes (including skylights) by covers. 3. All covers shall bear the markings "HOLE" or "COVER." a. Covers shall be able to support at least twice the weight of employees, equipment, and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any one time. b. To prevent accidental displacement resulting from wind, equipment, or workers' activities, the contractor shall secure all covers. 4. When holes are used for the passage of materials, the hole shall have not more than two sides with removable guardrail sections. When the hole is not in use, the contractor shall cover it or provide it with guardrails along all unprotected sides or edges. 5. If guardrail systems are used around holes that are access points (such as ladder ways), the contractor shall use gates or shall offset the point of access to prevent accidental walking into the hole. E. Other Fall Protection Requirements 1. The following are other common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of best safety practices required by CKE for fall protection: a. Stairs: Secure and properly install permanent and temporary handrails. b. Wall openings: Where wall openings or penetrations exist, install guardrails with the top of the sill or ledge lower than 39 inches. c.
Floor penetrations: Where floor openings are present and cannot be secured by coverings, install handrails, midrails, and toeboards. d. Elevator shafts: Where doors are not present or where they are locked Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 36 open, install covers or guardrail systems across openings of shafts. e. Open flooring or decking: Where interior or exterior walls have not yet been erected, use conventional fall protection when floor slabs are 6 feet or more above a lower level. f.
Scaffolding: Use top rails, midrails, endrails, and toeboards on all walking/working surfaces above 6 feet. g. Aerial work platforms: Full body harness and shock absorbing lanyard. h. Scissors lifts: Secure midrail chains across access openings. i.
Roofing and work on roofs: Use conventional fall protection systems. “Alternative measures” may be allowed only as part of a submitted fall protection plan. j.
Leading edges: Use conventional fall protection systems. “Alternative measures” may be allowed only as part of a submitted fall protection plan. k. Precast erection and grouting: Use conventional fall protection systems. XVII. Fire Prevention and Control A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart F, the regulations for “Fire Protection and Prevention.” 2. Each contractor shall provide training at the beginning of the project to any employee who is required or expected to fight an incipient-­‐stage fire. B. Fire Prevention Procedures 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, fire prevention procedures CKE requires: a. Limit accumulations of Class A (i.e., combustible) materials through daily housekeeping. b. Preserve all fire protection measures of the facility in proper condition, such as fire alarms, clear means of egress, sprinkler systems, smoke and fire partitions, and fire doors. c.
Give special attention to the safe storage and handling of flammable and combustible gases and liquids. d. Enforce proper precautions with temporary and permanent electrical installation. e. Control all flames through the use of a hot-­‐work permit system. f.
Provide adequate and proper fire extinguishers and fire-­‐watch protection when cutting and welding is being performed. g. Enforce all ANo [email protected] regulations. h. Review all temporary buildings and temporary heating units for proper clearance and usage. i.
Provide regular inspections for potential hazards and noncompliance with the above procedures. j.
All tarpaulins and plastic used for temporary covers shall be of fire resistant Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 37 manufacturer. k. Each jobsite trailer, tool trailer, many pieces of company equipment, areas near fuel storage, and various other areas around the project must have fire extinguishers. All employees shall be trained in the proper use of fire extinguishers. C. Fire Extinguishers 1. Temporary fire extinguishers shall be located conspicuously throughout the site. 2. Monthly inspections of the extinguishers occur to ensure that the fire extinguishers are holding a full charge and have passed their annual inspection. 3. If an extinguisher is discharged on-­‐site, the contractor shall immediately notify the CKE Superintendent or Safety Supervisor so that the extinguisher can be promptly replaced. D. Temporary Heat 1. The use and storage of temporary heating units shall create no uncontrolled fire hazards. The following conditions are prohibited on-­‐site: a. The use of open flame heaters is prohibited. b. The use of solid fuel salamanders is prohibited. c.
Drying clothing on or near heating units is prohibited. 2. With the use of temporary units, ventilation providing sufficient fresh air is mandatory. 3. Heaters used in the vicinity of combustible tarpaulins, canvas, or similar coverings shall be located at least 10 feet from the coverings. The coverings shall be securely fastened to prevent ignition or upsetting of the heater due to wind action on the covering or other material. XVIII. Housekeeping A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart C, the regulations for “General Safety and Health Provisions,” which include 1926.25, “Housekeeping.” B. Other Housekeeping Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of the CKE housekeeping requirements on a jobsite: a. Each contractor shall perform daily cleanup. b. The contractor shall use designated areas for material storage, parking, trash, and storage of compressed gas cylinders. c.
Employees shall use designated areas for their tools and clothing. The contractor shall provide adequate lighting and ventilation. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 38 d. Employees shall use designated/marked containers for trash, paper, and debris. e. Aisle ways, emergency exit routes and stairwells need to be kept clear at all times. f.
All hoses, cables, welding leads, extension cords and similar materials shall be located, arranged and grouped so that they will jot block any access way and will permit easy cleaning and maintenance. g. Store gasoline, kerosene, paint thinner and other flammables in approved metal containers at approved locations. XIX. Ladders A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart X, the regulations for “Ladders.” B. Other Ladder Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, ladder requirements of CKE for each contractor: a. The contractor’s competent person shall inspect all ladders for visible defects on a periodic basis and after any occurrence that could affect their safe use. Each employee using a ladder shall also inspect it before using it. b. Solid-­‐metal ladders shall not be used, unless required because of a special purpose described in the scope of work. c.
Keep all types of ladders (and tools) at least 10 feet away from live overhead power lines. d. Portable ladders: i. Lean the ladder at a 1-­‐to-­‐4 ratio—one foot out at the base for every four feet up. ii. When a ladder is used to get on or off an elevated surface, such as a roof. iii. When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, secure the ladder by tying. The side rails shall extend at least 3 feet, but no more than 5 feet, above the upper landing surface. e. Stepladders: i. All four legs shall be on solid, level ground. The spreaders shall be locked fully open. ii. Never climb on the cross-­‐bracing, unless the ladder is designed and provided with steps for climbing on both front and rear sections. iii. Never lean a stepladder against a wall. iv. Do not use the top or top step of a stepladder as a step. XX. Occupational Health & Environmental A. General Requirements Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 39 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart D, the regulations for “Occupational Health and Environmental Controls,” and 29 CFR 1926 Subpart Z, the regulations for “Toxic and Hazardous Substances.” a. In particular, OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.59 is the regulation for Hazard Communication (HazCom) in Construction; the requirements under that section are identical to those set forth in 29 CFR 1910.1200, the detailed regulation for HazCom in General Industry. 2. OSHA publishes a document entitled “NIOSH/OSHA/DOE Health Guidelines,” which provides guidelines for controlling numerous chemicals and other hazardous materials. 3. Contractors shall immediately notify the CKE Superintendent of any hazardous material leak or spill, including oil or fuel. B. Hazard Communication (HazCom) 1. OSHA has published a useful advisory document entitled “Guidance for Hazard Determination for Compliance with the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard” at http://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghd053107.html. (Note: OSHA also refers to the document for various Occupational Health hazard determinations, such as portland cement). 2. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of the requirements of a HazCom program: a. The HazCom policy and program shall be written. b. Employees shall be trained at the beginning of the project in HazCom: i. Of their potential exposure to hazardous chemicals/materials and environments, based on hazard determination, ii. For those hazardous chemicals/materials and environments, the specific hazardous physical properties and health hazards, and iii. How the employees should protect themselves from exposure to these hazards. c.
Maintaining appropriate MSDSs (SDS)—those relevant to this jobsite. d. Up-­‐to-­‐date inventory pages (i.e., a table of contents) of the MSDSs (SDS). e. A container-­‐labeling system that meets OSHA standards. i. Any contractor who receives a package of hazardous material which is required to be marked, labeled or placarded in accordance with the U. S. Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations shall retain those markings, labels and placards on the package until the packaging is sufficiently cleaned of residue and purged of vapors to remove any potential hazards. ii. Markings, placards and labels shall be maintained in a manner that ensures that they are readily visible. 3. Before a contractor begins work on-­‐site, it shall provide CKE a copy of its written HazCom program, as described above, and accompanying MSDSs (SDS) for common accessibility in the job office. 4. As new hazardous materials are introduced to the jobsite, the contractor is Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 40 required to update its MSDS (SDS) binder in the CKE job office with a copy of the product’s current MSDS (SDS). C. Industrial Hygiene 1. Industrial hygiene (IH) monitoring and/or sampling may be a necessary component of a contractor’s health-­‐hazard determination on the jobsite. a. This monitoring/sampling helps identify occupational health exposures above an OSHA “permissible exposure limit” (PEL) or above an American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) “threshold limit value” (TLV). b. IH monitoring/sampling may be performed by the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation (BWC), or an independent authorized consultant. 2. Some of the more common health hazards that may be monitored on a jobsite include: a. Noise b. Silica (dust) c.
Lead d. Asbestos e. Portland cement f.
Mold g. Radiation h. Confined space atmospheres i.
High or low temperatures j.
Spray paints k. Cadmium l.
Solvents, like methylene chloride m. Highly hazard chemicals, toxics, and reactives (29 CFR 1926.64 App. A) n. Oils o. Other chemicals in process piping or storage tanks p. Various gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists (29 CFR 1926.55 App A) q. Hexavalent Chromium (coating on steel, particularly stainless) D. Monitoring or Sampling Procedure 1. If ever IH monitoring or sampling is necessary for hazard determination and control, each contractor shall fully cooperate with the CKE Management Team and its assigned consultants. a. Basic information will be requested from each employee included in the survey, e.g., name, partial social security number or other type of identifying number, and job title. More information may be requested. b. The IH specialist may place a personal sampling pump or personal dosimeter on employees included in the survey. The operations of this pump will be explained at that time. c.
The employees shall wear the personal sampling pump/dosimeter for the Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 41 duration of the required sampling time period. d. At the conclusion of the sampling period, the IH specialist will remove the pumps/dosimeters, record the run-­‐time, and send any applicable samples to a lab for analysis. e. Written results from a lab usually will follow within a week. These results will be reported to all employees involved with the sampling survey. E. Occupational Health & Environmental Work Practices 1. Silica OSHA has an online “Silica eTool Advisor” to assist contractors – http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/silica/index.html – and a downloadable version – http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/silica/download/download_sa.html. The contractor shall abide by, at a minimum, the following procedures while working with silica containing materials on this project: a. Each contractor shall submit its silica hazard determination and protection program for review by the CKE Management Team prior to the pre-­‐start meeting. At a minimum the contractor’s silica protection program shall comply with OSHA regulations and shall address the following items: i. Description of air monitoring to determine the silica levels generated by tasks to provide a basis for: a) Selecting engineering controls, b) Selecting respiratory protection, c) Selecting work practices to reduce dust, and d) Determining if a medical surveillance program is necessary. ii. Description of engineering controls which are proposed to eliminate or reduce the amount of silica in the air and the build-­‐up of dust on equipment and surfaces (e.g., wet-­‐cutting methods). iii. Description of less hazardous materials than crystalline silica which are proposed for abrasive blasting and automatic blast cleaning machines or tools to be utilized. iv. Description of high-­‐efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter vacuums to be used by employees and work practices to vacuum, hose down, or wet clean work areas and equipment. v. Description of warning barriers proposed to identify work areas where respirable silica may be present and to limit access to only authorized employees. vi. Description of personal protective equipment and clothing to be provided to employees and changing facilities, if necessitated by the level of silica dust exposure. vii. Certification of training provided to employees about health effects of silica exposure, engineering controls and work practices that reduce dust, the importance of maintenance and good housekeeping, as well as the proper type and fitting of respirators; and include a statement that the employee is or is not enrolled in a medical surveillance program. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 42 2. Asbestos OSHA has a downloadable “Asbestos in Construction Advisor” to assist contractors: http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/oshasoft/asbestos/index.html and an Asbestos Fact Sheet. The contractor shall abide by, at a minimum, the following procedures: a. When encountering presumed asbestos-­‐containing materials (PACM) or asbestos-­‐containing materials (ACM) on this project, stop work immediately. i. Vacate the area in which the PACM or ACM is present. ii. Contact the CKE Superintendent. iii. Cordoned off to discourage entry, posting appropriately worded caution signs at all approaches to the area at such intervals to allow individuals to take any necessary protective steps before entering the removal area. b. The CKE Management Team will contact a certified asbestos sampling company to ascertain exposure and complete a written hazard determination. c.
The encapsulation, removal and/or disposal of ACM shall be performed by a contractor licensed to do such work, in which the work is being performed and in accordance with all applicable Federal, State and Local Regulations per approved abatement plans. As a minimum, the contractor shall: i. Before starting asbestos removal work, notify the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the local department of environmental management in writing, and appropriate permits shall be on file. ii. Appropriately train its employees and license them prior to the removal of any ACM. iii. Adequately protect work areas through appropriate type enclosures, to ensure that no ACM is permitted to leave the controlled area. iv. Affix appropriately worded labels to all materials, waste, debris, etc., that contain asbestos friable materials. v. Collect and discard asbestos waste and/or asbestos-­‐contaminated material in sealed, labeled, impervious containers by contractor. vi. Provide the CKE Management Team with copies of all air monitoring reports and certified disposal receipts. d. The following is a brief, but not all-­‐inclusive, list of pre-­‐1980 building materials often found to contain asbestos: i. Surfacing treatments, such as fireproofing, acoustical plaster, finish plasters, and skim coats of joint compound. ii. Thermal system insulation, such as equipment insulation, boiler or tank insulation, and piping and fitting insulations. iii. Roofing and siding miscellaneous materials, such as insulation board, vapor barriers, coatings, felts, cementitious board (Transite), flashing, and shingles. iv. Other miscellaneous materials: floor tile, cove base, floor leveler compound, ceiling tile, vermiculite insulation, fire stopping materials, Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 43 cementitious pipe or board (Transite), adhesives, caulks, sheet flooring (linoleum), wallpaper, drywall, plasterboard, spackling/joint compound, textured paint, grout, glazing compound, and terrazzo. Note: Not all cases of the above materials will have ACM. Only systematic surveying and identification of all the building and construction materials used the Owner’s facilities will identify whether the materials contain asbestos or not. If any pre-­‐1980 material is to be removed or demolished, all such PACM shall be handled or removed by certified asbestos contractors and properly disposed of as ACM, unless/until sampling and laboratory analysis has proven this material to be non-­‐ACM. 3. Lead OSHA has a downloadable “Lead in Construction Advisor” to assist contractors: http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/oshasoft/leadx_wb.html and six (6) Fact Sheets for “Lead Exposure Construction Worker Protection Programs.” The contractor shall comply by, as minimum, the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.62, OSHA regulation “Lead in the Construction Industry” and the following procedures while working with lead-­‐containing materials (LCM): a. The contractor’s competent person for lead, as defined by OSHA, shall directly supervise all work performed on-­‐site that involves LCM. This work includes: i. Completing a written hazard determination prior to the performance of the job, to ascertain whether lead is present in the workplace; ii. Ensuring the adequacy of any employee monitoring data and exposure assessments; iii. Ensuring that all employees wear required protective work clothing (PWC) and personal protective equipment (PPE) and are trained in and use appropriate exposure control methods (e.g., Until initial IH monitoring results indicate employee exposure below the OSHA permissible exposure limit, each employee in the contaminated work area shall wear half-­‐mask respirators with HEPA filters); iv. Ensuring that proper hygiene facilities are provided and that employees are trained and use those facilities (e.g., Employees shall wash their face and hands before eating or drinking at breaks, and employees shall not carry cigarettes into the work area); v. Ensuring that engineering controls are designed, operated and maintained properly; vi. Demarcating lead work areas; and vii. Take effective measures to reduce lead hazards. b. In keeping with OSHA regulations, every painted surface shall be considered a potential lead hazard until proven otherwise. c.
Typical contractor activities that would significantly disturb a painted surface include the following: i. Removal of all or part of the paint by hand or power tools. ii. Removal of all or part of the paint by blast cleaning. iii. Removal of all or part of the paint by other means such as the use of chemical strippers or a heat gun. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 44 iv. Structural work to the surface such as welding, burning, cutting, or drilling. v. Manual demolition of buildings, portions of buildings, or the building components. d. The contractor shall keep as primary consideration, when specifying work methods, the requirement to protect workers from exposure to lead above the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL). e. The contractor shall keep and maintain detailed and accurate records of all monitoring and other relevant data used in conducting employee exposure assessments, in accordance with the OSHA standard. f.
The contractor shall conduct all work involving lead removal or re-­‐coating in a manner that minimizes the release of lead and LCM into the air, water, and soil. i. All LCM hazardous wastes that are generated shall be contained, collected, segregated, labeled and held at a location designated or approved by the Owner or CKE pending the appropriate disposition. ii. Contractor shall provide for proper disposal of waste, including EPA identification number, notification, certification, manifest, etc. iii. All waste containers shall be leak proof and capable of being securely covered. iv. All waste containers shall be clearly labeled with weather-­‐resistant labels using indelible ink to identify the type of waste they contain. 4. Portland Cement Because portland cement is highly caustic and may causes severe dermatitis, OSHA has an advisory guidance document entitled “Preventing Skin Problems from Working with Portland Cement” to assist contractors: http://www.osha.gov/dsg/guidance/cement-­‐guidance.html. The contractor shall comply with, at a minimum, the following procedures while working with materials containing portland cement on this project: a. Follow the inspection guidelines, checklist, and safe work practices described in the OSHA document “Portland Cement Inspection Procedures,” which OSHA uses when inspecting jobsites that have portland cement: http://www.osha.gov/dep/hexchrom/BCTD_settlement_memo_20070416.ht
ml. b. Provide proper PPE for skin and eye exposures. c.
Provide washing facilities with clean water, non-­‐alkaline soap, and clean towels, while prohibiting the use of abrasive soap, waterless hand cleaners, barrier creams, and skin-­‐softening products. d. Provide proper emergency provisions where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to portland cement, including: i. Suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body within the work area for immediate emergency use, and ii. Reasonable for prompt access to 15-­‐minutes of continual flushing of eyes or body. e. Use “best practices” to suppress silica-­‐containing dust, such as a wet-­‐saw Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 45 cutting. 5. Mold and Other Biological Contaminants OSHA has a Safety and Health Information Bulletin entitled “A Brief Guide to Mold in the Workplace” to assist contractors: http://www.osha.gov/dts/shib/shib101003.html. The contractor shall abide by, at a minimum, the following procedures when encountering mold or other biological contaminants on this project: a. Field employees shall report all suspected mold, fungus, and other biological contaminants to the project superintendent for inspection. i. When mold or other hazardous biological materials are suspected, stop work immediately. ii. Vacate the area in which the biological are present. iii. Contact the CKE Superintendent. b. The contractor will: i. Seal off the area, to prevent the spread of spores. ii. Post appropriately worded caution signs at all approaches to the area. iii. Identify all areas of suspected water accumulation or intrusion. iv. Visually inspect identified building materials for potential mold growth or other biologicals, looking for earthy, musty odor and/or discolored plaster, wall board, or other building materials. v. If relevant, follow the Infection Control Risk Assessment recommendations the facility’s regulations. c.
If necessary, the contractor will out-­‐source and then coordinate air monitoring. d. If removal is necessary, the contractor will have it done according to OSHA guidelines. 6. Noise OSHA has an online “Noise and Hearing Conservation” eTool Advisor to assist contractors – http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/noise/index.html . The contractor shall comply by, as minimum, the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.52, the OSHA regulation “Occupational Noise Exposure” and the following, procedures: a. In all cases where the sound levels exceed the values shown below, a continuing, effective hearing conservation program shall be administered as defined in 29 CFR 1910.95. OSHA Permissible Noise Exposures Duration per day Sound level dBA (in hours) slow response 8.0 90 6.0 92 4.0 95 3.0 97 2.0 100 1.5 102 Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 46 1.0 0.5 0.25 or less 105 110 115 b. As a rule, high noise levels on the jobsite shall be lowered by using commonly accepted engineering and administrative controls. Only when these controls are proven infeasible shall earplugs as a permanent solution be considered. i. Examples of engineering controls: substituting existing equipment with quieter equipment; retro-­‐fitting existing equipment with damping materials, mufflers, or enclosures; erecting barriers; and maintenance. ii. Examples of administrative controls: moving workers away from the noise source; restricting access to areas; rotating workers performing noisy tasks; and shutting down noisy equipment when not needed. iii. Earplugs are the typical PPE given to workers to reduce their exposure to noise and are the control of last resort. As a general rule, workers should be using earplugs whenever they are exposed to noise levels of 85 dBA or greater, or when it is so noisy that they have to shout in order to communicate. c.
Distance from a noise source can be used to reduce an exposure: For each doubling of the distance from the noise source to the worker, a 6 dB reduction in the noise level is achieved. d. Noise perimeter zones (NPZ) limit the exposure to noisy processes or equipment to as few workers as possible. i. NPZ are areas where noise levels of 90 dBA or more are taped or roped off and marked to keep out all workers who don't have to be there. ii. NPZ can be set up using a sound level meter to find the safe distance from the source and the NPZ can be set up at that distance. iii. Contractors can also use the table below to determine how far from a loud noise source employees should be working to attain a reduced exposure of 80 dBA, 85 dBA, or 90 dBA. Calculating the Noise Perimeter Zone from the Sound Source
Noise Perimeter Zone for Target
Control Levels (dB)
85 dBA at
90 dBA at
distance from
distance from
source
source
Estimated
Sound Level
(dBA)
80 dBA at
distance from
source
90
95
3 ft
5 ft
2 ft
3 ft
1 ft
2 ft
100
9 ft
5 ft
3 ft
105
16 ft
9 ft
5 ft
110
29 ft
16 ft
9 ft
115
120
52 ft
92 ft
29 ft
52 ft
16 ft
29 ft
125
164 ft
92 ft
52 ft
130
292 ft
164 ft
92 ft
Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 47 7. Engine/Motor Exhaust OSHA has two particular online aids to assist contractors with understanding indoor air quality (IAQ) problems: a. “Powered Industrial Truck (Forklift) eTool” advisor entitled “Enclosed and Hazardous Areas” for IAQ caused by forklifts – http://www.osha.gov/dcsp/products/etools/pit/workplacehazards/ventilat
ion.html. b. A Hazard Information Bulletin entitled “Potential Carcinogen-­‐ icity of Diesel Exhaust” for IAQ issues from diesel exhaust – http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19881130.html. c.
If a contractor or its supplier uses an internal combustion engine in an enclosed area on the jobsite, the contractor is responsible for: i. Providing adequate removal of exhaust, ii. Providing adequate ventilation for the work space, and iii. If necessary for hazard determination, providing IH monitoring, as a minimum, for: a) The quality of breathing air for harmful byproducts of combustion, b) Contaminants, c) Carbon monoxide, and d) Insufficient oxygen. iv. Abating the hazards to levels within OSHA’s PELs. 8. Sanitation a. Facilities: i. The locations of lunch areas and employee toilet facilities will be designated by CKE and approved by the Owner. ii. A CKE designated Contractor will provide toilets at jobsites according to 29 CFR 1926.51(c). iii. The contractor shall provide adequate washing facilities for employees engaged in the application of paints, coating, or in other operations where contaminants may be harmful to the employees. Such facilities shall be in near proximity to the worksite and shall be so equipped as to Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 48 enable employees to remove such substances. iv. Whenever employees are required by a particular OSHA standard to wear protective clothing because of the possibility of contamination with toxic materials, the contractor shall provide change rooms equipped with storage facilities for street clothes and separate storage facilities for the protective clothing. b. Refuse and Garbage: i. Each contractor shall provide an adequate number of covered garbage containers. ii. The site shall be cleaned, and garbage and refuse shall be collected at least daily and removed from the building. c.
Potable Water: i. Each contractor shall provide potable water at the jobsite. ii. Portable containers used to dispense drinking water shall be capable of being tightly closed, and equipped with a tap. Water shall not be dipped from containers. iii. Any container used to distribute drinking water shall be clearly marked as to the nature of its contents and not used for any other purpose. iv. A common drinking cup is prohibited. v. Where single service cups (to be used but once) are supplied, both a sanitary container for the unused cups and a receptacle for disposing of the used cups shall be provided. XXI. Scaffolding A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart L, the regulations for “Scaffolds.” 2. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford’s six-­‐foot fall protection rule also applies to scaffolds. B. Competent Person 1. The contractor’s competent person, as defined by OSHA, shall directly supervise all scaffolding work performed on-­‐site. This work includes: a. The erection of scaffolding, b. Inspecting the scaffolding before each use to verify the safe working condition, and c.
Evaluating the feasibility of tie-­‐off (i.e., using personal fall arrest systems) during erection and dismantling of the scaffold system. C. Other Scaffolding Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, examples of best safety practices required by CKE for scaffolding: a. Supported scaffolds shall be on base-­‐plates and secured to mudsills (or other adequate firm foundation). b. Footings shall be level, sound, rigid, and capable of supporting the loaded Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 49 scaffold without settling or displacement. c.
Supported scaffolds exceeding a 3:1 ratio (height to width) shall be properly secured (guyed or tied) to a building or structure. This ratio includes outrigger supports, if used. d. Scaffold casters shall be locked before work begins. e. Scaffold frame shall be fully braced, level, and plumb. f.
Access ladder shall be properly installed, or a separate ladder shall be in place and secured for accessing the scaffold. g. Scaffolds shall have all required guardrails and toeboards. h. Where the scaffold height or length exceeds 25 feet, the scaffold shall be secured at intervals not greater than 25 feet vertically and horizontally. i.
The work platform shall be fully planked at all working heights. i. The planks shall be in good condition and free of visible defects. ii. The work platform shall be free of clutter, mud, snow, oil, or any tripping hazard. j.
There shall be at least 10 ft. clearance to power lines. XXII. Stairways A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926.1052, the regulations for “Stairways.” B. Other Stairway Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, stairway requirements of CKE for each contractor: a. When there is a break in elevation of 19 inches or more and there is no ramp, runway, embankment or personnel hoist available, employers shall provide a stairway or ladder at all worker points of access. b. Stairways having four or more risers or rising more than 30 inches shall have at least one handrail. c.
When there is only one point of access between levels, employers shall keep it clear of obstacles to permit free passage by workers. If free passage becomes restricted, employers shall provide a second point of access and ensure that workers use it. d. Except during construction of the stairway, do not use stairways with metal pan landings and treads if the treads/landings have not been filled in with concrete or other permanent materials, unless the pans of the stairs/landings are temporarily filled in with wood or other solid materials, installed the full width and depth of the stair. e. Doors and gates opening directly onto a stairway shall have a platform that extends at least 20 inches beyond the swing of the door or gate. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 50 XXIII. Steel Erection A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart R, the regulations for “Steel Erection.” 2. Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford’s six-­‐foot fall protection rule applies to steel erection. B. Erection Plan 1. The erection contractor shall submit an erection plan to CKE at the time of the pre-­‐
start meeting, if not sooner. Information to be included in the plan shall at least consist of: a. Phasing or staging of materials and equipment. b. Erection procedure and methods. c.
Safety compliance activities. d. Bracing requirements (if applicable). XXIV. Tools A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart I, the regulations for “Tools—Hand and Power.” B. Other Tool Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, tool requirements of CKE for each contractor: a. Contractors shall train workers to select the right tools for each job. All hand and power tools and similar equipment, whether furnished by the employer or the employee, shall be maintained in a safe condition. b. Contractors shall train and supervise workers in the correct use of tools. c.
When power operated tools are designed to accommodate guards, they shall be equipped with such guards, properly adjusted, when in use. d. The employer shall provide employees with the particular PPE necessary to protect them from exposure to the hazards of using hand and power tools (e.g., exposure to falling, flying, abrasive, and splashing objects, or exposure to harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases). e. Concerning switches on powered tools, 29 CFR 1926.300(d) shall be strictly adhered to. i. All hand-­‐held powered platen sanders, grinders with wheels 2-­‐inch diameter or less, routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears, scroll saws, and jigsaws with blade shanks one-­‐fourth of an inch wide or less may be equipped with only a positive "on-­‐off" control. ii. All hand-­‐held powered drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical, and angle grinders with wheels greater than 2 inches in diameter, disc sanders, belt sanders, reciprocating saws, saber saws, Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 51 and other similar operating powered tools shall be equipped with a momentary contact "on-­‐off" control and may have a lock-­‐on control provided that turnoff can be accomplished by a single motion of the same finger or fingers that turn it on. iii. All other hand-­‐held powered tools, such as circular saws, chain saws, and percussion tools without positive accessory holding means, shall be equipped with a constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the pressure is released. iv. Exception: These paragraphs do not apply to concrete vibrators, concrete breakers, powered tampers, jack hammers, rock drills, and similar hand operated power tools. XXV. Traffic, Vehicles & Motorized Equipment A. General Requirements 1. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart O, the regulations for “Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment.” a. Because Subpart O is not exhaustive in its coverage of machinery types or safety equipment does not address work practices, traffic control plans or shift work, these additional issues shall be covered by the contractor in its SSSP. 2. Where applicable, each contractor shall perform all work in accordance with the OSHA standards in 29 CFR 1926 Subpart G, “Signs, Signals and Barricades,” which includes flagging and signaling practices. a. Subpart G defers to the Federal Highway Administration’s Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices on matters relating to hand signals, barricades and traffic control devices, so FHWA regulations also shall be followed. b. The U.S. Department of Transportation has jurisdiction over interstate trucking on public roads and over all transportation of hazardous materials. Therefore, USDOT regulations shall also be followed. B. Vehicles and Motorized Equipment 1. All vehicles in use shall be checked at the beginning of each shift to ensure that all parts, equipment, and accessories that affect safe operation are in proper operating condition and free from defects. a. All defects shall be corrected before the vehicle is placed in service. 2. No employer shall use any motor vehicle, earthmoving, or compacting equipment having an obstructed view to the rear unless:
a. The vehicle has a reverse signal alarm distinguishable from the surrounding noise level, or b. The vehicle is backed up only when an observer signals that it is safe to do so. C. Other Traffic Safety Requirements 1. The following are common, but not all-­‐inclusive, traffic safety requirements of CKE for each contractor, including safe practices that workers shall follow when they are working near vehicles: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 52 a. All workers who are exposed either to traffic (vehicles using the highway for purposes of travel) or to construction equipment within the work area shall wear clean, high-­‐visibility safety apparel. b. Use a back-­‐up alarm or guide during all backing of bi-­‐directional machines like rollers, compactors, front-­‐end loaders, bulldozers and similar equipment, including forklifts. c.
Use a horn that is distinguishable from the surrounding noise level as needed when the machine is moving in either direction. d. Be sure that all vehicles have full operational braking systems and brake lights and that parking brakes are set when not in use. Block and chock on hills as needed. e. Be sure that all vehicles have working headlights and taillights when used in low-­‐light conditions. f.
Use seats and seat belts when transporting workers in motor vehicles and construction vehicles, including forklifts. g. Before using them, inspect all vehicles for broken or unsafe conditions, including: brake systems, tires, the horn, steering, couplings, and seat belts (which are not required for equipment operated standing up), and any other safety and health system. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 53 XXVI. Appendix A: Site-­‐Specific Acknowledgment Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford has prepared the preceding Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan (SSSP). Your signature below indicates that you are in receipt of this SSSP and accept the requirements by CKE regarding its contents Furthermore, signing this acknowledgment, you agree to train your employees with respect to this plan. Please print legibly: Contractor Company Name: Employee Name: Employee Signature: Employee Title: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 54 XXVII. Appendix B: Acknowledgment of Competent Person OSHA requires each contractor to have a designated competent person on-­‐site who shall have accident-­‐
prevention responsibilities that include frequent and regular inspections of the jobsite, materials, and equipment. If, for any reason, this competent person is changed, the contractor shall notify the Corna-­‐
Kokosing/Elford Superintendent immediately. Please print legibly: Contractor Company Name: Competent Persons Name: Person Affirming Competency: Effective Date: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 55 XXVIII. Appendix C: Sample Safety Task Analysis Form Safety Task Analysis Job Name: Owner Name: Job #: Activity being analyzed: Analysis performed by: Date of STA: Trade or craft to perform activity: 1. Breakdown the Job into Steps 2. Describe Each Step’s Hazards 3. List Hazard Controls Breakdown the activity into numbered basic steps. List their normal sequence of occurrence. Describe the What (not the How) of each step. Check with employees who are experienced in performing the activity. (Number each “Step.”) Question each step for potential causes of incidents. Seek ideas from similar work done in the past and by discussing it with employees. Review past incident reports. (Use the numbers that correspond to each step in #1.) For each potential hazard listed in #2, discuss what employees should do or not do to avoid an incident. Use the “Hierarchy of Controls” on JHA page 2. Be specific and brief. Use simple DO and DON’T statements. Never use generalities such as “Be careful,” “Be alert,” etc. (Use the numbers that correspond to each step in #2.) 1.
1.
1.
4. Job Requirements A. PPE and tools to be used B. Inspection requirements C. Training requirements List PPE, tools, equipment/machinery to be used in conducting each basic step of activity. (Only use numbers if they correspond to those above.) List inspections that will be required of the work area, materials, tools/equipment/machinery. (Only use numbers if they correspond to those above.) Determine training requirements (e.g., haz com, scaffolding, fall protection) to safely perform each basic step of the activity. (Only use numbers if they correspond to those above.) 5. Review the STA and Implement Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 56 XXIX. Appendix D: Sample Hazard Reporting Form SAFETY HAZARD REPORT FORM This form is for use by employees and contractors working on the Ohio University Project who wish to provide a written safety suggestion or to report an unsafe workplace condition or work practice. A safe work environment is everyone’s right and responsibility. If you see an uncontrolled hazard in the workplace, immediately report it verbally to your supervisor. Or fill out this form and submit a copy to the CKE Superintendent or Project Safety Manager. Project Name: Job Number: Date: Description of unsafe condition or work practice (such as who/what/when/where/why/how): Hazard causes or other contributing factors: Actions you have taken to address or correct the hazards, or your suggestions for improving project safety: Was this matter verbally reported to a supervisor? Yes No To whom and on what date the matter was reported: Optional: Employee name and phone number, if you want follow-­‐up: No employee will be retaliated against for reporting hazards or potential hazards or for making safety-­‐related suggestions. For Use Only by the Supervisor or Safety Officer Received By: Date Received: Required Actions: Actions Taken and by Whom: Status: Safety Committee Review? Yes No Date & Comments: Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 57 XXX. Appendix E: Sample Incident Investigation Report Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 58 XXXI. Appendix F: Pre-­‐Lift Requirements PRE-­‐LIFT REQUIREMENTS 1.
Prior to any crane/lifting operations, a completed “Lift Plan” shall be submitted to the CKE Superintendent and Project Safety Manager for review, a minimum of two weeks in advance of a contemplated lift. The Lift Plan shall include the following: §
Date, time and location of the lifting operation. §
The subcontractor providing the crane and the name of the crane company, if different. §
Current annual & quadrennial crane certificates §
Operator’s license(?) or qualifications §
Size and type of mobile crane. §
Site-­‐specific safety plan: description of work, crew, equipment and personal protective equipment, risk assessment, and preventive measures. §
Diagram of the staging and work area. §
The names and contact info of the crane company’s point of contact and safety officer. §
Rigger’s qualifications and a description of rigging methods and equipment to be used. 2.
Prior to any lifting operation utilizing a crane, the superintendent shall check for: §
Current crane certification. §
Operator certification. §
Crane inspection log. §
Competent person and rigger information. 3.
The crane contractor is responsible for maintaining a safe perimeter around all lifting and elevating operations. All roadways and personnel access points in or near the lifting operation must be blocked or cordoned off and the contractor’s personnel posted at the periphery of posted areas to prevent pedestrians from entering into the lift zone. 4.
Pre-­‐Lift Requirements (All must be answered YES) _____ Load chart utilized for exact crane model, boom type, & length. _____ Competent person in charge of lift: Name _______________________ _____ Competent signal person identified: Name ________________________ _____ Pre-­‐lift meeting held with lift crew. _____ Written crane inspection completed. _____ Swing path barricaded off. _____ Footing is sound. _____ Minimum clearances from power lines can and will be maintained. (Under 50KV — 10 ft. clearance; Over 50KV — See OSHA Standard) _____ The load radius has been measured with a tape measure. _____ Wind speed does not exceed 30 mph. Some “sail” loads limited to 20 mph or less. _____ Load will not touch boom in vertical lift. _____ Tag lines are long enough, tied only to the load, and in good condition. _____ Location is far enough away from excavations to eliminate the risk of collapse. _____ Application of blocking under outrigger pads has been carefully considered. _____ Outriggers or crawler tracks are fully extended and wheels are clear of ground. _____ Adequate swing radius protection has been obtained. _____ Boom composition is correct. _____ Crane is level. Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005
Corna-­‐Kokosing/Elford Site-­‐Specific Safety Plan 59 XXXII. Additional Notes g:\data\safety\projects\ohio university, athens\site specific safety plan.doc Ohio University – Jefferson Hall Renovation – OHU-14005